Pinkbike Gear Guide: 9 Summer Riding Kits for Men

Jun 13, 2023
by Nikki Rohan  


Summer showed up quickly this year. From a cold wet spring straight to the intense heat and dust of May and June, the past four months have offered a wide variety of conditions for testing.

Below you will find a review of nine mountain bike summer riding kits with a focus on breathability, fit, and style. I was only able to ride these kits a few times each, so durability will not be on the menu. But all of the brands whose product I reviewed have it pretty well figured out. Consequently, there are no outstandingly bad designs, but I did notice some things that elevated some items from "ho-hum" to "wow." If you’re like me, and you do a fair bit of your singletrack shenanigans in a cotton t-shirt and the one pair of riding shorts you haven't ripped (yet), this review could help pick up something new to add to the mix.





Table of Contents
Giro
Alpinestars
Fox Racing
Ride NF
7Mesh
Pearl Izumi
Ion
100%
POC




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Giro

• Men's Ride Shorts
• Men's Ride Jersey
giro.com/


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Giro Men's Ride Shorts and Ride jersey.


Men's Ride Short
MSRP: $140.00 USD
Sizes: US 28 -40
Colors: Black, Harbor Blue, Tail Green (tested)
Features:
• Renew series recycled nylon havoc durablend material
• Quiet, 4-way stretch fabric
• PFC-free water repellent coating
• Secure zip side pocket and hand pockets
• Exterior waist adjustment and belt loop

I tested these shorts in a size 34, which is the typical size that I wear for both shorts and pants. The Ride Shorts are made with Giro’s Renew series, a recycled nylon material with a PFC-free DWR coating on them. Similar to their Ride Shirt, the Ride Shorts offer plenty of pockes - there are two front pockets, one back pocket, a zipped back pocket, and finally, a concealed side zip pocket. To secure the shorts, Giro uses a zipper fly with a two snap closure system. A velcro waist cinch is added to customize the fit. And if the velcro cinches aren’t your thing, there are belt loops as well.

With the shorts having a 10” inseam and my 34” long legs, these were a bit on the shorter end of what I prefer for a MTB short. And I will note that Giro runs a hair big in the waist, so I had to pull the velcro side cinches all of the way closed to get a proper fit —which is pretty normal for me considering I have a 33” waist. The two zipper pockets on these shorts are great. The side pocket fits your phone quite well, allowing you to pedal without distraction, while the rear pocket is ideal for keys or gels. The three other normal pockets are great, too—they’re all fairly deep, so even without zippers for security you’re unlikely to lose anything. As I said initially, the inseam length was a bit short for me which made for a slight gaper gap between the knee pads and the end of the shorts, but fashion faux pas aside, I liked the fit.

From a performance perspective, the Ride Shorts delivered. I never felt like they were riding low or high and they were very comfortable. The breathability and softness of the fabric were also impressive. Add in an eco friendly DWR, mix gently with the stylish good looks, and this is a quietly stealthy pair of mountain bike shorts. One more thing: Giro boasts of their “quiet” four way stretch fabric, and I can confirm it’s whisper quiet, which I loved— in my opinion there is nothing worse than riding with two tarps between your legs. Overall, these are a good-looking, stylish pair of shorts albeit a bit shorter than I like.


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Giro Men's Ride Short.


Men's Ride Jersey
MSRP: $110.00 USD
Sizes: S - XXL
Colors: Black/Charcoal, Black/Harbor Blue, Trail Green/Black (tested)
Features:
• Recycled polyester with Drirelease moisture management
• Reflective highlights at back pocket
• 3 expandable storage pockets

I varied between a L and XL in all the jerseys I reviewed depending on the manufacturer’s suggested sizing; based on Giro’s website, XL was my ticket for the Ride Jersey. This jersey is more of a stylish trail riding item than the typical tech tee type jersey usually seen on the trails. It’s made from recycled polyester with Giro’s proprietary DriRelease moisture management system. Translation: it is extremely conformable to wear and dries your sweaty back after a long day by mechanically wicking away excess moisture. The fit of the Ride Jersey is what you expect from Giro; it conforms to the body without being tight and has a drop tail to prevent your backside from getting muddy. The material is extremely soft on the skin. Initially it seemed a little heavy in comparison to some of the featherweight jerseys, so I had my doubts regarding breathability, but after only one hard ride, my doubts vanished—it breathes extremely well.

This jersey was the only one I tested with back storage pockets similar to a road jersey—ie say goodbye to your pack for lunch rides. Along with the three storage pockets along the back, there is also a single zipper pocket with reflective highlights for any small essentials that you don’t want disappearing during your ride. And if you were thinking, “I wish there was another pocket,” you’re in luck. There’s also a stylish chest pocket that is perfect for carrying your sunglasses when they get fogged up on the climb. All of these pockets meant that I was able to ride with the essentials—multi tool, tube, snack—without needing to carry a pack.

This is the most expensive jersey that I reviewed but it also has the most features, factors that definitely contribute to the price point. Overall, if you want a jersey that can carry all your tools without the need of a pack, this jersey would be ideal. Bonus: even with all the pockets, it will still play nicely with a hip pack. Double bonus: this is kind of like a reverse mullet, as party up front and business in the back. It’s a stylish pocket tee up front that doesn't scream bike nerd, but has the pockets for gettin’ er done sans pack in the back.


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Giro Men's Ride jersey.





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Alpinestars

• Men's Alps Escape Shorts
• Men's Short Sleeve Drop Meta Jersey
alpinestars.com/


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Alpinestars Alps Escape shorts and SS Drop Meta Jersey.

Men's Alps Escape Shorts
MSRP: $114.95 USD
Sizes: 28 - 40
Colors: Black, Pewter Gray (tested)
Features:
• 4-way stretch for mobility and durability
• Zippered thigh pockets for storage
• Classic 2-snap closure for
• Water resistant finish

I tested the size 34 in these shorts. They are made from a blend of 92% polyester / 8% spandex with a DWR finish. This gives these shorts a super lightweight feel with a forgiving amount of stretch. Other than two buttons on the front to secure the shorts, it doesn’t offer any adjustments. This definitely adds to why these shorts are so light; there just aren’t that many things going on. In fact, there are only two side pockets (one on each side, and perfectly suitable for a phone) that are placed lower on the shorts. Interestingly, they open in the middle.

These shorts fit almost as if they’d been made for me. The waist was perfect. The leg length was great, giving me just the right amount of overlap for seamless coverage when wearing knee guards. And with the thin material of the shorts, you never felt too hot “down there” (if you know, you know). The leg diameter of the shorts is slightly on the fitted side, which I personally like, but not so snug as to bind on the mid-weight knee guards I tend to favor. The pockets are really interesting, and it’s super easy to get stuff in and out of them. After using it, I wish more brands used this pocket design.

I don’t know how you can make a good pair of trail riding MTB shorts any lighter than these, other than going lean on features like pockets. But that no frills approach can have its downsides, too. Primarily there’s no way to fine-tune the fit. No fancy Boa system, no Velcro tabs, no ratchet, so the fit has to be pretty spot on. Overall, I liked the lighter weight, no frills design these shorts offered—definitely a plus for racing. For the price, they seem like a solid riding option, although I’d recommend trying before you buy to ensure an appropriate fit.


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Alpinestars Men's Alps Escape Shorts.

Men's Short Sleeve Drop Meta Jersey
MSRP: $79.95 USD
Sizes: S - 2XL
Colors: Light Gray, Black, Gold (Tested)

I tested the XL Drop Meta SS Jersey. It’s made out of 92% polyester / 8% Elastane. This jersey has everything you would expect: a drop tail, unnoticeable seam lines, and a very lightweight bonded collar. This jersey is light, which seems to be a theme of the Alpinestar products that I tested. As the color suggests, this should be the golden child for how jerseys should fit and perform.

I really enjoyed wearing this jersey, even more so when riding on a hot day. The fit is not too tight around the shoulders and it flows nicely down to just below the shorts line. The design has zero seams going over the top of the shoulder so if you’re a backpack rider, there won't be any annoying seam chafe on the top of your shoulders. The bonded collar is what really surprised me; prior to trying this jersey, I didn’t know that I needed one. But now? Oh. Yes, please. The collar on a normal jersey is unusually bulky and has a lot of material that collects sweat. On the Alpinestar jersey, it’s the same thickness as the rest of the jersey and is crafted such that you cannot feel where the collar ends and the jersey begins. With the “Black Gold” color you do kinda look like big bird rolling down the trail, but it’ll be great for riding during hunting season.


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Alpinestars Men's Short Sleeve Drop Meta Jersey.





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Fox Racing

• Ranger Lite Short
• Ranger Jersey Moth Short Sleeve
foxracing.com/


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Fox Ranger Lite Shorts and Ranger Jersey Moth Short Sleeve.

Ranger Lite Shorts
MSRP: $84.95 USD
Sizes: 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34 (tested), 36, 38, 40
Colors: Black, Dirt Brown (tested), Dark Indigo Blue, Red Clay, Dark Brown
Features:
• Lightweight four way stretch fabric
• Dual-density chamois liner
• Moisture wick waistband
• DWR treated for water resistance.

I tested the size 34 Ranger Lite shorts which are crafted from a lightweight, four-way stretch fabric with a DWR treatment. This was the only pair of shorts that I tested that came with an integrated chamois liner (easily removed if so desired). As the name suggests, these shorts are a lighter weight version of Fox’s iconic Ranger shorts, and are meant for longer days in the hot sun. The shorts fasten with a snap closure system and feature an adjustable side cinch that isn’t Velcro (which is refreshing) and is easy to adjust while riding. The top of the waistband is lined with Fox’s TruDri fabric to wick sweat and moisture away from your body. There are only two pockets in the front, and they don’t zip, so maybe not an ideal place for your keys.

I really enjoyed wearing the Ranger Lites, and with how long Fox has been making mountain bike specific clothing it didn't surprise me. The inseam length is perfect for my longer legs, just barely overlapping the knee pads. The cinch system also makes it very convenient to tighten things up as needed (and less likely to wear out the way velcro seems to after a couple seasons of washing). I do wish that the two front pockets had zippers on them because that's where I stash my phone on most rides—that thought was always in the back of my mind, although my phone never even came close to going AWOL.

On a similar note, the removable liner that came with the shorts works great and was very comfortable on long test rides. I'm pretty picky when it comes to a chamois not having hard seam lines or hot spots and these had a nice level of performance for a mtb liner short with a decent amount of riding comfort and minimal diaper feel.

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Fox Ranger Lite shorts.

Fox Ranger Jersey Moth Short Sleeve
MSRP: $54.95 USD
Sizes: S - XXL
Colors: Cucumber Green (tested), Dark Slate Blue, Cordovan Red
Features:
• TruDri Fabric
• Mountain bike-specific tailoring
• Recycled fabrics

I tested an XL Ranger Jersey Moth SS. The jersey utilizes Fox's TruDri fabric, a wicking/ breathable 100% polyester number that utilizes recycled material.

The jersey fit my body really well: the length was just below my butt in the back, while the shoulders were loose but not baggy, and the neck was just that just right amount of snug. Fox states that they use mountain bike-specific tailoring and I definitely noticed, as it has a nice cut that moves well with the body without binding, and it has a nice drop tail back panel that offers coverage even while wearing a hip pack. With the jersey being 100% polyester, even if labeled "TruDri," I was worried that it would turn into a heavy wet mess once I started to sweat. Boy, was I wrong. My first dance with their signature recycled polyester fabric was a winner. I simply could not wet out this material, no matter how sweaty I got. I even took this out for a 3 hour ride, going up relentless, hot, sun-baked climbs mixed with deeply shaded descents, and I stayed dry throughout.

Overall, this jersey makes a great addition to Fox’s long-standing Ranger line.

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Fox Ranger Jersey Moth Short Sleeve.





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Ride NF

• Men's Lightweight Trail Pant
• Man's Trail Jersey
ridenf.com/


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Ride NF Lightweight Trail Pant and Trail jersey.

Men's Lightweight Trail Pant
MSRP: $165.00 USD
Sizes: XS - XXL
Colors: Black, Lagoon, Cool Grey (tested)
• 2 extra deep hand pockets, 1 secure zip pocket
• Elastic waistband and belt loops
• PFC free DWR Coating
• $30 CAD for alterations including extensions

These pants will definitely be a showstopper when you pull up to the trailhead. I am most definitely not one to wear flashy bike clothes when I ride, but I did feel just a little bit faster, and a little bit rockstar wearing them thanks to the almost white color and rather fitted design. The pants are crafted with a super stretchy ZRILIX 2 fabric, a 88% Nylon / 12% Elastane blend that offers enough stretch that you don’t have to worry about getting them over your knee pads, despite their slimmer fit and athletic taper. Lacking snaps or velcro, these pants are secured with NF’s elastic waist system, with added belt loops for those who like to rock belts. There are two hand pockets and one hidden YKK zipper pocket for secure storage.

The waist on the size large fit me fairly well. When we first reached out to NF and they offered to send pants, I was a bit concerned; with my 34" inseam, most riding pants are too short for me. Thankfully NF recognizes that not everyone is built the same, and for the inseam fit of the pants, they offer extensions (for a small fee) on their website. I took advantage of that to add two inches to them. With this extra length, the hem of the pants fell at my ankle, but the cuff area wasn’t quite as tapered as I would have liked. Maybe adding a small elastic band to the extra hem would have given it a more finished look and feel? Hmmm...

Despite the flashy Cool Grey, I did really enjoy wearing these pants and like I said earlier, you just feel faster. The waist fit perfectly, the legs were stretchy and not too tight, and kneepad fit was very comfortable—even with the knee fully bent. The material was lightweight enough I never found myself overheating in the warmer temps. As a side note, these were the only clothes in the test that I crashed in. But they held up great—other than a mud stain that I’m certain I’ll have a hard time getting out.


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Men's Lightweight Trail Pant.

Men's Trail Jersey
MSRP: $79.00 USD
Sizes: XS - XXL
Colors: Black (tested), Navy

This jersey is designed for hot summer days on the trail. It’s fabricated from a lightweight and breathable, 100% polyester material that has a UPF50 rating for sun protection. Add on a slight drop tail in the back, and it gives you ample coverage for all day adventures. The “NF” emblazoned on the front gives it a very classic and aesthetically pleasing look.

The material that NF uses is one of the highlights for me: I can sweat a lot during my rides and this jersey just wicks it all up. Along with being moisture wicking, it’s also anti-microbial too, so you and your friends don’t have to endure the stench of a post ride sweat fest on the drive back home.

As a taller rider, it is often hard to find jerseys that are long but not boxy, but the NF Trail Jersey fit me really well—it has a nice cut to it: just tight enough around the shoulders and neck to stay in place, but loose around the waist. There are no harsh seams on the shirt which allows for a flowy fit and feel.

Overall it’s a very simple jersey that isn’t trying to do anything special; rather it’s just a quality design meant for riding hard.


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Men's Trail Jersey.




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7Mesh

• Men's Flightpath Pant
• Mens Roam SS Shirt
7mesh.com/



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7Mesh Flightpath pant and Roam SS Shirt.

Men's Flightpath Pant
MSRP: $250.00 USD
Sizes: XS - XXL
Colors: Peat (Tested), Bottle Blue, Black
Features:
• Hand Pockets & 2-zippered side pockets with mesh sleeve
• Integrated ultra-suede hook and ladder waist adjuster
• Zippered fly with snap closure
• DWR Finish
• Oeko-Tex Standard 100 certified fabric

The Flightpath pants are made from a Oeko-Tex Standard 10/ certified fabric with a raised Cordura yarn to help prevent abrasion. Despite having a rugged construction, the fabric features a 14% elastane content for a healthy amount of stretch. Additionally, as the Flightpath Pant is meant for warmer weather, the fabric breathes well but is also bolstered with an eco-friendly DWR treatment. There are two front hand pockets, along with two side zipper pockets that can hold your phone. A simple hook and ladder waist adjustment with a zipper fly and snap closures secures the waist while also offering the ability to customize the fit. Oddly enough, per 7Mesh guidelines for sizing, I ended up testing the size small Flightpath Pants for this review. Like the jersey reviewed below, I was hesitant with their sizing recommendation, but they fit without a fuss. I'll freely admit that they were a bit snug, but thanks to that high elastane content and the articulated knees, I was still able to fit a lower profile knee pad under them. All that being said, I would probably size up to a medium if I was to purchase a pair of these.

I wore the FlightpathPant during a small rainstorm and stayed completely dry, thanks to the DWR finish. The pocket placement allows hassle free pedaling with standard essentials (phone, keys, gel/snack). Breathability was ok, neither mindblowingly good or bad. I did have one criticism, though; while I admire 7mesh's tendency for minimalism in their designs (as in their gear tends to have only the design features you need, and nothing else), the tapered fit at the ankle made it difficult for me to get my foot through the pants. I do like the tight fit that the pants give you and even with the sizing, the pants served the function of being a solid design with comfortable and durable feeling fabric. But I think a zipper or some elastic at the cuff would be a good feature to add.

Overall, this is a quality product and while these pants come at a hefty price tag, and despite my nitpick on the tight cuffs, they are definitely a worthy investment if you are looking for a lighter weight riding pant for shoulder seasons when the weather is hot, cold, wet, dry and everything in between.


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7Mesh Flightpath pant.

Men's Roam Shirt SS
MSRP: $70.00 USD
Sizes: XS - XXL
Colors: Black, Bottle Blue, Cinnamon (tested), Douglas Fir
Features:
• Lightweight Long-Sleeve Jersey
• Highly breathable, high-wicking mesh fabric
• Built with UPF 50+ fabric and heat map-inspired printed graphics

Like the Flightpath Pant, as per 7Mesh's sizing chart, I tested a size down from what I normally would wear, and ended up with a size M Roam SS Shirt. Surprisingly, it fit very well. The material used in this jersey is a highly breathable 100% polyester fabric manufactured from recycled fabric. It has a UPF 50rating and an antimicrobial treatment, both pluses for those days when you forget sunscreen or find yourself crammed into the car with your buddies after a long day on the bike. There is also a textured backer on the fabric that floats it a bit against the skin adding breathability and keeping the shirt from clinging when you're sweaty. There is a droptail, but it's pretty minimalistic.

During test rides, what I found most noticeable is that the jersey really does feel airy, like it was actually floating on me. There was no binding up or tightness and the fabric felt almost frictionless. Score one for the textured backer in the material. That factor alone frequently made me forget that I was wearing something I was supposed to be reviewing. I also really like the look, with the Cinnamon "heat map" color wave and the nicely proportioned seam lines. In fact, this was probably the most stylish jersey I reviewed here. The seam design across the shoulders is worth noting: say goodbye to having a seam line chafe your shoulders if wearing a traditional pack when riding is your thing.

Yes, for a simple (if stylish) looking jersey, this ain't cheap. But the functional tech hiding in the fabric as well as the thoughtfully designed seams make this Roam Shirt SS a keeper. It's nice to know that it's also available in 3/4 and LS versions, too. Like the shorts I would still prefer to size up to a large if I were to purchase one, mainly because the medium was a tad bit short in the torso even with the drop tail (leading to a little mud tramp stamp on my lower back). Despite that, this stylish jersey hits all the marks for summer shredding.


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Men's Roam Shirt SS.





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Pearl Izumi

• Men's Summit Pro Shell Shorts
• Men's Summit Pro Short Sleeve Jersey
pearlizumi.com/


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Pearl Izumi Men's Summit Pro Shell Shorts and Short Sleeve Jersey.

Men's Summit Pro Shell Shorts
MSRP: $135.00 USD
Sizes: 28 -38
Colors: Urban Sage (tested), Phantom, Cacao
Features:
• PI Dry permanent water shedding technology
• Adjustable waist closure for easy on-the-fly adjustments
• Constructed from light and durable recycled stretch-woven nylon
• Two zippered Trail Access side pockets shift contents to back of leg for pedaling comfort

Pearl Izumi apparel has always fit me really well and these shorts are no exception. As with the other brands in this review, I tested the size 34 and it fit great. The Summit Pro shorts are constructed from a lightweight, recycled nylon with PI Dry technology—a permanent water shedding coating. The waist can be tightened via an adjustable waist closure system, and laser perforated panels on the inside of the legs allow for breathability. The 13.5” inseam gives plenty of room for seamless interaction with knee pads, and two well placed pockets allow you to carry your essentials without hindering your peddling.

I was very impressed with the design of these shorts. First, they’re almost as airy feeling as the Giro and Alpinestars—they are so lightweight and breathable. You pretty much forget you’re wearing them. Secondly, I have pretty large quads. Not @dangerholm large, but not pipe cleaners, either. And these shorts offer just the right fitted feel for a snug but easy moving fit while pedaling. As you move down towards the knee, there’s an almost unnoticeable bit of flare that allows unrestricted use of larger knee pads. I also enjoyed the way that Pearl Izumi set up their closure system: it is a simple and elegant “set it and forget it” single cam; you just pull it tight and voila! You’re ready to get after it.

I truly couldn’t find anything wrong with these shorts. Not a single nitpick. They’re lightweight, have excellent breathability and pedaling performance - perfect for grabbing those KOM's on your next next lap.

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Pearl Izumi Men's Summit Pro Shell Shorts


Men's Summit Pro Short Sleeve Jersey
MSRP: $80.00 USD
Sizes: S - XXL
Colors: Black, Gravel (Tested), Pale Pine/Cacao, Gulf Teal
Features:
• Recycled Polartec Delta Fabric on the body
• Dropped rear hem for on-bike coverage

I tested the size XL of this jersey and similar to the shorts, Pearl Izumi knocked it out of the park. The recycled Polartec Delta fabric composition of the jersey (73% recycled polyester, 27% Tencel) offers an incredibly soft feel on the skin. And it’s designed with low profile bonded sleeves and collar for easy movement. Add in a drop tail, and this jersey is elegant simplicity in its design.

This jersey feels closer to putting on your favorite sweater with how soft the material is, yet it still breaths well. I wore it on a very hot late spring day and it wicked away all of the sweat, never sticking to the skin. Instead, it seems to float over you. The mechanical wicking is so good that even though you may have dark sweat marks showing, you’d swear you’re dry.

My two cents? This review should just say, “go buy this jersey right now,” because it is just that good. Although that simple excellence does have a bit of a hefty price tag. Even with that, though, from a pure functionality perspective, I really appreciated how it’s not trying to be anything crazy special or visually stunning; rather it’s just a high-quality jersey made for going hard in hot weather.

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Pearl Izumi Men's Summit Pro Short Sleeve Jersey





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ION

• Men's MTB Traze Amp Aft Short
• Men's Traze Amp Aft LS jersey
ion-products.com/


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Ioni Men's MTB Traze Amp Aft short and Traze Amp Aft LS jersey.

Men's MTB Traze Amp Aft Short
MSRP: $134.99 USD
Sizes: 30(S) - 38(XXL)
Colors: Dark-Mud, Evil-Amber, Black (tested)
Features:
• Highly breathable and moisture-wicking material
• Exterior velcro waistband adjusters
• Two zip front pockets with integrated phone pocket
• 4-way stretch fabric front and back

I tested the size 34 of these shorts. They’re made from an 88% polyester / 12% Elastane blend, making them stretchy and comfortable to wear. The Traze Amp Aft shorts have everything that you expect from modern mountain bike shorts: two generously sized front zipper pockets—so generous that Ion put a dedicated phone pocket in one so that your phone doesn’t flop around (although it’s small enough that maybe only a flip phone would fit in it). The shorts are secured by a single button and a Velcro fly, with Velcro side adjusters for a custom fit.

These were the heaviest of the shorts that I tested in the review, which for mountain bike shorts shouldn’t really matter because we’re already carrying water bottles, tools, etc. But you do kind of notice that heft when the temperature rises. The trade-off with that added material is it inspires confidence that should you slide out, you won’t shred them.

The shorts were very comfortable to wear and stayed put nicely while riding. The inseam length was flush to the knee pad and the cuffs were slightly flared out for seamless movement with the knee pads. This also translates into plenty of room for big quads, which many mountain bikers have. Note that I have a 33” waist, but I only needed to tighten the Velcro adjustments halfway to get a snug fit vs the way I frequently need to almost bottom out waist adjusters to get a secure fit (something to bear in mind if you're on the upper end of a size). As much as I liked them, I did have one gripe: when the Velcro waist adjustments were tightened, the waist would fold on itself.


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Men's MTB Traze Amp Aft Short.


Men's Traze Amp Aft LS jersey
MSRP: $94.99 USD
Sizes: S - XXL
Colors: Pacific Blue (tested) , Black, Shark-grey
Features:
• Highly breathable and moisture-wicking material
• Integrated microfiber glasses wipe
• Vented fabric back and side inserts
• Small pocket for lift tickets

I tested the size L version of the Traze Amp Aft LS Jersey vs. XL; in the past, Ion has fit me a bit more generously than other brands, which is why I sized down. Ion crafts the Traze Amp using their “Brrr Technology” —a treatment applied directly to the fibers vs. the finished fabric to create a permanent cooling sensation. An integrated microfiber glasses wipe on the bottom of the jersey allows you to keep your glasses squeaky clean. Stashed in the left side seam there is a small zipper pocket where you can keep a small snack or your keys.

The fit of this jersey was perfect for me. As a taller person, it’s difficult for a jersey to feel fitted but also long enough to cover my torso well. This jersey does both. For a true summer jersey, the material is a bit on the thicker side, which also makes it on the heavier side, particularly when you start to sweat. Consequently, I found the Traze jersey to be more ideal for those cold starts where you just don’t want to bother bringing a jacket vs. sun drenched epics. I wore this in March with no jacket in 50° F temperatures and it retained my warmth just fine—I never felt like I needed another layer. Contrast those chilly March rides with the surprise heat wave that we went through in May, and I did sweat a lot; the shirt definitely got a bit saturated then, but after the ride it dried out very quickly.

All in all I really enjoyed wearing this shirt. It has a good feel and is stylish enough that I found myself wearing it even when I wasn’t biking. The “Brrr” technology sounds like a funny marketing tool, but I did find the shirt was somehow consistently cool to the touch, something I think would be more beneficial on short sleeve shirt instead.


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Men's Traze Amp Aft LS jersey.





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100%

• Celium Shorts
• Celium SS Jersey
100percent.com/


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100% Celium Shorts and Celium SS Jersey.

Celium Shorts
MSRP: $139.00 USD
Sizes: 28 - 38
Colors: Forest Green, Black, Charcoal (tested), Sand
Features:
• DWR lightweight nylon/spandex 4-way stretch woven fabric
• Fully sewn then taped seams for maximum riding comfort and durability
• BOA Fit System dial and lace technology for a secure, custom fit
• Zipper pockets for security of essentials and stabilization pocket for tool
• Inseam laser perforations for increased airflow
• Silicone print on inner waistband to minimize slippage

Like most of the shorts in this review, I tested the Celium Shorts in size 34. They utilize a lightweight DWR treated nylon/spandex fabric that offers a comfortable four way stretch. The two zipper pocket on the front of the shorts are deep enough for phones, snacks or tools. There are laser cut perforations on the inseam for breathability. The waist has a stretchy mesh instead of a traditional fly, and is secured by a BOA fit system that is backed up with a silicone print on the inner waistband to prevent the waistband from slipping. Interestingly enough, all of the seams are fully sealed and taped—something you typically find only in Gore-tex apparel.

These shorts are one of the few that I’ve seen that offer a BOA fit system to secure them. In order to fit my 33 inch waist, the BOA system was nearly bottomed out, but still had just enough adjustment for fine tuning the final fit. The BOA system is often advertised to give precision fit and the ability to make micro adjustments on the fly and I liked that aspect. But…I don’t know if it is completely necessary for a pair of shorts, as I’ve never had that much difficulty dialing in waist fit with the myriad of other fit systems available. But, having said that, I have to fess up how satisfying the clicks of the BOA dial were, like I was strapping in for a fun day on the bike. However, it could potentially be difficult for some users to put on these shorts as the mesh in the fly area—even with the stretch material—could restrict the shorts from opening up all of the way.

Overall I really enjoyed wearing the Celium Shorts. The performance of the material was very impressive, easily withstanding some of the PNW’s typical spring rain squalls one minute, and keeping me cool with it’s breathability when it was sunny the next. These shorts did fit me a bit tighter around the quads than the other shorts in this review—not in a restrictive manner; but it’s something to consider if you have larger quads like me. All in all, the Celiums are definitely a contender for my top pair of shorts, as I always found myself reaching for them.


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Celium bike shorts.

Celium Short Sleeve Jersey
MSRP: $69.00 USD
Sizes: S - XL
Colors: Forest Green/Black, Grey/Racer Red (Tested), Black/charcoal
Features:
• Wicking Polyester/spandex mesh fabric with anti-microbial properties
• Fade resistant sublimated graphics
• Reflective logos for increased visibility
• Drop tail provides increased coverage in riding position
• Internal goggle wipe keeps your eye protection clean

I tested the Celium SS Jersey in XL. It’s made from a (you guessed it) moisture wicking polyester/elastane blended fabric with anti-microbial properties, making it incredibly soft and stink free. The graphics are reflective for safety in low light, which is a nice touch. The jersey that I tested looked phenomenal, like I was about to do a stage on the UCI Enduro World Series. I also appreciated the internal goggle wipe, which I found useful for keeping eye protection clean and sweat free.

I used the sizing guide on 100%’s website, and I feel that their sizing is a bit strange. The length of the jersey is perfect, but the arms and neck proportions were just a bit too generous. I’m not exactly ‘the Mountain’ from Game of Thrones but I’m not exactly a beanpole, either; and I felt a bit like a kid wearing his dad’s shirt. The neck collar of the jersey is very angular, which makes it look very cool, but if the opening is too large—like it was on me—it droops pretty low. The material that 100% utilizes is riddled with small holes. Not so much as, say, mesh, but it takes the breathability off the charts. I mean, a lot of the jerseys I tested redefined what I had thought breathable meant, but this one blew my mind.

In sum, despite the unusual fit, from a performance perspective, this jersey has everything you would expect from a “race” specific jersey. Heck, it even says “DH racing specific” on the front.


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Celium Short Sleeve Bike Jersey.





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POC

• M's Essential Enduro Shorts
• MTB Pure LS Jersey
pocsports.com/


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POC Men's Essential Enduro Shorts and MTB Pure LS jersey.

M's Essential Enduro Shorts
MSRP: $100.00 USD
Sizes: XS - XXL
Colors: 6 colors available. Uranium Black (tested)
Features:
• Lightweight and durable nylon fabric with stretch
• Precise Mountain Bike Ride fit
• Rider articulated (pre-bent) knees
• Designed for seamless compatibility with POC knee protection
• Two zipped side pockets
• Elastic waistband at the back

The Essential Enduro shorts are crafted from a lightweight and durable nylon fabric that offers a lot of stretch. POC doesn’t share a lot of information on what kind of materials they use, but don’t worry, it's amazing. An elastic waistband with a velcro adjustment allows the shorts to stay secured. The shorts feature two zipper pockets that can fit you phone or a few snacks. The cuffs are slightly articulated to accommodate knee protection and prevent binding.

I tested the Essential Enduro shorts in size 34. The fit of these shorts was just about perfect for me with the velcro cinched up to right in the middle. Length was also on par with what I like for riding, just long enough to overlap the knee protection. While riding, the shorts stayed in the same position, regardless of what shapes I was throwing. One thing that I noticed immediately (and that I had never thought of before wearing these particular shorts) was how glued I felt to the seat while wearing them. It wasn’t that they were “sticky”, but rather that the fabric used just grabs to the seat and makes you feel very secure in the saddle, kind of like a pair of Five Tens on flats.

My only slight nitpick is that the pocket openings are pretty small and the zippers scrape against your hands when getting something out of them. If you have smaller hands, then you probably won’t run into this issue, but if you’re trying to answer your phone in a jiffy, it can be slightly irritating.


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POC Essential Enduro Shorts.

POC MTB Pure LS Jersey
MSRP: $80.00 USD
Sizes: XS - XXL
Colors: Gone are POC’s days of vanilla black or white apparel offerings! The MTB Pure LS is available in an eye watering 16 colors. Prehnite Green/Hydrogen White (tested)
Features:
• Lightweight Long-Sleeve Jersey
• Highly breathable, high-wicking mesh fabric
• Quick drying fabric

I typically found that POC clothing runs a bit small so I tested the XL jersey. POC states that the jersey fits perfectly over their back and elbow protectors; translation - anticipate a loose relaxed fit design. The MTB Pure LS is made out of a highly breathable and lightweight material designed to help regulate your body temperature for the whole ride. The fabric was definitely very unique: it's almost a honeycomb material that allows the jersey to sit off your skin a bit, making it feel airy and even lighter than it is.

This jersey fit as if it was made for me: it feels extremely comfortably, the neck is not too tight, and the arms are not baggy or too long. The jersey length is perfect, too, resting just below the butt when standing, and resting a few inches below the hip bone while riding. I rode this jersey in overcast 50⁰ F days and 70⁰ F sunny days and it worked great in either temperature. The small pocket on the back can fit almost nothing except for your keys, or if you find your favorite pebble on the side of the trail and have to show it to all your friends back home.

I often found myself grabbing this jersey on chilly mornings when I knew it was going to get warmer and didn’t want to bring a jacket. It is definitely one of the items I will keep in my riding gear rotation, although it does come with a steep price tag.


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POC MTB Pure LS Jersey.





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About the Tester:

Micah is 6'3" and weights 185 lbs, with a 33-inch waist, 34-inch inseam, 40-inch hips, and 38-inch chest. He was born and raised in White Salmon Washington and after a few years away has settled back into life in the Columbia River Gorge. Micah is 26 years old, and has been riding a bike for close to 20 years. He did a short stint racing mountain bikes, doing some local PNW enduro and short track racing, and spends every fall and winter cyclocross racing. Along with mountain biking, Micah also enjoys skiing, whitewater kayaking, kiteboarding, and soccer.


Author Info:
nkrohan avatar

Member since Apr 22, 2014
36 articles

164 Comments
  • 90 2
 needs an option for "whatever was on offer at 70% off from *insert retailer of choice* when you ripped your last set". I might be alone in not caring what I look like, as long as I'm comfortable (both in terms of temperature and fit)
  • 10 0
 royal racing has a big sale currently. I bought a pair of their shorts 9 years ago, stopped biking for 6 years, then rode them for a year. two zippers failed, and they sent me a new pair of shorts for free, no problems through two seasons. A+ in my books
  • 20 0
 @etownrider3: I just got Dakine shorts for $27 from their memorial day sale. Whoever is buying bike clothing at full price is crazy.
  • 9 7
 Thats fair,
I think what gets me the most is the idea of wearing the action sports costume.
I just go with good quality, well fitting shorts and tops, that can be worn to the pub after.
I appreciate the work, development, and effort that goes into this stuff (does anyone need a Boa mechanism to tighten your pants) but I really cant be bothered.

I do enjoy the boys and girls out wearing their action sports costumes, especially at the bike park, they look rad when out ripping berms and jumps
  • 1 0
 @tjbiker38: The Dakine Memorial Day sale was pretty damn good - I got two pairs of syncline shorts and two jerseys for just over $100 Canadian delivered - should see me through a couple of years.
  • 1 0
 @etownrider3: They seem to have a general zipper-problem. I had an otherwise awesome winter jacket from RR, but 2 of 3 zippers failed and all velcro patches fell off in 3 years.
  • 2 0
 @tjbiker38: same people buying e-bikes for their kids..
  • 1 0
 I bought the Fox ranger jersey a month ago and the collar stitching has unraveled and after one wash at 40, the transfer on the front peeled. I’ve bought full 50to01 gear now, brilliant quality, great sizing, doesn’t fall apart, sustainable sourcing and tested by the best!
  • 1 0
 I bought the Fox ranger jersey a month ago and the collar stitching has unraveled and after one wash at 40, the transfer on the front peeled. I’ve bought full 50to01 gear now, brilliant quality, great sizing, doesn’t fall apart, sustainable sourcing and tested by the best!
  • 54 0
 I don't trust "summer wear" from places like the PNW and the UK. I want to buy from a company based out of Atlanta or San Antonio. I bought a jersey recently from POC. The description was for "the warmest of summer days". It'll be great for late fall. I want a jersey designed by an overweight street food vendor from San Antonio Texas.
  • 12 0
 Yeah...all of these companies don't quite comprehend that being wrapped in plastic materials (regardless of how many welded holes or fish slits) in the south is still just a garbage bag.

I found a Patagonia "mountain bike" capilene short sleeve henley recently that is the only thing with an inkling of a sleeve that agrees with the heat index & humidity here.

If I could buy lighweight merino wool across the board, I would. I've got one pair of Smartwool boxers that are heaven on my helmsman.

But I'm no dentist.
  • 5 0
 @blowmyfuse: Also a big fan of the Patagonia mountain bike line. I have a couple of those capilene jerseys as well as their shorts.
  • 1 0
 Yeah. I have some Enduro shorts.. Those things are way too warm to wear down here in the South.
  • 4 0
 Seriously! What's with all the long sleeve "summer jerseys"? I guess that's fine if it never gets above 70*F in the summer and you're so far north that the sun isn't very direct but anywhere else they're horrible. Same for shorts that go past your knee and what companies like to call "summer weight pants". You know what are summer weight pants? Shorts. Generally the shorter the better.
  • 2 0
 Fwiw, the 7Mesh Elevate and Sight shirts have proven justifiably comfortable in the Deep South heat and humidity for me.
  • 7 0
 @schu2470: the long sleeve jerseys are usually more for sun and crash rash protection than for keeping cool
  • 3 0
 @blowmyfuse: REI brand merino wool shirts, usually from the hiking section, are a really good option if you don't want to spend Patagucci money. Their outlet section usually has some Smartwool stuff on clearance and with how frequently they send out discount coupons, it might be worth looking into there
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: big fan of the capilene merino shortsleeve shirts. no big logos on it and nice colourways available. fast wicking and you dont smell like a moose at the pub when going for a beer after the ride. i dont go back to plastic jerseys.
  • 3 0
 I can’t tell you how often I see guys wearing long pants when it’s 80+ here in Denver. Makes no sense.

I’ve found Fox makes good stuff that isn’t obscenely priced and often found at a nice discount. It’s my go-to brand at the moment.
  • 1 0
 @schu2470: Short sleeves with aggressive sunlight and longer rides is a no-go for me. I always ride long sleeve, even these days with 95F. TLD "air" jerseys are a bliss these days, they just allow airflow trough all the concealed vents on the garment
  • 1 0
 In all honesty, the Fox Flexair jerseys are awesome. I'm in Brisbane, Australia and it's rather hot / humid in summer (most days are consisently 86F and above, often by 8 or 9 in the mornng) and I wear these all year round. They are excellent and my go to jersey. Probably won't consider buying anything else.
  • 1 0
 @FuTAnT: These are what I've been wearing. Haven't found anything better yet.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: the Patagonia capilene cool lightweight is great here in Arizona. I tend to wait until the previous season's colors are on sale so the price is actually reasonable.
  • 2 0
 @sjma: I live in Asheville. The men's "sale" rack here is non-existent unless you like small...orange...ugly...something....
  • 2 0
 zoic is based in hot-as-balls san diego
  • 41 0
 One thing is sure: those clothes won't make you happy.
  • 6 0
 The model has super concentrated happiness which requires a serious look
  • 5 0
 He is very seriously happy.
  • 5 0
 It truly is a skill to learn to be comfortable when someone is taking your photo. Next time I will bring the whiskey.
  • 4 0
 @nkrohan: need more ‘blue steel’ Smile
  • 2 0
 @Rubber-Buccaneer: Is it Quentin Tarantino ?
  • 2 0
 @Rubber-Buccaneer: Forget Blue Steel. This year's look is Reluctant Model.
  • 29 0
 It's got all the colour choice of a vehicle lease company. You bunch of bland swines.
  • 9 1
 There's no way I'm wearing bland colours in my local woods, the farmers and gamekeepers aren't likely to try shooting a flourescent deer
  • 1 0
 @HankHank: hard to poach on your e-moped if you're easy to spot
  • 1 0
 Yeah this drab earth tone trend is boring as hell.
  • 25 0
 Amazing how POC is on the lower end of the price spectrum in a roundup.

Specialized has their trail shorts on sale for $48 right now, they're a solid option. They have a zipper pocket and a button closure (BOA? really?) and don't get stinky
  • 3 0
 I recommend these shorts as well. Check out specialized’s eBay. I dunno why but everything is discounted even more. I ordered some 2FO Roost DH shoes from there. Black ones are listed at $111 everywhere else and $60 on the eBay. Arrived in two days.
  • 2 1
 Specialized trail pants I highly recommend but don't get the shorts. They are light and comfortable but there is only one pocket. So if you're carrying keys... phone...tool/plug/snack... they all have to go in the same pocket together
  • 1 0
 @ihertzler: I think I saw these pants on sale at Fanatik recently for around $80
  • 3 0
 @ihertzler: something that promotes you to not carry keys in your pocket while riding is a good thing.
  • 2 0
 @ihertzler: the regular trail shorts that I have have 1 regular pocket and 1 zipper pocket. The bigger, regular pocket holds the big iPhone with room to spare and the zipper pocket holds my credit card case wallet plus my car's key fob.

For me that's plenty but I do have a burrito hole in my frame full of snacks and tools, plus the multitool on my bottle cage. I think Specialized makes a cargo shorts version of them if you need some more serious gummy bear storage
  • 24 1
 such boring drab colours and at laughable prices. i know its cool to seem rich and modern but im never buying any of this depressing looking gear and simply cant comprehend why suddenly these overpriced t shirts and shorts have increased in prices so much in like the last ten years but that goes for a lot of mtb things. i guess its our fault for spending 6+ grand on a mid level bike with nx groupset so a couple of hundred pounds on this junk seems ok to most.
  • 22 0
 Do you have any more expensive offerings? I'd hate people to think I'm one of the poors.
  • 13 0
 I am too poor to spend this much on clothing like this. It's why I ride in tshirts and whatever pants/shorts I can find.
  • 26 0
 You're just frugal. The industry wants you to think you're poor. Marketing wants you to equate poverty with lower value as a human. Just because you don't have a boa enclosure on your pants, doesn't mean you aren't loved or valid.

All jokes aside, whenever I go to the trails, I see people all kitted out, and think that's "cool and trendy, they sure look slick". But, When I see a 40, 50, or 60 year old riding in cargo shorts, on an old GT Talera tackling mostly the same trails as everybody else, I think :"That right there is what a f*cking badass looks like"
  • 8 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: better to have the boa in your pants...
  • 6 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: Capitalism wants you to equate poverty with lower value as a human.
  • 1 1
 @handmedowncountry: No, capitalism allows you to spend whatever you want on your hobby.
  • 3 0
 @dllawson819: You're 100% correct. Freedom isn't free...but, it's always for sale.
  • 12 1
 most of these are way overpriced. Go to decathlon or shop around at chainreaction and you'll find a pair of shorts for less than 50 euros and use any kind of shirt you like. Spend the money elsewhere
  • 15 5
 Man... you guys aren't tired of olive drab and matte finish everything yet? Bring back glossy frame paint and helmet paint and neon yellow already like 2012. Let's make that new again. Biking for the last 5 years has been like swimming in an LL Bean catalog.
  • 1 0
 The description is missing, but I'm sure you can still get the suit from the bottom picture. It is a camouflage print for ehm... when you're among team mates I guess.
  • 2 0
 It's just as played out as regurgitated "party" shirts with copy/paste beers, palm trees, whatever.

Give me some real artwork kit. Psychedelic stuff like Threyda does.
  • 1 0
 @mkul7r4: I still have my Royal Steve Peat jerseys from the Syndicate somewhere that are like Red/White/Black with tie-dye cause they're awesome. I'm fat now though haha. Fasthouse shit is cool. Fist is cool. TLD used to be so rad, now they're doing more cookie cutter. Unit stuff used to be rad. I'll take anything that isn't matte or pastel at this point.
  • 10 1
 Are people really spending this kind of money on riding gear thats wild. TLD always has last year shorts on sale and they last like 5 years. Fasthouse has the best fitting pants and jerseys in my opinion and are always doing sales. If im just riding some local XC loops I'm wearing just a random tech tee.
  • 4 0
 MTB isn't underground anymore...
  • 1 0
 yup, went to the back pages of their (TLD) website and bought shorts for 50 each and jerseys for 38 each (american pesos). it'll be good enough for the next couple summers...
  • 2 0
 I used to only ride MTB specific clothing, but I think as I've got older it feels like it matters less and less. Right now unless I'm racing my go to kit is a pair of Prana hiking shorts over a liner paired with an inexpensive tech tee, and for days where I'm just sessioning a skills area I'll just wear whatever.
  • 8 0
 @danielsapp I take back anything I said about your modeling unhappiness. You were an amazing and authentic male model for gear and clothing. This poor fella looks more miserable modeling than any grown man should.
  • 2 0
 yeah, whatever happened to danielsapp? last i saw of him i was at I9 getting a hub serviced. that was before covid...
  • 2 0
 @flipoffthemonkeys: Stalked him recently (and by that I mean one of his social media posts appeared in my feed) and I think he's got a wee little one so probably going zero drama hour.
  • 5 0
 PNW has MTB shorts for $30 on Amazon. Never rode with specific riding shorts before because I was not gonna shell out, but I do like the marginal features they provide for the price.
  • 2 0
 Came here to say this exact thing. Can't beat $30 shorts!
  • 2 0
 Jersey for $15 as well
  • 1 0
 Also available at Amazon or Costco, 32 Degrees Cool men shorts and they're a two pack for $30. Perfect shorts for mtb with zippered good sized pockets. The prices above blow my mind.
  • 6 0
 I’m sure these insane margins find their way back to provide the factory workers with great working condition and wages yes?
  • 4 0
 All this gear is so overpriced. I only get any MTB branded gear when stuff is on sale at a good discount, no way am I paying $140 for a pair of MTB shorts. Walmart has Dickies and Wrangler shorts that are light and stretchy for under $40. I'd rather buy those honestly. lol
  • 7 0
 what’s with all the weird olive and light gray color ways?
  • 5 0
 Yeah, we need brighter colors and bigger logos! I want to look like I'm racing ALL THE TIME
  • 7 0
 I am the only one wishing the woman's lineup was available in man sizes
  • 6 0
 Micah needs some happiness and smiles in his life...
  • 3 0
 damn i would be smiling all day if i could jump like him
  • 2 0
 Things that are nice in warm weather bike jerseys:

* Pockets that can comfortably carry a CO2 inflator and cartridge + Small Multi-Tool
* Wicking so you don’t become a swamp creature after sweating
* Not making you look like a total dweeb if you decide to go for a drink or bite in public after your ride.
* Good and accurate sizing advice on the website so you don’t have to return your order like 5x
* A reasonable warranty and then an actual manufacturer-supported repair option, so you don’t have to throw them away when a seam comes undone after 2-3 seasons.
* Magical anti-stink properties for bonus points

Things that are nice in warm weather bike shorts and pants:

* Honestly, samsies +
* A pocket that can securely carry your phone, but also make it easy to pull out in time to capture photos of Sasquatch
* No stupid heavy plastic buckles.

I would like to request that all future warm weather clothing reviews use the above scale.

BTW, I think Patagonia’s dirt roamer scores pretty high on all of the above, except for an extreme lack of pockets. They might have fixed that in recent years, but I wouldn’t know because they keep repairing my old shorts when they fall apart.
  • 1 0
 Everything you pointed out except for the Co2 -inflater /cartridge and tool pockets. Thats just stupid and goofyWink just strap that to the bike with a Dakine HotLaps Gripper, Backcountry strap or use a hip pack .

Three pockets strategically placed with zippers (Two front hand and a Phone pocket situated slightly forward of the side of thigh.
  • 2 0
 Here's my current kit:

Pearl Izumi Canyon shorts/liner combo from 2018
$30 on Amazon before massive inflation
Colors: sky blue, black plaid
Features:
• Still don't see a need to replace them after 5 years
• Refuse to pay $80+ for a pair of shorts, and then more again for liners

PNW Ozone shirt
$15 on Amazon
20% wool, 80% polyester
Colors: poop "green", gray
• Cheap as shit
• Boxy as heck
• Covers my nipples
  • 1 0
 1 Kit? BARF! I bet your buddies just love riding behind you with the wonderful aroma emitting and permitting the surrounding air robbing their oxygen!! Or hopefully you wash it before each ride but that's hard on the material unless you 're a ride once a weekend warrior.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: Lol bruh I have more than that, I'm just being dramatic for the comments section.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: I do most of my rides in one kit that I wash each time, I have spare if I didn’t have time to wash the main one.

I ride almost daily, that means washing almost daily and in the 3+ years I’ve had the current fox jersey it’s been washed at least 400times (and spent time under the sun… and been sweated into). It definitely shows the wear, the colour has faded a bit, the seams are weakened, but most ‘real’ damage has been from crashes. Anyway, should last me this year for sure, Not sure about 2024…
  • 2 0
 @Plancktonne: Whenever other riders spot you they must think it's Deja Vu Wink
  • 1 0
 I like the idea of that giro jersey with the pockets but seems like it would just lead to very saggy, uncomfortable, jersey pockets if you put anything more than your keys in there. Someone should make a cargo bib with no chamois, since cargo bibs are the best for on back storage but I don’t like wearing shimmy under baggies, and I don’t have the confidence to wear Lycra with flat pedals and knee pads.
  • 1 0
 I wear cargo bibs *with* chamois with bike shorts and this is the best combo to carry bottle and tools on my back (vs Camelbak) for short(er) rides.
  • 1 0
 @cool3: I wear cargo bibs when I’m on my gravel bike in full Lycra and I agree they are the best. Just prefer no chamois on the more upright position on the mountain bike
  • 1 0
 @cool3: I got bought some endura cargo bibs, but found all the extra layer pockets (does anyone really run a camel back in their bibs?!) just got extra hot so cut them out...
  • 4 0
 Holy shit that 7Mesh shirt is ugly af. What the f*ck is that design on the upper part?
  • 1 0
 I’m so annoyed by this as well. I have the previous gen of the Sight shirt that has a normal all one color/texture and was gonna buy a few more but they’ve lost their minimalistic design
  • 1 0
 @pierceklinke: Strava heatmap. Sight shirts are still solid colours
  • 1 0
 As someone who runs hot and sweats a lot... the light grey and tawny colour-ways are to be avoided for me lest I appear to have pee'd my trousers on days where the moisture moves down my jersey into my lap. I find those colours significantly darken when wet... so yeah... just another consideration for the rest of you disgusting sweaters. Though of course- some fabrics are better than others for this.
  • 1 0
 Sometime I think that the bike industry really wants MTB to be a rich person's sport. The pricing on these clothing goods are outrageous! If the bike industry wants to grow the sport, products need to be more economically accessible to the masses. Also, the acronyms used to describes their latest tech or glorified garbage bags is tired.
  • 1 0
 I have that 100% Celium shirt (but I'm the green/black fade) and it is the lightest thing I've ever worn. Literally feels like not wearing a shirt at all. Did a hot enduro race in it last weekend, it was barely damp to the touch, even in the more sun baked climbs. Real contrast to day 1 where I wore an older Royal jersey made from a mesh material, that was heavy and wet after an hour or so. And while yellow is great for being seen, it also attracts bugs like mad! I've got some old yellow TLD shorts, and they got covered in insects like I'm a sunflower or something
  • 1 0
 For the people like me who don’t like their shorts to be extremely long,baggy and cost a fortune. Look into handup. I was skeptical about their clothes which I don’t love their shirts but the shorts are money. Only 44$ USD. All I’ll buy now.
  • 1 0
 7Mesh stole their brand name from the first nation of Squamish, the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw . The worst of it is 7mesh never asked the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw people and have never even engaged with them for compensation..... By the way they're partially owned by Lululemon who use coal powered factories to produce their “Be Human, Be Well, and Be Planet” moto... what a joke
  • 2 0
 Pretty dull/drab color for the most part. But then I remember the comment section in the Dharco party shirts article so my data suggests these are going to be popular.
  • 4 0
 can someone tell this dude a joke or something?
  • 4 0
 So ah... $100+ for shorts?
  • 5 0
 Cringe
  • 3 0
 Two observations:
1) That guy shreds, kudos.
2) That guy needs to take a laxative or some xanax or something.
  • 1 0
 Tried on several sizes of Fox Racing pants(trousers obvs). All sizes seemed to have forgotten to account for guys having testicles. Wondering who actually fits in these things…?
  • 1 0
 After all those years of PB tests & comments I still can't figure out how they still release shorts without the belt option and without zipper-pockets. Two absolute knock-out criteria for my purchases....!
  • 1 0
 All the jersey’s fit like some old art teacher’s smock or something. Like a blouse. You can’t shred the gnar looking like that
  • 3 0
 The model looks like he had mexican food the night before.
  • 3 0
 The women's gear is on point, the men's not so much!
  • 2 0
 A review of riding kit without Endura MT500.... the gold standard of riding kit (and Eco friendly)
  • 8 0
 this is summer kit.....since you don't have summer in Scotland, this review is moot to you. lol


MT500 is great, but hot af anytime the temp tops 65º....that's 18º in olde money
  • 1 0
 Might be well made but their sizing is utter lunacy. You either need to be a bean pole or a Viking to fit their stuff.
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: 18.... Time to ride naked lol.
It was a nice 28C today and the mt500s were prime.
Few more warm days in the forecast too.
  • 1 0
 @Mooweeman: I am 6ft1 and a small, the leg length works great for me too as most 30/32" waist riding trousers are half masts or baggy and the MT500 works great, even with knee pads.
I wouldnt want to be 5ft6 and a 38" waist and try and buy some though.
  • 3 0
 Those Giro gloves look like costume prop from Chronicles of Riddick
  • 2 0
 2023 Summer apparel buying plans: thrift shopping for hawaiian party shirts
  • 1 0
 The little pocket on the POC jerseys is perfect for a lift pass or mouth guard. I love my POC Enduro jerseys, might have to pick up some of these for summer.
  • 3 0
 The fly on those Giro's is shorts foreskin.
  • 2 1
 Fasthouse has $38 tech tees. Also have pants and shorts on sale for less than $70 bucks. Aesthetics of all are superior to these.
  • 3 0
 Mountain bikers really love dressing like complete tools.
  • 2 1
 Mons Royale merino perfect for skiing, biking, tramping, and everything in between. Doesn’t get stinky and boxers are great alternative to chamois…
  • 1 0
 I thought this happens only with food - packages getting smaller and price going up. Looks like this also applies to bike shorts.
  • 1 0
 I like my shorts to cover more of my pads than all of these look like they do. Shorts that sit above/on the top of my pads are a trail fashion faux-pas.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone have the link to those Amazon Endura pants that do not have the logos on them? lol no joke they're were like 40 bucks or something
Thank you in advance
  • 1 0
 Doesn’t any clothing manufacturer ever put ratchet straps on the shorts anymore? It is the only solution that works properly!
  • 1 0
 BOA for shorts- Beers Onboard Adjustment. Why not for jerseys? No matter how old you get or how many beers you drink everything in your closet will still fit.
  • 3 0
 No TLD!? Skyline Air is the best warm weather kit in the game.
  • 1 0
 I came here to say the same thing. TLD is by far the best gear. I have a LS jersey that is 13 years old and still looks amazing. The Air line is incredibly comfortable and breathable.
  • 2 0
 Ride NF pricing is wrong, those are the CAD prices not USD.
  • 1 0
 Thanks! We will let the admin know to update that.
  • 2 0
 What does Rob Warner ride in?
  • 2 0
 These outfits would still suck even if you ripped the sleeves off. Lame
  • 1 0
 I always take the sleeves off my riding shirts. I started doing that for when I needed to wear my body armor which back in the days had pretty big hardshell shoulder pads. But I discovered it also helps loads with ventilation so ever since I've been doing that with all shirts I use for riding. I do appreciate the rest of my shirt though (so I'm not riding shirtless). As I ride with a pack (which holds both water as well as a protective pad) I like to have a layer in between as tiny bit of sand or debris could otherwise rub my skin apart within a single ride.

So yeah, I wouldn't mind wearing these shirts (only wearing, not paying nor posing) but I'd still take the sleeves off Smile .
  • 1 0
 My kit is whatever hand me downs I can find at the local used sports equipment store.
  • 2 0
 POC stuff is nice..but man all these kits are pretty bad
  • 1 0
 Looks like Bubbles is done with shopping carts and go carts . He is now a mountain biker .
  • 2 0
 This guy looks like he's not allowed near schools.
  • 1 0
 mtb gear : blend todler´s clothes with dady´s clothes.... call it design . done.
  • 1 0
 Desert/dry weather? Cotton t-shirt and poly shorts. PNW/humid zones? Poly t-shirt and poly pants.
  • 1 0
 Man, they will never make mountain biking look cool to outsiders with fits like these.
  • 2 0
 I feel like I'm looking through a SkyMall catalogue on a plane
  • 2 0
 Laughing my $250 pants off
  • 1 0
 Why all kits have such boring colors? Does design team outsourced to chat GPT?
  • 1 0
 WTF Men, no tassles? Disappointing. 2nd place to Ride NF for the white slacks tho.
  • 1 0
 Hmmmm, niice, lovely dark coloured short sleeve tops, just perfect for absorbing the heat of the sun.
  • 1 0
 This must mean that my 6 year old board shorts and cut off t-shirt aren't cool....
  • 1 0
 If you see start seeing these at your local trails your rent is about to increase.
  • 6 5
 a cotton t-shirt does the trick for me
  • 8 2
 Is the trick "sands my nipples down to a bloody pulp"?. look, I ain't kink shaming here, just wondering....
  • 5 0
 Cotton sucks .. up all your sweat and gets sticky. But there is tons of tech t-shirts for $20-30.
  • 2 0
 If you want to carry your sweat around with you all day it's great.
  • 1 0
 I'm all about the cotton if it's warmer than 45 degrees (farenheight, that is). Keeps the sweat locked in so you stay cool.
  • 1 0
 What size NF jersey did you test?
  • 1 0
 I am pretty sure they sent an XL
  • 2 1
 Mons Royale is all you need.
  • 1 0
 $80 t-shirt so you can look like Steve V.
  • 1 0
 It helps to look stylish while hitting slabs
  • 1 0
 This guy needs to work on his Zoolander face. Smile
  • 4 4
 Does anyone else just hate riding in shorts? I prefer pants on even hot days…
  • 1 0
 Sweaty balls
  • 2 0
 Belt loop fail.
  • 1 0
 Where's LEATT? TLD, Chromag?
  • 1 0
 I just want pants with zipper ankles.
  • 1 0
 TLD Skyline's when they go on sale and a t-shirt ftw
  • 1 0
 I just want to look cute on the trail in my new summer riding kit.
  • 1 0
 Handup shorts and pants have been great @ ~$40
  • 1 0
 Yaaaaaawn.
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