Pinkbike Editors' Christmas 2022 Wish Lists: Workshops, XL MX Bikes... & Better Cheese?

Dec 21, 2022 at 14:22
by Mike Levy  
photo
A Christmas classic or just creepy?


The bells are jingling and the snow is snowing here at Pinkbike HQ, which means Christmas is probably tomorrow and that it's time for another list of wishes from the editors. Getting Santa to ban headset routing is about as likely as world peace, though, so don't expect any Christmas miracles below or on the 25th. Instead, we're asking for glasses, extra-large dirt bikes, a lift kit for a van, and more. What's on your mountain bike wishlist this Christmas?




Mike Kazimer
Clear Sunglasses, Waterproof Boots, & Pie

I'm still not a huge fan of wishlists, or really the holiday season in general. Big groups of people, buying and receiving gifts that no one really needs, awkward family gatherings... it's not my thing. Bah humbug. I do like pie, though. And cookies.

photo
I don't need sunglasses, I need mudguards for my eyeballs.

That said, until my personal electric aerial vehicle arrives, there are a few things I wouldn't mind having magically appear at my doorstep. The first would be glasses and goggles with a stack of clear lenses for each. Here in the Pacific Northwest, tinted lenses are useful for about five days a year, that brief period in late July when the sun rises above the horizon. The rest of the time clear lenses are the way to go, especially in areas with thick tree cover. There are lots of nice sunglasses on the market that come with a spare clear lens, but they're typically very expensive due to that fancy tinted lens that's the primary focus. I wish someone would make a PNW / UK special, basically a well-made pair of safety glasses with replaceable, inexpensive lenses. And yes, I've tried to go the budget route with hardware store options - it felt like I was trying to see the trail through the bottom of a mason jar.

How good do these Van's boots look? Imagine if they had a way to mount an SPD cleat or a rubber sole that was actually sticky. Winter riding shoes are getting better – Fizik's Artica GTX clipless shoes, and Five Ten's GoreTex Trailcross flat pedal shoes are both steps in the right direction, but there's still room for improvement.

Too often, shoes for cold or wet weather end up with soles from the XC world, rather than the flatter, skate shoe profile used for DH or enduro shoes. Those XC soles aren't great for walking, and when the ground is covered in a slurry of mud, ice, and snow, plenty of walking is going to happen. That's why these boots caught my eye – the overall shape and design look similar to what I'm envisioning.
photo

I have plenty of other design ideas for my ideal mountain bike shoes, but for the sake of brevity I'll end things here – I'm sure the others on this list have more interesting requests than goofy shoes and glasses.



photo
"This image is free of rights" - Henry Quinney.

Henry Quinney
A Selection of Reasonably Priced Cheeses

After a false start, I'm back for round two of BC life. The mountains are vast, the landscapes beautiful, and the people have fun catchphrases like "okie-ly ookie-ly" and "you betcha." From an outside view, and an uneducated one at that, Canada really can seem like the Flander's residence, quietly going about its business compared to its better-known neighbors. One thing however I can't abide is how expensive cheese is over here. Also, they name what I would guess to be a double Gloucester or a red Leicester "cheddar". The appropriation of British cheesemaking culture has gone unchecked for far too long. My culture is not a prom dress, nor is it a charcuterie board.

And, as with most imported cultures, it's ridiculously expensive. In England, I could get some stinking bishop actually made by an ordained clergyman for the cost of a slice of the plastic cheese here that has more properties in common with a melted yellow credit card than it does anything that's been within 50 yards of a cow.



Pole Stamina 140 EN
What will tires in 2050 look like?


Mike Levy
The Impossible Tire & Adventures

Aside from peace everywhere and all dogs finding good homes, I'm a simple man and my wishlist consists of nothing more than a garage full of overpriced hypercars, a giant catapult, a live-in pancake chef, a private go-kart track, a really hot hot tub, and definitely some sort of immunity against any and all speeding charges in every country. As I said, I don't pine for much in life. But when it comes to bikes, I can easily come up with a few things to wish for...

Number one on that list would be the impossible tire. The Sea to Sky corridor has endless trails and terrain where 1,300-gram downhill rubber deflated to about 17psi is exactly what you should be using. It's usually some combination of steep, wet, rooty, and rocky, and the kind of place where you're happy to pedal the stickiest and slowest rolling of tires to the top because that's what makes sense for the way back down. But I also spoil all that by knowing from experience that trail bike tires weighing 300 or 400 grams less mounted to a super light wheelset can feel just as amazing in a different way on a different sort of trail. There are way more important things than weight and rolling speed, of course, but I wish for a magical tire that somehow combines the traction and predictability of an Assegai with the best traits of a speedy trail bike tire. It also needs to come in at around 800 grams and have razor-proof sidewalls but not be too stiff and ride like wood. Good luck, Santa.

Back in reality, I'm hoping to gift myself some sort of two-wheeled adventure in 2023 that involves pedaling too long for too far, hopefully in the sunshine while wearing the same salt-caked shorts and t-shirt for all of it.



Reallon France Photo by Matt Wragg
Bike parks during the day and quiet camping in the forest at night.


Matt Wragg
A Mid-Sized 4x4

Mechanics call it getting tired. It’s when a vehicle has run too hard for too many years and simply can’t take it anymore. First, the power steering sprung a leak, then the 4WD selector linkage snapped, the turbo failed, a cylinder head went and finally, the steering linkage cracked apart. None of these things on their own would have killed our faithful 2001 Jeep Cherokee, it was the accumulation. It was not just a car for us. It was the vehicle we used to collect firewood to keep us warm through the winter, it was the vehicle we relied on when the mountain roads were too heinous for anything else and, occasionally, it was even a rally car. But more than those things, it was my way to get back out into the world. I don’t travel so well these days. I find the complication of noisy hotels and busy streets too much. My last attempt at a hotel was back in 2020, and three nights of hearing the family overhead stamping around as I tried to sleep reduced me to a sobbing mess. The Jeep offered me another way to travel. With the tent on the roof, it allowed us to head up into the calm of the mountains where I could sleep in peace. That meant that my wife and I could spend weeks on the road, touring bike parks during the day and escaping to the forests each night.

So yeah, what I want more than anything this year is a mid-sized 4x4. I’d love a bigger vehicle, but diesel is nearly €2/litre here in France, and an F150-sized vehicle would need to be parked a 15-minute walk from our house as it couldn’t pass the access road. And while electric sounds nice, we simply don’t receive enough current to charge one, at least not without turning off every appliance in the house first.



Fall adventure in the Chilcotins
Seb's dream workshop looks a lot like my dream cabin.


Seb Stott
A New Bike Shed

I've been planning a bike shed/store/workshop for almost a year now, but getting hold of a builder or landscaper has been super hard these days and I haven't got the time or the skills to do it myself. The cool thing about building your own shed is you can make it how you want it. When we moved house, we started looking for places with a garage, but I soon realized that a windowless concrete cube with one giant door which allows the whole street to see inside whenever you pop in or out isn't the ideal bike workshop. I'm planning something wooden-clad, with big windows for plenty of light (complete with curtains for security), a bike store, a workbench, a mezzanine, and some insulation. Most importantly, metal reinforcement and an alarm for security. Maybe even a little wood burner in the corner to keep it cozy.



Ben Cathro
A Motocross Bike for Tall People

I'm not average, which is blatantly obvious for those that have met me and uttered a variation of the phrase, "You're taller than you look in the video." I love these interactions but being nearly two meters tall I am often outside the normal size charts for mountain bikes. Over the years I've learned to make extra-large sizes bigger through setup tweaks to get things comfy, and mountain bikes have grown substantially over the years which has helped a lot too. I didn't really realize how much more accommodating mountain bikes are for people of different heights until I bought a MX bike and started geeking out about all the tall guy tweaks.

It's probably common knowledge to a lot of you, but MX bikes come in one size. There's variation in dimensions between the brands and different displacement bikes will have different sizes, but the main 250/300/350/450 bikes are all pretty much the same. Can you imagine if a bike company only had one size? Something between a large and a medium would probably be the average. Loads of people would be stoked as most would fit on it and the prices would be a lot lower as companies would only make one frame, but all the stumpy and lanky boys and girls would have a nightmare.

It's not the end of the world as many different people of different heights ride MX with no major issues. It helps that the bikes are heavy and stable, which makes up for the lack of room. Anyway, I've bought some down-and-back pegs to make things a little bigger, so let's see if 15mm of difference will help. If anyone decides to make an extra-large KTM 350F, give me a call.
photo



Matt Beer
Another Bike Park in the PNW

Access to the mountains is all time thanks to elaborate infrastructure and high-tech gadgets, which leaves me wondering why it’s so difficult to ride downhill bikes in the Pacific Northwest. I don’t need a chairlift to ride my bike - I’m totally happy to pedal to the top or organize a shuttle day, but there’s no way to crush more meters of descending than at a bike park. You’d think that there would be more lift-access biking in this corner of the world, given the high density of mountain bike enthusiasts. Within a three-hour radius of Vancouver, B.C., there are only a couple of areas that offer uplifts, even though there are more than a dozen ski resorts. Heck, there are four lifts between Vancouver and Squamish (what happened to the MTB trails outlined in the Sea to Sky Gondola master plan?), yet none of them serve mountain bikers in the summer. Have they missed the plot?


We Are One Composites Arrival
Matt's dreaming of more bike parks under the tree on Christmas morning.


Maybe land-use liability for mountain bikers is a concern or sightseeing brings in more revenue from a less complicated operation, but the bike park model has worked effectively for Whistler and Sun Peaks for over twenty years. A change could be on the horizon with the recently sanctioned trails near Cypress Mountain in West Vancouver or Mt. Prevost on Vancouver Island (hats off to the builders and trail advocacy groups heading those up). I won’t hold my breath to line up with my downhill bike at the bottom of a newly developed park, but I hope there are more options in the future.”



photo
When it comes to group rides, are you a Tom or a Henry?


Tom Bradshaw
Toyota Sienna Lift Kit

A lift kit for a vehicle can either be subtly sensible for legitimate off-roading purposes or a dangerous overcompensation for something else - sorry if you’re reading this from your massive F-350. I’d like to think my motivations for a lift kit are neither. Instead, I want to raise my 1998 Toyota Sienna (which gets BC collectors plates next year) so that I don’t have to worry about speed bumps and clearance when fully loaded. We recently went to the Coast Gravity Park on BC’s Sunshine Coast, and it was a magic time seeing Matt Beer fly while I get comfortable with my straight-air Steve’s down Coastal Cruise, the recently revamped jump line.

However, my only complaint was that the six 80kg carcasses and six 20kg bikes resulted in a severe bottom-out every time we hit a pothole and every speed bump on and off the ferry. I think it’s fair to say with a lift of at least 2 inches that this could seriously be the best shuttle vehicle on the market. My old clapped-out $800 Nissan Versa is a close second. I'm the complete opposite of Henry Quinney; I dream of mates piled into the seven seats, matching with the aged (aka stinky) upholstery en route to a mountain bike town somewhere. It doesn’t matter if chips fall on the floor as they just add to the texture of the carpet, and bulk drive-thru orders of Macca D’s are made for my family of degenerates crammed in the back. The People’s People Mover anyone?

Author Info:
mikelevy avatar

Member since Oct 18, 2005
2,032 articles

134 Comments
  • 306 1
 Alicia, I hope you are doing well and got everything you asked from Santa. Merry Xmas
  • 16 177
flag Monkeyass (Dec 24, 2022 at 11:10) (Below Threshold)
 Read the above in a creepy voice
  • 57 4
 @Monkeyass: You need to do some homework, bud.
  • 14 85
flag Monkeyass (Dec 24, 2022 at 13:20) (Below Threshold)
 @blissindex: i get what they are saying and i get they were being nice. Just sounds a bit creepy too. Maybe u can do some homework on creepy voices this Christmas
  • 71 0
 @Monkeyass: Uck! Your right! I am rereading it and it does sound creepy!

Let me try again - We hope you are doing well Alicia. We miss you on Pinkbike. Merry Christmas.
  • 2 0
 Yes!
  • 15 2
 @Monkeyass: I meant that the context here is really important. Alicia endured a traumatic brain injury recently, and is luckily doing well all things considered. You probably weren’t aware of that, so at any other time, totally a fair joke, but in this context, we’re all trying to show our best support for her recovery!
  • 8 0
 Alicia posted an update a few weeks ago here. For those who don't know, she was in a big bike crash. This fundraiser was a very kind thing to support her.

www.gofundme.com/f/alicia-and-her-family-with-medical-costs
  • 2 1
 @Monkeyass: is your user name shortened?

Merry Christmas Smile
  • 3 19
flag Monkeyass (Dec 25, 2022 at 10:36) (Below Threshold)
 @blissindex: mr bliss, one was totally aware of what happened to alicia and fully support wishing her well and donating to her justgiving etc. however, i also appreciate the joy of poking fun at the pinkers prominate causes of the month. Next on the list will be be headset cable routing and poor people from north america winning about not being able to afford good bikes. Long live socialism!
  • 3 0
 Absolutely 100% to that and also a huge thanks to Chelsea Kimball for being such a great friend to Alicia and keeping us all informed on her progress.
  • 113 0
 Thank you! I really appreciate that. I miss everyone here/home/a sense of normalcy more than I realized was possible, but I'm so so so glad to say that I'm on my way back and am doing really well considering the severity. I'll be back before too long!
  • 2 0
 @alicialeggett: Yeah! Great to hear it!
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett: keep it going!
  • 5 0
 @alicialeggett:
There she is. !!! Great to see you back here. We missed you as well. Have a great holiday season and speedy recovery !!!!
  • 1 0
  Glad to hear @alicialeggett:
  • 56 10
 Hi Henry, As a bit of a cheese gourmand myself may I recommend our local artisan VEGAN cheeses. They are expensive and taste nothing like real cheese thus perfect for whinging about.
  • 11 1
 Henry, I think you're nostalgic for the good old European subsidies for farmers! A basic Rocquefor is now over 40$ cad per kg at Tesco. Good cheddar around 20 to 25 at the same store. You can get excellent 2 years cheddar for 30/kg at Costco. Of course it's not convenient, but that's what happens I. Squamish. There are also some family owned cheesemakers in Quebec that will answer the phone and send you the goog stuff for 30-35$. Just get some friends ( oh wait, I forgot....) Nevermind, just make a big order when it's not freezing or blistering hot.

Of course you'll complain it's inconvenient, and you'll be right. You know, it's not always worth it being right.
  • 6 0
 Henry - drop into the US for a cheese run. We love cheese and we make it and import it in morbidly obese amounts! Blessed are the Cheesemakers!
  • 2 0
 Vegan cheeses... hum...
What's the next step then? Air-cheese? like air-guitar... including a glass of alcohol-free wine?
  • 29 0
 Hey Tom, if bottom out is a problem you might not need a full lift kit. They make helper doing kits for the Sienna that are super popular - and cheep. They’ve been around forever and it’s a fairly minor mod.

www.suspensionconnection.com/4118tv.html
  • 5 0
 Nice. Could also change out the springs? I changed mine out 3 or 4 times.
  • 4 0
 Kudos to NSR for being able to safely transport 120 kilos of bikes on bumpy roads.
  • 4 0
 Tom - another one for you to look into: traxdaliftkits.com

I lifted my 2009 Honda Odyssey 2" for the exact reason you listed and couldn't be happier with it. If you really want to make sure the rear doesn't sag you could install a slightly heavier coil (or just replace the existing coil with new ones cause they're probably sagging a bit from all the years of use)
  • 7 0
 I can't believe the shape that Sienna is in.
  • 3 0
 Spacer lift shouldn't be that difficult recently added two inches to a 95 Corolla was pretty simple
  • 4 0
 I installed these on our 2002 Sienna for towing a tent trailer, they definitely work as advertised. And not too hard to install if you have a friend with jack/jackstands.
  • 2 0
 Do it. My buddy has a Mountain Prius. 2” lift and AT tires. It’s a low budget beast!
  • 3 0
 Tom, look into a set of King Springs (progressive) for the same model year of Camry or Avalon as your Sienna. You’ll likely have to get them from Australia, but they worked well for our Subaru forester that suffered from similar issues. If the spring size is compatible, just think of all the talk amongst your passengers of the improved small bump compliance and bottom out resistance of your suspension mod. It will be game changing.
  • 1 0
 I want a lift kit for my leaf. Shuttles are practically free!
  • 1 0
 grumbly/Tom— By replacing the original springs of my 2010 Sienna 2WD with new OEM springs and adding SumoSprings I gained 2.75 inches rear hitch height. Old Siennas really slump in the rear. SumoSprings support the springs under heavy loads and keep them from losing too much height (this really helped for family trips when we loaded 4 bikes on the hitch with another 500 lbs in the rear of the vehicle). The SumoSprings did not make the ride harsh when unloaded and were not super hard to install in a home garage. You can also use a hitch riser to give your bike rack more clearance but that doesn’t help your vehicle and hitch get clearance. Tomorrow I will start to replace the struts and add 35mm spacers all around. Less than $500 US in parts total.
  • 16 1
 Honestly, I live in the brightest riding location this side of the sun and everyone wears clear lenses. Tinted lenses are a huge liability anywhere that has tree cover. I think it's probably just marketing preference- tinted lenses look cooler and are easier to sell.
  • 14 0
 Someone in a place, like say the Bay Area in CA, needs to arrange a swap with Levy. Someone with a track prepped Miata or two has him down for a week or two of driving Laguna, Sonoma, Thunderhill. In exchange, said nice person gets a week or two of riding the best BC has to offer, with Levy guiding, transportation included. Levy, you need to get on a track with a proper car, with for real track set up, get this itch scratched, while you're at it, get down with carts at the Sonoma cart track. I sold my 944 S2, and 996 long ago, which I regret fiercely, but you wouldn't have reached the pedals anyway, fortunately you'll fit just fine in a Miata which is the way to start, no question. Just be careful at Sonoma Raceway, there are walls and tire barriers that will make the deal a bit expensive, it is a track no to be missed though.
  • 12 0
 I wouldn't say no to this trade.
  • 2 10
flag ripcraft (Dec 24, 2022 at 12:29) (Below Threshold)
 @mikelevy:
Jeez dude you could have let him down a little easier.

I'm picturing this dude driving through some Napa valley hills in his Miata listening to Taylor Swift having a good cry. Lol, sorry bro.
  • 6 0
 @mikelevy: oh shit i totally read your post wrong. Sorry bout that.
  • 3 1
 @ripcraft: Miata Swifty, back in the game!
  • 2 1
 My Mx-5 (miata) had the slickest gearbox I’ve ever experienced. I miss it but was only the pleb NB. A black or mariner blue NA is dreams
  • 2 2
 On top of that Levy could borrow my fleet of Ducati’s as well. It was 65•F yesterday perfect moto westher in the bay. Or perhaps one of my 4 mountain bikes? No Xc bikes though…
  • 1 0
 There's a reason why Miatas are popular budget track day cars...
  • 8 0
 @mikekazimer Funny, clear glasses and suitable winter bike shoes are two things I've been fussing over for years. I live in AK and so have the same issue the rest of us in the far northern hemisphere have dealing with low light and even lower light and deep shadows in the woods. I think I sent back three different sets of glasses this year ordering interchangeable lens cycling glasses and finding they suck for various reasons and wishing that Native, who makes the Ragnar which fits me perfectly, would follow through on making a clear lens for the frame like they said it would. On boots, yes, for fat biking I've been looking for the unicorn boot with a flat pedal suitable sole. Winter boots occupy every level of suckage when judging them against flat pedal suitability. I'll keep rocking my old Lake SPD boots boots until the BOA finally tears off the right boot like it's been threatening to do for about the last 5 years and I'm forced to act. At that point I may just move to Mexico.
  • 1 0
 I think you mean the Native Raghorn (couldn’t find any mention of the Ragnar), and if so you can get clear lenese from Revant Optics down here in Portland for $25: www.revantoptics.com/products/native-raghorn-replacement-lenses-non-polarized-crystal-clear?variant_id=39288997969997

As a wearer of Rx lenses I’m well-versed in getting custom lenses for riding glasses. My current favorites are actually ones from Leupold intended as range safety/sunglasses with clear Rx lenses put in by my optometrist. Not cheap, but fit well, fantastic quality and warranty, and ANSI Z87 2+ (that’s high-velocity impact with Rx lenses) rated.

Range safety glasses in general are a good bet. Most people care about being able to see what they’re shooting at.
  • 1 0
 @melanthius: Dude, you are gold. And you are correct, Raghorn. Thanks for the fact czeck.
  • 1 0
 @polarflux: happy to help!
  • 1 0
 Have you tried having a boot re-soled or modified to play nice with a flat pedal? I worked with a local cobbler to knock lugs off a logger sole until it played nicely with a flat pedal in mid-foot position, and it's great for fat biking/snow trudging, but no reason they couldn't get crazier and use a wedge sole for riding with the pedal more forward, or add a section of rock climbing rubber (ala OG 510s).
Just have to work the tradeoff between pedal interface and hiking traction. Also let's you buy the boot independent of the pedal interface, or repurpose some old goodies.
  • 8 1
 I wish that Pinkbike could publicly acknowledge that one of their staff got smashed up big time. Thanks to Chelsea Kimball for the updates. All the best to Alicia.
  • 2 0
 This is hugely confusing to me. Any suggestions as to why they haven’t commented? Liability? I’ve asked on some social pages (evil, transition Instagram) and had comments deleted.
  • 2 0
 @shredddr: yeah that’s exactly why. Employee confidentiality
  • 3 0
 I have a 1.5" Traxda lift on my Honda Odyssey. It actually looks like it should now. Before the wheel clearance to the top of the wheel wells was less than around the sides even unloaded.

It's not the easiest thing to install, as the studs on the top of the strut need to be cut a bit to clear the spacer, but I think a 2" kit wouldnt have that issue.

Ideally Honda would have an AWD option. Put the Pilot system under (had one before we had all 4 kids) and it would be one amazing machine.
  • 4 0
 He has access to the new Suzuki Jimny over in euro land. I think that's a no brainer for a decent fuel, smallish 4x4
  • 2 1
 @j-t-g: He could also find a 2-door Toyota Prado depending on budget. Jimny's are great too, I'm so jealous of the 4x4 options overseas, our options here in North America suck in comparison.
  • 2 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: 3rd or 4th Gen 4Runner is the ticket. Last 4Fvckin ever and prices are beginning to come back down to earth.
  • 3 0
 @suspended-flesh: Couldn't agree with ya' more, I'd buy another 00's Toyota 4x4 in a heartbeat. Unfortunately, this is dragging down the prices on the GX470 I nabbed 6 years back. The thirsty v8 in it makes me lust for a smaller, turbo diesel Toyota Drool i.redd.it/2slvsvvontm51.jpg
  • 3 0
 This comment was meant for Tom's Sienna.
  • 5 0
 @Andykmn: I realized after I commented and started this train hahaha
  • 2 0
 Like Ben, I am over average height and I’ve always wondered about an XL moto. I used to run taller bars because it seemed like I was supposed to. Once I realized that was just shortening my “triangle” and throwing off weight distribution, I switched back to stock and love it. I think the sizing thing is a bit different on the moto, since it’s high power and so much heavier. You are somewhere between a rider and a passenger, so the dynamic is completely different than a bicycle. You are ~50% or less of the system weight on a moto, but on a bike you are ~80% or more.
  • 1 0
 As a tall someone who doesn't ride moto and always avoided it for these fit reasons your perspective makes sense. Can you talk more about your journey through this? Would you say it's true of street motorcycles too? I always assumed they didn't make multiple sizes of moto to serve the middle of the bell curve but maybe there's a better reason. Certainly a better reason than most bike manufacturers use for justifying such poor proportional fit across their size ranges.
  • 2 1
 I have a drivers license for motorcycles for over forty years now and never really rode one (a Lambretta scooter was the only one I ever owned) , because they are all that tiny.
It's my knees that hurt in short time when sitting down - I have my ears between them literally. I have sat down on some motorcycles over the years, but it always felt very uncomfortable. Once on a rented moto it was okayish as long as I rode standing.
  • 2 0
 @alexsin: motorcycles are one size, although the size depends on the brand. In sportbikes, adjustmentable rearsets, different clipon angles, and different seat thicknes are what's available to tune fit.
  • 3 0
 Just a thought but wouldn’t a longer mx bike have problems falling into the deep ruts through corners carved by the standard bikes?
  • 1 0
 @alexsin: I can't say anything about street motorcycles or track bikes, I only ride trail. Don't get me wrong, I definitely think there would ideally be some sizing for motos, I just think it matters a little bit less. I see more issues for my short friends who have a hard time reaching the ground or making big weight/pressure changes to the tires. I can throw my weight around more and dab anywhere I need to, the bigger pendulum helps. In general I would say being tall is a benefit for the type of riding I do. I used to have a tall seat on an old bike, but even with that, going between seated and standing was a really big motion. That would definitely be a downside for track riding with the seated corners. More energy and time spent changing position in to and out of corners. I am sure I would feel very cramped on a little street bike for any amount of time, but I don't have any experience there.
  • 1 1
 I'm 6'5" and run a slightly taller Pro Taper bar (like 1") and it does help on both my KTM 350 and Husky TX300. I've tried bar risers and taller bars, but the geometry quickly becomes compromised so less is better IMHO. I also have Fastway lowered and back footpegs which only amounts to about a half inch more room overall. I've got friends that are short and sometimes struggle through technical stuff where I can paddle through, stop or bail much easier....so there is that.
Beta makes a smaller bike called the X-Trainer and lowering kits can be found easily, but making a standard size bike for us big guys is tough. 80% of the time we ride standing up and I don't care what anyone says it's simply more taxing on the legs and lower back and I'm getting old.
An XL Moto frame would be sweet!
  • 3 0
 Cathro, you should look at one of the Kawasaki 450s. Very stretched out ergonomics compared to anything else modern. If looking at older bikes, an 04 CRF450R also had a really large frame. To some degree, the carburetor CRF450X is also a very spacious bike when set up right. KTM frames are KTM frames. Can't do much about them.
  • 1 0
 I like to imagine what one size of mountain bike would do to pricing. Some like to point to MX bikes and the price comparison to MTB, an argument with many gaps. But something that greatly changes production times and costs like having only one size is an interesting thing to think about.
  • 2 1
 Ben, they make bars, pegs, seats . . . To customize your fit. Check out Benny Bloss
  • 1 1
 @Trophycase: my friend is 4’12” and she rides a factory lowered X-Trainer. She had a small wheel Kawisaki before, but the fork tubes would literally bottom out in ruts sometimes. To be honest, I added 10mm risers on my Sherco because the front end was soooo low. My last bike was a Husky TE250 and I ran that one stock. I hear you on the stand up thing. I ride standing 99% of the time.
  • 6 0
 Mike K is on the money. Decent clear lens glasses that work
  • 7 1
 Yup. Every random manufacturer in the universe offers a clear lens, but as a package or add on. Mountain bikers by and large ride on mountains, which usually have trees, and need clear lenses.

And not just that one with the ugly frames in the hilariously named "tactical" section. (Military grade trail rated luxury space age all natural aerospace composites!)
  • 5 0
 @50percentsure:

"Military grade" - produced by the lowest bidder
  • 2 0
 As a contact lense wearer I have to wear eye protection all the time to keep my lenses from drying out. Lifetime issue finding clear lenses.
  • 2 2
 $4.88 glasses from the Walmart work great….
  • 5 0
 @thisspock: My buddy happily rides in those. When I've tried them they were unequivocally horrible compared to my grossly overpriced trendy brand glasses. If you're happy with them I suggest not doing A B comparisons.

I get the appeal. I suspect the price of glasses may be in the highway robbery category of retail. I once got promoted to manager of a shop that primarily sold sunglasses, we sold glasses that were $180- $220 retail. Employee purchase price was $37. Manager's purchase price was $17.
  • 6 4
 Henry, I'm currently visiting family in America. My toddler that usually devours french cheese gives me a look a disgust everytime I feed him cheese over here. If he could speak I'm sure he would say "are you sure you took the plastic wrapping off?"
  • 5 9
flag suspended-flesh FL (Dec 24, 2022 at 21:06) (Below Threshold)
 Stimpy, you EEEdiot. There are innumerable excellent cheesemakers in the US. Fun Kraft Slice stereotyping though.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer I’m in the same boat as you…while not “cheap” the Smith Wildcat’s come with a clear lens, I use that one about 90% of the time. Mine have been solid for two seasons so far, and the replacement clear lens is only $40, which still isn’t cheap but it’s not awful.
  • 3 2
 @mikelevy Smith makes their tactical series glasses with just clear lenses. Start at about $80 US MSRP and have a fair amount of frame options. They also have a few you can get with the Ignitor lens which is my favorite for the Colorado compromise of going in and out of dense woods into bright sunlight.

www.smithoptics.com/en_US/p/sunglass/hudson-elite-elite-sunglass/HUTPCCL22BK.html?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Shopping%7CUS%7CEN%7CCatchALL%7C400&campaignid=421268985&adgroupid=1147891024387482&msclkid=0059cd4680e7106cbcffaee1b8bbff52
  • 3 1
 I use a rose Smith lense. It separates brown, green and shadows pretty well. I actually prefer them over clear 90% of the time.
  • 3 0
 Just tucking into a rather nice stilton , with change left over from a fiver .. if there wasn't a postal strike id be tempted to stick some in the mail for you old boy..
  • 2 0
 Stilton is about $30.00 a pound at Costco. I do like it but it’s been out stock for long time, blame Brexit?
  • 3 3
 It ain’t just good cheese. Anything that isn’t make of orange gunk is expensive as f*ck.
  • 3 0
 @kingbike2: Brexit I guess. Hadn't a good piece of Stilton and crackers for long, both hard to come by in eastern Germany.
  • 3 1
 Tifosi Sledge have interchangeable lenses that include clear. If you can get a discount code they're pretty good.

www.tifosioptics.com/product/sledge-matte-black-smoke-ac-red-clear
  • 1 0
 I wish those fit my face better. My nose is just a little too narrow.
  • 1 0
 @mattwragg I’ve been on a similar hunt the last weeks and ended up getting myself a Skoda Yeti. They do a 4x4 with great fuel efficiency, it is super space efficient inside, has a great trackrecord in terms of failure statistics and you can easily fit a rooftent. And they are reasonable in price Smile )
  • 1 0
 Not sure if the collector plate comment for the Sienna was serious or a joke. If you are serious, read the application carefully. I can see in the one poor photo that there is a dent on the quarter panel, and the wheels are oxidized. Both will disqualify the van until you repair them. And a lift kit, forget it. I worked for that insurance company for 29 years , not trying to be a downer, but I guess I am this time. Merry Christmas anyway !
  • 2 0
 I'm reading the application from ICBC and it says: "No you can’t…
• raise or lower your vehicle by more than one inch/2.5 cm"

So he can add one inch.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer not sure of they are available over the pond but Viris offer good value for glasses in the UK, £60 for glasses with a tinted and clear lense included. I agree though, I wish you could buy the fancy glasses with just a clear lense as thats all I would use for 95% of my riding.
  • 1 0
 @Seb Stott - do you have any links to or photos of existing cool bike shed projects. I’m thinking of building a winter truck barn / summer bike shed / workshop/ mezzanine living space, any info would be much appreciated. Thanks
  • 1 0
 Hey Tom, its pricy to be sure but the body lift kit from www.journeysoffroad.com is well worth it, I've had zero issues with mine going on 6 months now and it makes accessing trail heads so much easier, and hopefully lots of shuttle runs next season.
  • 2 0
 I had a pair of Vans clipless DH shoes in like 2000, the shoes were great, although the design of the lace system was terrible. Also, Canadian Cheese is rubber.
  • 1 0
 Oakley makes PPE glasses with clear lenses that are great quality. They were like $60 at start of covid but are now double the price. Comes with a rubber gasket for your eyeballs apparently used by airsoft players.
  • 3 0
 Those Journeys Off Road lift kits make those vans look so rad! I want a lifted AWD Sienna!
  • 3 0
 Yep. I have one of the Journeys ones on my Sienna and the bigger rubber and clearance made it much more capable especially in the snow even with mine being just a front wheel drive. They are based out of Prescott only an hour or so north of me in Phoenix.
  • 1 0
 Lots of reports of CV joints wearing unreasonably fast with those...
  • 1 0
 Yep yep. @Tom, this guy put 3.5" on his Sienna with one: www.youtube.com/watch?v=sR_vDFKYSjk
  • 3 0
 Last time we went to the sunshine coast, the ancient little volkswagen was so weighed down we bottomed out on the ferry ramp
  • 1 0
 @kazimer Melon Optics make some great glasses, and the Alleycat comes with a clear lens included along with your choice of other lens, they're a great choice for wer and humid
  • 1 0
 Check out cascade armory too. I use the darker lenses for backcountry skiing and clear for biking plus you get to support a PNW company

cascadearmory.com/products/flash-bang-blue-iridium
  • 1 0
 Order a frame and the clear lens for the alleycat and you are done. Great lens!
  • 1 0
 Tom I wish for a lift kit for my 2011 sienna and. Awesome traction in snow but I can't get over a speed bump or on or off a ferry without dragging my hitch. Maybe Santa will provide.
  • 1 0
 Decathlon has clear sport glasses that cost almost nothing and beat anything else I have tried: www.decathlon.de/p/mtb-sportbrille-st-100-kat-0-transparent/_/R-p-129779?mc=8118518
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Madison sell a bunch of glasses in the UK. I’ve got the Enigma model, comes with a yellow, grey, and clear lens and costs £45. £7-10 for a replacement clear one.. and they don’t look like total shit!
  • 2 0
 So we need long, low, and slack to move on to the motocross segment now, I am all for it!
  • 1 0
 I’ve been happy with 100%’s clear lenses, mostly as they’re cheap to replace and quite durable. The S2 fits small faces really well too!
  • 1 0
 I want to know how you can use SPD's in the winter even with the ideal shoe, the damn things clog up for me the first time I step off the bike.
  • 1 0
 Dewalt brand shop glasses are very scratch resistant and optically quite true. Canadian cheese and butter is mostly bland and overpriced.
  • 3 1
 MY list is simple. All I want is FF on Friday, every Friday.
  • 1 0
 Taller seat foam, riser bars and low pro pegs. All you can do to a mx bike majorly made in an asian country.
  • 3 1
 That plate of cheese makes me think gas and heart disease.
  • 1 0
 For me, it will be mud-less trails all round the year! Those who lived in southeast asia will know.
  • 1 0
 All I wanted for Christmas was a 2023 Transition Smuggler announcement. Oh well...
  • 2 2
 I’ve raced Moro for 25 years and honestly the fact everyone has the same size bike has never slowed down the real riders. Suck it up and just f*ckin twist it
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer starting a lobby for Crystal Mt. to start a lift-accessed bike park in the summer.
  • 1 0
 Nothing creepy about Levy doing Blue Steel in Santa’s lap
  • 1 0
 Wishlists remind me of this... youtu.be/qz_qE925uJY
  • 3 2
 I symphatize with Ben...
(pure selfishness)
  • 2 5
 photochromatic lenses are the best of both worlds, as they automatically adjust based on the amount of sunlight. I bought a cheap pair of rockbros on Amazon for less than $25. I’ve had the same pair for two seasons and they still work like new.
  • 3 0
 I had photochromatic lenses on an old pair of glasses. It took a good 60 seconds for them to fully adjust. That’s fine enough for driving but useless for fast DH riding. The light will change again before the lenses are halfway there.

Maybe photochrome has improved in the last couple years? The glasses I had were from 2015 (give or take a year).
  • 5 0
 @bocomtb: Had a few pairs recently. They're faster, but not fast enough for variable dappled light or anything like that. You basically end up with something inferior to a clear lens for almost the entire ride, because photochromic always blocks light even in clear mode. Get to something like a bright parking lot and they turn dark, but as not as dark as dedicated sunglasses.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Kaz, take a look at Endura glasses
  • 1 0
 "British cheesemaking culture" LOL
  • 1 0
 Sienna - add air bags, with different shock and struts. Or just bags…
  • 1 0
 Sienna awd not and
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.045714
Mobile Version of Website