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Interview: Talking About Tires With Bontrager, e*thirteen, Michelin, and More

May 24, 2023
by Dario DiGiulio  



What is your favorite tire in your lineup, and why?

My favorite tire is the XR4 for 120-140mm bikes. It has a good balance of rolling speed, weight and grip. It’s the perfect Top Fuel tire. If it’s a little rougher I would opt for the SE4 in back for the added puncture protection. For 150mm+ and ebikes I go with the G5. There’s nothing like a Rail or Slash with a G5. Grip for days and you can smash into everything without worrying about flatting.

It seems as though tubeless technology has plateaued a bit over the past few years, do you see any major changes on the horizon?

The major change for tubeless tech will come as more companies design products around the ISO-5775-2 standard. The standard has set design ranges for tire well shape, bead wall height and bead seat diameter among other things. This will lead to less compatibility issues between different brands of tires and rims. Maybe not a major change but I think there will be more high flow valves coming onto the market as those things are pretty handy.

Where do you stand on inserts? How do they factor into new tire development?

I think inserts have a place. They offer performance benefits and added protection however due to the installation challenges I normally steer clear of them. If I need more protection or grip I just run an enduro or DH tire. Currently we don’t factor inserts into new tire development however maybe something to consider in the future.

I’ve heard that leaving newly installed tires at max psi overnight can help stretch the casing, giving full volume and a better ride feel. Is this actually the case?

I’ve heard about this also but never actually tried it. Time for some N=1 internet science. I inflated a new XR4 and took some tread width measurements assuming a delta in tread width would equate to a volume change in the tire. At 25 psi the average width was ~58.7mm. Then I inflated it to 50 psi and it was ~60.6mm. I let it sit over the weekend at 50 psi and when I came in on Monday it was ~62.2mm at 40 psi. I then dropped it back down to 25 psi and it was ~61.2mm. So I gained ~2.5mm in tread width at 25 psi over the weekend. Now I need to ride it back-to-back with a new tire to see if there is better ride feel. I’ll do that and report back.

If you had to choose between sticky tires or aggressive tread pattern for your typical riding, where would you bias? I realize we get to have both, but humor me.

Assuming the sticky tire has good wet traction I would take sticky tire over aggressive tread. I feel like the traction in good dirt between an aggressive tire and a less aggressive one isn’t nearly as big as the traction difference between a grippy and slippy tire in wet conditions.

Many high-level racers are still running relatively narrow rims compared to the broader market, why do you think that is?

I think some athletes use narrower rims due to the balance of tire feel, rim durability and traction they can achieve at their preferred riding pressures. Or they saw Aaron Gwin’s Leogang tireless run and won’t run anything other than a 25mm inner width EX 471.

Do you worry about rolling resistance in a downhill-focused tire, or is grip the only concern?

Rolling resistance is still something of concern for a DH tire. Fort William motorway anybody? That’s one of the reasons most DH tires are 2-ply 60TPI high turn up constructions without any added sub tread puncture protection. Although this 2-ply 60TPI construction makes for a diesel tire, the bias plys of the carcass material can still flex and allow the tire to roll relatively well over rough terrain.

Does your company have any programs in place to recycle tires or generally reduce the waste associated with production?

We are working to get a tire recycling program in our Trek stores however nothing concrete has taken shape yet. We are also looking at incorporating more alternative materials into our tires. We are working on compounds with high percentages of recycled/bio based materials as well as 100% recycled nylon fabrics that come from old fishing gear. We still have a lot of work to do to achieve our performance goals but the early lab data looks promising.

Historically we’ve heard that tire availability is the thing holding back further development on 36” (or other large wheel size) bike designs, any plans to push that envelope?

Right now there aren’t any plans beyond just drinking a few beers and talking to Travis Brown about it. Not only are there limitations on the manufacturing side but adapting frames to wheels larger than 29in would be especially challenging on smaller sizes. I also think riders suffered some burn out by all the wheel size and axle standard changes in the 2010s. Let’s make the 2020s the decade of no standard changes, just better products like headset cable routing…../s






What is your favorite tire in your lineup, and why?

One of our favorite tires is the Michelin DH22 (a.k.a. the "22"). The positive feedback was overwhelming when finalizing the design with our professional athletes. Our riders' impressions were "tons of grip, nearly unbreakable, extra confidence, and shralp ready." As a part of our top-performing racing line tire offering, the Michelin DH22 provides maximum grip and reliability to riders. The DH22 delivers high performance and creates reasons to believe in our Racing Line's top-level DNA.

It seems as though tubeless technology has plateaued a bit over the past few years, do you see any major changes on the horizon?

Each time we renew an MTB range, our mindset is to provide a superior experience with tubeless-ready tires. Our engineers are continuously working to improve tubeless-ready technology for all riders. For example, a rider can easily ride the DH22 or Wild Enduro Front Racing Line with minimal sealant when combined with a new rim, tape, and valve stem, thanks to our design focus on tubeless-ready technology. Today, the biggest challenge with tubeless technology is achieving the optimal balance between lightweight and airtight tires for cross-country, down-country, and trail applications.

In conclusion: no significant changes, but we are dedicated to continuously improving tubeless tire technology for riders.

Where do you stand on inserts? How do they factor into new tire development?

Inserts are good for protecting rims, but they are disadvantageous when used with tires that do not rely on inserts to perform optimally. If your tire is robust enough, putting an insert inside the tire decreases the air volume in the tire, which causes a loss in absorption capability resulting in a less efficient tire. The tire insert effectively reduces your bike's rear travel. Furthermore, inserts do not provide additional puncture and cut protection for the tread and can even degrade tire reliability if too large. This is important when riders try to optimize weight by combining a trail tire with an enduro or D.H. insert.

With our new tire development, we remain focused on a "no insert" strategy by achieving the tire performances riders look for with inserts. Riders will enjoy easier tire installation and can ride more confidently in rough terrain with lighter wheel sets.

P.S. - Did you know the MS Mondraker team was not riding inserts during the World Cup? Also, did you know Sam Hill won two Enduro World Series titles without using inserts on Michelin tires?

I’ve heard that leaving newly installed tires at max psi overnight can help stretch the casing, giving full volume and a better ride feel. Is this actually the case?

It is true! New tires grow after installation and inflation for 24 hours, but there's no need to stay at max pressure for long periods. Once the tire has been installed and has stretched, adjust the pressure to your preferred riding pressure and go out for a ride! The tire will feel even better after a few laps on your local trails.

If you had to choose between sticky tires or aggressive tread pattern for your typical riding, where would you bias? I realize we get to have both, but humor me.

I would choose a sticky compound over an aggressive tread pattern. In most cases, a sticky compound will provide more confidence when riding harsh conditions like wet roots and off-camber slabs like what you will find on the North Shore. An aggressive tread pattern will slide without a sticky compound when riding these same trails.

Many high-level racers are still running relatively narrow rims compared to the broader market, why do you think that is?

Racers riding 25 to 28mm rims (versus the standard 30mm) are doing it for multiple purposes:

1. Narrower rims provide a rounder tire profile for more dynamism when changing the lean angle from side to side
2. Narrower rims can offer more flex which provides more grip
3. Narrower rims provide weight saving

Do you worry about rolling resistance in a downhill-focused tire, or is grip the only concern?

Increased grip provides more confidence when descending, allowing riders to push their limits and test the laws of physics each run. In addition to grip, rolling resistance is essential to maintain momentum in rough sections and regain momentum after a mistake. After a full day of bike park laps, riders will appreciate a better rolling tire that preserves some energy for the post-ride party!

So yes, we care about rolling efficiency while focusing efforts on preserving a high level of grip for all future Michelin tire ranges.

Does your company have any programs in place to recycle tires or generally reduce the waste associated with production?

Michelin is a big group, and we are 100% concerned with reducing our impact on the planet. The Group's ambitions are to have tires consisting of 40% recycled or renewable bio-sourced materials by 2030 and 100% recycled or renewable bio-sourced materials by 2050. Michelin group also works with local institutions to push the recycling of all tires. For example, bicycle tires are now within the scope of tire recycling companies in France. Our challenge is to develop this kind of initiative for all countries worldwide. Also, we recently joined the Tire and Tube Recycling Task Force initiative with People For Bikes in the U.S.!

Historically we’ve heard that tire availability is the thing holding back further development on 36” (or other large wheel size) bike designs, any plans to push that envelope?

We have no plan to develop 36" or bigger tires today.






What is your favorite tire in your lineup, and why?

I thought parents weren’t supposed to pick a favorite… If I had to pick one, I’d go with the Newton. For me personally it fits my style of riding perfectly. I’ll typically use the Enduro casing of both the MTF and MTR and have found it to be the ideal partner for anything from all day pedal missions to smashing out bike park laps.

It seems as though tubeless technology has plateaued a bit over the past few years, do you see any major changes on the horizon?

One of the key items that has ‘plateaued’ tubeless technology, especially with MTB, are the established standards around the rim and tire bead interface along with the design inner rim and tire width standards being more in line with what people are actually riding. For Goodyear bicycle tires, our focus has been on user experience with tubeless.

We developed our Tubeless Complete system that uses our Dual Angle Bead design that allows for easier initial set-up and bead retention along with our additional non-porous casing layer which better seals the tire’s carcass. This means more sealant is left within the tire to seal it, should a rider experience a puncture.

Where do you stand on inserts? How do they factor into new tire development?

While we remain neutral to the usage of inserts, we understand their popularity for riders looking for additional protection from impacts. Many of our test riders along with our athletes may use inserts based on the conditions their facing so we are able to capture the feedback as part of our overall development process.

I’ve heard that leaving newly installed tires at max psi overnight can help stretch the casing, giving full volume and a better ride feel. Is this actually the case?

I’ll apologize now for the long answer here. All bicycle tires are a bias construction which means that the casing fibers are run at an angle (45° give or take) which allows the casing to expand unlike what is found on a radial tire. Increased volume does affect ‘ride feel’ but doesn’t necessarily improve it, it’s just one part of a bigger picture.

Per ETRTO and ISO standards, a tire’s section width is taken after it has been mounted on its specific measuring rim at maximum pressure for a period of 24 hours at room temperature. The measuring rim is the one the tire was originally designed around. As an example, a 29x2.4” (60 thru 62 – 622) is designed around a 30mm inner rim meaning that tire will be that width in mm when mounted to that inner rim for 24 hours. There is always some variance based on the tire construction and rim profile. This is done for safety reasons revolving around tire clearance requirements between frame & fork structures.

An important thing to remember is that for every 1mm change in inner rim width, a tire will increase or decrease roughly .4mm. This means that a 29x2.4 tire could measure around 2.2” wide if mounted to a rim with a 25mm inner rim. We publish both the design inner and allowable inner rims for all our tires which can be found on their product pages at www.goodyearbike.com.

If you had to choose between sticky tires or aggressive tread pattern for your typical riding, where would you bias? I realize we get to have both, but humor me.

That’s a tough one.. For me personally I would run a sticky tire over an aggressive tread pattern. On my local trails in South Wales and for my riding style, a softer compound works best. Thankfully we can have it all though!

Many high-level racers are still running relatively narrow rims compared to the broader market, why do you think that is?

This is an interesting topic that I’ve discussed multiple times with a good friend who’s a mechanic for one of the top DH teams. From his rider’s perspective on their current setup, a narrower rim gives a much rounder tire profile and therefore provides more usable tread when leaning the bike. Although I somewhat appreciate that point, my argument is lack of stability: you’re taking a narrow base (rim) and putting something wide (tire) on top that takes huge impacts and sideloads with only a small area of connection (bead) between rim and tire. In my opinion, it’s better to increase the footprint to provide a more stable base.

It’s also worth noting that tire manufacturers optimize tires around specific internal rim widths, taking tire profile amongst other factors into consideration. As a newer brand to the market, we have the fortune of introducing our MTB tires after wider rims (30mm+) became more popular and subsequently design around modern rim standards. I can’t speak to any specific brands, but I would guess there are many 2.4 or 2.5” tires being used by high-level racers (even those produced recently) that are designed around a 25mm internal rim width. In this instance it makes perfect sense that a narrower (25mm) rim would ride better.

Do you worry about rolling resistance in a downhill-focused tire, or is grip the only concern?

Absolutely, rolling resistance is still very important with a downhill focused tire. Whilst the bias is shifted towards gaining as much grip as possible, having a tire with as little rolling resistance as possible is still key. Even if riders aren't chasing split times, having a tire that rolls well will have a huge impact on how a bike feels.

Does your company have any programs in place to recycle tires or generally reduce the waste associated with production?

We understand and appreciate the need to reduce our environmental impact in a meaningful way. For starters, we have made the choice to utilize recovered (recycled) carbon black which is the second most widely used raw material in the rubber industry. Tire production is also heavily energy dependent and as a part of the vulcanization process, we minimize energy waste by recycling steam / water from the curing process which reduces both fuel usage and conserves water.

Historically we’ve heard that tire availability is the thing holding back further development on 36” (or other large wheel size) bike designs, any plans to push that envelope?

We are in constant communication with our OEM partners and are working on some ‘out of the box’ thinking projects at the moment. However, tires with a larger than 622 (29”) bead diameter is not one that we are currently working on.






What is your favorite tire in your lineup, and why?

This is a tough one, as I can think of so many tires like the Snap WCE, which kick-started our journey in the DH World Cup, or the Speed Booster Elite, which has one multiple World Championships in BMX and Pump Track, but I guess, I will have to go with our newest tire is the Attack FSX.

This tire is the culmination of our hard work throughout the last year and has produced the best results we ever had in the Downhill World Cup, which is in my opinion, the most competitive race with how close each race is (by a few milliseconds).

It seems as though tubeless technology has plateaued a bit over the past few years, do you see any major changes on the horizon?

Soon, probably no big changes will occur as I think the reason why it plateaued is because everything is working now.

Where do you stand on inserts? How do they factor into new tire development?

For us, we’ve always developed tires functional on their own. Our R&D does take it into consideration but is not a main driver when we develop our tires. To give an example, Intense Factory Racing uses our tires without any inserts in the DH World Cup.

I’ve heard that leaving newly installed tires at max psi overnight can help stretch the casing, giving full volume and a better ride feel. Is this actually the case?

In general, if you leave it at the max psi, it will stretch the casing a little bit but variations and effects differ depending on multiple variables such as TPI, how far does the Apex Inserts go on the side of the tires, etc.

If you had to choose between sticky tires or aggressive tread pattern for your typical riding, where would you bias? I realize we get to have both, but humor me.

This is a tricky one, as you said, to each on their own.

We usually make tires based on 4 things, tread design, compounding, casing, and development. All these things are equally important to make a great tire. But if I must choose, I’ll go with the sticky tires. It’s usually super dry here in Thailand during the summer and trails near our HQ is mostly Hard Terrain, so this gives us the best benefit in riding.

It doesn’t hurt also to mention that Vee is well know in making a super sticky compound that is renowned in the underground drag scene in Thailand and innovated the DH race scene with our project with ITS (Intense Tire Systems) back in the early 2000s.

Many high-level racers are still running relatively narrow rims compared to the broader market, why do you think that is?

Top athletes try to get even the slightest advantage in the pinnacle of their discipline. Assuming that narrower rims use narrower tires and wider rims use wider tires, generally speaking, the narrower setup will provide less rolling resistance and should be a tad lighter than the wider setup.

Wider setup would provide more comfort but if we’re talking about milliseconds, athletes typically have the luxury to forego this as their bodies are trained extensively to have great range of movement.

Do you worry about rolling resistance in a downhill-focused tire, or is grip the only concern?

Yes, both of them are important as in a downhill track, there are 2 main parts, there’s the bike park / motorway parts where rolling resistance play a big role in getting the fastest time, while there are technical segments where tire grip gives the riders utmost confidence in going faster and doing quicker turns than if they have a less grippy tire.

Does your company have any programs in place to recycle tires or generally reduce the waste associated with production?

Currently, we are developing ways to use excess rubber we have when producing green tires and re-using them in other production runs, reducing our waste. We are also trying to make better performing tires with 100% recycled rubber as another running project in our pipeline.

Historically we’ve heard that tire availability is the thing holding back further development on 36” (or other large wheel size) bike designs, any plans to push that envelope?

Funny you mention that as we are one of the few manufacturers that care and make 36” tires.

I think there’s some truth to that, but also, I think the performance jump from 29” tires to 36” tires aren’t as big and mainly benefits tall people. For people who are average in height, it might not be motivating for them to even want these as 29” is sufficient. Maybe the next step will be 32”, but 29” will probably be the top choice for riders for years to come.






What is your favorite tire in your lineup, and why?

I was riding the Grappler tires before I worked for e*thirteen — it’s the first tire I’ve ridden that has felt truly balanced. The combination of the sidewall construction, tread, and compound made my bike feel more predictable.

It seems as though tubeless technology has plateaued a bit over the past few years, do you see any major changes on the horizon?

We think of tubeless as a system: we engineer wheels, tires, tape, and Plasma fluid. Our current system works well but there is so much room for improvement. There won’t be any game-changing improvements unless you work on it as an entire system. That’s obviously difficult because we want to preserve compatibility so riders have more choices.

Where do you stand on inserts? How do they factor into new tire development?

Inserts! We love them in most circumstances. We look at them not only to protect the rim from strikes but as a way to tune the spring rate and damping characteristics of any tire. Running a mid-sized insert allows riders to drop a few psi while offering better damping and traction on roots and rocks. The tire also ramps up for better support when being pushed through turns and impacts.

I’ve heard that leaving newly installed tires at max psi overnight can help stretch the casing, giving full volume and a better ride feel. Is this actually the case?

This is definitely true in terms of full volume. Depending on the construction, a 2.4” tire casing can stretch 1-2 mm when left at 30 psi for 24 hours. You can accomplish the same thing much faster if you just go out and ride the tire though.

If you had to choose between sticky tires or aggressive tread pattern for your typical riding, where would you bias? I realize we get to have both, but humor me.

Put me down for an aggressive tread pattern, Dario! I’m lucky enough to call the loam capital of Squamish my home so having tread that bites into the mud and soft soil would do me a lot more good than a nice soft rubber floating around on top. But I’m sure I’d have a different answer if I didn’t live where I do.

Many high-level racers are still running relatively narrow rims compared to the broader market, why do you think that is?

That’s a good question. In our experience, we have found 30 mm to be the perfect strength-to-weight ratio for our aggressive enduro/downhill rims and 28 mm for the trail/downcountry folks out there.

Do you worry about rolling resistance in a downhill-focused tire, or is grip the only concern?

Rolling resistance isn’t an afterthought when developing a downhill tire focused tire. For us, getting the tire to feel fast and efficient while offering traction and support is in all the small details hashed out in the testing process. Small adjustments can be made to the casing or compound to get the right combination of characteristics. In the end, it is about choosing the right compromise for the intended application.

Does your company have any programs in place to recycle tires or generally reduce the waste associated with production?

The factories that produce our tires do have recycling and regrind processes in place. In terms of end of life for tires, we’re finishing up our company ESG policies this year which will include supporting some regional upcycling programs.

Historically we’ve heard that tire availability is the thing holding back further development on 36” (or other large wheel size) bike designs, any plans to push that envelope?

Let’s all take a deep breath and not create more standards to confuse and frustrate consumers. 29” and 27.5” work pretty great for performance mountain bikes.



Need more tire talk in your life? Check out part one of this interview series here.

Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
202 articles

175 Comments
  • 104 1
 “Let’s all take a deep breath and not create more standards to confuse and frustrate consumers. 29” and 27.5” work pretty great for performance mountain bikes.”

::golf clap::
  • 7 1
 Agree. What he said was so reasonable and grounded. Imagine that!
  • 21 0
 32 for the win and the ultra-mullet 32-26 DH bike.
  • 7 0
 @pink505: 36 x 20 bmx wheel in the back. that's what I run on my Shand Ioma
  • 17 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: penny farthing downhill bike
  • 14 0
 @pink505: Penny Farthing- the OG of ultra mullets.
  • 6 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: 36x12 with the hotwalk carbon rim and supergigaextremeboost++++ hub
  • 4 0
 And he gets inserts
  • 6 0
 29.5 front and 28" rear, the most ideal set up...
  • 7 5
 This is bonkers. How do you know 32" isn't great if you haven't tried it.
We were all sceptical about 29" and it turns out that most racing disciplines are using them on the front now!
  • 5 0
 @rojo-1: My sense is the comment isn't as much about performance as much about some level of mental exhaustion around seemingly constant changes in standards and equipment. Although seems like bike design is kind of plateauing in the last few years.
  • 6 0
 @MT36: Yep, for sure it has plateaued, I don't see many bikes out there would tempt me to upgrade from by 2018 bike, which is great for my wallet and sanity (but probably why the bike industry is suffering, because there is no cool new tech outside of eBikes). Also, nobody is forcing anyone to upgrade.

It's a bit like I don't want the latest and greatest iPhone or folding phone, but I'm glad that they do the R&D to invent this new stuff because one day it will filter down to whatever cheap phone I end up buying.
  • 2 1
 I'm quite disappointed Bontrager doesn't have plans for a larger wheel/tire size since their own Travis Brown has been experimenting with them. But in that same breath, even if they had a 32" wheel bike coming out next year, it's not like they could talk about it.
  • 1 0
 @rojo-1: exactly! Totally agree
  • 1 0
 Michelin give the people what they want and thats a comp 16, 24, and 32 in 27.5 and 29 without the massive crazy logos as if we were riding a formula 1 car!
  • 4 1
 I'm gonna get downvoted to oblivion for this, but here goes. I'm 6'2" and I wouldn't mind seeing an even larger wheel size. Maybe not full 32, but something for the ridiculously tall dudes riding XXL frames and making 29" wheels look like kids sizes.
  • 6 0
 @mkul7r4: go 32 or go home...we don't need 30.5 inch...
  • 62 1
 Buy this guy a beer. "I also think riders suffered some burn out by all the wheel size and axle standard changes in the 2010s. Let’s make the 2020s the decade of no standard changes, just better products like headset cable routing…../"
  • 46 8
 Does your company have any programs in place to recycle tires or generally reduce the waste associated with production?

Does your company have any programs in place to stop greenwashing the bike industry and the lie that is ebikes are good for the environment?
  • 18 4
 I like you.

You can stay.

Bicycle tires aren't recyclable in the slightest. I don't really consider that one chic with a shark fin nose ring and 8 colors of hair sporting a 6" section of knobbies on her belt "recycled".
  • 32 0
 E-bikes are only good for the environment if they are replacing a car, otherwise their only purpose is power.
  • 5 0
 @blowmyfuse: I usually bring old tires to join the piles of car tires at the dump. Not recyclable but I think repurposed into rubber derivatives and chips.
  • 1 0
 @noopinion: I'd like to get one to replace my bowflex so I can try to lift something heavier.
  • 4 1
 @vicmaj: That's a myth unfortunately

The ONLY tires that can be repurposed/ground up for things like playgrounds are the giant construction/heavy equipment tires that have no kevlar, steel or other materials in the bead/carcass.

Passenger tires, bike tires, etc...all big spider webs of fibers, chemicals, and metals with a rubber coating. The vast majority sneak their way into landfills and dump sites in the poor corners of the world.

And now that they're dumping tons of silica into tires to all hit that mythical 50k mileage warranty, even more so.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Well, I think there may be tires with metal getting through or maybe it's just the lowest bidder thing for the military but I definitely had tire bits poke through my ACUs and stab me in various places during combatives training held in ground up tire training areas. Getting those tiny wires piercing your hands is surprisingly painful.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Sad but completely true.
  • 2 0
 @danstonQ: I read an ambitious project that is separating the metals from the other compounds, attempting to use the then liquified rubber & other components as "bio-fuel".

It mentioned it didn't create additional pollutants, but I don't see how that's possible. Just sounds like they're heating it to such high temps, you just don't "see" them floating out of the exhaust pipe of whatever burns them off.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: as far as I know, cars and trucks used tyres are mostly shredded and "recycled" (I'd say "definitely buried") into concrete for constructions (allows to save some material and to build lighter structures with better anti-sismic properties) and into asphalt for road, parkings, airports etc... Bicycle tyres are a drop in this ocean of shit, and there's no possibility to recycle them as they are much more complex than a car or a truck tyre.
  • 4 0
 @blowmyfuse: There is a true bicycle tire recycling program currently operating in Germany. Hopefully, soon to expand into other markets.
www.pinkbike.com/news/schwalbe-announces-its-future-of-tire-recycling.html
  • 1 0
 @schwalbe: it's ironic that the reference I made was to the process you're using. Could swear the article I found was geared toward larger scale automotive use though, but same process?

The article indicated the facility ownership was a VERY large corporation in that instance?
  • 8 0
 @blowmyfuse: Schwalbe developed a process specific to bicycle tires. Typically, the fibers and metals from bike tires will clog the machines used for car tires. We've partnered with a Pyrum Innovations to process the used tires and the end product is rCB (recovered carbon black) and recovered crude oil that is high enough quality to utilize in the production of new bike tires. A true cradle-to-cradle system unlike the down cycling programs that turn car tires into playground mats or studded belts Wink
You can find more information here: www.schwalbe.com/sustainability/csr-report-2021/?page=41
  • 1 0
 @schwalbe: Massive shout-out to you guys for actually putting in the effort and create a true recycling process. That's the spirit.
  • 33 3
 Next time please ask:

What can you do to reduce the outrageous margins you charge mountain bikers compared to the other tire markets you serve.
  • 8 1
 What do you think the margins are on mountain bike products? road bike products? A t-shirt at your local mall?
  • 10 0
 Don't get me started on MTB clothing margins....
  • 8 6
 @pink505: No seriously, what do you think they are? Have you heard of 'normal profits'? If MTB accessories made so much more money than any other product, why would anybody make road goods? Or anything else at for that matter. Tons of investors would be frothing to get in on it, then over saturate the market, causing prices to fall.

In all fairness that is kind of whats happening at the moment but traditionally they make the same margins as most businesses, even less considering everybody are after 'buddy-bro' deals all the time.

As a whole, anything that actually sells hard goods is making less than other services like software, rentals, transportation, subscription based businesses, tax services etc. because the bike industry actually have to MAKE something as opposed to just paying people, which the bike industry has to do anyway.

Standard profit margins will be 5 to 10% like most industries but that's not going to be the case for a few years at least, so enjoy the deals on product at the moment, and appreciate that most bike stores and honestly businesses are passion projects and not run by money grubbing venture capitalists.

Save your ire for your bank that will charge you a monthly fee to take your money, and reinvest it 4x over to make 3-10% ROI a year on it while giving you .125% interest on anything you save.
  • 7 1
 @thetruejb: I'll bite.... I am not talking about retail margins....we do a small by market size, expensive first world sport so get charged first world expensive sport prices. Doesn't mean I can't point out the abuse of my wallet and ask the manufacturers to justify $100 mountain bike tires.

I like banks both as a user and investor... now hedge funds and VC get my ire.
  • 1 0
 @thetruejb: investors are all over the market. Pon holding for on and there are plenty of others. Who do you think are funding the smaller brands like your transition, pole, pivot, ibis etc. They all need investment to exist from one source or anothet
  • 1 0
 Answer: why would I sell my tires for cheap if Maxxis ones are almost 100$? Maxxis is the leader, other brands follow
  • 2 0
 @pink505: eh. $100 per tire for a relatively low volume part that requires ongoing mold maintenance and relatively high shipping costs is pretty fair. The average bike shop might have a dozen of a given tire in stock while the average automotive shop will have dozens of any given tire in stock and there a lot more auto tire shops than bike shops. Plus. High end auto tires are far more expensive than bike tires. A set of winter tires for my lightning set me back $1500.
  • 2 0
 @cueTIP: They are sticking it to us for the simple reason that they can and your view that you are getting good value is validation of that. That said am I riding Mike Bears? Hell no but getting tires on clearance at the end of the season.
  • 18 1
 If they all prefer sticky rubber then why the hell do so many brands only offer sticky rubber in DH casing? Also why the hell cant I get DH casing without sticky rubber so I can use it as a rear tire?

So many reasons to try and buy something else besides Maxxis but I can never get the configuration I need from anyone BUT Maxxis (sticky/light up front, durable/heavy in back). So I'm stuck with Maxxis.
  • 4 3
 because sticky ruber wear faster and no trail rider want to replace his/her tires every 3 rides.
  • 1 0
 This is the big miss by so many. Rave reviews for the new Conti tyres, but trail casing doesn’t offer soft, pass
  • 20 1
 Tyres.

Just tried the Continental Argotal/Kryptotal rear combo and I'm pretty impressed with them.
  • 4 6
 Just ridden Kryptotal Fr, for grip only. Not so impressed.
  • 2 0
 @ka81: Argotal 2.6 in the front goes. Kryptotal rear 2.6 in the front goes.
  • 13 0
 @ka81: I don’t think the intention was riding on ice and snow.
  • 1 8
flag bigmeatpete420 (May 24, 2023 at 9:34) (Below Threshold)
 They are good till you fold them. They fold very unevenly. It feels sketchy vs maxxis fold evenly and don’t feel randomly squishy
  • 6 1
 @freeridejerk888: if you have any corner knob left on the maxxis,
  • 2 9
flag bigmeatpete420 (May 24, 2023 at 10:25) (Below Threshold)
 @souknaysh: I just don’t think they are as good as maxxis tires.
  • 3 1
 @freeridejerk888: Krypto's wear better than Maxxis tires for sure. The side knobs don't get all frayed and chipped, they just get a little duller, which is fine.
  • 10 0
 @ka81: What casing/compound. I've been running DH supersoft and it's excellent in my opinion.
  • 2 0
 @pisgahgnar: got a set of DH supersoft Kryptotals for the first swap on a new bike...when the rear's roasted I'll switch them both. It came with Schwalbes (MM/BB) and they're fine, but they don't EXCITE me like these new Contis do...feels good to let go of the Assegai, but I'll go right back if ze German shoes dont fit

all I know is what I know, so I gotta find out for myself ya dig
  • 1 0
 @owl-X: ze germans. Well played
  • 2 7
flag bigmeatpete420 (May 24, 2023 at 19:47) (Below Threshold)
 Lot of downvotes from people who havnt actually tired them. They are good but not better than maxxis. I do think the Goodyears are better than the conti
  • 2 0
 @freeridejerk888:

Been on Kryptoal fr/re enduro soft for a few months. The casing is good, they roll fast, and are wearing well. The soft compound is more like a maxx terra. Fine for the rear but leaves me wanting more on the front.
  • 1 0
 @PhoS: do you also have that weird sensation that it doesn’t fold and you keep pushing pushing pushing and then all the sudden it folds super hard?
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888:

Haven't experienced this. These are way stiffer than a DD to me. 2.4s on 30mm btw.
  • 14 0
 This is all neat info and all but my real question is: Why do tire manufacturer websites almost universally suck when it comes to finding what tires I want?

More specifically: Just let me pick a diameter and filter by width. Quit forcing me into choosing "Mountain" or "city" or "gravel dammit. I'll be the judge of where I want to ride a tire, just show me my options and let me filter them, dammit!
  • 13 0
 Please Michelin make a TR22 and a EN22 tire,same shape,same compound as the DH22 but light casing. It would be the best tire out there. Love the DH22 in my enduro bike too,but it is heavy metal for all day pedal..
  • 4 0
 100% agreed!!!
  • 4 0
 Yes yes yes
  • 2 0
 +1, 1600g is a bit heavy, lol.
  • 15 4
 It would have been interesting to ask them what is missing to achieve the performance of the M brand you see blacked out on every team who's sponsored by them. Not that I mind it myself, in fact, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be able to tell the difference in a blind test, but something has to be missing from the other brands. IMO, seeing blacked out tyres on teams sponsored by a tyre manufacturer makes them look pretty bad...
  • 19 3
 That doesn't necessarily mean Maxxis is better, it just means that up until a few years ago, Maxxis was the only real major player in the mtb market. Pros like to stick with what they know. Thats why they run 'old' geo on their bikes etc
  • 5 3
 This was my thought as well. "How does it feel to be fighting for 2nd place behind Maxxis?" Tongue-in-cheek of course.
  • 2 0
 I eventually got to the point where I only ran an insert (~100g) in my hardtail. I think it makes sense there. I don't think it makes sense to run an EXO casing with a 250g insert in an enduro bike.
  • 6 0
 Across the pond, maybe, but in Europe Schwalbe are close to Maxxis. Maxxis wins because their OEM pricing is crazy cheap for top spec tyres, hence why you see so many bikes with them out of the box.
  • 8 0
 Bs, I've never seen Michelin and Hutchison sponsored riders blacking out M tires and they've done well in Enduro. Bruni had sharpied Michelin muds on a few races if I remember correctly. Also Conti rides are not using sharpie. But yeah, Vee, Bonti, Spec, E13...
  • 4 0
 @iian: I don't know about other countries in Europe, but in Spain and Portugal I can assure you you'll see 10 bikes with Maxxis for every bike you see not just with Schwalbe, but any other brand.
  • 3 2
 I've seen blacked out Schwalbe tyres on several occasions. But nowadays it's mostly the riders sponsored by c-list tyre companies like Bontrager, Vee or e13 who run off brand rubber. Even Specialized are slowly getting their act together.
  • 5 0
 Continental have demonstrated how to overtake the M brand. More and more pro teams choosing to switch to Conti
  • 1 0
 @kanasasa: Cant say I've seen any pros riding e13 tyres but honestly prefer the e13 grappler / all-terrain mopo set I'm using over the previously maxxGrip assegai / dhr2 set
  • 2 0
 I always think it’s highly misleading when teams and riders are paid to ride brand x but don’t and get the sharpies out.
  • 2 1
 @ponyboy24: lol no. Continental haven’t gone from producing trash like the Baron and Kaiser to just suddenly topping the DHF and Asserguy overnight. I’m sure they’re a lot better than they used to be but that’s not saying much and they won’t be troubling that Max grip compound.
  • 2 1
 @thenotoriousmic: you obviously haven't ridden the new conti tyres yet...
  • 2 0
 @ponyboy24: Agree. It's like Continental was busy making mass market tires for other industries and then suddenly got some free time and decided to crush everyone lol
  • 2 1
 @Tmackstab: Or maybe they just rebranded the same old shit and paid a bunch of promo and you just lapped it up without thinking? The compounds aren’t as good and you can’t get different compounds with different casings, the casings won’t be as good and the tread pattern is like the android version of maxxis tyres if not direct copy’s.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: you obviously haven't ridden the new conti tyres yet...

and did you even see them yet, or read the basic data on their website on compounds and casings?
  • 2 2
 @ponyboy24: I can’t find any information anywhere which tells you all you need to know when a tyre company won’t tell you the durometer of the rubber they’re using but it feels pretty firm to the touch and it’s a world away from max grip compound. It’s that compound that sets maxxis apart from the competition. Until someone matches that compound nobody’s topping maxxis.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: my advice to you is to try them, then have an opinion!

Interesting how many world cup DH teams have switched to conti this year...
  • 1 4
 @ponyboy24: the answer is absolutely non. They’re ether being paid to ride a tyre or they’re on Maxxis and yes they’ll have to do a lot more than sponsor a bunch of teams and pay a load of sites and channels to promote their tyres for me to spend money on continental tyres after their previous efforts and the people who have got them are hardly raving about them. They’re the 2023 Michelin’s remember a couple of years ago you was saying the exact same thing and you soon went back to Maxxis with your tale between your legs. Remember the Magic Mary? No me neither but not so long ago you was saying the exact same thing yet everyone’s still running Maxxis.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: ride them, then have an opinion. Otherwise you constant ranting just makes you look stupid.

Maxxis tread is great, but many of us got sick of their weak sidewalls and constant punctures.

Many people still use Michelin and Shwalbe today, they still make good tyres.

Conti has just moved to the top with their latest range. They are just awesome!
  • 2 3
 @ponyboy24: there’s about 4 people still using Mary’s or Michelins and they’re much better tyres than Continental, everyone’s back on Maxxis. I suggest you learn about how tyres work so when you buy a tyre you buy a tyre with the correct compound and casing and you actually understand what you’re buying so you don’t end up wasting your money on Continentals who haven’t even released specifications so you couldn’t have made an informed decision other than the fact the specifications aren’t being published being a big clue they’re not very impressive or buying the wrong Maxxis for what you require.
  • 2 1
 @ponyboy24: let’s see how funny it is when you’re tearing them off and replacing with a Minion in 6 months time. Wink
  • 9 1
 My favorite part is where the guy is so proud of mentioning they made ITS tires for Intense.

Anyone who went through that knob shedding, dry rotting boat anchor of a flat getting nightmareexperiment thinks you should NOT mention that part of your company history Beer
  • 1 0
 I loved my Intense System 4 tires! I thought they were great!
  • 1 0
 @sledMXer: You used the ITS monster inner tubes and weighed in the 150-160lb range at the time I assume? Maybe raced places that were sandy?
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Nah, just regular tubes, and I was probably about 187 lbs back then. Dry, dust on crust hardpack.
  • 10 0
 Should have asked Michelin why all their DH tires in the US are always out of stock.
  • 1 1
 I know the answer to that one.
  • 3 1
 I didn't know Michelin was imported in the US, most of the time French brands stay away from the US.
  • 2 0
 Same in Europe.
  • 1 0
 Yep Michelin dh tires are hard to find. I always buy a pair when they are available.
  • 1 0
 @homerjm: Yep they are good they just tend to leak air a bit more than other brands.
  • 2 0
 @Ba1rog: Got the opposite experience with DH22.Even make a full enduro day with one bone dry,0 tubeless sealant and that tire keep the air for more than a week with little drop.
Had other tires in the same rim,like an Assegai DD or Butcher and those leak air like any other tire I had in the last years.
My rims are Roval enduro&dh and EX511.
  • 3 0
 Funny, up here in my corner of Canadia, the local shops have a wall of Michelins (DH22, Wild Enduro, etc). Cheaper than Maxxis too.

I got convinced to try the Wild Enduro for a fast-rolling rear tire, and it's been pretty good. Not as grippy as the Assegai it replaced, but I have the energy for an extra lap at the end of the day because the rear tire hasn't sapped away my will to live. Predictable grip, doesn't recover as well from stupid mistakes as the Assegai, rolls faster.
  • 3 0
 @Ba1rog: "most of the time French brands stay away from the US".
Wrong, french brands are left apart by the US protectionism most of the time.

Anyway, Michelin tyres are difficult to find here too. Factories issues apparently...
  • 2 0
 @danstonQ: I've never heard the term "US Protectionism". What is that?

And as for factory issues, you mean the Asian factories? Since Michelin stopped building their tires in France and moved manufacturing overseas.

For those looking for Michelin tires, maybe try calling up a bike shop in the Greenville, SC area. Their corporate US headquarters are there. They don't supply the tires from there, but the shops in the area are more likely to order loyally from them.

Oh, and if you ever need Maxxis tires, search the Georgia ads and shops since Maxxis is stil the loyalty fave in the ATL and greater metro.
  • 6 0
 I am in aggreement with Mr Trek's take on inserts. I'll use one on my park wheels, but on the trail I do not wanna be fighting with an insert if I get a flat. Even the easy ones to intall are anything but. I think this goes for wider rims especially as they even make getting the tire on harder.
  • 9 2
 Doesn't help that Bontrager's carbon wheels shatter at a light sneeze if they have an insert in them. No insert and you can slam them into rocks all day.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: I have great luck with mine so far on my Slash. They have been bulletproof. I also run heavier tires though. No inserts. I used to run inserts and saw minimal benefits for my type of riding, now I just run tougher burlier tires with thick casings on my Slash and Canyon Sender.
  • 7 0
 All the shop rats tell me to run an insert and to say the hell with changing the flat...to just ride the insert out that day.

I've only flatted once with my insert in my trail bike. I went back to the car after thinking I was gonna get the tire off the rim and stuff a tube in it trail side.

Didn't have my 55 gallon Rubbermaid trash can, Cush Core lever & zip ties to work with.
  • 8 0
 @bedell99: I've probably owned over a dozen Bonty carbon wheels at this point. I think I got my first set in 2017 or so (working at a shop so there was lots of opportunity to get wheels on bikes or a la carte). Without inserts, I broke one Kovee Pro and one Line 30 Elite. The Kovee was the result of a delamination, and the Line developed a hairline crack. Neither were dramatic and I likely rode them both for quite some time before noticing the issue on either one. I really, really like them - without inserts.

I started trying out inserts in 2021. I've tried both Tannus and Cushcore. In 2021, with a Tannus front and back, I got hairline cracks on a pair of Line 30 Elites with DD tires in a single weekend on a 21' Norco Range. The rims were still rideable. I kept experimenting in 2022. I broke 5 more rims, all Elites, 4 rear 1 front. 1 rear Cushcore, rest Tannus. 2 were hairline cracks, 3 were dramatic rimplosions. Not a single one was in a large impact, crash or bottom out. I recall 3 specifically, the dramatic ones. They were all on fast, techy double black trails, but not in big sections, moreso in repeated hit chatter. Somewhere the tire/rim/insert/suspension combo gets overloaded from the chatter and boom, bye rim. Bikes were Rocky Instict, Norco Range, and Norco Aurum HSP.

Anyway, I now only run inserts on my Line Pro 40 29+ setup, which has been bombproof since I purchased them in 2018. I don't run inserts otherwise, it's now just back to Tire+Rim only. I might build up an insert wheelset on a sturdy alloy wheelset for the right day, not sure.

Credit where it's due though, Trek has been fantastic with rim warranties. I now have a very healthy collection of spare Bontrager hubs and spokes should I need them.
  • 3 0
 @j-t-g: it's crazy to me that the addition of soft foam would lead to more breaks.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: Nice reply. Damn, you are hard equipment. Curious to know your weight and what rear wheel pressures you run. I run Schwalbe Super Gravity tires at 23 psi the rear and I'm 170.
  • 1 0
 @bedell99: 220 lbs geared, with inserts not less than 27 psi front 29 rear, without 30 front 33-35 rear.


I am hard on equipment but for many years leading up to the insert/rim fiasco above, I have not broken too much stuff. I used to brake a ton of stuff prior to 2018 but between good maintenance habits and generally getting much faster/better on the bike I stopped breaking things for the most part. That is partially why the insert issue is such a standout!
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: Interesting. I ran my first bontrager carbon rims with inserts and the rear cracked on my first ride while going over some roots, no tire bottom out or anything. Been running the new line carbons with no inserts and they have held up longer than any other rim for me.
  • 2 1
 @j-t-g: so...is a guy who is 220lbs and tall running carbon rims because they keep replacing them or...I have no idea why you'd run them honestly.

Why bother?
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: because without inserts they meet or exceed my durability expectations, they're stiff, light enough, and Trek has been exceedingly easy to deal with regarding their 2 year no questions asked crash replacement/lifetime warranty on carbon rims.
  • 2 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: some people have speculated that inserts concentrate the force on the central channel (typically very thin in cross section) vs the rim bead which is reinforced and what you would hit when you bottom a tire sans insert.

I would have thought Tannus less susceptible to this mechanism given their design with the channel, but maybe not. Also that poster is a wrecking ball :-)
  • 1 0
 Most of the time I got a flat, it was when I busted a rim. So I started running an insert with my current set of tires, and haven't broken a rim since. Only flat was recently with a punctured sidewall, my first ever. Though I am thinking about running a DH tire next time around without the insert as opposed to DD level tires.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: One of my close buddies who I rode with 15 years ago and is a mountain of man. 6'7" 280lbs, in shape and he destroyed bikes. Chains, wheels, hubs, you name it, he broke it. I saw him bend a chainring from stand still starting on hill. There was no part of a bike that was made for him especially the wheels and hubs. Tire and wheels then sucked in comparison to today. He finally settle on DT Swiss hubs and rims and got the most life out of them. I feel you pain but there has to be a better solution than Bontrager Line Elites. I have a feeling you are pretty good on a bike but no wheel you buy will stand up to your abuse and the terrain you ride. I get it why you stick with Bontrager though, Trek warranty is off the chart. I have had the same experiences with Trek and have to say there warranty is second to none for anything wrong with there bike. They actually warrantied a XR5 tire off my sons slash that was leaking sealant thru the side walls and replaced it was a SE6 at no charge. Blown away.
  • 6 0
 XR4s are probably the most underrated trail tire on the market. Unrivaled weight/grip ratio. I literally shed 3 pounds off my bike when I switched to them from WTB trail bosses.
  • 1 0
 Agree 1000%. I went to an SE4 on my STEVO for a little bit stiffer sidewall.
  • 1 0
 How much do you guys weigh and where do you ride? Would they make a good all mountain tire for a lightweight person?
  • 1 0
 @ashmtb85: I’m 200 should work fine for you
  • 8 0
 I want to make prototype stencils for my tires. Really confuse people.
  • 2 0
 I want stencil prototypes, just to waste my effort
  • 5 0
 @ethirteen I love the Gen3 Mopo AT tires, but please offer them in real trail casing like you guys used to. At 1150 grams, the new "trail" casing isn't any lighter than the EN variant.
  • 3 0
 @KatzT - Thanks for the feedback! We'll make sure this makes it back to our product manager.
  • 2 0
 @ethirteen: Gracias amigo. Love your pedals too. Cheers!

P.S. I see Gwin's prototype dry tires from the last season had identical tread pattern to your AT tires - I hope you guys are getting fat royalties from Vee Rubber.
  • 2 0
 @KatzT: Thanks for the kind words about the pedals. We're admittedly biased, but we think they don't get the respect they deserve! That's right about Gwin's tires! That talked to us about it and we gave them the thumbs up as we have a great relationship with them.
  • 6 0
 Love that all but one said they prefer sticky rubber, but most brands have either no sticky rubber or the sticky rubber available in only a few configurations.
  • 2 0
 Why was tire cost not part of this interview? Can anyone explain to me why bicycle tires cost nearly as much as car tires? Seriously. Why? A mid level car tire can be $100-150 and lasts 30-50,000 miles or roughly 2-3 years of average driving. A decent mountain bike tire can cost $70-100 and lasts maybe 2-3 months of average riding.
  • 3 0
 Didn't you already post this article a while back? I remember the question about leaving your tire inflated to maximum pressure overnight.
  • 6 0
 Different brands this time.
  • 2 0
 I think it was with other brands, like Maxxis, Schwalbe, etc
  • 3 0
 Initially I was confused as well, but at the bottom of the article it says this is part 2 (and they give a link to part 1 which is what you are referring to).
  • 1 0
 I haven’t been to the store to pickup some sealant, great reminder to do so before I leave to go race this weekend…. But my racing line wild enduros. Hold air like a champ be riding all month to start the riding season. On last years sealant. And no leaks.
  • 3 0
 Old Crow Medicine show is already in talks with whoever goes full-on with the 36"rs for their theme song....
  • 2 3
 That's Bob Dylan's song fyi.
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: the chorus...the verse lyrics (as a NC boy) are decidedly different :-)
  • 1 1
 @preach: Sure but it's the chorus that everyone remembers and that sold the song. Just sayin.
  • 2 0
 Wait. That’s Hootie’s song.
  • 1 0
 @Whataboutism: Hootie and the No Fish: pretty sure it was just Darius on that cover that popularized the song a-new.
  • 3 0
 Has anyone tried running a Kryptotal Rear on the front? It looks so much like a DHR2, which was my go to front tire.
  • 2 0
 yes was running the Argotal/Krypto rear for the spring. Now that the bike park just opened up I'm using Krypto rear front and back. works great so far
  • 2 0
 I run Krypto RE (Enduro casing, soft but not super soft) on both wheels. Not intentionally, just grabbed what was in stock.

No complaints for the past three months. Mainly ride moderate and very dry trails, not much rocks or roots. Did some quite hardcore enduro racing too, though.
  • 5 1
 "...we’re finishing up our company ESG"
I just threw up
  • 4 0
 #metoo
  • 2 2
 I just ran a Gen 1 Shorty 29x2.5" DH Casing maxxgrip front and Gen 2 Shorty 27.5x2.4 DD maxxgrip rear today on my Megawatt. It may have been a worlds first of running two different generation of the same tire. THE GRIPPAGE WAS INTENSE.
  • 1 0
 That’s the “I’m getting down this trail” and I don’t care how steep it is set up.
  • 1 0
 Try doing that without the motor
  • 1 1
 I thought the tire stretch question was done and dusted last time... Literally the same gamut of answers this time.

It also means that any calipering of tires under test should only be done after at least one ride and reinflated to normal pressure, or after a (silly) max pressure overnight sit.
  • 4 1
 “We want to copy Maxxis but everyone will know”
  • 6 0
 "Maxxis used to copy Michelin but no one remembers"
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: Can you give me an example? I had a guy tell me the DHF was a Michelin copy but I haven't been able to find a Michelin that looks the same.
  • 2 0
 Bontrager rep says G5, but Slash doesn't come with G5. I beg Bontrager to stop making tires so my garage will be cleaner...
  • 2 0
 Has anyone ridden Continental Kryptotals? I'll need new tires by the end of the season and I'm leaning in that direction.
  • 2 0
 Soft compound bike tires that cost the same as car tires. It's pain to watch them wear down.
  • 1 0
 You only need two, though, so half as much cost.
  • 3 0
 Missing question: is 26 dead?y
  • 2 0
 Who cares what Bonti says about tires... their own factory race team is running Continental!
  • 3 0
 The g5s are the shit..
  • 2 0
 Vee guy wins with underground Thai drag racing connection.
  • 4 1
 took me a second to figure out you weren't saying he wins because he's in some kind of Thai drag queen mtb racing circuit.
  • 1 0
 @phatsmoker: thailand does have a unusually high amount of crossdressers
  • 3 1
 I really want to try a 36er.....NOT
  • 1 3
 The Bontrager tires are absolute dog sh!t. The fact that the Trek Factory XC team left them and the Trek Future Development team has had more flats in one month than they had all last season speaks to what crap they are. It isnt like their TPI count is lower on the XR1 tires but they flat all day long. If you are racing, just avoid them altogether. Sucks if you are forced to run them.
  • 2 0
 I call bullshit on your statement from personal eyperience - I've been running XR2 and XR3 in Team edition carcass for about 6y now and have had two flats, both were hidden rock snakebites that dented my rims in the process.
  • 1 0
 Didnt we have an interview just like this couple months ago? Some questions and answers seem copypaste
  • 2 0
 zero comments on Goodyear, blimp'n aint easy
  • 1 0
 I have absorbed this into my lexicon. thank you. Anyone running the winged feet is gonna hear it for sure! saw a blimp last year...googled em...the blimp scene is mindblowingly small--check it out!
  • 1 0
 Everybody loves a good tire... Right?
  • 14 0
 I hate good tires. Too predictable. I need some uncertainty in my life
  • 8 1
 @pushmongo: *inserts Shimano wandering bite-point joke*
  • 2 0
 @pushmongo: Hehe....that'll change.....
  • 2 0
 @pushmongo: user name checks out! He pushes mongo for the chaos!
  • 1 0
 wish Bonti would release a SE4 but with SE5 shoulders, perfect rear tyre
  • 1 0
 Fantastic article, please do more of these.
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