Field Test: GT Sensor Carbon Expert

Dec 13, 2018
by Richard Cunningham  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST
GT SENSOR CARBON EXPERT
GT's redesigned Sensor pays homage to the famous LTS.
Words by R. Cunningham, photography by Trevor Lyden


LTS stands for Linkage Tuned Suspension (who knew?) and it was also the name of the dual-suspension trail bike that put GT in the game back in the day. The 2019 Sensor marks their return to a conventional four-bar, linkage-driven rear suspension, and a concerted effort to rekindle the one-bike-to-ride-everything spirit that turned mountain biking into a social revolution during GT's golden years.

The 130-millimeter-travel Sensor Carbon Expert carries a $3899 USD sticker price and shares the same half carbon, half aluminum frame as the $5000 Sensor Carbon Pro and its more affordable sister, the Sensor Carbon Elite.
GT Sensor Carbon Expert Details

• Travel: 130mm rear /front
• Wheel size: 29"
• Frame construction: carbon / aluminum
• Head angle: 65.5º / 65.98º
• Seat angle: 76º / 76º.48º
• Sizes: SM, M, L, XL
• Weight: 29.5 lb (13.4 kg) size M, w/o pedals
• Price: $4200 USD
• More info: GT Bicycles

Give the Sensor Carbon Expert a walk-around and it's apparent that you are getting a hell of a lot of bike for under four grand. Start with 29-inch wheels and add a 12-speed Eagle XO1/GX drivetrain, a 130-millimeter RockShox Revelation RC fork, paired with a Deluxe RT3 damper. The handlebars are wide and the cockpit is steep in the back and slack up front - which is a good thing. GT's shock-mount flip chip can be used to toggle between a 65.5 and a 66-degree head-tube angle, with a corresponding shift at the seat tube angle. We left ours in the low, slack position, 'cause that's how we like our trail bikes..



RC GT Sensor Carbon Expert Pro


Climbing

Judging from the Sensor Expert's build, 29-inch wheels and modern numbers, I expected it to roll smoothly over the area's ceaseless roots and be calm at the controls. Instead, GT's take on the trail bike pedals and rides almost as firmly as I'd expect from an XC racer. A steep seat tube angle and zealous support from the rear suspension eliminated any settling while climbing. With or without employing the shock's low-speed compression lever, I could hammer on the pedals willy nilly and the GT would convert my effort into forward motion.

That didn't necessarily make the Sensor a great climber. Its rear end felt notchy while powering over roots, especially at slower speeds. There are many zones where high anti-squat values and mega-firm pedaling are hallowed trail bike attributes. None of those places, however, are located in the Pacific Northwest. The GT would ease into a fast tempo on the smoother sections of a climb only to bog down three meters up the next root garden. Experimenting with shock settings (like Cannondale, GT recommends a maximum of 25% sag at the shock) did little to soften the rear suspension. Low tire pressures (21 psi front and 24 rear) helped, but speed was really my only savior. Like a hardtail, the Sensor hydroplaned over the chunder as long as I stayed on the gas.

Negatives aside, the Sensor was rarely lacking for grip. Overcome your frustrations, keep the power on, and the GT could top technical sections that would raise the eyebrows of experienced observers. No doubt, some of that traction was generated by its shopping-bag-thin, tan-wall Schwalbe Nobby Nic tires which wrapped around nuances in the trail in a way that only an invertebrate life form could duplicate. More on that later.

RC GT Sensor Carbon Expert Pro

RC GT Sensor Carbon Expert Pro
RC GT Sensor Carbon Expert Pro


Descending

Both riders who field-tested the Sensor Carbon commented that we were being pushed forward on the downs. The solution was to up the fork's air pressure and add a touch more low-speed compression. The culprit was that the rear suspension was riding high and overdriving the fork. Normally, the solution would be to soften the shock, but it seemed were were fighting rear suspension kinematics, not damping or spring pressure in this case. The resulting ride was still firm, but much better balanced, and the GT responded by becoming a composed descender.

SRAM's Level brakes lacked the sophistication you'll need to finesse the Sensor downhill at speed, but stay at 80% and the GT will have you dropping down boulders, or drifting loamy corners until you run out of altitude to burn. Steering is light, but not wiggly, and the fork's 51-millimeter offset works well with the steering geometry for those times when you need quick steering inputs to thread down a tricky chute. Rough surfaces at speed, will have the Sensor drifting both wheels with minimal drama until the suspension is no longer overwhelmed and the tires find consistent grip again.

RC GT Sensor Carbon Expert Pro

GT needs to upgrade the Sensor before it's going to reach its full potential. The tan-wall Schwalbe Nobby Nic tires were a laugh. They should be renamed "El Chapo" because the air usually escaped before we had put the pump away. You didn't have to ask if I was riding the GT - the Stan's sealant on my kit was the giveaway. Another miss was the 120-millimeter-stroke seatpost on the medium-sized bike. It should have been a 150. I am only five-foot, seven inches and there was plenty of extra post showing above the clamp. Cash can fix those gaffes, but GT will need to tame the Sensor's ill-tempered rear suspension before its 130-millimeters of wheel travel will feel adequate for the aggressive trail bike category.


Note: The shock tune on the Sensor has been changed since we conducted the Field Test. Our test bike had a medium rebound, medium compression tune and two volume tokens, which has been switched to a low rebound, low compression tune and three volume tokens. This should help improve some of the small bump sensitivity issues we were running into.

In addition, bikes are now shipping with an extra inch of steer tube, allowing riders more room to find the ride height they prefer.


RC GT Sensor Carbon Expert Pro



Pros

+ Efficient pedaling action
+ Light weight for this price point
Cons

- Rear suspension isn't all that plush
- Level brakes are underpowered
- You'll need to factor in real tires into the MSRP



214 Comments

  • + 137
 plz give this back to hans.
  • + 86
 I would like a Pinkbike staffer's Calves Shootout/group test. RC has got to be in the running.
  • + 80
 Those calves are so big because they 250 years of cycling behind them Wink
  • + 11
 @mikelevy: shots fired.

Let's get it on!
  • + 60
 I've ridden that bike and my comments (short of agreeing the tires are super thin) would contradict many of those of the reviewers. I did my initial Sensor testride day on the exact trails pictured. I couldn't get myself off the thing and got a Strava top 10 (which in Whistler is one of the best endorsements you could give a bike).

My comments: Bike is the stiffest thing I've ridden: ever. Combine this with the relatively short travel, firm pedalling platform and a very aggressive (slack head angle for descents, steep seat angle for climbs) geometry and you find yourself wanting to charge at everything. It begs to be ridden aggressively, wants to be railing corners, favors having the dropper dropped so you are always ready to do something fast and stupid.

My negatives would be that the stack height is short, especially once you're into a size large, but that is fixed with changing to hi-rise handlebars, or changing the air spring in the fork to a 140mm or 150mm which would turn the bike into quite the ripper. Small bump sensitivity isn't awesome but the trade off is the firmness of pedalling platform.

I liked the bike so much we decided to add GT to the brands we sell...
  • + 5
 Was it the same build? A lot of the complaints seem to be based around the component spec.
  • + 12
 I came here to leave this exact same feedback. I own this bike with the same trim. First thing I noticed, the stack is too short. It’s obvious the reviewers were aware of this too with the comments that they felt their weight too far forward on steep descents, but they fail to analyze it any further. I easily solved it with a high rise bar. This also helps make the cockpit feel more roomy. The reach is long and the sta is steep, making the fit great! Even though it feels compact seated, it’s so comfy on the legs for long climbs. Secondly, holy cow this thing is as stiff as they come. It makes my downhill bike look like a wet noodle. I could barely get any side play when I pushed on rear tire and pulled on the seat tube. Truly impressive stiffness! Third they mention the fork is capable but they spend zero time analyzing it. It has the new OPEN BATH CHARGER damper. It’s basically a grip damper. It’s got a spring loaded IFP. This means the midvalve is extremely supportive without causing any hysteresis. It’s a GREAT damper and extremely easy to service. It’s miles more user friendly than a bladder type damper. The chassis is the same as the pike and the debonair spring is actually wonderful. It’s without a doubt the best stock fork I’ve ever tried, it’s supportive, plush and blows off very smoothly on big hits. I’ve felt zero high speed jacking (at least while riding the bike Wink . Finally not sure what they’re talking about, this being more of an XC trail bike?? The bike is super plush in the rear and far closer to the all mountain side of trail bikes. The Italian mag Vojo printed the LTS anti-squat curve and it starts at 100% exactly at sag and falls off fast! They also have a leverage graph showing it’s very nicely progressive at a 0.6 ratio change, so it’s perfect for a coil without being too progressive for an air shock. Come on PB, how about some real analysis in your bike “reviews?!?”
  • + 3
 @jayacheess: to be fair, Yes, I was on the Pro version, though it still has the same rear shock (it and the kinematics seemed to be a large part of the criticism), and major drivetrain/brake componentry. I don't think many of the other upgrades to the Pro would have impacted the bike's feel (different version of rim, carbon bar, fancy stem, carbon dropper). There is a fork difference: Pike on Pro, Revelation on Expert but that seems to not be one of the critical issues mentioned (or that I noticed).
  • + 12
 @Bike-Bros, thanks for the feedback. It doesn't sound like you're really contradicting much of this review at all. The stiff suspension feel is going to work for some riders, but there are other bikes in this category that offer up a much more forgiving ride, which leads to more traction and control in rougher terrain, especially for riders who may not always be riding at full throttle.

I agree that an air spring swap would be a highly recommended move - that was my first thought when I rode the bike earlier this year.
  • + 4
 @Purpledragonslayer: yup, I think that "more xc" comment is what made me comment. I'd say more like short travel all mountain that could still do a marathon race... then next day go have some fun on steep stuff in BC". An additional comment about stack height is that in smaller sizes this bike fits incredibly well because of the low stack - way easier to put riser bar on size large than drop bar on size small. My wife, who is a good rider but doesn't get techy at all in her reviews (size small), made the comment mid ride that the bike fit her amazingly and looking at her positioning I thought the same thing.
  • + 8
 @Bike-Bros: good to hear, when i saw this bike was included in the test i was hoping it would get raving reviews as it seems like its exactly the bike i'm looking for (similar to the smuggler but cheaper and lighter). Also good to hear you guys are stocking GT as i don't think anyone else in the Calgary area is. i may be paying you a visit next year Wink
  • + 9
 @mikekazimer: Wow, honored to have your feedback. I think the brief comments about the "more XC" and that GT needs to work on Kinematics were two things that compelled me to comment. As you guys are proving, you can do an amazing job on the reviews but this one has brought up the idea in my mind that the tone of a review can be "its good" or "not good". Being as excited as I was after riding this bike I had to say something.

As you mention, and what I would identify with more (I've had to learn this for moments when I'm suggesting a bike that I personally am not a fan of) is to talk about the type of rider a bike might suit, why it might suit them, the trails it might suit etc.

A great example is the Sensor vs. Trance 29er. Some see similar bikes, I see 2 bikes that compliment each other. For a certain rider who goes out on long rides, keeps their butt in the saddle much of the time, the Trance and its Maestro suspension would be more comfortable and the slightly slacker seat angle means slightly less weight on the hands on longer flatter pedalling trails. The Sensor might favor an aggressive rider who is out of the saddle more, or rides/enjoys trails with quick punchy climbs and steep descents to take advantage of the geometry and suspension.

Maybe a thought for the tone of the reviews?? Otherwise, thanks for the great reviews!
  • + 2
 @Bike-Bros: I was looking at buying one of the Sensor AL comp models. I know the trim wouldn’t be as nice however do you think it’d be a worthy investment of buying one and upgrading the parts over time? I’m not against the carbon models or anything I’m just stuck with a budget lol.
  • + 2
 @arrowheadrush: come on out to check out the bikes. We have 2 carbon versions in stock in most sizes (including the Expert model tested), I personally am riding a Pro model I'm happy to bring in if you want to see it, we have the beige alloy version in stock too... they look impressive in person. Great fit and finish! On models like this expert it is surprising they don't highlight more the fact that this thing has an X01 derailleur and cassette in a price range other companies are selling NX or maybe GX on carbon bikes.
  • + 1
 @Hardtailhooligan: I think the Sensor AL Comp is killer value. You pay a bit of a weight penalty, the brake levers are a little long (just slide them in further) but otherwise I don't think you have anything you'd have complaints about. Solid drivetrain (SLX 11 spd with 11-46 cassette is best bang for the buck available I think), wide enough rims to get good performance from the tires, solid dropper and modern bar/stem dimensions. The nice thing being a really strong setup out of the box is you can buy it, ride it hard, upgrade as you break things.
  • + 1
 @Bike-Bros: It would be my first full suspension and I was blown away that it felt almost the exact opposite of what I had experienced on a couple of random ones I’ve gotten to do a lap on. I’m a pretty big guy at 6’4/240lbs and this bike didn’t feel like I stepped on a pogo stick. I wish I could have taken it for a ride but I think that alone had me hooked. I’ve always ridden bmx and dj’s and I’ve just started getting into trails in the last couple years. I ride mostly xc and for my hardtail 29er it’s been fun, but I don’t think it would live through a couple of the things I want to build. I’m not going to be sending any Jordie Lunn gaps but I figure a sensor would be up for the fun.
  • + 1
 @Bike-Bros: good stuff, i'll probably be interested in the pro or expert model myself, any idea on pricing? just checked your site but doesn't look like you've added your GT range yet. Interested to try out the Trance 29 as well
  • + 6
 I agree, I love these reviews and hats off to the Pinkbike staff, but this one fell a bit short for me. On top of this, they never mentioned the flip chip geometry or the fact that is has a threaded BB.
  • + 6
 @NinetySixBikes, those are nice details, and they're mentioned here: www.pinkbike.com/news/first-ride-2019-gt-force-amp-sensor.html. We don't go quite as in depth in the Field Test videos, which means not all the little tidbits get mentioned.
  • + 1
 @arrowheadrush: Sorry about that. I'm rebuilding the website so haven't updated the old one... $5360 Expert, $6700 Pro (almost exactly represents exchange rate of USD price / CND).
  • + 7
 @Purpledragonslayer: Mate, you've done 3 short rides on it and now you're selling it after a self-proclaimed only "11 total miles" on it.
  • + 9
 UPDATE: GT just reached out to say they've adjusted the shock tune on the Sensor since production of the one we rode in the Field Test.

We'll have to see if the new tune fixes the issues we had with the bike—but it could explain why all our reviewers felt one way about the bike and some other riders didn't have the same issues.
  • - 4
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 13, 2018 at 17:18) (Below Threshold)
 @andrewdaly: that true, but everything I wrote is correct. The PB boys have now explained in a comment down there somewhere that theirs was over damped and that the AS values aren’t high... well then how can this review be valid? I got one of the first production bikes and it came with the low compression tune. The bike is plush. Man you know, I can, you know, really send it brew. And I sent her immediately on my local with some big step downs. The fork and rear suspension are fantastic. They’re supportive and blow off nice, what more can you ask for out of the box?

Ya the stack is low. That combined with an over damped rear end sure as hell will feel like you’re gonna go otb. The tires are thin as tissue paper.

Not sure why I’m getting down voted? Go look at real user reviews, they all contradict what is written here.

But hey, want more ammo to down vote me? I’m selling this bike to fund an ebike! Eww gawd burn him you must be thinking! Well doesn’t seem like anyone reading pinkbike is gonna buy so I guess the sensor will just have to be my enduro race bike next season. See you at the finish line, mate.
  • - 4
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 13, 2018 at 17:22) (Below Threshold)
 @brianpark: hey when you fix your review can you also comment on the new and improved charger rc damper? It’s the best out of the box damper I’ve ever had, I think it deserves a little love. Especially when your first article on the bike wrote off the fork as not being able to keep up with the rest of the chassis. Much like the grip damper it’s an excellent budget option PB readers deserve to be made aware of.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: Great to hear. I sure feel odd questioning anything RC says. That is like arguing with the preacher at church!
  • + 1
 @Purpledragonslayer: Open bath Charger damper? Tell me about that please!
  • + 3
 @panzer103: I started a thread and took it apart so you don’t have to wait for pinkbike to not review a good product at an affordable price Wink

New 2019 RockShox Charger RC cartridge-style, self-bleeding damper
forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspension/new-2019-rockshox-charger-rc-cartridge-style-self-bleeding-damper-1089874.html
  • + 1
 @panzer103: why would you want that?
  • + 0
 @clink83: because a supportive damper requires a firm midvalve which creates a lot of back pressure that bladder dampers can’t keep up with so you either get hysteresis or a weak midvalve. The spring loaded ifp is firm enough the damper can run a supportive midvalve but not so firm it creates any threshold. Plus it’s dead simple to service vs changing bladders every season. This just needs fresh oil every once and awhile.
  • + 1
 @Bike-Bros I have one of the first Force Elite and a lot of what you say seems applicable as I suspect the Force and Sensor to be the same frame with different shock length. A real shame that on the first series they didn't bother adding steerer tube length because it is running super low for a L size. I will up to a 170mm Yari air shaft and probably high rise handlebar but moving spacers would have been nicer and cheaper. Other than that I love the bike it's super rigid and loves to me riden in anger, components on the Elite are just spot-on for my use. One thing I noticed the other day while changing the spring is that the trunion bearing are already shot on my bike, after 2 months only that's a bit of a shame.
  • + 2
 @Purpledragonslayer: Mostly agree with you but Vojo is French mate ... I know that Americans have no clue about what's outside their borders but come on ...
  • - 4
flag mattmach7 (Dec 14, 2018 at 4:20) (Below Threshold)
 ugliest bike in the test (IMO!)
  • + 3
 @Balgaroth: I do think you're onto something there. Though not quite as simple as just a different shock, the main triangle looks like it could be shared between the two (Force and Sensor) with switched out rear-end and top link to allow for longer travel. We have the luxury in a store of being able to look at the bikes side by side which helps. If it is what they've done, I think it is genius as we're seeing geometry expectations (head angle, seat-angle, reach being most obvious) being the same on either 27.5 or 29" wheels now. I ended up getting a Sensor Pro size Large for myself and steer tube length was a tad short which forced me to put a higher rise bar on... still trying to track down the appropriate air spring to push the bike up to 140mm fork too.

It is a funny thing about the rigidity that makes you want to ride like an idiot heh. Whenever I mention the stiffness to people I have to also mention that I'd never complained about a bike not being stiff enough before - just not a thing that I ever thought about - but then when I get on this thing there is this weird sensation almost whispering in your ear like, "dude, it is built like this for a reason - ride harder." I liken it to the first time I rode on a tapered steer tube frame/fork when that was a new thing - I hadn't ever thought about front end stiffness as an issue then all of a sudden the game changes and you start pushing the front end of the bike more.

One thing on the stack height too: look at Martin Maes and Wynn Master's riding styles. They both seem to share a similar riding style of riding in a very aggressive bent over stance which suits these bikes (and racing in general). I admit on my first test ride day I was liking that position - I was only out for a couple hours and was pushing hard. It was more once I got my own bike and the rides weren't all-out that I felt the need to raise the front end.
Enjoy your bike!
  • + 3
 @arrowheadrush: @Bike-Bros... aka, the best shop in Calgary
  • + 1
 @Hardtailhooligan: One thing to keep in mind is the low stack height mentioned. At 6'4" you will be ok on seat-tube length but may struggle with getting the bars high enough. At very least, go into the purchase with a plan to buy some FU40s or some other handlebars with a lot of rise... might just be enough to put you in a really comfortable position.
  • + 0
 @Balgaroth: thanks, I was wrong about that. My apologies to the French.
  • + 2
 @Bike-Bros: I’ll definitely keep that in mind thank you for the heads up. This just makes me more excited to get the bike now, I was bummed I couldn’t find to many reviews of it at first because it’s so new but between the comments and this article it just makes me think “I don’t have to eat this month and I could get that bike sooner” lol
  • + 4
 @Purpledragonslayer: If it's like the Grip damper, your observations on Charger IFP are accurate. But unless you're arguing that PB is lying about the incorrect shock tune, it's GT's responsibility for providing inferior product. PB reviews what it gets.
  • - 5
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 14, 2018 at 17:44) (Below Threshold)
 @ceecee: @ceecee: I don’t think they’re lying. For whatever reason they reviewed this bike with a nonproduction shock so their issues are non-issues for potential buyers. Journalistic integrity would indicate you hold off posting this cause you are directly misleading your readers. Moreover they didn’t do analysis of why the bike was behaving poorly. When I tried to eleiminate high AS as a potential cause with real kinematic info and the source cited @mikekaziner responded with a pejorative “numbers on paper don’t always translate to how a bike feels on the trail...” comment. Kinda kills any useful analytical discussion. Nobody is perfect but I feel like these guys hate being wrong and a lot of readers seem to be licking their butt holes in celebration of them getting it wrong this time.

It’s not a personal thing, I’m not offended or something, I just want to look out for other riders. Plus I recently had to undergo flexor tendon repair surgery so being active in these comments has been fun for me.

Let me explain this: my favorite riding buddy just got the new blur. I wanted an xc style trail bike to ride with him as the enduro was too much bike for those mellower xc/style trail rides. Based on this review you might think the sensor fits that bill nicely. But I was immediately disappointed the sensor was clearly much closer to an all mountain bike than light and snappy trail bike. I put my enduro wheels and tires on immediately because I knew these tires were not gonna survive one ride. With that set up the sensor doesn’t climb much better than my Wreckoning, just a lot more comfortably. My large expert, out of the box, is 31.6 lbs (with tubes no pedals). I verified it on two decent quality scales. It’s pretty heavy and you got to use the climb switch to keep the rear suspension from sagging too much on the climbs.

With all the negative props I’ve received I decided to lean into it. So I’m gonna race the smuggler next year. Pretty excited about it!
  • + 7
 @Purpledragonslayer, the bike was reviewed as we received it - it wasn't a 'nonproduction shock', it was a shock with a tune that has since been revised. There was no intent to mislead on our part - that tune was changed after bikes had already been on the market.

In any case, although the suspension impressions would likely alter a bit with a different shock, the other portions of the review, which discuss the bike's fit and component spec, still stand.

As for the rest of your comment, I kind of lost you there. Good luck with the healing, and go easy on the pain meds.
  • - 2
 @mikekazimer: ok we’re cool.
  • + 46
 #RCFORRAMPAGE
  • + 26
 I think I can start ragging Mike Kazimer (and all other Eagle proponents) after watching RC climbing steep, techy stuff with the chain 3 cogs below the 50... time to man up guys, Pappa is stronger than you
  • + 28
 @WAKIdesigns, when are you coming to visit? I've got some climbs that'll have you begging for an easier gear. But yeah, RC's got some serious power in those calves.
  • + 39
 @mikekazimer: Waki just wants to serve it, not eat it.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: I second that. @WAKIdesigns and all others crying about Eagle, 1. it's a great 1x drivetrain, screw front derailleurs. 2. The 50 or so isn't ONLY for climbing. It also lets you run a larger front ring for higher top end. Don't like it, plenty of non-eagle options out there as well as Shimano's full range (and reliable) 2x out there. 3. Bring it to the NW or even my area in the Rockies with some serious elevation and climbs, great to have some bailout options.
  • + 6
 @mikekazimer: I will deliver you the satisfaction sooner or later but if we get to the walking pace I will walk Smile
  • + 7
 @WAKIdesigns, I can't wait.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I also prefer Shimano, but in places with long, sustained rock slab climbs (Hymasa and Golden Spike in Moab, or up Ribbons in G.J.come to mind) a lower gear would be nice. Just because you can push a bigger gear doesn't mean it's the best way to go uphill.

Personally, I'll likely be looking for a new bike when XT-level Shimeagle 12 comes out. Then I can have the low-profile rear derailleur and clean shifting of a Shimano drivetrain AND an extra-low bailout gear.

Until then, I'll grunt out on an XT 1x11 (11-42 rear, 32 oval front, 27.5 wheels).
  • + 0
 @peloton7 we have stuff as steep and as techy as it gets. Length is irrelevant because when things get steep enough you can say hello to max pulse zone and nobody can go in that zone for longer than a minute or two and after few sets of these you are more wasted than after 3h climb in Alps.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: maybe if you would use a lower gear you could hang in the red zone longer ehhhh?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: 2nd that. Why not closer to home?
  • + 3
 @mkotowski1: really? You know how I know shit is steep? Because my front wheel keeps lifting while the only thing stopping the tip of my saddle getting into my bum hole is integrity of the fabric of my POC shorts. Now once you get into that zone and are able to pace yourself, come back to me. And BTW humans can’t stay much shorter or longer in the red zone. They may eventually not get into it as often, which isn’t the case when things are so steep your saddle can penetrate your sphincter. And BTW 2 when things are that steep and you run too high gear you loop out. Unless you spin out on slippery sht below first.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: lol yes your the only one on here with steep climbs In their region...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Don't you mean Waking pace?
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: it is quite possible to spin steep climbs in higher gears without going into the red as quickly as a someone in a Lower gear and it is also not that hard with some practice to keep the rear from spinning in higher gears. It’s like slow trials riding up a steep hill
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: o wait I forgot you have he hardest terrain in the world to ride and you are beast mode at everything
  • + 2
 @mkotowski1: LOL, ROTFL, It all started as a frindly pok that RC is climbing using 36t on the rear, LOL. No I never claimed to have toughest climbs. But I understand the limitations of certain setups and body types. And spent 8 years riding granny rings. LOL
  • + 5
 @mikekazimer: can you guys make a high profile commentator series with WAKI as the first guest? That would break the site
  • + 2
 @me2menow: That and someone needs to track down protour and have him and Waki debate it out. Big Grin
  • + 6
 @bman33: not a debate, god no-- I want to see them ride or at least attempt to
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: your posts are never friendly
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: "only thing stopping the tip of my saddle getting into my bum hole is integrity of the fabric of my POC shorts"

I'm in tears laughing at the image of this.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: same here, come on down to the Rockies.. I can hit climbs in that gear as well.... Thing is,your not going to be doing that 100% of the time.. You will need that 50 in certain areas without question.. That and your not dialed in smashing it every single day... Its nice to have round these parts son!
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Walking is not an option and will have you getting spit on by passers by out here my man! ????
  • + 1
 @me2menow: hahaha yesss! I like it.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Have you tried removing the shorts? Also, droppers aren't just for descending.
  • + 15
 I like riding with other people that run Schwalbe tires, always get a couple of good rests in while they fix their flats. Wondering if going with 30% sag on the rear might be better? Or maybe it's just the shock tune. Design doesn't look all that dissimilar to other bikes out there. I'd expect something a bit better than a Revelation on the front as well.
  • + 3
 Wrong this fork is amazing bro. It’s not the crap moco it’s an open bath charger. Such a sick damper.
  • + 1
 Whats wrong with the 2019 Revelation? Its got the updated debonair spring and the charger 2 damper? Other than that the only diff between a pike and a lyrik is stanchion diameter and and beefiness of the lowers. Are 32mm fork just for XC hardtails now?
  • + 3
 Fork-disagree. Shwalbe tires-yeah, they're overpriced garbage.
  • + 1
 I think Schwalbe's are a country dependant love affair. In the UK they're pretty much the cheapest and they favour our wet climate. I can see that in generally drier places they'd suck especially if they were also more expensive
  • + 2
 @freestyIAM: the revelation has 35mm stanchions like the pike
  • + 1
 @tenbeers: Agreed. I have never finished a race on Schwalbes. And the only reason they were on those bikes was because they came OEM and I hadn't had a chance to change to Maxxis.
  • + 1
 @Purpledragonslayer: Really? They list it as Motion Control, although maybe an updated one. Not saying it's a bad fork, just that for the price I would expect a Pike. If it truly is a Charger 2, then there is really no difference between the 2.
  • + 1
 @arrowheadrush: you're right. Had missed that detail. For reference, the charger damper in the revelation is using a ifp rather that a bladder and has fewer rebound and compression detents.

www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=www.sram.com/sites/default/files/techdocs/gen.0000000005683_service_manual_2019_pike_revelation_english_rev_b.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwjYx5SR0Z_fAhVic98KHZggCXIQFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw26SDmJfT1LCebqNhjmafAj
  • + 1
 @freestyIAM: does that mean that, overall, the only difference is the level of adjust-ability?
  • + 1
 @arrowheadrush: Pretty much. That and the marketing department at RS will tell you that a bladder based damper is more sensitive than an IFP based one, but with the Fox GRIP and GRIP2 dampers (IFP based) getting such rave reviews, I don't put much stock in that. It is all going to come down to execution. Could be as sensitive, could not be, only a shake down will tell.
  • + 1
 @freestyIAM: with the self bleeding damper they can significantly reduce the squeeze of the damper seal and thusly increase sensitively by reducing stiction.
  • + 1
 @Purpledragonslayer: So more internet digging finds this useful thread on mtbr

forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspension/new-2019-rockshox-charger-rc-cartridge-style-self-bleeding-damper-1089874.html

Nifty exploded view here: uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20181004/13bbf39e483f9b028a677af0da010d81.png

Looks like the it also doesn't have any HSC adjustment.

So what are the odds this goes the same was the Fox GRIP Damper did (i.e. introduced as a budget option that was actually as good or better than the bladder based system that was occupying the top of the line)
  • + 1
 @freestyIAM: there’s a tiny port above the ifp, if the damper sucks up too much oil or air from the lowers it will push the ifp above the bleed port allowing the damper to purge itself. This is opposed to a sealed bladder type, which can’t purge itself so it needs a restrictive, tight shaft seal. That of course adds stiction when it’s properly functioning and if it happens to suck up air or extra oil it will be trapped inside the bladder, which can cause a whole bunch of other issues. One of the other beauties of the self bleeding damper is anybody with a vice and a strap wrench can service it. It’s no harder to do than lowers or an air spring. Imagine your fork feeling fresh all the time at the cost of a couple hours of wrenching and some oil.
  • + 1
 @Purpledragonslayer: Thanks, I figured that out from the exploded view and the thread (sorry for the bate a switch with the question in the initial post then the edit which removed it after i figured it out)
  • + 1
 @freestyIAM: no worries mate it seems the whole cult of pickbike already think I’m an idiot :p
  • + 15
 The subtle Pinkbike branding in all of these tests has finally got me looking at the merch store for socks....but I don't want anyone knowing I post on the internet.
  • + 6
 I looked through there earlier too! Mainly to see if they poked fun at themselves. A lot of missed opportunities on the T-Shirts by making them so serious.

"Pinkbike- Post early, post often"

The early bird gets the "First"
  • + 6
 @raditude: I miss the classic Pinkbike shirt "I Love 8 inches in the rear"
  • + 2
 @FatTonyNJ: Some classics never die. Perhaps they should update it. I prefer 29" in the rear with 215mm of travel and a low leverage ratio.

Maybe, I heart direct mount

Post-mount is for me
  • + 4
 @raditude: Might have to use one of those.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy:

“In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death, taxes and creaking PFbb's.” -Pinkbike
  • + 10
 I've ridden this bike a few times and I must say that RC didn't setup his shock very well. This bike rips and is incredibly capable. Disappointed in this review after having spent time on this bike and experiencing the opposite of what the reviewer experienced.
  • + 3
 Couldn’t agree more!
  • + 10
 RC and Sarah both spent plenty of time experimenting with various shock pressures, and I spent time on the bike earlier this year. We all reached the same consensus - it's not the plushest bike in this category. That's not to say it isn't capable, it's just that it doesn't smooth out the terrain the way some other 130mm bikes do.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: is it possible it could be the damping tune? Just curious really
  • + 4
 @IllestT, I think that's the likely culprit. In fact, GT has since changed the compression tune to a low compression, low rebound from mid compression, mid rebound, which I'd imagine would help with that small bump sensitivity.
  • + 2
 Rips compared to what bike?
  • + 11
 We have reached the point where $4k "is not going to break your bank account."
  • + 2
 Hardcore hardtails are the penny pinchers last chance
  • + 9
 Love the intro, so much vibe!
In addition, in the last fews days/weeks all I look for when I go to Pinkbike: Is there a new slow-mo of a bottom out, which i need to see?! :-D
  • + 9
 That's a fine lookin' bike. GT still in the game. Here's hoping Gary turner dominates the MTB biz once again
  • + 3
 Best looking bike in the Field Test.
  • + 5
 would much rather see a full gx drivetrain and a pike fork than a gx x01 mix with a revelation...
Honestly this spec is kind of baffeling... Tan walk tires and level brakes on a trail bike with a 65 degree HA? Poor allocation of resources.
  • + 1
 Agree. Really weird mix of parts on the bike. Why revelation? Gx and X01 have the same performance. Would've much rather seen a pike on the bike.
  • + 2
 The drive train and fork are sick! A lot of brand do the whole high end derailuer and low end cassette and shifter. Not GT, this is the ultra light x01 Casette which saves over 200grams! The brakes do suck and the tire choice was for the looks. But brakes and tires are an easy thing to change. Also got to factor in a riser bar.
  • + 1
 I was going to say the same thing, it's the opposite of how I would spec a bike, expensive drivetrain, cheap brakes, cheap fork, thin tyres.
My current build:
Lyric RC
Super Deluxe RCT Coil
XT Drivetrain with E13 Casette
XT Brakes (some issues I know, but plenty of power, easy to bleed the levers on a road trip and cheap to replace)
Minion DHR 2.5 front Agressor 2.5 DD rear
1 Up 150mm dropper
Carbon bars
$4500
  • - 6
flag catweasel (Dec 13, 2018 at 12:00) (Below Threshold)
 Bike pictured in some Colorado fall glory
www.pinkbike.com/photo/16670045
  • + 2
 This just in: I just discovered that you can build this bike from the frame up with a GX drivetrain, a fox 34, guide rs brakes, 150mm dropper, race face carbon bars, and MK3 wheels for nearly $200 less than the factory pro build. Go on Fanatik if you don't believe me. What a rip-off.
  • - 1
 @bridgermurray: And how long does it take you to assemble it? Do you own all the tools? Potential warranty hassle?
  • + 1
 @kingtut87: it arrives practicaly fully assembled with a lifetime warranty on the frame... why the neg props?
  • + 2
 @bridgermurray: Because you MUST buy from a local shop to support them... To be serious, wrenching on a bike is almost as fun as riding it for me, I don't see a downside of building the bike yourself.
  • + 5
 Question for the testers..
How do yall think this would be with a coil in the back and bumping the front up to 140?
Have access to the Sensor and the Habit and intrigued by doing coils on both.
  • + 6
 I rode this bike, its rad with an air shock or coil, use a light compression tune and she's dialed.
  • - 1
 Ya it really doesn’t need a coil. A 140 fork and riser bar would be sweet tho! This review is terrible.
  • + 1
 SuperDeluxe coil out back with 140 up front is awesome- raced the USopen enduro with that setup and it was rad
  • + 6
 Needs creme coloured Smoke and Dart tires with tan sidewalls to complete the look.
  • + 1
 Maybe even Tioga Psychos!
  • + 3
 So far most folks in the comments are like, oh sh!t, this bike must be a piece of garbage compared to everything else. But what I think may have happened is we have a reviewer who is not afraid of being truly and unabashedly critical.

It's really hard to compare bikes in a vacuum. There are a lot of things changing. The reviewer is an important one - both his/her ability to make judgments and their tendency to follow through and to take them to the article. More reviews from RC.
  • + 2
 Sick of seeing every single bike review complain about the SRAM brakes that come installed, when will companies stop cutting corners on installing sub par brakes on their bike builds to save a buck. Makes them look like a joke.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer (I'd tag RC but he doesn't seem to reply to comments), interested in getting one of these but RC says in the review that the bike has high anti-squat. GT in their LTS suspension and their sensor marketing imply that the bike has low AS, as do some other reviews.

I'd prefer low AS, so if the choppiness you guys experienced was shock related rather than frame kinematics related it'd make a big difference to my opinion of the bike... I'm going to go out and test, but does the bike actually have high AS?
  • + 3
 @AgrAde, I think the choppiness is likely shock related. The anti-squat values on this bike aren't super high; after speaking with GT it sounds like the compression tune was more than likely the issue. That tune has since been changed from a medium to a low tune, which should make the back end a little more willing to respond to smaller impacts.
  • + 2
 Definitely ride one and see for yourself. I spent more time on the GT during the test than any other bike. Some of those laps were spent fine tuning the suspension in order to correct the notchiness we experienced. When compared to a handful of others with similar travel, the difference was clear enough to make it an issue in the review.

As I mentioned, in a different context, where the techy pitches were spaced between long, smoother sections of trail, the Sensor's shock tune and kinematics would be praiseworthy. Also, many prefer a super firm pedaling platform, at the expense of small bump compliance, you'll just need to keep your speed up.

I did not confirm the anti-squat percentage, but (watch the boulder footage) the chassis does not rock rearward under large pedaling efforts, which is impressive, so the GT either has a significant percentage of anti-squat built into the design, or it has a combination of factors that provide the same effect.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham @mikekazimer Rad, thanks for building on that guys! much appreciated.

Looking forward to giving it a go, sounds promising. What a time we're living in, I'm considering buying a GT....
  • - 2
 @mikekazimer: this explains why real user reviews and yours are so different. Also your testers don’t look very big so their light weight and over damped shock is a bad recipe for supple suspension.
  • + 3
 @richard cunningham
Did you fellas check/try removing volume spacers for more plow through roots, better climbing?

Imo more linear spring force plows through better, would you agree?
  • + 2
 I wonder if you can get a longer air shaft for the Revelation to extend its travel and what the compression tune on the shock is like. Other than the brakes and tires it sounds as if playing with these two things could turn this bike into a real rocket.
  • + 2
 You most definitely can. The new (2018+) Revo has the exact same product number lowers as the newer PIKEs, creating lots of neat options for upgrading. Revelation is a true big boy option these days, with 35mm stiff stanchions. It’s finally a wicked value trail/enduro fork, maybe the best out there. CSUs remain different from PIKE, with PIKE CSUs being a lighter taper-wall design, and being exclusively designed for Charger 2 dampers in the right leg. I’ve changed the air spring on my 2018 Revo a couple of times. Note that if you’re going to do it the 2019 DebonAir setup is your best bet - that is, the newest spring assembly with a way better negative chamber volume and the aluminum, rather than Delrin, sealhead taken straight from the new red Lyrik. The joint result is supportive plushness to write home about. (See @mikekazimer for solid review information.) It works and works great. @worldwidecyclery has the best in-stock selection of such upgrade kit in my experience. You won’t regret the change-over. You could safely go to 150mm without overstressing the head tube on a Sensor (as with most bikes, +/- 20mm), while also helping to solve RC’s issue of an overwhelmed, wallowing fork position. Good luck!
  • + 2
 So other bikes climb in a lack lustre way and this comes along with a setup that seems to reward aggressive riding and it’s a flat out fail? Not everyone wants a sloppy sofa that you can sit and granny ring up a staircase like some of these bikes. That has got to be a positive to a lot of riders and feel this review wasn’t as balanced as the vast majority of the others for some reason
  • + 2
 I have the same Nobby Nic rubber in all-black with the SnakeSkin casing. I've had no issues: they are fast and durable. Another unfortunate case of a manufacturer skimping on tires. The Performance line doesn't belong on serious trail bikes even according to @schwalbe
  • + 2
 It’s funny that they hate on the bike for having a 120mm dropper post in the Medium. I always thought that was personal preference. I ride a large and prefer a 125mm dropper instead of a 150mm dropper.
  • + 1
 I have now seen multiple images of Stan's Flow rims with a different profile than the MK3 ones that I have. In this review I see eyelets as well. In a Martin Maes bike check (somewhere) the Flows had an angular profile instead of the box-with-heavily-radiused-corners shape on mine...have they been redesigned? That would make sense because I have destroyed 3 already...two of them had cracking nipple holes in addition to dents so deep they wouldn't hold tubeless anymore. This is at 33psi too.
  • + 2
 Noticed that as well - they seem to be the flow s1 wheelset which uses a slightly different rim to the flow mk3.

www.pinkbike.com/news/stans-s1-wheelset-review.html
  • + 1
 Last I knew, Sun-Ringle rolled the hoops for Stan so maybe these are rebadged Duroc rims..they have eyeletted and non-eyeletted versions and they have nearly the same section height as the flows but exactly the same profile as viewed in the pictures. Funny because I ordered Duroc 35 rims this morning to replace the Flows.
  • + 1
 SRAM Level brakes.....without doubt the most shit brakes I've ever had. No power, noisy in the wet, noisy in the cold and looking even cheaper as they are. Almost makes me wish I still have those elixir brakes and they where really shit, too.
  • + 4
 One of the best colorways I've seen this year. plus those tires? oooh buddy it looks good
  • + 2
 looks like poo and pee
  • + 16
 @me2menow: you should probably see a doctor mate if yours are that colour
  • + 8
 @miketizzle: everyone gets dehydrated from time to time mate
  • + 3
 Obviously it's personal preference...but you couldn't be more wrong Wink
  • + 3
 Only because it looks different... in about 3 months you'd be like "Hmm, why did I like this again?"
  • + 1
 I AGREE! One of the best looking bikes of the year. And I typically am repulsed by GT's.
  • + 1
 Anybody have any mention of the 'playfulness' of the bike? Effort to manual or bunny hop? How well or eager it goes from right to left and back again? I'm to the point where I am looking for a 29er in this travel area but I want a fun bike to ride. Stopped caring as much about how fast it went up or down, I just want to have a blast and smile a lot.
  • + 4
 445mm reach yet the top tube felt cramped? Guess that steep sta doesn't come without its drawbacks.
  • + 3
 You could move seat back on rails or offset seatpost. Steep sta is not bad ever
  • - 6
flag JohanG (Dec 13, 2018 at 13:53) (Below Threshold)
 @getsomesy: we need more setback dropper options.
  • + 1
 Yea that comment just seems off. The Geo is just a few millimeters off from the SB130. I'm sure if you went back to back rides you would notice the difference. But complaining that it's "cramped" makes no sense...???
  • + 2
 When did bikes with a 65.5/66 degree head angles become under gunned? Is it due to having a half inch to an inch less travel front and/or rear?
  • + 4
 No mention of the flip chip geometry or threaded BB?
  • + 1
 Soooo is the bike $3800 from the paragraph, $4200 from the details block. or $4000 from the video??? Also not sure how the bike hangs up under power because it's too stiff, but has enough grip??
  • + 4
 Richard Cunningham IS the Bob Ross of bikes.
  • + 2
 Glad to see GT coming back, but who knows what knee pads those are in the suspension bottom out photo?
  • + 2
 Nice looking bike. Nobby Nik tires are not my friend tho.
  • + 2
 That's what they get for abandoning the I-Drive
  • + 1
 Disappointing to hear about the mediocre suspension feel. Otherwise this bike checks all the boxes!
  • - 4
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 13, 2018 at 11:56) (Below Threshold)
 This review is just plain wrong about the suspension. Look for the kinematic analysis on the Italian bike mag Vojo. They praised it. It is essentially the same as a smuggler with less kick back and slightly more progressive LR.
  • + 11
 @Purpledragonslayer, numbers on paper don't always translate directly to how a bike feels on the trail. Whether it's the stiff frame, suspension tune, or the actual kinematics, this bike doesn't have the the same small bump sensitivity and ability to smooth out rough sections of trail as others in this category.
  • - 2
 @mikekazimer: well I have to disagree. I know I’m not a pro bike reviewer but I own this bike and have owned a lot of bikes in the 120-140 travel range and I think this one of the most active bikes I’ve ever ridden. GT themselves said they designed these to be optimized for descending not climbing. In my experience this bikes needs a climb switch to feel firm. There you go, a negative I pose for this bike, I’m not saying it’s the best bike ever or some unicorn or something. I’m just trying to help people who buy bikes based on your reviews know they’ll be experience something different. This suspension design is ACTIVE, and sags on the climbs without the climb switch on. That’s the truth. You can choose to believe it or not.
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: What would you say to the bike's capabilities to have the rear suspension transformed by say, a DVO Topaz, or a Fox X2? It seems that this observation of it behaving unforgiving in the rear could be tuned out to me to the rider's preference?
  • + 4
 @cottontm, potentially. With more time it'd be interesting to experiment with a different compression tune, or with something like a Float X2. These Field Tests aren't extensive long term reviews - they're our impressions of the bike's out-of-the-box performance after a couple weeks of riding.
  • + 2
 @Purpledragonslayer: Have you ever thought that you might be biased as you own the bike ????, I would be gutted if my bike got roasted too!
  • - 4
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 14, 2018 at 7:52) (Below Threshold)
 @knightB27: it does seem that way, but I’d have to be pretty insecure to care that much what someone else thinks. Rather I’m trying to do my civic duty and help my fellow riders understand this is not a “light for its price” xc style trail bike. This shoddy work by the PB staff is extremely misleading, I mean they used a NON PRODUCTION shock they proceeded to publish a review based on that. I’m happy to give you the negatives: the stack is too low, the steerer is cut too short, the tires won’t last long, the brakes are underpowered and imo the rear is a touch too active. Also my large expert was 31.6 lbs out of the box (included tubes and no pedals), verified on two decent scales. For me PB went beyond the pale with this one. I got to see behind their veil and the high and might really arent as perfect as they portray themselves to be. They should have the integrity to admit when they made a mistake, but that’s expecting way to much for this group of arrogant “journalists.”
  • + 2
 @Purpledragonslayer: Have to agree with that these bikes are certainly plush, just hard to do the review correctly without the correct shock tune.
  • + 0
 @wynmasters: you’re a LEGEND!
  • + 1
 This paint job should be called GT Senior. Make sure you wear beige leather Rapha gloves and quinted vest to it...
  • + 3
 I don't understand how people hate on Santa Cruz's matte understated paint jobs but then nothing to say about this thing...
  • + 2
 I must be senior, or nearly, ‘cause I dig it.
  • + 1
 @jeremiahwas: I think it looks sweet!
  • + 1
 Love it. RC smashing some gnarly tech rock roll and leaving an actually honest review.
  • - 15
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 13, 2018 at 11:56) (Below Threshold)
 This is a bad review, because it’s very inaccurate based on owners actually experiences.
  • - 5
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 13, 2018 at 13:15) (Below Threshold)
 Funny how I get down voted as an owner of the bike trying to leave honest feedback by people, I assume, have never ridden it. SMH
  • + 4
 @Purpledragonslayer: and RC just left his honest feedback as well. Both his review and your defense to the bike are anecdotal, should take it with a grain of salt.
  • + 4
 @Purpledragonslayer: his review and yours are both subjective and anecdotal and are not factual at all. They’re relative to your, and his, experience. Accepting differences of opinion in good grace on the Internet is a lost art it seems.
  • + 1
 29 pounds is porky for a trail bike? I guess that makes my 35lbs bike obese haha.
  • + 1
 Looks good but the spec sucks, especially for the money. These new GTs ain't cheap.
  • + 1
 I want one, someone let me know when it's 50% off so I could think about affording it. Thanks dudes!
  • + 2
 Four grand? These GT bikes are a steal...
  • + 1
 "Light weight for the price point." That's pretty funny stuff
  • + 1
 Some serious fork flex going on in that slo-mo everything compressed shot!
  • + 2
 More Moore please.
  • + 1
 Thanks PB this is awesome to get some "other" bikes in good review
  • + 1
 what about the insane amount of fork flex on the drop off!!!!
  • + 1
 Where the reach numbers at?
  • + 2
 445mm for the Medium. Smile
  • + 2
 XS: 395, Small: 420, Medium: 445, Large: 475, XL: 495mm. www.pinkbike.com/photo/16073797
  • + 1
 This colorway is ugly, but it's kinda not.
  • + 1
 Good, honest review by the way.
  • - 9
flag Purpledragonslayer (Dec 13, 2018 at 11:57) (Below Threshold)
 But it’s factually inaccurate.
  • - 1
 Hilarious! I own this bike but I get downvoted like I’m not allowed to comment. Internet warriors never loose.
  • + 2
 By never loose I mean y’all are tight asses.
  • + 1
 For some odd reason, the color makes me want to go #1 and #2.
  • + 1
 Which trail is the really steep rocky one that RC is riding?
  • + 2
 I need tanwall dampfs!
  • + 0
 That thing is ugly, is that an Eddie Bauer edition color scheme?
  • + 1
 Whatttttt no i drive?
  • - 2
 I liked the weirdness of the old Pathlink. Not sure if it worked all that well or not, but it definitely set the bike apart. Now this new one has lost some personality.
  • + 1
 Spoiler alert, it didn't work well.
  • - 1
 I heard changing to a bespoke suspension tune on the Deluxe would be a revelation.
  • - 1
 The DVO Sapphire 34 D1 fork had the least amount of flex in the huck to flat test of any of the forks.
  • - 2
 It took this long for gt to look like a session but it was too long so it looks like a Marin session
  • - 3
 Who is she?
  • - 2
 4K but it comes with trash tires ????.
  • + 1
 Spec'ing liteskin tires was goofy as hell.
  • + 1
 @JohanG: Indeed they are not made for this kind of purpose. On top they are not even TL-ready. This bike should come with TLE (SnakeSkin casing) tires.
  • + 1
 @schwalbe: I bought these tires since ive riden the nobby in the past and wanted a skinwall 26" tire.. not many options it turns out. But these really are a JOKE, i spend more time fixing flats than in my whole 16 years of riding combined this summer. Why not make them in skinwall with tougher casing?
Will need to switch to minions or smth durable like that and throw my 90 € pair of almost new tires away.. and im not even riding rocky/sharp or even street stuff, only groomed jumps and trails.
Very disappointed since i used to ride Schwalbe tires that actually worked and i could not imagine to get such inferior equipment (especially at that price-point)
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