Revel's DH Bike Concept Has a 3D-Printed Thermoplastic Frame

Mar 6, 2023 at 18:59
by Mike Kazimer  
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Revel Bikes made their debut back in 2019, and in the years since the brand has rolled out several new models, all situated on the slightly more conservative side of the geometry spectrum. The fact that Revel didn't dive headfirst into the extra-long and slack pool isn't a bad thing – the bikes have received plenty of praise for their quick handling and excellent pedaling manners – it just makes Revel's announcement that they've been working on a 3D printed downhill bike a little more surprising.

The idea for the bike first arose during Revel's early days, when Chris Canfield was working on the suspension layout for the trail bikes. Keen to see his CBF suspension design applied to a composite bike, Canfield came up with the geometry figures and kinematics for the Rodeo.

Before going further, it needs to be mentioned that the Revel Rodeo is still in the very early stages of development. It's more of a proof of concept than anything else, and if the bike went into production as it's shown now the price would be so high that only the Musks and Zuckerbergs of the world would be able to afford it.



Enter Arevo

With the basics of the DH bike in place, the next step was deciding how to manufacture it. Adam Miller, Revel's CEO, has an appetite for new manufacturing techniques, and in this case it was Arevo, a Silicon Valley-based company that's focused on implementing futuristic ways of making composites that grabbed his attention.

If the name sounds familiar, Arevo is the company behind the Superstrata, the crowd-funded road bike that was billed as the “world's first 3D-printed custom unibody carbon fiber composite bike.” The campaign was wildly successful, raising over $7 million USD, although the reception to the bikes once backers finally received them was decidedly lukewarm – the weight and overall finish of the Superstrata didn't live up to the lofty claims. The multiple long shipping delays that were exacerbated by Covid didn't help things either.

Arevo also launched the Scotsman All-Carbon Fiber Scooter on Indiegogo, although once again comments for that campaign are filled with angry backers frustrated at the ongoing delays and lack of updates. That was followed up by the Mishima lounge chair, which does seem like it's available, assuming you don't mind waiting 14 weeks and paying over $5,000 for one. F1's Fernando Alonso even makes an appearance in this story – his Kimoa brand released an e-bike manufactured by Arevo at the Miami Grand Prix last year.

As a final twist to the tale of Arevo, the CIA, or rather In-Q-Tel, the CIA's venture capital firm, is one of the investors in the company.

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Robots, Lasers, & Thermoplastic

Putting aside Arevo's odd history and and ongoing hurdles, the potential for a 3D printed thermoplastic bike is very intriguing. Creating a carbon fiber frame is traditionally a very labor intensive process, and an expensive mold must first be created for each frame size.

Bring in some thermoplastic, lasers, and robots and the amount of hand labor required during manufacturing dramatically decreases. It's worth mentioning the use of thermoplastic isn't a new concept in the mountain bike world – GT was using the stuff in the mid- to late '90s, and more recently Guerrilla Gravity started using it for their frames, while several companies including Revel, Chris King, and Evil, have worked with CSS Composites to created thermoplastic rims.

What sets Arevo's methods apart is the fact that they're 3D printing the frames, building them one layer at a time, rather than using a mold. The filament is fed through a six-axis robotic arm, where it's heated up by a laser, and then compacted by a roller while it's laid down in the pre-programmed pattern. The lack of a mold opens up all sorts of customization options when it comes to frame sizing and geometry.

That said, although there's technically a nearly infinite number of possibilities when printing a frame, the strength of the final product still needs to be considered – you can't just scale up a frame without performing an analysis to ensure that it would still be strong enough to pass the relevant standards.

In the case of the Revel Rodeo, the frame did pass ISO standards, but Adam Miller said that it's still not quite at the level of strength they're looking for. Revel's pie-in-the-sky, long term goal is to have a rider aboard a 3D printed Revel at a Red Bull Rampage someday, which means that the frame needs to be as strong as possible.

As for those water bottle mounts, those aren't a joke – they were added as a 'Why not?' feature during the design process of the bike. It's easy enough to remove the mounting bolts if a rider doesn't want to carry a bottle, and for the thirsty park rat they'll be a welcome addition.


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What's Next?

Where do things go from here? That's a good question. Adam Miller believes that this could be a glimpse into the future of bike manufacturing, but Revel's efforts haven't resulted in a clear conclusion as to when that future will begin. The cost is still a major hurdle, due to the amount of engineering time the project requires, and, as Arevo's other endeavors have illustrated, being able to meet demand is another factor that needs to be considered.

For now, the Rodeo is simply an interesting side project – we'll have to wait and see where Revel and Arevo's efforts take them.





Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,710 articles

240 Comments
  • 264 3
 Someday us know-it-alls will be able to f*ck up a bike proper by custom selecting any geo we want, paying the full non-refundable cost, and having that thing 3D printed. Me, I can hardly wait.
  • 82 2
 Grim Donuts for all!
  • 89 3
 *Atherton bikes on line one for you sir
  • 57 0
 I mean, with steel bikes that is already a thing. I went that route with a custom Marino frame and I was pleasantly surprised that the geo I cooked up in my head came out really damn good
  • 33 2
 That day is already here. Atherton for 3D printed, but any custom frame builder with a welding torch and some steel tubing can screw up a bike for you at your request.
  • 39 0
 @ak-77: charlie sponsel had a hilarious rant about this on a recent(ish) vital podcast. "How many pairs of pants have you owned in your life? Ok, design yourself the perfect pair of pants, go!" Pretty fun podcast all around.
  • 8 0
 Just adding Nicolai to this list.
  • 5 0
 @bkm303: lol, excellent analogy. I might kinda know what I want but its definitely best left to experts.
  • 23 0
 Or maybe those of us in the most maligned sizes (the XSs and XXLs) could actually design something that fits properly.
  • 11 4
 It isn't just about the customization. Thermoplastics are easier to recycle than thermosets. And they may not be as strong or stiff, but they can be tougher. And for purposes where that is the critical factor, the thermoplastics aren't that much of a compromise. So maybe not so great for XC, CX and road but a decent option for the harder hitting disciplines like DJ, enduro and DH. Basically where steel isn't that much heavier than the other common frame materials.

Still I'm more intrigued by that Kellys Theos frame. Also thermoplastic matrix, carbon and steel fibres, robot made, and it is already there. Yes the geometry (and the way they present it in their keynote) may be questionable though the low top tube does make me happy. The lack of bottle mount will make others unhappy, I get that. Considering they probably do tape laying with the robot they probably still need a mandrel which Revel doesn't, so that places some restrictions on the customization options. But what if you'd just fix some parts in space (head tube, bottom bracket, seat tube, position for bearings etc and let the robots connect everything with impregnated fibres a la Achim Menges? I think that'd be pretty cool or would at least make for a fun experiment. Call me nuts, I'm still willing to try this Smile .
  • 6 4
 But if you’re like me then you’d want a new custom frame every year or two when you realise you like different geo better to what you’ve got.

Bike Evolution is expensive!
  • 8 1
 @ak-77: Its funny that we jump to Atherton for this, when pretty well any frame welder can, and has been doing this since the dawn of bicycles. Atherton just does it with 3d printed lugs and carbon tubes.

As mentioned earlier Marino can weld you up a custom steel frame in a couple months for pennies what Atherton will chaarge.

Hell, FTW, WaltWorks, and others have been doing it for ages, and youll get a quality USA sourced frame in what ever silly geo configuration you choose
  • 2 0
 @vinay: @vinay:
With a more repeatable manufacturing process (good old fashion molds?) I think this is where the industry should be headed.
There was a time when plastic was going to be the automotive engine material of the future (Polyamide-imides)
That started in the 1960’s. I bet we can do better..
  • 3 2
 @onawalk: yeah, except the Atherton (and Nicolai) are full suspension bikes...the custom frame builders who have been doing this for ages can build you what ever hardtail you like.
  • 5 2
 @ReformedRoadie: All those frame builders will build you a full sus bike.
Even Marino, with any custom geo you want.

Hell, you could do a 2 week frame building course for less than the cost of a custom Atherton frame
  • 8 5
 CIA as in Christian’s in arms, I’m all for a bit of religion in the bike production world
  • 2 3
 Only way I'm gonna get a bike I actually want... to ride
  • 15 3
 @onawalk: Let's be honest though, all those bikes are pretty simple machines (single pivot trail bike). A dual link, long travel bike is a different product.
  • 9 1
 @vinay: Thermoplastics feel good, but really is anyone out there actually downcycling thermoplastic carbon? The brands that use it love to tout how green it is but it's like any other plastic and can't ever be reused for its original purpose, just downcycled into something cheaper and less structural.

I respect Revel / CSS Composites for downcycling the waste carbon from their rims into tire levers.
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: To be just a bit pedantic, waltworks.com/framebuilding-school has higher rates
  • 5 2
 @onawalk: All of them? Really? you threw a few out there. And they may be able to make a single-pivot, but having something more advanced, with solid kinematics? Doubtful.
And suggesting as an alternative, to take a class and build my own full suspension frame?
I mean...I like DIY projects as much as the next guy/gal (literally about to head to the Depot) but...
  • 3 0
 @bkm303: makes sense that kids and beer have "redesigned" my physical form, I should be able to design a new bike to optimize my dad bod.
  • 6 0
 @ak-77: I once asked a custom frame builder to build me a frame with stupid geometry. He refused. Years later I rode something close to what I thought I wanted. Frame builder was right - too stupid.
  • 5 0
 My endur-downcountry super slack penny farthing (with all the routing through the headset) will be the envy of the PB community
  • 7 2
 @mammal:
@ReformedRoadie I spent maybe 6 minutes finding and pasting those links,
feel free to do your own research, theres more out there.

The Daambuilt bikes can build a rockered multi link bike,

Not sure I understand what the issue is with a single pivot bike for you lot is, just a bunch of elitism going on.

You guys really want it all handed to you eh
  • 3 0
 @dreamlink87: higher rates than a custom geo Atherton frame?

What is the cost of that delivered to your door?
  • 6 3
 @ReformedRoadie: What exactly is it that youre riding that you believe is so advanced that cant be built?
you get that all the fancy bikes start out as test mules built by welders in a shop right?

As noted, I spent like 5 mins on the internet to give you a couple options, only for you to complain about the options, jesus wept.

I'll continue to be surprised about the level of entitlement, but I really shouldnt be.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: higher rates than in the link you originally posted about Walt’s frame school. Looks like you found the info for 2018.
  • 3 1
 @onawalk: Weird response. No, I don't want everything handed to me, but I can also understand the value of a company providing production long travel bikes, with custom geo. I personally have nothing against single pivot bikes, but they certainly aren't the pinnacle of mtb interest.
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: thanks… I really needed another rabbit hole to go down….
  • 5 0
 @GTscoob: and it’s for this and a few other reasons I think hmmmm wrong material especially when you look into the goal and total lifecycle of both approaches , a place where I go sometimes has a machine that they have been developing that can get the fibres out of the matrix material but it’s actually pretty pointless to me it’s more second hand toilet paper level use ability than you would like when you want virgin material again , it might be useful for long strand reinforcement of compression moulded parts at best
  • 1 0
 You have Marino bikes for that down in Peru. Sick hand made bikes in chromoly
  • 1 0
 @Marquis: So what did you do at that time? Go to another frame builder, or did you get a bike from him with different geo?
  • 1 0
 Actually, I would know pretty well what I would want in terms of geometry, I wouldn't mess that up. Suspension design however, is too many variables and not enough experience with different systems for me. I would need at least a half year internship as test rider at Pinkbike before I would venture into that.
  • 2 2
 @Oxiros: I have a Marino, it’s a decent frame, but I wouldn’t go a far as saying it’s sick. They did a nice job, but the welds are far from what you’d get from most small or medium sized semi custom manufacture and a long shot from what you’d get from Sycip, Retrotech, 44 or any number or custom framebuilders. Also, the finish quality was pretty poor, it needed every surface faced, chased and prepped, if you don’t have experience or the tools to properly prep a steel frame, then you’ll be dropping it off at a bike shop experienced at those things. Also, my Marino isn’t exactly light even with Reynolds 520 tubes. For the $400ish dollars delivered, and considering I’ve prepped dozens of steel frames in my life it was worth it for me, but in the hands of most casual bike mechanics, they’d never get it built without spending another $100 or so at a shop for a prep-out.
  • 3 0
 @ReformedRoadie: FYI Nicolai does custom Geo and very modern suspension kinematics and suspension design.
  • 1 0
 @Dem628: Penny farthing, the original mullet bike.
  • 1 1
 @ReformedRoadie: It's actually not too difficult to learn and understand and come up with something that works really well. Secret is to stay away from the gimmicks.

devlincc.com
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: That analogy doesn't work at all: I'm not interested in making pants so I don't know the numbers... bikes on the other hand!

Besides, give me a day and I could probably come up with a pretty darn good pair of pants, especially if I am going to a specialty custom pants maker who could advise me, just like a custom frame builder would do...
  • 2 1
 @SonofBovril: Agreed, you don't just send some numbers to a frame builder. You discuss what you want, what your suggestions are and they'll get back to you with what is possible, what the implications are of your choices etc. And typically you'll be discussing your options with a builder who already has something that's close to what you want. In my case, all I changed to the standard BTR Ranger, 26" wheeled large sized geometry is that I wanted a 400mm seattube and a lower top tube. They double checked that I had the room I wanted to move around, found out I needed a stronger seattube to cope with the leverage. It got built, I'm happy and it is keeping up. But it is really a mindset of the builder. Builders are skilled everywhere, but the culture can be different. In the far east (where they typically work with companies of course, doing mass or series production), it can be like "yeah we saw it was wrong but we made it the way you asked" whereas a western production company just won't make it if they see it is wrong and will get on the phone. That said, I have no experience with far eastern builders who work with customers directly and can see that in such a situation they won't build a product if they see the design is wrong. I personally discussed my options with Olsen, Portus Cycles and BTR and eventually went with BTR. But every single one of these companies/builders won't build anything for you if they see your proposed design won't work or won't do what you said you want it to do.
  • 2 1
 @onawalk: WTF makes you think there is a sense of entitlement??? I have an aluminum DW-link bike. Came from a linkage driven single-pivot (which I rode for 7 years...yeah, "entitled").

I've ridden VPP, DW-link, yetis (I took my entitled self to Outerbike several years ago)...the suspension is better. If you could get that level of performance from a single pivot, no one would be spending the time and resources to refine their designs.
  • 1 2
 @vinay: Im really curious how youve come up with yor take on "far East" builders making something they believe is wrong, but its what you ordered, so they built it anyway.

Why wouldnt that just be a trait of the individual youre dealing with rather than East vs West?
  • 2 2
 @ReformedRoadie: right from your first comment,
you want to beleive that some DW link is magic, who am I to tell you otherwise. You want to believe that the myriad of custom frame builders out there cant for some reason provide you with what you want, sure. You want to argue with some random dude who lists you a couple options to explore, and tell him hes wrong, cool. You want to believe you couldnt take a frame building course and learn to do to cool stuff on your own, I cant stop you.

But man, if youre gonna close every door that someone opens for you to support your beliefs, thats your prerogative, and who am I to tell you that options exist, and have for decades.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: you could 100% get there, Its not rocket science, its just melting steel with fire and electricity, what could be cooler than that!
  • 1 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: excellent notes on the Marino frame.
All that being said, even with the additional $100 spent with an experienced shop, would you give it a thumbs up?
  • 3 0
 @mammal: I think maybe this has gotten off topic from the original idea/post.

Custom geo, and frames have been available for decades, you simply need to do some work on your own to find them, discuss with them, work with them to develop what you want. Atherton is simply making it a HAppy meal for you, packaging it into a nice little website, and advertising it. Theres nothing wrong with that, and its an interesting idea, I wish them all the luck in the world. I was very interested, am on their mailing list, even spent some time trying to sort out what I was looking for, and then costs.
For me, at the time, I could do something similar, more locally, and get what I wanted. I dont seem to play well with DW link bikes, they dont seem to work well for my lack of riding ability.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: I’m happy with it. I ride it a lot. It fits they way I want it too. It shipped fast, but once it left Peru you had no idea where it was until it showed up at my post office. Literally I showed shipped and then there was no tracking available for around a week. My Spanish is rudimentary so trying to talk to anyone in the Peru post office was challenging. Like I said, for the $400, shipped, it was a decent deal. It came with nice thru axles, three hangers and a seat clamp. Compared to my Rootdown, which is made in Taiwan, but finished at Chromag, there was no comparison, the Rootdown was beautifully prepped honed and faced.
  • 2 4
 @onawalk: Now that I think about it...thinking you need a custom bike is more entitled thinking than wanting a better suspension design.
Custom is great if you need a road/gravel bike and either you are oddly proportioned, or at either extreme of the height spectrum. Custom mountain makes sense if you want to get an extreme geo...now that the majority of manufacturers have sorted geo, unless you just want to be different, or special, why go there?

DW link is not magic...but it is one of the better designs I have ridden. I stand by the idea that full suspension is better left to a larger manufacturer, or boutique brand (Atherton) that has invested in the engineering. There is a difference between the art of frame building, and the science of kinematics. How is pointing that out "entitled"?
  • 5 2
 @ReformedRoadie: I'm going to call bullshit on that. If you don't believe a small boutique brand or single frame builder can produce a bike every bit as good as the big manufacturers then you are certainly free to think that and I'm sure you sleep well at night. Myself and quite a few others have built bikes that definitely go toe to toe with the big brands. Yeah, I am biased but the proof is in the pudding. You don't need to poor crazy amounts of engineering into it to produce a great bike and the great thing about steel is you don't have to resort to years of expensive R&D and FEA to do it, and with the wealth of knowledge out there learning about and understanding kinematics is easier than in the past and you can design a bike that will be very close first go if you are careful and considered about your design.

Custom fit mtb is also not just a want. When you live in area where the only way to get to the downs is to ride up you spend way more time climbing and being in an efficient position pays diviends in saving eenrgy and preventing injuries. As someone with somewaht fragile knees, ensuring my position on the bike is optimal is important. I agree taht more people can get away with a production bike in a set size but having teh option of specing a bike exactly the way you want it to fit you is an awesome option and it's freaking fun building bikes.
  • 4 4
 @devlincc: You're calling bullshbit?
"Myself and quite a few others have built bikes that definitely go toe to toe with the big brands. Yeah, I am biased but the proof is in the pudding."
That's laughable.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: Yeah, as I said it probably won't happen with individual products but it is the experience with mass production. Of course western countries have loads of design companies who have access to CAD software, come up with a design and send it off to be produced by a production company. At this stage companies in Hong Kong, China, Taiwan etc have so much experience and knowlegde, they can probably design more efficiently and better than many of us over here who don't have that hands-on experience. You can work closely with the production company and make it perfect. But you can "go cheap" and just send your design the way you think it is correct and then you'll receive your product with the errors. Excessive sink marks, voids etc. A western company doesn't offer that "cheap" option. They'll typically double check and just won't make it if they think there is an error. So I won't by any means say that the eastern companies can't make something proper. On the contrary. It is just that the scenario described by the OP (of coming up with your own idea and throwing it "over the wall") may be possible with one of those eastern companies but probably not with a western one.

I'm talking primarily about my experience with mass production though and it may not apply to frames. I indeed doubt that the Taiwanese factory that some British steel brands work with would allow frames with mistakes leave their factory. I do agree in hindsight that my post could come across as generalizing so I should at the very least nuance that.

@ReformedRoadie : No one was offering what I wanted at the time so that's why I went custom. And so many question how what I want makes any sense so that's the very reason that it wasn't being mass produced. Basically, I wanted a shorter seattube for the reach and front/rear center ratio I wanted. Indeed it is getting more common now but back in 2017 when I placed my order, it wasn't there. At the end of the day what makes most sense is to, when you're going to buy something new (with all the money, materials, energy and footprint involved), you'd best just get what you really really want and stick with it. I got the geometry I wanted in the color I wanted. I can't see why I'd ever replace it.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: I just decided to buy a different off-the-rack frame rather than custom.
  • 4 0
 I doubt the novel rear suspension designs and kinematics are that critical to 99% of riders so long as you don't stray too far off the beaten path. Horst link, progressive leverage curve with ratio somewhere between 2 and 3, falling antisquat hitting around 100% at the sag point. I bought a copy of Linkage to play with (a personal copy is like $20) and what's most striking is how similar the kinematics are for most popular bikes. Especially if you use a well established bike as a baseline you're unlikely to get yourself into too much trouble designing your own. At the end of the day it's not a space shuttle and regardless of what magazine editors claim about the performance of novel suspension platforms the last couple of EWS titles were won on humble Horst links so you can definitely make them work well enough.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie:
Two years ago I would have called bullshit to this..
Now all I have to say is Amen Brother!
  • 3 1
 @ReformedRoadie: like I said your free to have that opinion. It's a shame you are dismissive of the small guys. We all work our feakin arses off and make great bikes. There is more to the world of bikes than the big manufactures
  • 1 1
 @devlincc: I'm in no way saying that small manufactures don't have something to offer, or are not making great bikes...Antidote and Atherton are small. Nor am I saying custom doesn't have it's place (which the latter offer). I am saying that personally, I am not picking the guy in his shed, taking either a single pivot, a open source plan off the internet, or a pre-fabbed (I know at one time Ventana offered something) suspension bike over something else.
Completely opposite opinion for a road bike, where I think about going for a Rock Lobster (before Paul hangs up his torch...may be too late now) frame where I know exactly who's welding/brazing my frame and can chat about tube selection and thickness for each tube of the frame. And there I am looking for experience, knowing what works and having feedback from many frames they built.
  • 2 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Doesn't that go for mountainbikeframes too? Geometry and frame comfort isn't just relevant for road bikes. As said, I trusted the manufacturer on tube selection and didn't have any specific demands there, but I did want a geometry that wasn't available off the shelf anywhere. If I'd get a full suspension design at some point, I'm mostly tempted by Starling as again, they can offer shorter seattubes than what I'm seeing from the standard production bikes. Others may have other requirements. Different suspension travel, specific colors even. Big brands are limited in that whatever they come up should appeal to a large number of people. If people have very specific desires, a smaller brand may be able to offer something more suitable. For many the big brand bikes are perfect yet at the same time, seeing as from the PB polls people seem to be replacing their bikes every few years, they aren't that perfect apparently.
  • 4 0
 @ReformedRoadie: I don't have any stake in this argument either way, but keep in mind that DW-Link was designed by... ONE GUY. There are lots of suspension design systems out there that can be fine tuned by a one person team into something exceptional. For example, as polarizing as it is, the suspension behind the Structure bike was basically done by one person. So I'm not sure that theres necessarily evidence that a whole team of engineers make suspension designs and kinematics any better than some pretty small brands.
  • 3 0
 @ReformedRoadie: their is no such thing as an 'open sourced plan'. There are setups like VPP DW and Canfield etc. Which are licenced but they all are used with design input from the licence owners. They don't want a bad bike made using their proprietary design. Not good for business. I use a four bar Horst link. Looks like a session. Haha. It's a proven layout. When designed well works amazing and for a small one man business its free instead of a fee that is impossible to cover with the low volume. Canfield did offer a really good deal with that but even then it's not possible.
Speaking for myself and I will take the liberty if tooting my own horn, I've done everything from designing, engineering, testing and fabricating every part of my bikes. There is no using anyone else's design or bolt on system. I started with an aporoxinate and tweaked it till I was happy with the numbers then comitted to the build. I've had a magazine review that gave the trail bike high praise and said it was every bit as good as anything else out there. Similar story to the enduro frame. Have had one with a tester that said it was the best bike he's ridden. Sure that's a sample size of two people but everyone that comes back from riding one of my bikes raves about it and usually is the price that holds them back.Personally I can't sell them any cheaper and actually make any money out of it. It is what it is.
So I apologise if I'm taking it a bit personal that guys like myself can't produce bikes as good as the big guys when we can and we do and I'll defend the other builders as well because the reality is the big manufacturers have done an amazing job of telling this story about how mysterious bike design is, when, with a bit of knowledge and a shit tonne of hard work it isn't that mysterious at all. Just freaking expensive.
  • 1 1
 @devlincc: No offense intended. But I would say you are the exception, not the rule. Bike design and building is art, science and engineering. Not magic. I would say suspension design is more the later and road the former, but that's IMHO.
It's been a long time since I rode a Horst-link bike, but that was impacted by other things, like a shit shock, super low BB. I know it can work well...look at how many companies switched over to it when the patent expired.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Lots of brands were using Horst Link already, they just weren't selling in North America because of the patent. It wasn't a switch. So it isn't such a huge increase in brands using the design, just more of those brands selling their bikes over there.
  • 1 0
 @SonofBovril: you're kidding yourself. Knowing some numbers != knowing how to build a bike. You'd end up going through just as many (or more) iterations as the big brands do to arrive at something that has the right geo, right kinematics, doesn't break, etc. Look how many iterations Neko has been through with Frameworks, or how many versions of Gwin's Intense prototype we've seen - and they have a WAY better idea what they want (and way better feel for evaluating it) than some dude on the internet.

So many people claim to know the exact geo/kinematic they want, but it's not like anyone has had the opportunity to actually try out those ideas and see how design changes interact with the rest of the bike. If you just wanna tweak the HA or CS length on some existing design and get it built to say it yours that's one thing (and fwiw it's super cool), but there's virtually no chance someone on PB is producing something better than a stumpy/top fuel/altitude/ripmo/whatever on the 1st or 2nd try.
  • 1 0
 hm. NEGATIVE head angle
  • 2 0
 @SonofBovril: I can point you in the direction of a guy who was a very famous bike designer who now makes a lot of money making pants I’d wager he makes more money now in a year of pants than he did the entire time he made or designed bikes
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Is it possible you've gotten yourself a little to wrapped up in marketing bs? I dont mean that as a critism, but I do want to challenge your idea a little bit.
Any one of these suspension designs has been developed by an engineer, or sometimes just a guy that has tried and failed at a couple things. Theres no magic involved, nothing crazy, just intelligent people, working, trying, failing, and working again.
Atherton is just licensing a patent from DW for a suspension design, sure they might have worked with him to provide something that fit their priorities, but again, it aint magic.

You could have, when Spesh held the patent rights, licensed the Horst link from them to adapt the design to your own frame. It was a design put together by a guy, who tried and failed, and re-tried, who then licensed it to others to use.

And to be clear, I dont necessarily think anyone needs a custom geo frame, I merely pointed out in my original post that custom geo frames have been available for decades, Atherton hasnt pioneered anything here, theyre just another name brand, that you seem to believe in
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: I don't think so. What I like about the Atherton bikes is they went to someone who's thing is suspension, licensed their latest design, and surely worked with them to maximize what they wanted out of it. They use additive manufacturing for a purpose, not just because it is cool. And they have the riding ability to test the crap out of it. I'll probably never get to ride one, or even see one in the flesh, but from all accounts (i.e. reviews...which I am sure you will just call marketing) they produced exceptional results.
I don't think it is marketing if you ride a bunch of bikes and decide from experience that one fits your riding style more than others...
  • 2 0
 So many long comments here. I was hoping for some nonsense banter and unsupported but vehemently held opinions and all I am not even sure what was there because it was too long to start. Disappointed.
  • 1 0
 @TopherJones93: sorry man,
I'll do better next time
  • 1 0
 @TopherJones93: would you like fries with that?
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: When you say "there's virtually no chance someone on PB is producing something better than a stumpy/top fuel/altitude/ripmo/whatever" , can you define 'better'? Because the way I look at it, people have their specific taste in bikes. And different body proportions. And riding styles. So what is better for you may not be better for me. Most large companies however, will try to cater to the most common taste, since this is the largest market for their products. This is where custom manufacturing comes in. When you want something else than what's commonly available.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: Considering how vague patents are, I don't even think a designer has to finetune a concept to the point that it lives up to its claim before they can patent it. So the initial concept of Horst Link may not even have been that much work to come up with. To make it perform the way you want for a particular frame, for a particular purpose will be most of the work. I don't think it was necessarily one person behind the initial design for Horst Link, but it weren't many. Wasn't it Horst Leitner and Kalle Nicolai? The latter who may have been the reason that Nicolai bikes could be sold in the US and why the patent itself was only limited to North America and loads of brands who didn't sell their stuff there designed their frames around the concept and didn't have to bother with VPP, Maestro and all that.
  • 1 0
 Just for fun, I'm gonna bring up that Naild2React suspension design.
MASSIVE steaming pile of hot garbage that TWO big bike brands signed on to use (and then abandon very quickly). Bigger company doesn't mean they'll do suspension better.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: The Naild suspension design won the 2017 PB innovation of the year award. Shouldn't have been too bad, should it? I feel it has been abandoned more because it might not sell because of the polarizing looks. But I recall PB reviewers were happy about the performance. Where did you uncover the "MASSIVE steaming pile of hot garbage" part of the story?
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: to be pedantic again, Robot Bike Co licensed the design, then atherton bought/took over RBC. At least, that was my understanding of it
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Horst was the primary designer who sold it to Specialized who rebranded it as FSR and then licenced it out to those who wanted to use it. But it was only licenced in the US. Brands in Europe were using it the whole time the licence period ran for in the US.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: there were definitely some questionable designs through the early days as brands scrambled to create the next best thing. Thankfully it's all settled down and people like myself can ride the coat tails of all that early development. I am certainly not doing anything new and don't pretand too. Merely using a system that works with a slight tweak to suit my local riding area and the trails we ride. In time I will build a Canfield platform. chris has been super helpful with early design discusions and I definitely interested in what it can offer.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I test rode one, and spoke with other professional suspension designers about it. Consensus was it was an inherently flawed design that couldn't possibly fulfill its marketing hype. Plus, I think we all can think of a few examples when PB reviews missed the mark *cough* Status-gate *cough*
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Like it or not, aesthetics matter to a majority of riders whether they admit it or not. Which is why linkage forks have an uphill battle for acceptance, regardless of how well they work, or add to handling.

Those bikes were abominations that I have tried to unsee.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: can't argue that point in the slightest. Just saying that just because a big brand is involved doesn't mean the suspension design is "good" or that they have their kinematics dialled.
  • 7 0
 We are here for you man...
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: What linkage fork proved better than its telescopic counterpart?

whos arguing aesthetics dont matter? Remember though, what you might like, another might not, its a subjective point, so its fairly useless.

Knolly, comes to mind in the polarizing category, and I was one who wasnt interested, until I rode one, changed my mind completely.
Sounds to me like your the type of person who lets aesthetics, and brand recognition get in the way of a more subjective review of things. Youre willing to write off a brand, or frame maker simply cause theyre not a more well known brand. Youre screen name makes a tonne of sense
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Im curious, what part of its marketing hype was it not living up to? I'm inclined to agree with @ReformedRoadie on this that the looks, and possibly the aggressive marketing claims werent for everyone. I had an acquaintance who loved it, said it was one of the best pedalling long travel bikes hes ever used. Claimed maintenance, and spare for that sliding shaft were his issue. its kinda the same principal as the yetis of past where a sliding pivot creates a VPP with less actual pivots.

Im sure it could have been made more appealing
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: the Structure. For certain use cases (high speed dh, rock gardens) their fork is definitely the best thing going. Problem is it sucks (Imo) in berms and on jumps. Plus looks ugly AF.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: Ok, thanks for your input. So we have several reputable reviewers primarily liking the suspension design or even awarding it the "innovation of the year" and we have someone in this comment section who test rode and spoke to unnamed professional suspension designers and declared it a "MASSIVE steaming pile of hot garbage" yet doesn't explain that statement even when asked. I'll call it a draw and leave it at that.

What goes wrong with the Structure bike in berms? Is the issue that the front wheel might have a forwards axle path which doesn't work well in berms? I'm curious and I can imagine this could feel weird. Also when compressing at the beginning of the jump.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: right, so overall NOT better than, just trades one compromise for another. Couple that with the fact that its not a fork, its an entire suspension system for the front of your bike. You have to design the whole bike around that system. In no way is that better, just different.
  • 65 2
 Please add an option to your "What Factors Influence Your Bike Purchasing Decisions?" poll: 'It is not funded by the CIA.'
  • 10 0
 Maybe someone should take a look at the financials of Contra bikes as well!
  • 5 2
 that would make me want it more
  • 3 0
 Woah, I didn't know Google and Amazon employees were into mtb.
  • 1 0
 Why you say this? I don't get it
  • 5 1
 For as high-tech, sneaky, and spooky as all their CIA / In-Q-Tel composites technology sounds, I was able to hack into their marketing manager’s email and I found some of their pending trademarks and branding and marketing plans. Below are the highlights:

CIAO — Carbon Innovation And Optimization. CIAO is so amazing that we can’t talk about it (sorry, it’s classified).

Adhesive Formula 007 (AKA: Bond, Adhesive Bond) — our new thermoplastic adhesive allows riders to swap head-tube modules for variable reach and slackness, as geometry preferences change. The adhesive sets in just 7 minutes, yes just 007 minutes. The adhesive can be dissolved with our proprietary acid in just 30 seconds, allowing rapid disassembly of head-tube modules. Just avoid skin contact, as our proprietary acid readily dissolves human flesh in seconds.

“Intelligence Asset” is our new frame-integrated data logger, recording GPS, suspension, and acceleration data from our embedded high-frequency accelerometers, allowing riders to analyze their riding and manually optimize their suspension tuning.

IAAI — Intelligence Asset Artificial Intelligence. IAAI analyzes all “Intelligence Asset” data from other riders and automatically optimizes, via Artificial Intelligence, all of your suspension tuning; of course taking into account your body weight, riding speed, local weather conditions, and additional rider-input data.

SIGINT is our radio frequency antenna technology embedded into our carbon fiber frames — the co-molded boron fibers act as a VLF (very low frequency) antenna, based on state-of-the-art Signals Intelligence technology, allowing us to monitor the usage of our bikes, locate stolen bikes, and transmit “Intelligence Asset” and IAAI data, all via our proprietary VLF transmitter and antenna at Mountain Biking Area 51 (AKA, Q’s cabin).

Q — he, or rather it, is our Chief Technology Officer. Q not only conceives great bike technologies, but Q is an incredible chemist.

CQC (Conceived at Q’s Cabin) is a trademark we place on every technology and innovation we conceive at Q’s Cabin. Q’s Cabin where the engineering team goes monthly to brainstorm innovations while on LSD. New engineers are always in for a wild ride on their first visit to Q’s cabin...and we’re not taking about the singletrack.

Stealth Mode — utilizing our proprietary frame-integrated SIGINT VLF antenna, riders can radio-frequency jam your buddies’ mobile phones, rendering them temporarily useless, when needed. No calls from the office when it’s time to ride. No calls from the wife when it’s time to ride. No posting pictures to Instagram when it’s time to ride. And especially no checking Pinkbike when it’s time to ride.
  • 2 0
 This bike brought to you by the crack epidemic, cointelpro, and JFKs head
  • 44 0
 Bottle mounts on a park bike are surprisingly useful. No, I don't drink during a run, but it's nice to be able to drink during the lift ride back to the top or while waiting in the lift line.
  • 9 0
 For sure... and any bike park I've been too... I'm never doing top to bottom runs without stopping. Having water is great. Plus half the time, at my local, the water jug at the bottom of the lift is empty anyway.
  • 10 0
 The water bottle mount on my Shore is a game changer. I have migrated to the it must have a water bottle mount camp now
  • 1 3
 but, because of that bottle clearance this bike got a sorta ugly downtube. its one of those bikes I'm surprised clears its own front wheel on bottom outs
  • 1 2
 Built in bottle openers would be even better.
  • 2 5
 Bro just stash a bottle at the bottom of the lift.
  • 1 0
 @thustlewhumber: Cans are the answer.
  • 3 0
 Fidlock makes a great zip tie mount for their bottles. I use 3M dual sided foam tape and ditch the ties for a cleaner look, works great on my DH bike with the 140z bottle. (You do need to glue the rubber interface to the magnetic mount if you go without ties - has not failed in 3 seasons of use)

But ya, bottle mounts on DH frames please!
  • 1 0
 @GeneralGroovus: Genius, I just ordered this! I really missed my bottle when stopped riding my trail bike at the park.
  • 1 0
 @Chief2slo: Right on, the dust/mud cap on the bottles is cool too. Cheers!
  • 35 1
 My memories of thermoplastic was snapping the head tube clean off my GT STS1 about 25 years ago. Hopefully much has changed since then....
  • 34 0
 the good news is you at least have a memory of that. Terrifying failure of a frame
  • 40 0
 *Thermosnapstic
  • 4 0
 @mtmc99: luckily it was at low speed.
  • 3 0
 spectating a dh race in devon late 90s saw 2 of those frames head tube seperation on the same day
  • 6 0
 To be fair, I have memories of seeing a helluva lot bikes snapping 20+ years ago. Thankfully GG now makes thermoplastic frames that are incredibly strong and offer amazing ride quality. Good to see others getting in the thermoplastic game assuming they can bring this product to market.
  • 4 0
 Came here for this comment,was not disapointed. I remember vividly,seeing two GT STS frames snapping clean at the headtube back in the day. Scary stuff.
  • 4 1
 It sounds like a similar process to what Guerilla Gravity have been using for the last few years. Those frames are strong AF
  • 33 2
 "As a final twist to the tale of Arevo, the CIA, or rather In-Q-Tel, the CIA's venture capital firm, is one of the investors in the company."

This is the kind of hard-hitting journalism I come here for. More exposés on UFOs and deep state connections to the bike industry, let the Mikes loose.
  • 5 8
 My experience of machining 3d printed metal parts using a cnc machine says usually where any kind of tolerance at the tighter end of the scale is involved
  • 12 2
 I want my bike to be the first 2 wheeled entity to destabilize an industrializing 3rd world country
  • 18 1
 I really thought it was going to have a 65 degree HT angle
  • 1 0
 underrated comment haha
  • 2 0
 New trends in MTB: shorter, higher, steeper

Buy your modern bike now and throw out that old thing you have been riding and get on a bike that is agile, precise, and playful!
  • 18 1
 Yeeeehaw!!!!
  • 5 1
 Put your Cowboy or Cowgirl hats on and lets RODEO!
  • 2 1
 @jankus: giddyup Janker!
  • 3 0
 @jankus: this bad boy could bust so many muttons
  • 30 14
 Exo+ tires on the test bike tells me they aren’t serious about this
  • 6 1
 Flow trails only
  • 1 0
 @newbermuda: have def flatted a brand new exo+ assegai on a bike park flow trail embedded rock
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: I have done the exact same. First run of the day too. Exo+ assegai with a cushcore.
  • 19 10
 Can we get run times for these 3D Printed parts and then compare them to other forms of manufacturing? Feel like that's the data we are missing with all this 3D Printed talk. Also, do they require CNC work post printing? What's the scrap rate? How are the tolerances. Lots of questions.
  • 2 1
 Agree, it would be interesting to know more about those procedures, so we as End-Consumers could have a more realistic perspective on why and how a price for a frame is as it is. Then again that's probably the reason we won't get those information. In my opinion the selective laser melting, applied by Atherton ist one of the most promising manufacturing innovations. I worked in a marketing agency for one of the bigger manufacturers of those machines, and they really take leaps forward innovation-wise currently. They also manage to reduce scrap etc. a lot.
  • 10 2
 Not really sure why you as a consumer need any of this info lol. What's the scrap rate / tolerances / etc for hydroformed aluminum? Hand-layup carbon? From which manufacturer? Etc

But they talked a lot about this stuff on the CyclingTips Nerd Alert podcast with the company that makes these (Arevo).
podcasts.apple.com/dk/podcast/the-superstrata-doesnt-need-your-silly-seat-tube/id1489098732?i=1000577328325
  • 3 0
 Why is it better for the consumer then?
  • 3 1
 @damagemydirt: 3d printing is good when you want to make one, or a few, off. If you are making lots of the same thing(s) then there are lots of better ways to make them.

3d printing captures the imagination and it can make some cool looking structures. In some cases (such as with heat exchangers) there is some small functional benefit but it isn't worth the massively increased cost.
  • 2 0
 @The-Spirit-of-Jazz: seems like a ploy to get VC funding with fancy PR's. I need to 3D print some prototypes and send out some PR's and see if there's any money left in the VC world.
  • 2 0
 @The-Spirit-of-Jazz: 3d printing allows to deal with complex structures (reinforcements inside the frame as seen on one picture) that molds cannot. And yes, its to slow to manage mass production of big elements.
  • 3 1
 @xalt: it does. But it doesn't give any overall benefit.

(I used to work at a company that was started pretty much on basis of 3d printing buzz. In the time I worked there we looked at all sorts of applications.....none really yielded a meaningful benefit despite the costs)

As others have identified (and the article alludes to with the other bike frames mentioned) the loss of material/structure properties from printing offsets the benefit of the design freedoms of printing.

They look cool. Sometimes. That's about it.

Sorry to buzz killington!
  • 1 0
 @The-Spirit-of-Jazz: What about this "The filament is fed through a six-axis robotic arm, where it's heated up by a laser, and then compacted by a roller while it's laid down in the pre-programmed pattern." ?
I understand that there are carbon fibers embedded in the thermoplastic, which makes a big difference with usual 3d printing.
  • 1 0
 @xalt: for sure it's better than regular plastic or filled powder bed printing but is still going to be a lot less properties than carbon when it's made in the "usual" moulded processes.

Look up AFP machines which are whats used in aerospace. You could call that printing but its not quite the same.

Don't want to rag on the revel project too much it looks like a nice bike. But it won't have that manufacturing process if and when it gets to production.
  • 2 0
 @xalt: I mean he's basically right - there's basically no chance that the 3D printed bike will be stronger/lighter than the same frame made by laying up + molding cloth. As I understand it Arevo is basically printing with thermoplastic/CF tape.

But just like Ministry and the other companies milling Al frames out of billet, processes that seem insanely expensive/wasteful at the large scale are often more cost effective at the small scale / in a small physical mfg footprint. If Revel is printing these it's probably because they don't expect to sell a large # of DH frames and can't justify the cost of conventional production space for it. So in a roundabout way it's probably cheaper / less of a pain in the ass than making molds and adding production capacity at their own factory. That or they're demoing the technology for evenual use in something else.
  • 6 1
 For NASA's N+3 future airliner program, Boeing has determined that hybrid electric engine technology is by far the best choice for its subsonic design. Hybrid electric propulsion has the potential to shorten takeoff distance and reduce noise. Boeing created a team to study electric propulsion in future generation of subsonic commercial aircraft. SUGAR for Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research includes BR&T, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. There are five main concepts the team is reviewing. SUGAR-Free and Refined SUGAR, are two concepts based on conventional aircraft similar to the 737. SUGAR High and SUGAR Volt, are both high-span, strut-based wing concepts. The final concept is SUGAR Ray, which is a wing-body hybrid. The SUGAR Volt concept has resulted in a drop in fuel burn by more than 70 percent and a reduction of total energy use by 55 percent. This reduction is the result of adding an electric battery gas turbine hybrid propulsion system.[47]
  • 4 0
 wat
  • 2 0
 Wat
  • 3 0
 Ah so the Dow country airliner
  • 1 1
 Da fuq man? There's nothing in that paper about Thermoplastics. Please elaborate.
  • 6 1
 Oh sorry wrong website
  • 2 0
 I have seen the future and the SUGAR future is apparently, well - SWEET. Super Watt Electric Enjoyment Technology. This SWEET stuff does elicit a bitter taste in some instances though...also wrong website.
  • 7 0
 DH with 2 water bottle mounts?
  • 3 0
 Probably going for the same idea as the Canfield ONE.2. Build it with dual crown 200 mm or single crown 190 mm.

canfieldbikes.com/collections/one-2-dh-mtb
  • 2 0
 Better come with some Voile straps too
  • 4 0
 Extrapolating this 5 years into the future, it's clear that the next big trend in mtb is DH bikepacking. Place your frame bag orders now
  • 6 0
 The fact that it's taken this long for a modern DH bike to be...named the Rodeo, is an industry wide failure.
  • 3 0
 Wait, did he said the first ever a mountain bike was made out of thermoplastic? Really?
If i recall (old age here), there was a company called GT that had a thermoplastic + carbon fiber downhill bike called the LOBO. Ok, ok, it wasn't 3d printed in silicon Valley, but common! Revel is not the first thermoplastic bike......

Give to Caesar what belong to Caesar!
  • 4 2
 In composites, proper fiber layup is exceptionally important to strength. This is especially true in thin wall tube structures, where long fibers take load longitudinally. I am very skeptical that this method of manufacturing will provide any performance benefits over traditional composite technology. Additionally, having voids in the carbon can severely impact strength, even if appropriate layup is achievable.
  • 8 3
 Can this fit a Rolhoff hub?
  • 1 0
 Surprised to see this.
I've followed the super strata story from afar as the process was interesting and nothing really looked transparent.
The only actual print demonstration was a bad quality video of a rough frame with lot of tinfoil here and there, and absolutely no showcase of how they print the 1st half of the frame (when the layers are half hanging over nothing, or maybe they flip it at 50%, still...)
Then it looked like the finish was very rough and they'd lose a lot of time sanding and prepping the frame, more or less losing the gain of not having to do the carbon layering in the 1st place.
  • 2 0
 My son is really interested in a career in 3D printing and CNC. We just watched a video where a 3D printer was used to make a titanium rocket injector manifold that was designed by AI. Very cool to see what can be done
  • 13 0
 Who’s Al
  • 17 0
 @Compositepro: Allen Iverson.

He doesn't get enough credit for his work as a rocket propulsion engineer after he retired from the NBA
  • 5 0
 black is the new black.
  • 3 1
 Can't wait for the all the people melting these by sticking it on a bike rack right next to their exhaust. That said, 3D printing the fibres themselves in situ is kinda sick
  • 4 0
 Sure, carbon wheels and rubber tires are susceptible to melting with poorly thought out rack mounting, but if your bike's *frame* is near your exhaust, you probably shouldn't be operating a motor vehicle.
  • 4 0
 Thermoplastic..
In the words of Frodo: We've been here before.
  • 4 0
 Fits TWO water bottle cages.
  • 1 0
 Hell yeah son
  • 8 5
 "Made in America" = welcome to some very mediocre craftsmanship. Does it come with a gun holster?
  • 3 2
 Yeah, wanna test how it works?
  • 4 1
 First Yeti, now Revel... who else is going to make a DH bike that's not for sale??
  • 3 0
 CHROMAG!!!
  • 2 0
 a prototype thats not for sale? shocking!!!
  • 3 0
 Don't forget Honda.
  • 1 1
 The frame looks smooth (no layer lines) because it was wrapped with one or more layers of woven carbon fiber cloth. Just a note.

It looks like there is a mold of some sort under the frame during the extrusion (FFF Printing) process. I'd be curious what level of strength and precision is required of the mold.
  • 5 1
 Another plastic bike that will crack. Great story bro.
  • 4 0
 Let'rrrrr eat!
  • 3 0
 Doesn't look like a Session and it fits 2 bottles! Sign me up!
  • 4 1
 GT sends out cease and desist....
  • 1 0
 Why not putting a 50 tooth cassete, a water bottle mount, a more vertical angle and a dropper in these super light pedaleable DH bikes?
  • 2 0
 The bike has two water bottle mounts, I have seen it in person
  • 1 0
 @ZB-defender: finally! Ratparking 6h hours requires proper hidratation... can't believe it took so long...
  • 1 0
 Canfield One.2 has this now....minus the bottle mount.
  • 1 0
 Interesting, it reminds indeed of my thermoplastic GT LTS. Mid 90s, they also had a downhill version. Terrible climber but the frame was very pretty. And very heavy.
  • 3 2
 Just what the world needs, more products that can be produced from recycled/recyclable steel or al by actual people created using robots from plastic. Yay!
  • 2 0
 Thermoplastic... Gt had a blast with that. Hope glue technology has evolved since then...
  • 1 0
 My understanding is that this is the same material Guerrilla Gravity is using in their frames and Revel and Chris King are using in their wheels.
  • 1 0
 And when 3D printed frames are perfected with huge production cost reductions, bike MFG's will finally pass along the savings! Or not.
  • 3 0
 but are they members of Silicon Valley Bank?
  • 1 0
 Bail out ! ! !
  • 3 0
 Was waiting for Kyuss to kick in.............
  • 2 0
 This looks very complicated and un-recyclable ...isn't it possible to just weld together some metal tubes?
  • 1 0
 There's a podcast with the owner of Revel I heard recently. He speaks about how this is actually much less complicated because you don't need to make a mold (to the tune of thousands of dollars) for every little change, and because it doesn't use resin like typical carbon it is much more sustainable and easier recycled. Much like their wheels that they currently produce in Utah.

The catch however, is that the technology to make a DH bike strong enough to withstand, well, DH, isn't there yet. At least not in a way to make it affordable. I think he said that if someone were to purchase this bike, the cost to break even for all parties involved was north of $200k, hence this being a one off concept.
  • 1 0
 I feel like if they straightened the seat tube to allow for a dropper on this thing it would be a super enduro/park bike ripper
  • 2 0
 I had a GT Lobo made of Thermoplastic it broke and they replaced it with a polished aliu version
  • 1 0
 I look forward to the day they release the file on thingiverse so I can print one on my Ender in like 5000 individual pieces.
  • 3 0
 Saddle up wranglers!
  • 3 0
 That's a Revelation!
  • 4 2
 I have not heard the word "Thermoplastic" since the days of the GT STS!!
  • 1 0
 this looks super rad, 3d printed carbon and cbf suspension!!! Ill go ahead and get in line now
  • 2 1
 They forgot to print cable guides? That line on the rear triangle looks to be held on with electrical tape!
  • 1 2
 Rear triangle outside cable routing ... Could have beem tube in tube cable routing with the 3D printing possibilities ?
Also the shape of the frame is quite conservative.
Not using full potential of 3D printing yet.
  • 4 0
 Well it is a prototype and proof of concept only. So there is that...
  • 2 0
 Hyper making a DH too y'all
  • 2 1
 So cool, and CBF to boot! GG bikes are solid, rode them for years.

I'd take a thermoplastic Pinion enduro bike ... anyone?
  • 1 0
 "thirsty park rat"

you keep using those words...i do not think they mean what you think they mean.
  • 2 0
 Would you say I have a plethora of prototypes?
  • 2 1
 Chris Canfield kinematics and geo with a future-now design... Hell yeah, sign me up for that Rodeo!!! SICK
  • 1 0
 GT made thermoplastic DH bikes for the public way way back in the day! (1990’s)
  • 2 0
 I can hear it creaking through my screen.
  • 2 0
 I’ll take a Jedi. ✌️
  • 2 0
 2 water bottle mounts on a DH bike? What is this? 1996?
  • 1 0
 I appreciate the idea, and props to the Revel, but just dont live the bike close to the bonfire... Razz
  • 1 0
 You know.... Aviato? My Aviato?
  • 1 0
 Get your spurs on, were going riding! Yeehaw!
  • 2 0
 Want
  • 4 3
 Don’t forget the advent calendar!
  • 1 0
 That's pretty badass,Airbus and boeing already do it
  • 2 1
 If they want it at rampage they should make it shorter and 27.5 of course.
  • 1 1
 I can Barely hold onto my Rail, how do they expect me to hold on to the rockect ship!
  • 1 0
 DO you even thermoplastic brah!?
  • 1 0
 Same stack height for everyone? That's a hard pass.
  • 2 3
 Trusting plastic to hold my head tube in place as I roll into steep sketch? Nope. Never. I'll take metal or carbon please.
  • 7 2
 what if I told you that the stuff holding the carbon fibers together is plastic
  • 1 0
 The future, right there . . .
  • 1 0
 Bikes exposed to to much sun void warranties.(thermoplastic bike melted)
  • 1 0
 DH bike with water bottle ? finally some people think about people.
  • 1 0
 As long as it's more expensive, it will be the next best thing
  • 1 1
 I've been pretty indifferent about the way that revel bikes look in the past, but this downhill bike it's just ugly
  • 1 0
 seems like great tech to make freedom cannons out of
  • 1 0
 What is a freedom cannon?
  • 1 0
 Make a metal bike please!!
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: looks beautiful but I guess I should have been more specific. I’d rather have a full suspension with the CBF design.
  • 1 0
 thermoplastic go boom?
  • 1 1
 I don't own a guerilla gravity trail pistol
  • 1 1
 Exo+ tires on a „DH“ bike? Seriously now?
  • 1 0
 I know, why not 3d printed recycled rubber tires? (:
  • 1 1
 iscg-05 finally. annoying only the rail29 has it to date.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a rodeo
  • 1 0
 Revel the Price $$$
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