Hello Again From Alicia's Recovery World

Jul 3, 2023 at 17:35
by Alicia Leggett  
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I ride bikes again now. It's very frustrating to be this bad at it and very amazing to be back at it at all.

Hey all, I’m writing again to check in and give an update on how the injury recovery is going these days. I’ve now passed the nine-month mark since I crashed my bike and hit my head. Last time I wrote, I had just returned to Bellingham after the first months of being hospitalized then working with an intensive outpatient clinic.

Since then, I’ve settled the tiniest bit into my old life again, traveled to my old home state of Montana then met my coworkers at Sea Otter, spent a month working with another brain rehab clinic, returned home to Bellingham, then spending two weeks at paragliding races, not competing but there to learn and once again be part of that community I love so much. My recovery process is both horrible and amazing.

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We saw seals when we went to Sea Otter. I really love seals. I also like how they socialize, how it's normal to hang out all in a giant cuddle pile. I am sure it's not as simple as it looks from the outside, but I think the world would be a better place if it were considered more normal to be cuddly with the many platonic people in our everyday lives.

There’s more loss here than I can really explain, and it's the type of situation I really can't think about too much because I don't want to crumble any more than I already have. Losing most of my ability to mountain bike, for one thing, doesn’t feel great.

I’m still riding most days, but my balance and coordination and ability to create specific physical responses to visual information are much worse than they used to be. I’m hugely thankful to still have most of what mountain biking has given me: the experience of working at something and seeing the progress, friendship and a venue where consistently being at our limits makes us all better at being friends with some nice forced vulnerability, permission to play around and just have fun, a job, and so much more.

But there's also having to constantly re-remember that I can’t keep trying to make plans to ride gnarly trails with my fast friends, I can’t assume that Whistler Bike Park will be fun in the years to come. Riding has still been absolutely delightful – it’s a great chance to still see my patient friends, and I make quick progress being an ultra-beginner compared to my last few years of feeling plateaued skillwise.

There are other pieces lost, too, of course. I used to have a pretty good memory and don’t anymore. My peripheral vision is much worse than it used to be, and losing hearing in one ear means I can’t sense sound direction anymore. My right pinky was stuck at 90 degrees, though I just had surgery for that and the surgeon says it may or may not fix it. And then there are the less concrete pieces, like the loss of my trust in myself, the constant second-guessing of almost any thought or experience. There’s the pre-limiting of myself, making assumptions about what I might or might not be able to do that then become the maximum of what I try. There’s viewing my life as a ‘before’ and ‘after’ and wishing I could have maybe even a minute that isn’t tinted through the lens of being the brain-damaged girl. Having a sense of time again would be nice. Since there's a blank spot between last September and November, I don't think my brain has learned to believe in the continuity of time again, so the fact that we're about to head to Crankworx is pretty weird.

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I made this new friend recently.

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This little one, a friend's cat, is selective about who receives her affection, which makes it feel extra special.

Also, this has been a time of intense appreciation for the people and opportunities still in my life. First of all, at least one parent and often both were at the hospitals with me for the hospitalization period, and my brother visited too. Beyond my family, my friends showed up more than I could ever imagine. Friends visited me in the hospitals, even when I was several states away from almost everyone in my life. The letters sent to me will be saved as long as I live.

My friend Chelsea started a GoFundMe for me, which has now given me opportunities I’d never expected. I got a sweet new bike – one of the favorites I’ve reviewed ever – as a ‘get well’ gift from a rad bike company. None of that makes the injury feel remotely worthwhile (as if my opinion about its worthwhile-ness matters at all anyway), but I’ll take whatever silver linings I can find. People said the funeral-type praise, maybe in some part thinking (correctly at that point) that I was gone. Everyone – be nice to your friends and say the scary vulnerable things when they’re still alive and can hear you!

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Life is better in the air. I'm beyond thankful I can return to paragliding. Life feels more okay when I'm in the air than any other time, and being able to do something helps me regain some belief in myself.

Recently, I spent two weeks at two consecutive paragliding races. I decided not to compete in the name of caution and small steps back into the sport, but I still had constant moments of feeling giddy, reeling with the delight at how lucky I felt to be there and how good it felt to still be part of that community. Sometimes, I think the feeling of loss in my life these days shifts me to expecting to lose every time and makes me surprised now when something actually works out the way I want it to, when I can show up to a place I used to feel at-home and still feel like I belong. (Though frankly I think I’m due for a win pretty soon.)

One of the latest and very cool developments in my life recently is starting to work for Pinkbike again. I’m just working a light part-time, but it’s been great even to just have daily calls with my coworkers and add a bit of routine back to my life. I’ve been able to tie up a few loose ends that were left after I crashed, and Pinkbike has been seriously awesome, letting me take my sweet time testing the waters and relearning how all of this works. It’s nice to feel like part of something again.

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Packraft days so far have been good days.

My day-to-day life is still not exactly thrilling, but there's enough joy to keep me going. That joy might be an equal and opposite reaction to a lot of what I've been feeling lately, but I'll take what I can get. I just had hand surgery, and early next week I'm heading to Crankworx Whistler to spend a little more time once again being part of the bike world. I'll keep trying to ease back into my Pinkbike life, writing the articles that feel relevant in the moment, digging into my unfortunately new niche of helmets and brain injuries and working on a few other projects. Nothing time-sensitive since unfortunately I don't get anything done as efficiently as I used to, but I'll still be trying to find my new place here. I'll keep trying to progress back into mountain biking, at least after the period of having my hand in a cast, and same with paragliding. I'll keep leaning into what I am able to do, focusing on that and the ways that stays rewarding rather than fixating on what I've lost.

There are a few exciting developments too: I recently got a packraft, something I've wanted for years but haven't acted on. I made a new friend who had a similar brain injury to mine, and packrafting has been therapeutic enough for him that I was convinced. We've already hiked into a mountain lake together and paddled around. Also, part of what appeals to me about a packraft is that it'll fit into my paragliding setup, so I can fly upriver and paddle back to where I'd started. I've carried it before on a cross country flight, but I have yet to actually line up landing near water to complete that adventure. I keep trying to develop new ways to get outside in ways I can be excited about, and I love finding one that feels creative and rewarding but isn't especially technically complicated. There are lots of new directions for me to explore.

In slightly less exciting news, I recently got myself a Rubik's Cube and have become obsessive about solving it over and over. A friend (one who has stepped up in ways so far beyond what I could have hoped for) wrote me a page of cube solving notes, too, though now I've thankfully learned enough to not need the cheat sheet anymore.

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Proof of solving the first side for the first time at least.

Thank you to everyone who has reached out, shown care, shown up, stayed my friend even though I can't ride a bike fast anymore, listened to my many fears and frustrations, allowed me to take the time I need coming back, trusted me, encouraged me, and helped celebrate the small wins. I can hardly imagine doing this without you, and I'm glad I don't have to.

Things are really not my favorite right now, but I'm sincerely looking forward to the future and am curious about how all of this will feel later. That openness to what might happen next feels like exactly what is going to help me move through this, and for that I'm beyond thankful. I'll keep checking in from time to time for a while, and I hope you all can take care of yourselves and chase some dreams in the near future. Until then, take care, be kind, and have fun!

Love,

Alicia

Author Info:
alicialeggett avatar

Member since Jun 19, 2015
738 articles

113 Comments
  • 275 1
 These are great updates. Head injuries are scary and seems like recovery is very different for everybody, so there isn't 1 path forward like a broken bone or an ACL. Its nice to hear progress, steps and difficulties and the context around it. Good luck to you Alicia moving forward. Keep killing it and would love more updates as you continue to improve.
  • 126 0
 Thank you! Head injuries are so wild, and the timeline/everything that has to go into recovery is waayy more involved than things like broken bones. It's been both frustrating and very cool to experience how the brain keeps trying to problem-solve and self-heal and learn new ways of doing old things. Thanks for reading and for the kind words.
  • 5 0
 Well said, thanks for saying that. Much love Alicia, your thoughts and feelings are deeply felt.
  • 5 0
 @alicialeggett: Kokopelli pack rafts are the friggen best.
  • 123 0
 “be nice to your friends and say the scary vulnerable things when they’re still alive and can hear you!”

Wise words right here. Take a minute or ten to tell your friends and family that you love and appreciate them.

Keep it up Alicia!
  • 11 0
 Came to post the same. A million times that. Keep on going Alicia!
  • 41 0
 I’ve not met you before Alicia, but I’ve always appreciated your articles and work on PB - and even now, with what you’re going through, I find your content extra meaningful.

Wishing you all the best, and on those hard days, know that the world is a far better place with you in it.
  • 38 0
 I know it is not the kindest thing to say, but you should know that, for me at least, as someone who is starting to learn jumping and pushing the limits of my comfort zone with clearing gap jumps, your injury has been a cautionary tale that even the most experienced riders will have accidents and that consequences can scale with the level of danger. Because of your injury and numerous other anecdotes I have decided I am happy with never doing a big gap jump, simply because I know that even if I can clear it 90 percent of the time, the 10 percent is unacceptable if it means losing the ability to do what I love. I think it’s easy with social media to see the amazing things people are doing on bikes that was only attempted by pros 10 years ago and feel everyone is doing it. Once again I don’t write these comments to be mean as I am sorry for your injury and wish you well for your recovery and am glad you are making progress. I appreciate your updates both to hear that you are learning to love life again, but also to see how difficult coming back from such an injury can be. Best wishes.
  • 51 0
 No worries at all on feeling like that might be harsh - I hope to be a cautionary story. Enjoy your sports but do it in a way that doesn't put you in this situation. I'm glad you're progressing and being thoughtful about it!
  • 9 0
 my wish is to simply still be stoked on bikes and being able to ride until the day i drop dead. i'm all for progression but not at the expense of my body, my livelihood, my life. if i'm on a bike, in beautiful mother nature, that's more than enough for me.
  • 16 0
 I appreciate your thoughtful comment but would note that often the worst accidents don’t happen when you’re doing something gnarly or pushing the limits. Some of the worst injuries I’ve seen and experienced could include statements like “I’ve done it a million times” or “I was just riding along.”

All the best!
  • 6 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Its a scary thought! One that has echoed in my own life for sure. Broken femur, and TBI all from non sports related injuries (at home). People would torment me for the amount of insane shit I did on my bike, only to hurt myself at home doing trivial things. For me, it has been a call to presence / consciousness. As far as I can tell, when I'm riding my bike those things are incredibly elevated. Were as at home, we become complacent with comfort and familiarity.
  • 30 0
 This is the good news we all needed right now. Thanks for inspiring us all!!
  • 25 0
 @alicialeggett You haven't lost a step in your writing. These articles are even more engaging because the topic is personal experiences instead of inanimate objects. I wonder if maybe your story and thought could become a book/memoir someday?
  • 18 0
 Thank you! I don't want to get too far ahead of myself, but I am actually really hoping to make that happen someday Smile
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett: that would be amazingSmile
  • 2 0
 @alicialeggett: +1 for the pre-order list
  • 26 0
 Powerful. Thank you for sharing, that must have been hard to write. We’re all rooting for you Alicia.
  • 2 0
 100% this. Thanks for being open about the life-as-you-know it process. Keep patient, keep believing @alicialeggett ❤️
  • 14 0
 Thanks for sharing, Alicia! Great to hear of the progress and new adventures, while being honest about the challenges. It helps others understand that the journey will be filled with ups and downs and it is okay to take time in figuring out the new approach to a full life.
  • 14 0
 That first photo says it all Alicia. You’re back on your bike. Amazing progress both physically but mentally as well. Stay the course…this is a marathon not a sprint. Positive thoughts
  • 9 0
 and speaking of the bike... huge props to the bike company for stepping up and would really like to know who it was.
  • 3 0
 @trillot: I have no actual idea but I'm betting it was Revel with a Rail29. She seemed to really enjoy it in the review and they regularly partner to fundraise for Love Your Brain
  • 1 0
 @trillot: Propain Hugene maybe?
  • 11 0
 Hi Alicia. It's great to hear from you and read up on the recovery and other hobby developments. Paragliding up river to float back sounds pretty damn fun. Your "limited" activities may be a big step back for you, but for many people it's a whole lot more than our normal outside activities. It help me appreciate my own outside time when you eloquently express your own gratitude for mini adventures (in spite of their lesser gnar than before.)

I look forward to a bike - packraft article when you're feeling ready. You're a great writer, and it's great reading about whatever is going on.

Cheers to progress!
  • 8 0
 My middle-age, cubical/basement-dwelling ass is jealous of the outdoor activities you're able to do. That's really amazing to see.

> digging into my unfortunately new niche of helmets and brain injuries

I don't know if you've talked about this before, but I'm wondering about your perceptive on if you would have had a better outcome with different protective equipment.
  • 27 0
 Good question, but I don't have a good answer! I was wearing a really excellent helmet, the Bluegrass Legit Carbon, and I don't really have a good way to compare it with anything else - every hit head and head injury and recovery is sooo different that there's no real "normal." As for other protective gear, I wasn't wearing much else other than knee pads, but got lucky and avoided most injuries, breaking my wrist and pinky but I think that was inevitable no matter what I was wearing. So I guess the short answer is that I got both very unlucky and very lucky, and it doesn't really seem useful to wonder about the alternate realities!
  • 8 0
 Thanks for sharing this. You have a lot more friends than you can even imagine. You may not have ever met them, and may never meet them in person, but there are a lot of people that hope for nothing but the best for you in life. Take care.
  • 8 0
 Thank you for sharing your experience in such a generous and genuine way. I can only imagine how difficult it is, but I definitely know there are many more like me that appreciate it and are wishing you the best.
  • 7 0
 Thanks for writing this, Alicia. We don't know each other, but I've appreciated your presence in the mountain bike journalism world, and have been rooting for you hard in your recovery. Glad to hear you are making progress and have some highlights to share. Wish you the absolute best in the ongoing journey.
  • 6 0
 You do a fantastic job of relating a painful human story and your positivity is inspiring.

A word about packrafting to anyone interested. I got one a couple years back after seeing various media around bike-packrafting. It is indeed an ingenious and fantastic outdoors tool. But being a lifetime MTB'r with no real water experience of any sort I was brutally and embarrassingly naive about the risks involved with any sort of moving water... went for a couple of swims, lost my boat (miraculously recovered!) before I clued in. If one doesnt have a knowledgeable whitewater group to tap into, The Packraft Handbook by Luc Mehl is an invaluable resource - I've read and reread it several times. He also has a useful website.
  • 10 0
 Three cheers for an adventurous recovery. Kudos @alicialeggett
  • 9 0
 We love you, Alicia! We're so glad that you're ok, and still with us.
  • 5 0
 Everything sounds really hard, but your positivity and zeal, your honestly and openness is inspiring. I am not living with a TBI, but reading your experience helps me reflect on and appreciate everything that I do have and for that I thank you. I hope the path of healing becomes easier for you, and I'm glad you've got such a strong support community. Stay well and stay positive!
  • 5 0
 Alicia you are an awesome human being! Thank you for sharing your journey with us!
As a person who has suffered multiple concussions from racing 30 years ago , and I have also been deaf in one ear since birth so I can relate to how you feel and a little of what you are going through!

Please keep being you and do what makes you happy, your path with take you to where you deserve to be…
Much love from across the pond xx.
  • 4 0
 @alicialeggett thank you for writing this, and I'm sorry you're going through this too. I had a TBI mountain biking last august, also did mine riding jumps. I ended up losing my job, my home, my memory, years of skills in various things, and a lot of other stuff in the process. It's been a year now and I'm finally back to riding and I really, really feel you about the loss of skill and confidence. it's rad you're getting out there and paragliding etc. don't have anything profound to say, but I really empathize with what you're going through.
  • 4 0
 Ah sorry you've had a similar experience. That sounds like also so much to deal with on top of the direct brain effects. The years of skills loss feels so real - I can hardly pinpoint what's gone in a lot of cases, it just feels like I took a break for 20 years and am really really out of practice with doing a lot of things. I'm glad you're getting back into riding. I know it's hard but I really hope you can still find some enjoyment there. I hope you keep healing, and know that someone else in a totally different community fully empathizes with you and wants you to feel better!
  • 2 0
 @alicialeggett: that's very sweet of you, you seem like a cool person, I hope you heal up soon. The struggle for me right now if that I'm better enough that I feel normal some days, and then I'm like "oh I'm better now!" and then I do too much, and then all my symptoms flare up again and I'm back to exhaustion and vertigo and brain fog and all the rest. seems to be common with TBI/PCS.

It is very weird to have spent years getting good at something, and suddenly you can't really do it anymore. really makes you reassess what's important to you. or, it did for me.
  • 3 0
 I can't even solve one side of a rubik's cube and it has tormented me since childhood. With any injury its definitely an interesting time of finding hobbies you are capable of doing that you actually enjoy while wanting to go back a do everything you used to be able to do. Have fun at Crankworx!
  • 1 0
 Just gotta memorize the formulaic steps Wink I never could until recently, and now that I've memorized enough of the basic steps, there isn't any real problem solving in it anymore! But that first hurdle is kind of a pain, figuring out which sequence of moves to use when. And thanks!
  • 3 0
 A friend of mine got pretty bad TBI in an auto accident and it took a few years to recover... I bet you'll continue making progress. I've been recovering from long covid and not sure I'll ever be normal again, so I get that before/after and feel grief for what I've lost, but I try to remain grateful for all I have. Hang in there! Smile
  • 3 0
 I've been living with the loss of hearing in my right ear since a big crash in 2007...definitely a long term challenge, loud places and events certainly became a lot less enjoyable really quickly and that's certainly persisted over the years. Putting your good ear towards people, poaching seats that allow you to have people on 'your good side', lip reading more than you realize all become pretty second nature! I'm thankful that I'm not overly bothered by tinnitus at this point since it's pretty commonplace. Hope you continue to adjust and adapt!
  • 3 0
 So tough Alicia. I think about everything you've gone through a lot, and I really appreciate the updates. Keep doing what you're doing; your perseverance through it all is incredible. Much love, best wishes, and see you soon.
- Dan P.
  • 3 0
 Hey! Thank you for reading and for the kind words. It's been a pretty weird life phase but it's been made waayy better by the people around me. Much love and best wishes right back at you, looking forward to seeing you soon!
  • 3 0
 It's great to see you on the road to recovery Alicia. I suffered a career ending TBI in 2015. There's been frustrating days, but there's also been great days. My entire perspective on life changed post-injury. I'm looking forward to seeing more positive updates.
  • 3 0
 Our cat kinda hopes for me to get injured. It gets a lot more attention when I’m injured and stuck to the couch.

A good friend of mine had a brain injury some time ago and is still recovering (it might not be as serious as yours though), but he is kind of in the same spot, can’t do biking, can’t so motocross and can’t work the same way he used to. Even through all the bad times and shitty rehab stuff he seemed to be focusing on small stuff. Like being out in the woods, coffee in the mornings and having a beer or two with friends.
I asked him why he wasnt more annoyed and frustrated of not being able to do any of the things he loves and he simply answered ‘I’m just happy being able to appreciate anything really’. He’s getting back at it again it and he’s happy being able to do it (albeit not as fast anymore).
Enjoy your days, cuddle that cat and stay safe @alicialeggett
  • 3 0
 Thank you for being kind enough to give a window into your life, but don’t be sad you don’t rip as hard as you used to. The older I get the more it is clear. Riding is about the smiles per hour, and not the miles per hour.
  • 2 0
 Glad to hear you're continuing to mend. Head injuries are awful and terrifying. One of the local mountain bikers recently died to one. You're not alone in being hesitant to trust your memory and sense of time after a head injury either. Years ago I had a pretty severe concussion where I lost all sense of time and self for about half a day. For a couple months after, I was questioning just about anything I tried to remember, no matter how trivial, and that doubt lingers now even nearly 20 years later. It sucks, but the doubt becomes less pronounced as time passes as we build a new life after The Accident. Best wishes... things will get better, even if they're not what they were before.
  • 6 0
 Cuddles are good....cats or seals.
  • 4 0
 I'm not crying you are. But for real, this update was so real and inspiring. So stoked your back on the bike and best wishes for your continued recovery!
  • 2 0
 Stoked to hear progress (esp now being nuked from a recent injury - helps me keep perspective). I think more riders are injured than we think and hearing from others about it for me def'ly helps knowing it can be overcome. I guess in a way it would be good to have more post injury articles (? maybe that's weird).

WILD about going back to paragliding. As the lifetime aftraid-of-heights kom-holder, it blew my mind even before the injury to hear about paragliding, much less going back after. So awesome. Anyway - we're all stoked for you and maybe this os TMI but - what's the new bike? It's on the top of my brain (maybe Propain Hugene?) Would love to see an Alicia bike check on it, but mayer ya dont wanna advertise that...

All the best on healing up - "it's just bikes" and when you keep it fun, you win.
  • 3 0
 When you said viewing life as before and after it definitely hit home for me. I sustained a massive concussion last February mtbing and it took me about a year to feel 95% normal. Thank you for sharing your inspiring story!
  • 3 0
 Thanks Alicia for these refreshing news. I am very glad that you're getting back to normal life. Looking forward to hearing you on Pinkbike as your interventions have always been meaningful. Cheers from France!!!
  • 4 0
 I've never met you but I'm glad you're still with us. Sending you, and your new kitty friend, all the platonic cuddles and love!
  • 2 0
 Is this the first pinkbike article that has been signed with love? That was the cherry on top of the article for me, which to me shows that this is process about more than just writing articles. Love it.

Awesome to see your recovery, I’m looking forward to an in depth comparison of how the cwx coffees compare to sea otter.
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett I also lost hearing in my left ear. Granted my circumstances were different, but you'd be surprised how the body will eventually adapt. Mine took a while, and I'm sure given the circumstances surrounding your hearing loss it will be a different timeline than it was for me, but it does start to feel less disorienting after a while. Glad to see you're on the mend.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the update, and I wish you all the best. I think your writing on your recovery is terrific and helps redirect the sport of mtb (which tends to be overtly aggro) to a more human and humane context.
  • 1 0
 Always a treat to hear from you Alicia! I'm holding out hope that your situation continues to improve!
I fell in my house and whacked the sh*t out of my head (without a helmet obviously)) in April of 2020 and I had blank spots in my memory ever since... BUT, it has improved and the seemingly random bouts of working memory loss (details about the past 5-10 minutes) are happening less and less.
I sincerely hope you experience the same or better!
  • 3 0
 Thanks for the kind words and sorry you've had a similar experience! It's good to hear that it has improved since then. The random bouts of having no idea where I am definitely mess with me, but I'm learning over time that at least it'll come back shortly. I hope I can be more consistently oriented soon. Take care and I hope you keep getting better!
  • 1 0
 Oh man! Stoked to hear that things are progressing for you Alicia. Nine months is not long in brain injury terms, taking things slow and appreciating the small things in life is the way to go. You'll get there eventually. Thanks for the update and keep on progressing/healing!
  • 1 0
 Wonderful piece written with real emotions and expressed so eloquently. It makes me very happy to read your recovery is going well and you have an amazing support network around you to help you progress. Healing vibes and much love from the UK ❤️️
  • 2 0
 Powerfull words Alicia! Thanks for being so transprent. Really appreciate you. You’ve come a LONG way, Hoping there’s more recovery ahead!!! Your zest for life is contagious!!!
  • 1 0
 Thanks for sharing this with honesty and a healthy perspective. There are lots of us that have struggled and will struggle through similar scenarios.

For me, a concussion was very mentally traumatic. Not being able to focus my vision while riding over bumps on a sidewalk was really scary. Would I ever be able to enjoy riding and my previous lifestyle again? For me there was a happy ending. While I've scaled back the intensity of my riding, the lifestyle is intact. That was my goal and I'm so thankful to have reached it. The process always takes longer than we'd like to bear but there's hope.
  • 1 0
 Hope this doesn't come over weird, but I'd give you a big hug right now! It's so amazing to see you keeping going and moving on, seeking out new things and relearning the had befores! Gives me a huge new perspective on myself to not stare at the wall but to actually get of my butt and try things for the expirience and joy of it! Stay strong, move on and don't forget the cuddles! They come at the unexpected moments, that's when we have to let go and enjoy the most! Keep it up, and take your time!
  • 1 0
 "There’s the pre-limiting of myself, making assumptions about what I might or might not be able to do that then become the maximum of what I try"
So recognizable from when I was recovering from concussion, so well described in a single sentence.

@Alicialeggett , I really love these pieces, keep them coming. The whole article is so heart-warmingly honest and it conveys very clearly both the stoke of still being alive and able to do stuff, and the disappointment of not being as good at it as you used to be (at a way too young age for that to happen in this degree).
  • 1 0
 I don't know you but I felt this article to the core. I am so sorry you have had to go through all of that the past 9-months. I am so happy that the Go Fund Me was a success and that you are finding the joy in the little things. Keep on keeping on, Alicia! - Pierce from Southern Utah
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the update, @alicialeggett - been wondering how it's been going. I have a friend who was an xgames vert athlete that had a TBI skating. He said it felt like he was living in "inception" for months, there were good days & bad but he's doing pretty well now. He said one of his doctors suggested learning to play an instrument might help reconnect things, the Rubik's cube could very well do similar things. I'm sure he'd be happy to talk/email about his experience, if you're interested DM me & I'll intro the two of you.

Anyways, this is a great article(?), thanks for updating us all. Keep at it, being positive and you'll continue progressing.
  • 3 0
 Great to hear things are going in the right direction... Hopefully the recovery continues to go well!
  • 4 0
 Stoked you’re slowly making it along the path of recovery Alicia Smile
  • 2 0
 Tough people outlast tough times! Your optimistic view is a great sign that this current period is a stepping stone to greater times.
  • 4 0
 Tell the cat pspspspsps from me Smile

And glad you are doing better!
  • 2 0
 Cuddle puddle. Stoked to hear of your progress. Sounds like you have a good support network. Remember to be kind to yourself.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the update and the brain is an amazing brilliant adapter to new challenges and with your focus and time it will make more leaps and bounds. I think your future is bright. Only 9 months since. ❤️ Keep it up!!
  • 1 0
 Alicia, paragraphs 4-6 also describe what its like to get old. I'm sorry you had to experience it so soon and wish you a swift and complete recovery. Silver linings are wonderful things. Keep looking for them.
  • 2 0
 I loved this and it has given me some new food for thought about how our society is driven by certain performance metrics and how that excludes people. Thank youSmile
  • 2 0
 I'm exited both for Alicia's continuing recovery, and the possibility of more Coffee-and-dogs-focused MTB-event coverage.
  • 2 0
 SO happy to see you back at it and enjoying your life Alicia. All the best...
  • 2 0
 So happy to see this. You're a huge inspiration, Alicia, you'll be in my prayers!
  • 1 0
 Thanks for sharing your experience - it sounds brutal. Kudos for not letting it crush you! Good luck for all that's still to come
  • 1 0
 Great news Alicia! You are the proof that miracles do happen Smile Keep on with the promising recovery and keep us updated with more of these joyful news!
  • 2 0
 Glad to hear you're back on the bike and on the road to recovery. Keep going!!!
  • 1 0
 You are a champ. One day at a time and keep moving forward. Wishing you happy trails and all the best in your recovery path. Smile
  • 1 0
 Bravo Alicia. Don't ever forget the final picture and title you gave it in your prior update article.
  • 3 0
 Viva Alicia!
  • 3 0
 You're amazing!
  • 1 0
 It's clear that nothing can keep you down! Thanks for sharing your updates, and the wisdom you've learned along the way.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for sharing. Keep focusing on the good things. Positive energy will get you to where you need to go.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely wonderful writing, from any person, in any condition. Thanks, Alicia!
  • 2 0
 That photo from the air looks terrifying and amazing at the same time!
  • 3 0
 Cuddle piles!
  • 2 0
 Great update and fantastic words! Keep up the fine work.
  • 1 0
 so great to see you out on a bike. Im pretty sure those are sea lions, not seals though.
  • 2 0
 Yay! keep on healing ❤️
  • 2 0
 go for it! Heartwarming to see you recover and progress
  • 2 0
 Great work Alicia, keep on keeping on!
  • 1 0
 hey!! i recognized that face, i have very little time to read, but i am glad you are ok now Alicia, thanks for sharing.
  • 1 0
 In a sport obsessed with trail dogs, very nice to see a kitty cat getting some love and making it on the site !
  • 1 0
 alot of good insight there, and thank you so much for being vulnerable and willing to share!
  • 1 0
 You’ll be back with a fresh perspective
  • 1 0
 Awesome! Keep on keepin' on!
  • 1 0
 Thanks for checking in. Keep enjoying the ride back up the curve!!!
  • 1 0
 Keep on getting better Lass. Great to see you up and at em Smile
  • 1 0
 Great article. Keep on getting better.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the update and for being an inspiration, Alicia.
  • 2 0
 Love
  • 2 0
 Inspiring read!
  • 1 0
 Still waters run deep Go far go long
  • 1 0
 You know, you don’t have to ride fast to have fun on a MTB.
  • 1 0
 you once coached a bike camp I was in. Hope you get better fast
  • 1 0
 Nice melly
  • 1 0
 Thanks for sharing.
  • 1 0
 All the best







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