1 Question - What Product, Event or Trend has had the Greatest Effect Upon the Sport this Millennium?

Jun 1, 2015 at 19:47
by Richard Cunningham  

One question





Max Commencal - Founder, Commencal



bigquotesMuch has changed since the beginning of the millennium in the world of MTB, particularly in terms of distribution, with the arrival of direct selling online, which has dramatically changed the habits of consumers.

Perhaps the biggest change, in my opinion, is the arrival of bikes that can be called "universal." For a long time we thought it was necessary to have at least four or five bikes in the garage, allowing us to be able to ride anywhere and everywhere. Big mistake! Now, with the arrival of the modern "All Mountain" bike, everything becomes possible. With 160mm travel, a telescopic seat post, 650B wheels and a 1X transmission... Voila! Long distances, climbs, descents, Bike Park - everything is easily possible. The bike is lighter, stronger and more playful, therefore it's the perfect accessory for those who don't go anywhere without their bike. That's what we did with our META AM and we're proud of our achievement!





Greg Minnaar - DH World Cup and World Champion, Santa Cruz Syndicate rider



bigquotesTo me, there are definitely a couple things that have had huge effect on our sport since I turned pro in 2000, but only a couple. I'm gonna' go with carbon fiber. If I go back, my 2001 World Cup title bike (my Orange 222) was completely aluminum and the only carbon piece on the bike was the seatpost. My 2012/2013 World Champion Santa Cruz V10cc is a complete carbon frame with carbon bars, seatpost, seat rails, and wheels.

Carbon has a great feel and there's a ton of benefits, like weight and handling, but only if it's done right and the manufacturers are on top of their game. One thing it certainly does is sort the men out from the boys (Manufacturers). It's easy to make a crap bike out of carbon and, with the expense of tooling, you'll still see some odd bikes and even aluminum bikes raced at the World Cups.





Andrew Juskaitis - Senior Product Marketing Manager, Giant Bicycles



bigquotesYou gotta hand it to Stan Koziatek to develop a product that has truly revolutionized the sport of mountain biking. At 220 pounds, I used to flat just about every ride. With the introduction of Stan's Sealant, I now only flat about twice per year. His product (coupled with tubeless tire technology) gives every off-road rider the piece-of-mind to ride more aggressively over rougher terrain without the fear for the dreaded snake-bite puncture. In addition, every rider can benefit from the added control and capability of running lower PSI's. And while there are many imitators these days, no one does it better than Stan. If I ever run into this dude, I'm gonna give him a big hug - I love his product that much.





Bob Fox - Founder, Fox Factory



bigquotesBetween a "single product, event or trend" I would say a trend has had the most profound effect - specifically the trend within the mountain biking community and industry to continue pursuit and development of new bike types and new riding categories and sub-specialties.

Pre-2000, mountain bikes and mountain biking pretty much fit into two main categories: cross country and downhill. Now, 15 years later, we have a modest proliferation of mountain bike types and riding categories. In fact - to such a degree that there can be confusion and overlap when trying to distinguish them. We still have cross country and downhill, but now we also have "Freeride," "All mountain," "Enduro," "Dual Sport," "Fat bike," etc, etc.

Good stuff...

These added categories and sub-specialties help drive improvements and innovations at a more accelerated pace. As a result, mountain biking overall reaches and serves a broader audience, while enjoyment in all riding categories is enhanced, thanks to continually improved equipment. That's the way it should be - and tends to be - in many other sports and recreational activities. However, it is my view that in mountain biking, this trend of creating new categories and sub-specialties is stronger than in most others. And I believe it will continue for many more years into the future.





Joe Murray - MTB Hall of Fame legend, Designer, Voodoo Cycles founder, Shimano test rider


bigquotesTo me it's a no brainer: frame suspension. What affects the ride more than anything, how efficiently it climbs and how smooth it descends? All other parts that bolt on to these amazing frames have changed dramatically as well, yet I think they would not mean nearly as much without the level of suspension technology we have now.

Imagine bolting 90s parts to a cutting edge carbon trail frame... if that was possible. Now imagine bolting all new top end parts to any suspension frame from the 90s. What bike would you choose? Second choices to reinforce my argument would be perhaps forks, yet we've had 150mm travel forks since the 90s. Heavier and primitive damping would be easily more tolerated than a 90's era suspension I figure. Even carbon construction - another second place - because a carbon frame with lame suspension would suck way more than an aluminum frame with awesome suspension.

What suspension designers call kinematics, has become a more exact science since the year 2000. One of the few aspects of cycling that I still do not understand that well is suspension, because it's damn complicated. I totally respect the designers and all the mind numbing hours at a workstation tweaking loads and leverages. Here is real science, where huge gains in riding efficiency have been realized out of advances in computer technology, kinematics, 3D solid modeling and stress analysis. Cycling is really a cutting edge industry with some of the highest technology available. (Price be damned.) We all want as much technology as possible and I think we are getting even more than we ask for. Suspension design is at the heart of this insane technological push and I feel stoked to be riding this wave. It's an exciting time to be a mountain biker, without a doubt.





Chris Sugai - President, Co-founder, Niner Bikes



bigquotesWhile some would predict my answer as obvious, I think the single product, event or trend that has had the most profound effect upon mountain biking since 2000 has to be the efforts of IMBA. IMBA's tireless efforts over the decades have prevented countless trail closures. Now we are seeing the complete reversal and IMBA is now working on making trail building a hot new trend for economic growth. Unfortunately much of their efforts go unnoticed or underappreciated by the mountain bike community. Talking to land managers, local and national governments is not sexy and rarely gets the press headlines, but is more important than any technology that has been developed in the last 15 years in my eyes.





Matt Robertson - Mountain Bike Product Manager, Shimano



bigquotesThe year 2000 seems like a long time ago, and I would consider a bike built in 2000 to practically be unrideable today, but in reality, bikes were already pretty awesome back then. I have memories of epic rides in the 90's that would be just as epic today on the same bike, but my modern perspective would now prevent me from enjoying it as fully. So what has changed?

Surely it had to be more than a 29-inch wheel or a tubeless tire. Even products I cannot ride without, like the Shadow Plus rear derailleur or dropper post, are less than singular. I would have to say that the most profound effect upon our sport in the last 15 years was a simple change of perspective from race to trail. Mountain biking is not a sport, it is a lifestyle. As long as mountain bikes were designed solely for the needs of XC and DH racers, the rest of us were left with promising, but inappropriate products that were always just a little off target. It was BoXXer or Sid. 40 pound Lobos or 20 pound noodles.

I was tempted to answer this question with the word "Enduro," which I hate already, but the idea of enduro was, and still is, amazing. First of all, an event where the trail is the star, not the riders. MTB riding is all about terrain, not spectators. And an event where people race their bikes, bikes they already own and ride for fun every day, not an event where people race specialty bikes purpose built and useless for anything else. But already we are seeing Enduro go too far, too far - in a cool direction, but still too far. Your average trail bike is now under gunned for the top level enduro courses and riders are building Enduro specific bikes, which stimulate industry development and sales at the shop level, but threaten to leave your average trail rider behind.

Once again, you're seated on a bike that is too long, too slack and too sluggish for your local singletrack, so the answer is not Enduro, or any one product or trend, but the perspective that is driving more and more of today's trends - the trail perspective. It is the trail perspective that led to the dropper post, 180mm rotors, and clutch derailleurs. It is the trail perspective that saw 29ers, fat bikes and 27.5. The main difference between the bike I ride in 2015 and the bike I rode in 2000 is that the bike I rode in 2000 was designed by me, but the bike I ride now was designed for me!





Cameron Zink - Red Bull Rampage and FMB World Tour champion, World Record holder, YT Industries rider


bigquotesRampage, Duh!






Dave Weagle - Inventor, Product designer, Design consultant



bigquotesI could take the easy route here and talk about suspension or materials, but at the risk of being a fully engulfed flame bait in the comments section, I'd like to reminisce about mountain biking in the late 90's. At that time, downhill was really coming into what we know it as today. Suspension was nearing the 200mm mark front and rear, and suspension actually started working. Lift serviced downhill meant that you were racing. There was no widespread bike park network yet.

Ask anyone who rode DH bikes back then and they will tell you that the most frustrating part of riding downhill was the chain guide. They were ALL junk. Usually, chain guides consisted of one or two thin pieces of metal as a "bash guard" and a collection of hardware store parts. This translated to riders living in constant fear of even touching a rock with their bottom bracket area. To do so meant the end of your race run, and one or two mangled pieces of metal that you needed to hammer with a rock that you found in the pits, just to get your chainring straight enough to pedal at all. This forced downhill and trail bikes to use ridiculously high BB heights, typically 35-40mm higher than today.

Then, in 2000, came the often-overlooked impact-absorbing thermoplastic bash guard. Immediately, obstacles that were once avoided like the plague became a ramp to bounce the bash guard off of. BB heights dropped radically, bikes became easier to ride fast in corners, and in racing, speeds increased radically. Instead of threading through the rock gardens, riders attacked them at full speed. Downhill bike geometry got longer lower and slacker, and this translated directly to the trail bikes that we ride today. Today, you can scarcely find a popular metal bash guard. The thermoplastic bash guard was such a simple idea, yet the catalyst for a geometry revolution that mountain bikers of all levels enjoy today.






MENTIONS: @COMMENCALbicycles, @GiantBicycleGlobal, @foxracingshox, @voodoobike, @NinerBikes, @shimano, @EeehhZink
Must Read This Week

264 Comments

  • + 354
 we are forgetting one key thing... the internet. Pinkbike... 2000-2015, the web edits, the easy access to content and media. How many people started riding because they saw a video or a photo and thought "damn that looks cool". This very platform has had the most profound effect on the sport, it has been at the core of opinion which in turn drives change. For better or for worse mountain biking in my opinion at least owes its now main stream status to the internet. That change in popularity has been the biggest evolution of the sport so far.
  • + 40
 i would not have started downhill if it wasn't for Dirt Magazine and PinkBike Photo Epics from the world cups. I was fascinated by it all...
  • + 3
 I agree. Social media in general not only gives us first look at new "changes", but the manufacturers/developers get instant feedback from it's customer base (as well as potential customers).
  • - 7
flag groghunter (Jun 10, 2015 at 13:25) (Below Threshold)
 some company is doing a fatbike specific pump that they just moded the valve on, based on customer feedback before it ever shipped. I think it's PDW & they're going to launch it on KS. (They were talking about how much easier it was going to be to use this pump with winter gloves, & people who saw previews of it pointed out that a presta only thread on chuck doesn't meet that criteria very well.)
  • + 23
 ROAM started a whole generation of mountain bikers
  • + 19
 Seing the "New World Disorder" and Kranked videos got me hooked on DH/ Freeriding!
  • + 15
 27.5 +... O wait can i try again
  • + 3
 Going along with that: the proliferation of mountain bike media, particularly video, has allowed us to learn riding techniques and body movements almost without thinking about them. I remember the first whip I ever threw. I did it without thinking, and without anyone ever telling me how to do it. It just felt right.
  • + 4
 This post makes me feel old, I got way to MTB way before the Internet was a "thing"
But to anyone that's been into the sport since around 2000 and beyond I'd agree..
  • + 7
 Ride Guide tv is what got me started, miss that show.
  • + 3
 James-Carey, I have to say you win, today. Here I was thinking it was wheel size, free-ride suspension, carbon frames, etc. But the truth is, Pinkbike really was the ignitor for my motivation to be a better mountain biker and to ride harder. We are a generation that is moved by imagery (ask yourself what you're doing right now) and I am personally inspired by riders with new ideas. Almost every week I watch a video that teaches me a new trick. Plus I'm learning a ton about my bike and how to service it via Youtube. Therefore, you win. Internet and websites like Pinkbike.com augmented by creative videographers and the ideas and courage of what seems to be fearless mountain bikers have revolutionized the (for lack of better word) SHRED.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez for me, ROAM was definitely what made me into a mountain biker.
  • + 1
 Getta grip and the sprung videos are worth a mention! 90's mtb at its best!
  • + 1
 marketing has grown significantly in 2000-2015.
  • + 3
 I remember when the only two mountain bike websites of any relevence were Pinkbike and MTBR. Checking Pinkbike maybe every week or two and getting excited that there was a few new videos. Everything was filmed with a VHS handicam and it was so amateur. But the video's seemed more "real" back then. Now they're "unreal"
  • + 1
 life behind bars kicked it off for me, and then all the other videos out there.
  • + 3
 Don't forget the internet opened up the market for lower prices and overall access to rare(r) components. Simple plebs like us were able to afford to ride and (learn to maintain/build) some nice rigs thanks to the internet.
  • + 2
 Fully agree. After a long break I bought a XC Bike, but then I've seen videos like Whistler A-Line and Rampage...BAM I want to ride Freeride.
  • + 121
 Weed...

Without weed, we wouldn't have "brah", "rad", "stoked", "brown pow", "soul", "flow", "gnar" and of course "epic". And without those critical descriptives, mountain biking would, like, totally not exist...
  • + 22
 Don't forget 'dope' explains both with the same word.
  • + 18
 We're talking about stuff from THIS millennium. Weed was giving people goofy smiles WAAAAAY before the bike came to be : )
  • + 4
 @jackalope sounds more like surf culture to me. majority of ppl are 420 friendly, and a fair few of this crowd attend high level multi-million business meetings without opening the meeting with "Epic gnarly ride we've had to reach this rad deal, stoked for all brah's involved, let's keep this flow going and connect our soul's by snorting a line of coke".
Then they all go home after a hard days work and brown-pow their wife.
  • + 1
 Longer, lower, slacker. Magic words.
  • + 86
 The other answers are quite obvious, but I would have never really thought about the chain guide.
  • + 27
 It makes sense though. One unassuming little product allowed the progress of modern geometry. D.W is a freaking genius. And this modern suspension kinematics in which DW was a big part of.
  • + 6
 Amen to that. Mind blown.
  • - 9
flag raph11 (Jun 10, 2015 at 12:52) (Below Threshold)
 BS for me, I was riding downhill without chain guide for years, it was just fine with a front derailleur. Ok it wasn't as reliable but far from hell
  • + 3
 I call black magick..
  • + 11
 DW is completely right about the chain guide - the early products were absolutely terrible.

Hugely expensive (MRP World Cup with the 2 orange rollers!!) and would instantly fail when introduced to a rock or tree stump, causing the drivetrain to jam.

I had a number of different, early chain guides, and Mr. Dirt's Gizmo was about the best, just before E13 landed and changed everything with the "Supercharger" polycarbonate bash guard and chain device.

DW should also be credited for his suspension design, the Split Pivot used on the Devinci's was an incredible concept, an active suspension system you could actually pedal without requiring heavy compression damping to mute the rider input
  • + 1
 I remember Truvativ boxguides having a lot of problems with moving on the mount, even from mud on the drivetrain.
  • + 7
 DW himself might be a good argument for most important impact on the sport. CF and dropper posts are also significant in bike design/progression.
  • + 3
 I like chain guides, but for me, they are the single most expensive, bullsh component on a bike. 60Euro for a Sgaman on discount is more than a rip off, but I needed one so Ican start making my own, pretty soon I hope I can start making carbon ones to sell to the public so that they don't get ripped off. Also, when I firt got into FR/DH, I rode for 5 years with a front dereileur and some foam on it, it actually worked better than my Shaman. I call BS!
  • + 7
 I think DW makes a really good point, but it is also worth mentioning that he was a part of E13 when they introduced that first polycarbonate bash guard.

Also, his suspension designs definitely pushed the industry very far and very fast. Everybody remember when the Pivot Mach 5 came onto the scene and changed everything?
  • + 5
 I agree with big lips, giggity. But if you want to go down memory lane and talk about remembering the pivot Mach 5, take a stroll a little further and ask your dad about the iron horse Sunday. Whatever happened to the parent lawsuit with giant and it's maestro suspension design anyway? DW has had his hand in designing a lot for mtn biking.
  • + 1
 The old orange roller MRP guide would have been just fine if only it had ISCG mounts. It was held onto your BB shell by tiny set screws. Mr. Dirt guide was pretty decent too.
  • + 1
 @swassskier

the problem with the MRP not really the mounting to the BB / frame but it was the thin aluminium alloy bashguards - once impacted would dent, pinch or fold over and cause a drivetrain jam, or rip the roller off its mount on the next pedal rotation.

the introduction of lexan (polycarbonate) bash allowed the chain guard to absorb / deflect impacts that would be terminal for an aluminium alloy or carbon bash
  • + 56
 Spandex. So i can show off my package in public. that and narrow spd cycling shoes so i can walk like a pigeon.
  • + 29
 Finally one of these articles that isn't mostly "whatever my company makes" Though Bob Fox get's a raised eyebrow from me, as his response seems more like a "why you should invest in my company" pitch, because look how many different forks people need.

Even Chris Sugai didn't stoop to touting the 29" wheel, pretty nice.
  • + 10
 Yep, and his answer was great. Bikes would be nothing without trails to ride them on.
  • + 4
 Not gonna rewrite everything I wrote in WestwardHo's thread below, but as a trail advocate, I have some severe problems with IMBA. They're the USAC of advocacy.
  • + 5
 +1 for Chris Sugai's response.
  • + 2
 the Commencal response almost veered into it and I almost stopped reading the rest of the responses from there. Glad to see the others actually had some nice well thought out responses
  • + 24
 Two innovations have changed my riding and enjoyment the most - DROPPER POSTS that actually work, and secondly, narrow/wide chain rings and clutch derailleurs. I've been riding 6 inch travel bikes most of my MTB life and what I ride now compared to 10 years ago doesn't look that different, but the ability to ride up and down on a silent bike is a dream!
  • + 17
 +1 on the dropper post. Its the only thing that provides an immediate effect and tangibly changes the way you ride.
  • + 21
 That was 3 things lol
  • + 8
 Dropper posts, end of.
  • + 3
 Good luck riding 6 inch ^^
  • + 0
 But we had "dropper posts" in the 80's.......it was a greased post, a Hite-Rite, a cut length of innertube and zip-ties and a seat post QR Smile
Nice and lite weight too! Wink
  • - 1
 whats a dropper post? Smile
  • + 0
 A silent bike is the good life. But even today you still may get a unwanted noise out of a high end bike, that you may not be able to locate. Someone has got to invent some kind of machine where you can put microphones all over your bike, so you can find the unwanted sound source. That would be the best bike invention.
  • + 1
 @AMGoran - Perhaps..but I figure the Narrow/Wide and Clutch Derailleur making 1X possible is one "innovation" and everyone talks about the Hi-Rite post. Way ahead of it's time for sure!
  • + 0
 @orastreet1 maybe but if i ask you to get me a clutch derailleur you won't come back with a narrow wide changing right?
  • + 1
 Well, if something could be take COMPLETELY literal by someone --I guess that would be you.
  • + 1
 So does that work on bikes @qldmtb? That device is genius. Many great bike mechanics could use it to make their job a lot faster to find the problem. Do some bike shops use these kind of devices? Do the pros?
  • + 2
 What is that even?
  • + 2
 They are basically little microphone's you can clip on various places, you can select which channel you want to listen to with the receiver, they are quite good, we use them on cars but it could be helpful on a bike.
  • + 22
 I read through all these, and my thought for all was "yeah, I guess..", but none really hit home with me. Until I read Chris Sugai's comment. I don't know if I would specify IMBA in particular, but for me the biggest thing is trail access.

When I started riding (2000-2001) there were no trail maps, guidebooks, signposts, trail signs, online resources (ie www.trailforks.com ), or even legal trails. If you wanted to ride a new trail you had only 2 options: A) explore in the woods until you stumbled upon something good, or B) get directions from a friend, which was usually even worse than randomly exploring.

Nowadays I can plan an entire ride from my computer before I go. I can print off a map and bring it with me so I don't get lost. Trail markers and signposts let me know that I'm on the right trail. Even if I don't prepare pre-ride, there are maps in the woods telling me where I am. Heck with Strava I can even gps my ride and see how fast I am compared to other riders!

I think trail access is by far the "thing" that has had the biggest impact on the sport, leading to more participation, greater legitimacy of the sport, and more fun for those of who do it.
  • + 10
 Check out MTB Projects for your IOS and Google app stores. It's free and stores maps. Thank you IMBA!!!
  • + 7
 I accidentally neg propped you, but I completely agree with you. IMBA is freaking rad
  • - 7
flag jrocksdh (Jun 10, 2015 at 12:40) (Below Threshold)
 Using tools(strava/g.earth/y.tube/et al) to share illegal trails, unfortunately.
  • + 4
 what, no sextant?
  • + 1
 Catching fish in a stocked pond is better then no fishing at all.
  • + 14
 As someone who stoped riding bikes around the early 2000's and returned about 3 years ago, I would have to say the biggest change for me, is the increasing influence of gravity riding in old fashioned trail riding. In the late 90's - at least in northern Colorado and Connecticut - mountain biking seemed very much derived from road biking and to a lesser degree, trials riding. Hard riding always seemed to mean climbing up stairs designed for hiking, riding over obstacles, spinning up super steep climbs, more climbing, and climbing for the sake of cleaning nasty tight sections of hiking trail. It was fun at the time, but it didn't hold my interest, especially as bouldering and sport climbing were beginning to follow a more aggressive and physical trajectory. I don't think I knew any mt. bikers who rode dirt jumps back then, granted neither place I lived was exactly a hotbed of progressive riding. Now you go to Valmont Bike Park and people in spandex on XC race whippets or cross bikes are cranking out laps on the dual slalom courses. I would never give up my dropper post - my desert island component if I had to go back to riding my Klein Mantra - my 65-66 degree head angle, or suspension designs that work really well, but I also wasn't very interested in low bottom brackets while I was trying to clean wooden staircases and a slack bike would have sucked when low speed tech was the end goal. I think a lot of the stuff we love now is a product of this changing interpretation of what mountain biking is. I could also be totally wrong.
  • + 13
 A few things I like here, but the best line comes from Matt Robertson "Mountain biking is not a sport, it's a lifestyle." It's my lifestyle. When I think back to the old days, yeah the bikes weren't as good but I had just as much fun then when I could find trails. Yup there is more trails everyday and they are easy to find. Back then we might not know about a great spot 2 hours down the road, now you can find information for anywhere.
  • + 0
 I've done did a lot of shit just to live this here lifestyle We came straight from the bottom, to the top, my lifestyle Nigga livin' life like volcano And this is only the beginnin' I'm on the top of the mountain Puffin' on clouds and niggas still beginnin'
  • + 13
 I almost wish the guy from 9er had said the 29" wheel. While obvious, it would have been a better choice than IMBA. IMBA may have stood for something at one point but now they are just a big bureaucratic waste of advocacy money more committed to not offending anyone than fighting for trail access. Hell 29" wheels aren't even necessary anymore on IMBA trails since they've just become gigantic paved pump tracks with stupid giant berms and a max 6% grade.
  • + 7
 Speaking from seeing up close some of how IMBA's advocacy works: Travesty is the word that comes to mind. There's actually some groundswell in the country to finally allow bikes in wilderness areas, & they point blank refuse to take up the issue because they say it'll "anger people they work with in the government" WTF, that's your job, if you aren't pushing for things hard enough to piss people off, you're doing a shit job of advocacy.
  • + 3
 What are you doing to improve things? Anyone can bitch that a national organization isn't catering to their preferences, but the reality is that IMBA does make progress, and especially in areas you might not think about.

IMBA's internationally-accepted trail standards are used in Canadian cities and national parks, and they make it much easier to push through that burocracy and get mountain biking permitted at all.
  • + 18
 I don't get on PB to brag about what I do, but since you asked, I'm a board member on a local trails organization, & currently involved in efforts to get a new skills park built in my city, & preserve an existing trails network under threat from the city. IMBA didn't think it was important to show up to the public meeting on that trail network, BTW. I also participate in erosion control work with a climbing group, & I'm part of focus group attempting to get provisons for recreation of all kinds built into the next 20 year forest plan for the local national forest.

I complain about IMBA failing because I'm one of the people out there picking up their slack.
  • + 5
 Perhaps I am misinterpreting, but it seems like the expectation is that IMBA should be everywhere at the same time. There is only a finite amount of resources that they have at their disposal. So if they don't pick up one fight or make it to one meeting, shouldn't that be expected? By the same token, if we do not support their efforts, then we will have to "pick up the slack." They also don't just fight for the radly brocore pinkbike shredders, but the majority of riders who are in the middle of the bell curve skill-wise. But work for those individuals will bring resources for the more advanced riders/trails as well. I think it is great that we have anyone fighting for what we love to do. Don't like it, fine, no one is stopping you from getting a local group together like sdmb in Tucson.
  • + 4
 So Fantasy Island is a place for Rowdy brocore shredders? It's an internationally known trail network, & a huge boon to the Tucson community, especially for beginners, it's not some little trail in the woods, & it's going to get gutted. IMBA doesn't need to show up at every little meeting, but that isn't a little meeting, that is a big deal that needs every single person available to speak towards.

As for bike access in the wilderness, that is EXACTLY in IMBA's baliwick. That's national level advocacy, that's their job, as they're the only ones big enough to get a seat at the table, & they're not even trying.
  • + 6
 At least the Niner guy eluded to what IMBA cares about these days and thats building boring IMBA trails. They don't care or fight for keeping existing trails open anymore since its financially better for them to make money building trails. As grog pointed out in Tucson the local IMBA rep was no where to be seen and yet its possibly the most recognizable trail in Arizona in danger of being closed. Plus they have made it extremely clear they are not even going to attempt to get bikes in Wilderness areas and are not going to fight new ones being proposed. Instead they are going to try and have new trails built outside of the wilderness areas because again its better for them to make money than to fight to keep trails open to bikes. Even if we said fine they are to big and can't be in every place at once and so yeah they couldn't make the 2.5hr drive down to Tucson there is no excuse why they are not fighting Wilderness bike closures on a national level. They say the are the International voice of mountain bikers than they should be fighting at a minimum at a national level for us. Unlike Grog I will toot my horn and say I put my advocacy where my mouth is. I have helped my local club log over 1000hrs in the past two years maintain and fight for trails in my town. I don't speak as an armchair QB but as someone that cares and his heavily involved in advocating for the sport I love.
  • + 0
 Maybe we should start a new advocacy group since IMBA isn't living up to our dreams.
  • - 2
 I still am not convinced we should be fighting for bikes allowed in Wilderness. It seems like that goes directly against the whole idea of having a Wilderness to begin with.
  • + 9
 How? Horses are allowed in wilderness. We're far less impact to erosion than they are. If it was only Hikers, I could see it, but we're literally the only non-motorized trail user that isn't allowed in there. What about places that people have been riding for years being declared wilderness, & being closed off to bikes? Surely that's something IMBA should be doing something about?
  • + 2
 Perfect
  • + 2
 Rocks belong!!! When I see an IMBA sign at the start of a trail I know its gonna be smooth but not in a good way. However, given time, these trails will revert back to a more technical state. As well, rerouting trails so that erosion doesn't become a huge issue is not a bad thing. Bent Creek in North Carolina has a few nice trails but much of it is all but paved. This is discouraging to seasoned riders looking to have some fun, and is a disservice to beginners that should be learning how to sharpen their skills. Talking to the guys in the bobcat tractor working on the trail, they seem to think small smooth humps are the shit and rocks and roots exist only because they can't figure out how to move them. I guess you can't make everyone happy.
  • + 3
 Totally agree with the horse comment. They are hella jumpy and shit all over the place. Drives me nuts.
  • + 5
 I'm glad to learn about IMBA not fighting for access in the wilderness areas. What do they do then? I don't get the smooth trail stuff either. My worst crashes are always on smooth trails, because they are so fast. Rocks help keep speeds in check.
  • + 3
 The reason why IMBA is associated with smooth trails is because the "flow" trail design is an easier pitch to land managers who risk opening up their land to potential lawsuits especially in states/ regions with horrid recreational use statutes such as Oregon that allow people to sue land managers and the State itself. We have to remember that IMBA is a non-profit organization with limited capital and focused on the sustainability of Mountain biking. If you have a problem with IMBA's work try working with land managers to build technical or "freeride-like" trails. Not saying it's impossible but you need to be in a totally rad place with the local municipality, land managers, volunteers, funding, sustainability, user group etc. and many IMBA chapters have been able to help influence this kind of growth before and will continue to.
  • + 2
 @groghunter all mechanized vehicles are prohibited from wilderness currently. That means basically anything with wheels (yes, even baby strollers). I totally agree with you on erosion. That said, I value the importance of having land that is as untouched as possible by industry/technological developments made by humans. We don't need people out in wilderness areas turning them into the next Rampage site or cutting corners and making "Strava lines". Even without that issue, people aren't expecting bikes and trails may have poor line of sight and turns that are terrible from a biking perspective. There is plenty of land to go around, why is it such a big deal that some of it is not open to bicycles? I'm not specifically against it, biut haven't heard any compelling arguments for such a change other than that we somehow also deserve to be able to bike there.
  • + 5
 I do understand they don't want to piss people off, especially if these are the people making the (final) decisions. They will only start disliking you and not do anything for you and just throw your ideas of the table.

Over here there was a local indoor skatepark that only allowed skaters and not bicycles. Several groups of riders have tried gaining access by demanding them to let cyclists in, but you can already expect what the result was: they received the same attitude back as they showed towards the skatepark owners.
I actually had a different plan and went inside to talk with them to COLLABORATE. They actually liked my idea of giving it a try to allow cyclists every now and then, and that's where it all started. First just some random days to test / see how it goes, and after that went well we made the deal to let cyclists in on their least busy day: because that would be beneficial for them aswell, because all the cyclists will actually show up on that day if it's only once a week (especially in autumn/winter times). Organized one big event in de skatepark to introduce the skatepark to our national cycling scene, and after that it was always super busy with cyclists on their normally quite day, and they were super stoked to have us riding there. Later they even came to me and told me they want to open up for cyclists another day aswell, and which day I think would be best.

Long story short: the best way to win is to make friends, and not enemies.
It's the most effective way and also the way that leaves great vibes for everyone. Even if you would be able to get what you want by making enemies, the tension will always stay.
  • + 1
 @Mattin
I understand where you're coming from, & considerate discourse is always preferable to being antagonistic. That said, I've heard IMBA people refuse to even bring the issue up with decision makers. That's not avoiding antagonism, it's refusing to take up the banner for your cause, especially now, when public opinion on the matter isn't as dead set against it any more.

Consider the Arizona Trail: here we have a route intended to provide a scenic adventure through the wilds of the entire state. It's fairly successful in that regard, for hikers & horseback riders: Cyclists have to divert on to roads for large sections of the trail. IMBA should be at the front lines with FS leadership trying to get exceptions to the wilderness act for situations like "state showcase trails," at the very least. Instead, you've got individuals taking up that banner, which is great, but they don't have the resources IMBA does. Their success has been mixed.
  • + 1
 @eoisaacs They allow huge packtrains & cattle grazing in wilderness areas. I agree that we should have some truly wild, untouched lands, but we do: that's what National Parks & Monuments are for. The entire point of the National Parks act is to preserve those environments, while the mandate the USFS was created under is to encourage sustainable use of public lands.

So, are wilderness areas open to horses because of some traditional reason, or because of successfully lobbying of ranchers to get grazing allowed in wilderness, & needing a way round up their stock?

In light of those facts, I have no reservation saying that Wilderness, to put it bluntly, isn't really, & that the prohibition against bikes is arbitrary and unjustified.
  • + 3
 I wish they would just change the rule from Mechanized to Motorized.
  • + 3
 Grog, Fantasy Island has been doomed for a long time given the tract of land it is sitting on. But it is not as much of a "boon" for the community as it once was. Thanks to sdmb and others there have been countless trails built in the last ten years and more are being built every day: Robles, Sweetwater, and all the new stuff in the Tortolitas for example. Change is difficult, but in this case it clearly does not signify a lack of attention paid to mountain bike trails in Tucson. I would much rather ride in Tucson today than 10 years ago.
  • - 1
 @LuvAZ The issue with the current piece of land is a new problem, due to it being released from the golf program back into the city's general fund. Until that happened, due to the golf program having to make up for losses covered by the general fund, the city had every intention of leaving the land alone, & the state land office wouldn't have any reason to actively market that property, as they have lands that are far more valuable to focus on in the Phoenix area, & a limited staff.

Regardless of new trails being put in, preserving existing trail networks with a rich history should be a primary goal of IMBA, & not being willing to show up for a 2 hr meeting doesn't show commitment to that cause. In fact, it brings up the question of whether they're more interested in making money for IMBA Trail Solutions, than preserving existing infrastructure.

As for how much a "boon" to the city, it is, ask some other riders who live in cities if they have a trail system within 15mins of their workplace. Ask some real, raw beginners how they feel about Sweetwater, vs the Bunny Trail at Fantasy.
  • + 5
 It's not a matter of 'not being willing' to show up. I was at another meeting that evening and posted on a local club page that I couldn't attend. I can only do so much and there is a lot of new access coming online in the southwest region. Feel free to send me a PM, as i'm not planning on getting into an online argument with you on this. Cheers.
  • - 2
 Last week I was trying to find the start of a DH trail and came to a fork. On the left had a sign that said IMBA - share the trail. Thanks IMBA. Went right.
  • + 3
 I read all comments about IMBA here. and I have my own opinion to share.

first: less talk and more action, if you are not agree with IMBA or with they do, create your own non profit, support during years, deal with the government and people, and when you finally has the balance, I´m sure not all people are agree, specially selfish people what can´t see more of 2 steps in front. IMBA do stuff for all people in general.

Second: again, if you are not agree with IMBA and what they do, come to South America, where the trails are just a few, and are ´92 style, or better come to Argentina, where you need to drive 1 hour at least to take.... if you have lucky one super steep, rocky, shit trail. because here "trail system", "sustainable trails", "green, blue, black level"...... or any kind of trail what do you have everywhere here is just like sci-fi.

to be honest I think all American what are angry or disagree with IMBA, just cry like a boy full of toy, what don't appreciate what really has.
  • + 13
 I had to do a double take to see if I accidentally missed the rest of cam's response haha! Great article and really cool to see how different mountain bikers opinions can be on a subject that isn't wheel size for once
  • + 11
 Zink´s response was brilliant hahah
  • + 4
 Not Sensus grips Cam? You might want to reconsider your answer...
  • + 1
 I like Cam's response but would go with Crankworx over Rampage. CWorx laid the path for FMB, forced manu's to build lighter, more capable and trickable bikes, spawned the birth of countless bike parks modelled after Whistler, is the genesis event for mainstream TV coverage and has allowed a number of otherwise known riders to make a splash on the big stage. WBP was so far ahead of the curve with this comp (now festival) and it had tremendous impact on the industry and community.
  • + 12
 Disc-brakes: While they existed, they weren't commonly available until well after 2000. You would be hard pressed to find an even halfway decent bike nowadays without disc brakes. If just being in existence prior to 2000 was a disqualifier, you may as well toss out most of what the experts said above...carbon fiber, frame suspension, do-it-all bikes, bashguards, IMBA...all existed before 2000. It wasn't until after that they made an impact for "the masses." Same situation as disc brakes.

At any rate, for me, since 2000, nothing changed HOW I rode my bike more than disc brakes.
  • + 3
 I had to scroll for quite awhile before I came to disq brakes. I've been riding since before front suspension and that was a 1st edition Judy on my third bike. I have a dropper post and still run tubes. All great stuff but nothing was as big as replacing rim brakes with reliable hydraulic disq brakes. The great thing is you can pretty much take them for granted, as most folks in this survey seem to.
  • + 2
 I think that really depends on what you ride. If you're an XC rider who only goes out for a ride when the weather is good, and your trails are nothing crazy, v-brakes are plenty enough. But if you like to ride aswell when it's wet/muddy or do more agressive types of riding, discs are much better for sure.
  • + 3
 Yup. Affordable and simple to maintain hydraulic disk brakes, I believe, is the product that revolutionized the mountain bike industry. One can go as fast as you want down the hill, but at some point you gotta slow down or stop. Old rim brakes would have turn into a puddle of molten rubber. If it is wet or muddy, you might as well just hang up the bike and take a nap.
  • + 2
 Here,here. No one, even weight weenies would give up disc brakes. Downhilling would not be possible without them.
  • + 1
 Decent v-brakes are not as bad as people nowadays think. They can have more brake power than many disc brakes (coughsramcough). Modulation is better though on disc brakes and the main thing is that disc brakes keep on performing well when the weather gets bad.

Downhilling would definitely be possible with v-brakes if DH bikes had v-brake mounts and -rims. But it would be less effective / good because of the modulation. But definitely not impossible. Just like how Aaron Gwin rode the Leogang UCI DH World Cup track without a rear tyre.
  • + 13
 Best invention of the millennium? Definitely the wheel! Not to sure when it was invented exactly but must have been around 2006, I guess
  • + 5
 No no no the best invention was boost 148 duhh
  • + 2
 No no no no, the fanny pack!
  • + 4
 Without a doubt it was the seat/saddle. Seat posts were ridiculously uncomfortable until they were invented. D'oh!
  • + 2
 +1 for aoneal. I remember riding bikes back in the 90ies, even before the seat post was invented. Sitting on that seat post clamp was so uncomfortable.
  • + 9
 I liked all the different inputs from everyone for such a simple question. In my opinion, it is the "all mountain bike". They are so much more capable at everything than bikes were in the 90's.
  • + 1
 I think this is an effect of modern suspension, and thus falls under Joe Murray's response. Modern suspension designs made the All Mountain bike possible.
  • + 0
 Jerry let me introduce you to my good friend the AM hardtail...
  • + 0
 Scott, let me introduce you to my full suspension bike, which is faster than yours....Just kidding, of course. However, you can't deny that the development of full suspension bikes that pedal well - which didn't really exist pre-2000 - changed mountain biking in fundamental ways. Minimalist bikes are cool and all. But modern frame designs have developed to the point where shitty bikes don't really exist anymore. That's pretty awesome.
  • - 1
 FS bikes have benefited from AM geo just as much as hardtails- it's the geo that's important.
  • + 6
 At first i thought dropper post .... Then after a bit of thought, i came to the conclusion I could live without a dropper post - suspension , carbon , strava, bashguards ,ect.... But going from V-brakes to disks ..... Well that was night and day..... You could stop in the pissing rain! Smash your wheels till they looked like potato chips ... And still ride home... With brakes!
  • + 6
 I have to agree with joe, nothing made me laugh more than when my former boss sold his sb66 and grabbed an orange five off display to tide him over until his sb6 arrived. He was so excited, his rosy eyed love of his five from yesteryear. From the first turn of the pedals you could tell the love was gone...
  • + 5
 The biggest change in the past 15 years is geo IMO. Long, low, slack, shorter stems, and wider bars make a HUGE difference. I would also vote for tubeless, dropper-posts, 1x, and choice of wheel-size. Disc brakes and suspension both have made a lot of progress as well, but the basics were already there around in 2000, so I don't think that counts.
  • + 1
 I do like 1X riding. I however have spent time with Truvativ's Hammerschmidt and after that 1X feels like a huge step in the wrong direction.
  • + 1
 Hammerschmidt is heavy and very expensive though. Pretty much the exact opposite of a 1x drivetrain (which makes your bike simpler instead of more complicated).
No disrespect to the Hammerschmidt though, just stating that it is exactly the opposite of a n/w chain ring.
  • + 9
 chamois cream, duh
  • + 0
 Thank you.
  • + 4
 I would say rideable bikes for smaller kids, especialy for DH and dirt - there used to be none. It will hopefully create generation of progressive young riders, who can push our sport further. I am always happy to see youngsters shred better than I do.
  • + 1
 This is THE answere!
  • + 3
 For me, it's whatever techniques that have allowed bikes and components to be both lighter and stronger (maybe advances finite element analysis, greater use of carbon and better techniques for forming and machining alloy?).

In 2000, we were riding 40 lb bikes and stuff broke ALL. THE. TIME. Bent cranks, ripped out pedals, tacoed wheels, snapped frames were all common occurrences. In comparison, you can now reliably use something like a Shimano XTR crankset for every discipline of mountain biking. My AM bike weighs the same as my dad's 2000 Norco Charger Deore-level XC hardtail and descends better than my old 45 lb. 2001 Specialized Big Hit.
  • + 8
 148mm hub spacing.
  • + 2
 27,5+
  • + 2
 24++ coming soon...
  • + 1
 ^^^ isn't that the same as 26
  • + 1
 Or is that 24+++
  • + 1
 24+=26 but 24++=27.5 imagine 6in tires and you get my drift
  • + 1
 Guys what about 20+ then? maybe the bmxers also want fat bikes
  • + 4
 Am I the only one that would prefer a relatively mediocre frame with high end component , rather than just a top frame with shitty parts ?
  • + 4
 Yep.
  • + 4
 i would prefer top frame with mediocre part
  • + 2
 I go with vl95. Even if the geometry is better nowadays, I would much rather ride a 90s frame, with 2015 suspension, disc brakes (if it would fit), n/w chain ring, dropper post etc,
than ride a super high end modern carbon frame with 90s suspension, old school shifters, cantilever brakes, shitty 3x6 drivetrain that hardly works etc, etc.
  • + 1
 i prefer top frame cause parts are something you can fairly easily upgrade
  • + 3
 I'd rather ride a Wallmart bike with saint/guide brakes than V10cc with cantilevers. Cool article, I liked the non obvious answers of most folks. Max Commencal is Neal DeGrasse of MTB, hands down respect to this guy.
  • + 1
 To be honest I'm not sure which one would be more dangerous.Not having enough brake power vs. a frame that can snap any moment. Smile
  • + 2
 All the new standards 15mm axels, 110mm hubs, 27.5, 27.5+, 29er wheels, all of which have made my fortune spent on 26in bikes obsolete, and me no longer willing to keep up with Jones. Now I'm looking for a more stable sport that won't break the bank. I'll continue riding my 26ers to the ground then I'm on to something more substainable. Thanks Mountain biking for all the great memories, but the time has come, I'm tapping out $$$$$$$$$$$$$########???
  • + 5
 This millennia?? We've still got 985 years of innovation and new standards before this article can be posted Smile
  • + 2
 How is it that nobody mentioned modern trail building????

I live in the Pacific NW. The biggest difference between now and 2000 is the huge change in trail building philosophies. Huge berms. Perfectly sculpted jumps. Seamless transitions between natural and built features. Trails that are far less prone to erosion. Fast, flowy awesomeness. The trails here today are amazing.

The bikes we have to ride those trails today are awesome, but I'd rather ride 2015 Whistler on a bike from 2000 than vice versa.

Its all about the terrain.
  • + 2
 Not to get overly esoteric, but my personal favorite is the threadless headset. For nearly every other aspect of a mountain bike - geometry, brakes, suspension - you can find early examples of what we ride today. Few predate threadless headsets and the ones that did, notably early suspension, were the impetus to rethink how we attached the handlebar to the bike. It was the first instance that one of the core structural parts of a bicycle was completely re-engineered to suit the needs of mountain biking. Threadless headsets made it possible to turn the fork into an aftermarket accessory, giving birth to an entire ecosystem of companies wholly focused on suspension. More importantly, they demonstrated that mountain bikes needed specific design, giving rise to a whole host of mountain bike specific design standards for disc brake mounts, through axles, hollow axle bottom brackets all originated as mountain bike specific designs. One need only look at how much the mountain bike changed in the 10 years before the threadlesss headset and the 10 years following to see how important an invention it was.
  • + 5
 But Threadless was around pre-'00
  • + 7
 Honda RN-01
  • + 2
 Hey, some really interesting comments. Although I generally agree with Dave Weagle, I think the Jeff Lenosky bike build solution to the chain retention question is also a great alternative. The lifestyle poop is kinda sad, though. If you are into that, buy a fixie.
  • + 7
 the Go Pro/youtube
  • + 1
 Josh Bender and BMX. Both of these events were instrumental in showing us how big and hard you could ride. It's been a really long time since there was anything in Mountain biking which was not a tiny incremental improvement or bar raiser. I have always felt ripped off by the "mountain bike companies". I think right now though, the price and quality of the lower end bikes from the larger bike companies is matching or surpassing the skills of the average rider. The "trickle down" of technology and manufacturing is finally happening and it's cost effective. This, by the way, happened in sports like motocross in 1987 when Honda put a 19" wheel on the back of their CR instead of an 18"er. I think they had already introduced the rising rate linkage to the standard single pivot swing arm by then too( which is just making it out to probably half the mtb bikes out there today). Maybe its just letting us ride ski hills in the summer and building trails with excavators...
  • + 2
 Gotta love Bender. My son watches his exploits all the time. Bender is to mtb what Jesus is to christianity-total sacrafice.
  • + 1
 Fat bikes have allowed people who live in areas of heavy snowfall to ride (effectively) in all four seasons. I can now go places and do things that I wouldn't have dreamed about doing on a "skinny" mountain bike. And they have allowed both riders and manufacturers to satisfy our innate n+1 approach to bicycle ownership Smile
  • + 1
 How about hydraulic disc brakes. In my opinion, this really allowed the rider to become much more aggressive in their riding. Naturally the next thing to follow was frames with suspension. The rest is whatever until the dropper post emerged for us guys that earn our turns.
  • + 5
 Electric gearing systems because they're definitely not unnecessary.
  • - 2
 I'm pretty sure is Electronic suspension systems because they will CHANGE EVERYTHING
  • + 1
 I'm pretty sure is Electronic suspension systems because they will CHARGE EVERYTHING Fixed...
  • + 5
 Brb going to bounce off my bash guard
  • + 5
 sorry i have a e13 lg1 guard that snaps everytime i get near something slightly harder than wool...
  • + 4
 i went from riding a 8 inch bike for years to 6 inch,and i still ride the same stuff and huck just as big
  • + 14
 youre the best
  • + 1
 I'm with Murray and DW, bash guard/guides that work, and the fact that everything is highly dependant on one and other when talking about industy advancements.

Without frame design good suspension is useless, and without great suspension why bother pushing the design envelope?

Some of the folks here are too young to remember the ass puckering rides of an 80mm fork and a steel hardtail with "xc race" geometry. And they likely wont have tire burn marks on their calfs and bruised chests from their seats.

Go grab your dads bike and "smash berms" and "huck to flat", find out how much easier it is on a modern bike. go to a lift serviced "resort" with a bike from the early 90s and try it, now thats an adventure!
  • + 1
 I think Matt Robertson nails it-bikes designed with innovation for normal riders not extreme disciplines like noodly xc or full on dh. Modern bikes are great for every day riders. This covers frame design, droppers, lighweight thru axles etc
  • + 4
 Strava. It removes any shadow of doubt that the world is filled with assholes
  • + 1
 Once again RC, you are the king of soliciting max Internet clicks. That said - Matt for the win!!! My trail bike in 1990 was an xc bike. My trail bike now is so much more like riding a ktm in the woods.
  • + 3
 I think the recent trend of having women friendly bike designs is significant also. Date night is MUCH better now.
  • + 1
 for me it was my 20in then started hucking a xc like it was a DH. I would have to say Fontana Southridge USA pushed me into a one track mind and realy let me use my insurance to its full potential.
  • + 4
 Tippie...ya im going with that
  • + 1
 The humble trail center or bike park. Before them it use to be all natural xc riding or digging short dh trails in woods hopeing they would not get knocked down.
  • + 1
 Not one thing but several :
Different wheel sizes.
Dropper posts with remotes.
Strava!
Suspension that works.
Reliability of stuff.
  • + 3
 @TeamRobot will appreciate Chris Sugai's answer.
  • + 1
 One thing that should have had a bigger effect was truvativ Hammerschmidt. Seriously revolutionized my ride. 1x11 feels like a step back.
  • + 1
 @Matt Robertson - I salute your stance, you've hit the nail on the proverbial head!

At their current rate Enduro bikes shall evolve into DH bikes.
  • + 2
 Matt Robertson nailed it. It's about the sheer fun of it! The Adventure. The experience on the trail.
  • + 3
 Andrew Juskaitis looks like a Bond villain
  • + 1
 No bashing over rocks on my low bb new carbon santa cruz! Ouch that poor lower swingarm corner has taken some abuse just from kicked up rocks.
  • + 1
 Got the same on my Intense....cut a piece of automotive heater hose same width as the knuckle, one slit to open it up, and glue it on with rubber cement. Cheap and works like hot damn!
  • + 3
 What about super tacky tires? Wet roots are no longer death traps.
  • + 1
 Being able to watch live downhill races (and XC races) means it's now possible to follow MTB as a sport. That's the big change for me
  • - 1
 ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO ENDURO
  • + 1
 Trail builders and bike parks for me. Pinkbike and the internet a distant 2nd.
  • + 3
 Marzocchi Z1
  • + 1
 those came out in 96--97...I should know I had my dad buy a Z2 from Italy in 97! It was amazing what that 2kg 60mm fork allowed me to get away with! Now I ride a 190mm shiver!
  • + 1
 (L) Shiver (L)
  • + 1
 1. Invent of the full suspension goodness 2. Advances in carbon manufacturing 3. Dropper post
  • + 1
 It should be Which, not what..... what is not grammatically correct, for the title of the piece.
  • + 0
 I may have missed it but I see no mention of how great trails are today. I'm so much more inspired to ride with so many jumps, berms and features that we have today.
  • + 3
 Better pain killers?
  • - 1
 120mm stems...I can't get enough of them....so much control on the descents and it can make me climb better than any XC professional. Yeah they get my vote.....said no one ever!!
  • + 3
 RUX
  • + 4
 RUX ALL THE THINGS
  • + 1
 interesting read and good mix of industry people, keep it coming....
  • + 1
 Split pivot suspension. It wins medals!!
  • + 2
 Short chain stays
  • + 1
 Dropper seatpost, changed my game far more than suspension did.
  • + 1
 Wow. I didn't know Val Kilmer worked for Giant Bicycles.
  • + 2
 Dropper post
  • + 0
 Front suspension. Period. It enabled everything to follow and keep up with the evolving mountain bike.
  • + 2
 front suspension was around before 2000
  • + 3
 Also came about 10 years before the new millenium. I was there maaan.
  • + 2
 Opps, completely forgot the time period! My mistake.
  • + 1
 Can't believe 27.5+ didn't get a mention.....ha.
  • + 2
 Thru-axles.
  • + 1
 What 90s action movie was Andrew Juskaitis in?
  • + 1
 New sta here and everywhere to make as much money as they can.
  • + 1
 Best answer ever was Zinks!
  • + 1
 It is indeed something that defined freeride. Allthough I'd have to say Fest Series also deserves just as much respect for keeping that freeride spirit alive nowadays.
  • + 2
 geometry
  • + 1
 Bob fox deserves a big crown
  • + 1
 I'd say the invention of the wheel back in 89' i think it was.
  • + 1
 According to fox , that the kashima stantion ! Ha ha ha
  • + 1
 TUBLESS TIRE TECHNOLOGY!!!!!
  • + 1
 the highlighter yellow color....
  • + 0
 Its a toss up between my Reverb Dropper post and my 1x11 narrow wide drive train for me...
  • + 2
 Tires
  • + 1
 GREG MINNAAR IS ADDICTED TO CARBON
  • + 1
 Different coloured hats.
  • + 1
 Money.
  • + 1
 Got to be suspension
  • + 1
 the wheel
  • + 1
 BC BIKE RACE !!
  • + 0
 I'm surprised no one said slacker geometry.
  • + 1
 Disk Brakes
  • + 1
 Dropper Post for SURE
  • + 1
 cam zink killin it
  • + 1
 Local Enduro races.
  • + 1
 cool article!
  • - 1
 I predict that in 15 years we'll look back and add Schwalbe's Procore system to the "game changer list". What else?
  • + 0
 We're all forgetting the way boost 148 has changed mountain biking forever
  • + 0
 It's disc brakes by 1,000 miles. It just is.
  • + 4
 disc brakes existed before 2000 so doesn't count.
  • + 1
 Dropper post
  • + 1
 DCD Smile
  • + 1
 Enduro. Hands down.
  • - 1
 All wrong. It's obviously the new boost standards!
  • - 1
 Suspension, ProFlex kind of started this
  • + 0
 DROPPER POSTS
  • - 1
 1. X GAMES (event)
2. Red Bull (product)
3. Pinkbike (trend)
  • - 2
 I forgot:

Go Pro
  • - 1
 the worst invention 2000-2015 is 29 ";.)
  • - 3
 Non solid rubber tires.
  • + 12
 Eeeerm, the pneumatic bicycle tyre is DEFINITELY pre 2000's
  • + 6
 I misread hahaha woops.
  • - 3
 Enduro, best invention ever!
  • - 3
 racing.....hands down, pushes every aspect of the sport,
  • - 2
 DING DING DING !
  • + 6
 Besides being a bad answer, racing existed well before 2000.
  • - 1
 explain to me how it hasn't pushed the sport please, athleticism, technology, approach, trails, everything has been pushed on by racing bikes. fair point racing existed before 2000, but its an ongoing progress, one race season to the next.
  • + 3
 Before the enduro phenomenon, you could argue that racing was actually bad for the sport. It was all 20 pound XC bikes and full on DH rigs. Those are great machines, but are designed for a niche market and athletes that have little in common with normal riders.

Read the comments by Bob Fox and Matt Robertson. Now, bike manufacturers are making very high end bikes and developing cutting-edge technology for the 99% of mountain bikers that don't race much (or at all). I'm a gear dork, but my bike has very little technology that was developed for traditional racing formats. Its all about riding awesome terrain.

Maybe its different in the UK, since you guys don't have much vertical. But here in the US and Canada, the emphasis is on building rad trails and pushing boundaries. Who cares about time? For most people out here, it's all about riding new lines and doing things that scare the shit out of you.

Everyone likes to shit on the 'Enduro' thing because its become marketing jargon. But the reason its cool is because its the first racing discipline that is like the riding that normal people do: not a short DH course that takes 2.4 minutes to ride, and not a bunch of loops on a boring XC course that is mostly fire roads. I don't care how long it takes me to ride a trail. My goals are hitting the transition of a jump, doing a drop that I've never had the balls to do before, or riding something with a little more style than the last time. Its all about the myself and the terrain.
  • - 2
 Strava /Garmin.
  • - 1
 Say no to imba
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