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First Look: Pole Bicycles' Four New Long-Travel Models

Jul 7, 2023
by Matt Beer  
Pole Bicycles
Left to right: Voima eMTB, Vikkelä, Onni, and Sonni eMTB.

Pole Bicycles has never taken a normal approach to building bikes. Their crafty CNC frame construction and extra long-travel "trail" bikes have polarizing appearances. The Finnish brand is debuting four models that are split into two categories; "Gravity" and "Trail". Those are further divided by an eMTB in both segments, denoted by Pole as "Motor-On".

The Onni and Sonni eMTB Gravity models have 200mm of front and rear wheel travel, use stiffer frame construction, and supportive suspension kinematics for specific downhill race applications.

On the Trail side, the Vikkelä and Voima eMTB not only look very similar, but are also capable of equal travel numbers. These bikes can be set to 168, 190, or even 200mm of rear wheel travel, however the frame stiffness and suspension kinematics are said to be more forgiving than the Gravity models.

All four frames offer the choice of a full 29er or MX wheel setup too, although switching to the smaller rear wheel will slacken the angles slightly.





Gravity Models - Onni (Motor Off) and Sonni (Motor On)

Pole Bicycles
Pole Bicycles

Pole Bicycles

Onni Details
• Intended use: downhill and super enduro
• CNC alloy frame
• 29er or MX wheel configuration
• 190-200mm dual-link suspension
• Fork travel: 190-200mm
• Head angle: 63.5°-64.3°
• Reach: 433, 463, 493mm
• Chainstay: 448mm (effective)
• Price: 4490€ ($4890 USD)
• Framese: 3200€ ($3486 USD)
polebicycles.com

Pole Bicycles

Sonni eMTB Details
• Intended use: Super enduro eMTB
• CNC alloy frame
• 190-200mm dual-link suspension
• 29er or MX wheel configuration
• 190-200mm fork
• Head angle: 63.5°-64.3°
• Reach: 433, 463, 493mm
• Chainstay: 448mm (effective)
• Price: 6290€ ($6851 USD)
• Framese: 5565€ ($6061 USD)
polebicycles.com

The Onni, named after the aspiring Finnish downhill racer Onni Rainio, comes as a DH-race bike with 200mm of travel front and rear, mixed wheels, and a 7-speed drivetrain.

Swapping out the 200mm dual-crown for a 190mm single crown, where the effective axle to crown length is mimicked, and swapping to a dropper post and 12-speed drivetrain to take advantage of its steep seat angle makes it a super enduro bike. If that's too much, shortening the shock stroke will produce 177mm of rear wheel travel and is best paired with a 180mm single crown. All three travel configurations are possible on the Sonni eMTB as well.

Geometry

Pole Bicycles
The Onni and Sonni come in three frame sizes. Changing the fork and wheel size will alter the geometry slightly. More detailed info can be found on the Pole website.




Trail Models - Vikkelä (Motor Off) and Voima (Motor On)

Pole Bicycles
Pole Bicycles

Pole Bicycles

Vikkelä Details
• Intended use: enduro and trail
• CNC alloy frame
• 29er or MX wheel configuration
• 168-200mm dual-link suspension
• Fork travel: 170-200mm
• Head angle: 63.5°-64.3°
• Reach: 433, 463, 493mm
• Chainstay: 455mm (effective)
• Price: 4490€ ($4890 USD)
• Framese: 3200€ ($3486 USD)
polebicycles.com

Pole Bicycles

Voima eMTB Details
• Intended use: enduro and trail eMTB
• CNC alloy frame
• 168mm-200mm dual-link suspension
• 29er or MX wheel configuration
• 170-200mm fork
• Head angle: 63.5°-64.3°
• Reach: 436, 449, 479, 509mm
• Chainstay: 455mm (effective)
• Price: 6290€ ($6851 USD)
• Framese: 5565€ ($6061 USD)
polebicycles.com

The Motor-On and Motor-Off theory is applied to the Voima and Vikkelä "Trail" bikes as well and despite their gargantuan travel numbers, Pole says these bikes are designed to be comfortable for the average consumer on prolonged descents and provide confidence when the trail becomes steep. The suspension has a less-rearward axle path than the Gravity bikes and more supple suspension for increased tracking at slower speeds.

Like the three travel modes on the Gravity bikes, there's room for multiple configurations on each of the Trail bikes too. 200mm of front and rear wheel travel isn't out of the question, but traditional numbers of 170 and 168mm rival most enduro bikes out there.

Geometry

Pole Bicycles
The Vikkelä and Voima come in four frame sizes. Changing the fork and wheel size will alter the geometry slightly. More detailed info can be found on the Pole website.




The "Motor-Off" bikes retail for 4490€ ($4890 USD) while the "Motor-On" eMTBs cost 6290€ ($6851 USD). Each assisted bikes will be equipped with a Bosch CX 85Nm motor and a 750Wh battery.

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214 Comments
  • 272 2
 Having seen this in person I will say three three things:
- Side profile is really not his best angle
- Still pretty strange looking
- f*cking weirdly stiff

My Tinder Bio is now also complete.
  • 7 1
 I think the thinner swingarm (or whatever it should be called) on the Onni looks better to me than the thicker one of the Vikkela. Just like with an Orange, Cannondale Prophet/Rush etc, I do like the idea of not having another link passing through the chain-loop. Seems convenient too, if you can take the entire chain off for cleaning without opening it. Or to carry a complete prepared chain in your pack just in case you happen to snap a chain.
  • 6 2
 I used to be pretty well set on the design disaster champion that Orange created..
  • 12 1
 @vinay: how do you get it through the derailleur tho
  • 8 0
 @Upduro: you could do that by undoing the pulley screws so the plate can be taken out of the way
  • 7 0
 @Upduro: lots and lots of faff undoing the jockey wheels, obviously. Quick link fastening has wasted so many minutes of my life.
  • 21 0
 @Upduro: you take the spare chain along pre-threaded thru the spare derailleur
  • 3 0
 The one time the E bike looks better then the normal mountain bike...

Still odd. But I'd Hit it!! Smile
  • 8 1
 @scary1: Orange bikes ride incredible. Can't see them while you are riding them.
  • 1 0
 @Upduro: Good one. May be the one selling point for AXS. Just bring a spare chain with the derailleur already installed.
  • 4 1
 @dave-f: And you pre-thread the spare derailleur cable through the internal routing of the spare frame.
  • 6 0
 At least some continuity … still designed by engineers and engineered by designers.
  • 3 1
 I saw the Onni in person and it looks really fu***ng sick. As in really cool. I mean that detached BB and how it connects to the "nod" from which the pivots branch out and from there to the rest of the frame. Looks really organic. Not strange, just cool as hell.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Or you just use Wippermann Codex chains, or at least their quick link, which can easily be opened and closed with only your hands (by design) and which is good to use for years (no 'one time use' as most other brands' quick links).
No chain link plier or chain tool necessary, dependable and easy as it gets.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: YES but still have to take off your jockey wheels, but easier than taking off your swinging arm, could think of an other good reason, but not allowed to say it?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: With Pole it is non issue - you happen to snap the frame.
  • 100 1
 Should be Onni - motor on, Offi - motor off
  • 5 11
flag psyfi (Jul 7, 2023 at 10:58) (Below Threshold)
 Great remark!
  • 7 0
 @psyfi: remarkable
  • 66 5
 Pole is the most dramatic example of how manufacturers have quietly been clawing back reach numbers, pretending like they haven't massively over done it for the last couple of years. Pole Stamina K3 equivalent used to have a 540mm reach. Now it has 509. That's crazy! Step in the right direction, though.
  • 19 2
 and head angles - interesting that they're ticking back up above 64* (no need for lower on a bike you pedal IMO)
  • 16 0
 @scotteh: I mean, to find the best spot you sometimes have to overshoot and then pull back. I personally think for most people at most sizes, 150mm up to DH, 64 degree HTA is the optimal geo. DH bikes seem to vary from 61-63 nowadays.
  • 16 0
 who remembers the Revel Rail 29 comments...not long/modern enough.
  • 20 2
 By contrast, I would call that innovation while Specialized/Trek/Giant are s-l-o-w-l-y increasing their reach numbers (as they copy the innovators) by 3mm per year. I'll take innovators over $ based metered out changes.
  • 10 0
 I’m so glad I have a G1 so I can put them where I want them.
  • 5 2
 at 6'1 I have to buy size smalls since 2019 s2 status is the first bike that finally feels sized ok for me. I actually want to feel like I'm in the air when I hit jumps.
  • 4 1
 @stunnanumma1: yeah and yet I see more Revels around than the Uber long and slack smash machines
  • 10 3
 @hamncheez: you're supposed to do that with R&D, not by selling experimental products that people had to put down thousands of dollars in deposits for just to wait over a year for.
  • 6 1
 @luckynugget: kudos to you for knowing the type of riding that makes you happy and optimizing for it! More people need to be realistic about that. Everything has trade offs and there is no one perfect bike for all types of riding. I personally feel like a full sus bike that is has optimal geo and setup for jumping just ends up sucking at everything else. And when I set my bike up to be fastest and most composed in really steep and technical stuff, it jumps like shit. I think the reality is one needs to be honest with what type of stuff you want to ride and have the appropriate bike setup for that. My XL G1 isnt great in the air but IDGAF and wouldn’t ever want a smaller bike because of the confidence it gives me in the gnar. Obviously if you are a crazy skilled rider you can ride any bike on anything, but it doesn’t mean it is the optimal setup for you.
  • 2 0
 @bigbrett: Everything continues to be a compromise. I had an XL G1 and at first the extra length was awesome; felt so good to be properly balanced against my center of gravity for the first time. But now it seems too long and definitely too slack and after trying a couple of smaller bikes to test the water I'm done with 535mm of reach and 64' HTA. Giving up a bit of wheelbase and reach makes for a more versatile bike for me. It's a happy balance for me to have the bike be a bit more maneuverable though I was happy smashing the gnar on my G1 battleship for a long time. It's nice finally that there are a few more options in this size range.
  • 7 0
 @stunnanumma1:

yeah R29 copies Ripmo geo and adds a hair more travel and it’s ‘horribly steep, not enduro enough, barely rideable’.

“All mountain” bikes still exist and are great at everything, people. You can still ride steep trails with a 65 hta and then your bike is still agile and fun. So horrible.
  • 7 1
 @WasatchEnduro: +1 for the Ripmo mention. The bikes get some crap in the looks department, but Ibis does what they do, and they do it well. "Let my Ibis handle this" comments notwithstanding.
  • 20 0
 @justinfoil: Very valid point you're making about Pole being poor in their customer service [early on]. However, Leo has done an amazing job of innovating and bringing great products to market and now supporting their customers as well. I've just gone thru both a warranty issue and a new bike purchase and both were really top rate experiences. They asked for pics of a frame issue and had a DHL driver pick up the frame at my home & their expense a week later. One week past that they emailed confirmation of a frame replacement with upgrade options as well. I chose to replace my frame and to buy a new Vikkela on top of that. One week to ship and less than a week later my new Vikkela arrived at my door! They've def gotten their game together! The Vikkela rides like nothing I've ever been on from local park trails to DH runs! Magic.
  • 6 0
 @justinfoil: the bike industry considers consumers to be their R&D all the time.
  • 13 3
 @BamaBiscuits: You don’t see the long and slack bikes because they’re faster than you.
  • 7 0
 Grim Donut 3 will have road bike geo and a 20” rear wheel.
  • 7 0
 @alexsin: at 6'6" on a 535mm reach Spire, I hear you. However my feeling is that all bikes have strengths and weaknesses, and the ideal solution that not everyone is able to do is to just have all the bikes. I have a shorter bike as well, and whenever I switch bikes, whichever one I'm switching to I think "God this bike is awesome, glad I have it". I'm lucky to be able to have multiple because to me there is no right answer unless you just ride one kind of trail. Same applies to my hardtail. Every bike is awesome in it's own ways. Happily keeping my 535 reach for the trails that it shines on because that shit is absolutely amazing.
  • 3 0
 @manco: Whenever I had a question I’d just ask Leo directly and he was super helpful. They built my Voima and shipped it in under a month. Customer service has been dialed so far. On par with We Are One, way better than Specialized.
  • 4 3
 been arguing for awhile that Reach numbers were to long on modern bikes. at 6ft 470-480 is my min/max... with a 470 reach i run a 50mm stem, with a 480 i run a 40mm...

some were starting to stretch to 485-500... ive ridden a few bikes with over 485 reach and they feel quite cumbersome - great for bombing down the gravel road though!
I gotta give it to brands like nukeproof who stuck to their guns and stuck their larges at 475 ish,
  • 2 0
 @alexsin: that’s fair - an XL G1 is actually “sizing down” for me at 6’6” (198cm) tall, so I found that was a good compromise for livening up more mellow trails vs the the XXL that I started on. For the type of riding I do (long climbs and then long technical descents) it’s perfect. I figure if I want something more fun on mellow trails I’ll just get an XC bike or a hardtail!
  • 1 0
 @alexsin: ha, ha, I am exactly where you are/were. 6'2 an on a XL G1, thinking about downsizing to L or even M. Feel comfortable on my smaller bikes with 480 Reach that I have for "around the house". Can't decide between M and L. According to Geometron's recommendation, I should be on an L but M is closer to what is enough on other bikes.
  • 3 0
 @manco: I can confirm both the positive purchase experience and the excellent ride quality of the Vikkelä. Top rate bike!
  • 3 2
 @scotteh: My Spire would like to have a word with your opinion.
Its the most enjoyable pedalling experience I've had in quite some time. Not necessarily the fastest, or most sprightly up a hill, but definitely most enjoyable.
For some reason it makes me want to go exploring different trails and areas, go hunting for the gnarliest, jankiest, steepest stuff I can find, all while happily pedalling along.
I will concede, it needs more spicy terrain to really come alive, and makes most blue trails seem fairly pedestrian. But it'll happily climb our tightest switchback corners, and claw its way up nearly anything.
  • 4 1
 @onawalk: Transition geo is dialed, especially if you have the right trails and like to ride pretty aggressively.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-journal: I have a L at 184 if you mullet it the reach actually drops and it’s really nice to flick around. Especially with the poppy EXT. Out back.

What people forget about that Reach game is to look at stack too. My go to these days is to look at the bikes in bike-stats. When you align them on the BB and look at how the steerer tubes compare you get a much better idea of the size. Just in this case the Vikkäla in K2 with 480 reach and my G1 with 505 reach happen to have overlapping top tubes down to 5mm. But the Pole has way more stack and I run a ENDH stem and spacers to come to a decent stack height.
  • 1 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: Its a trade-off, just like everything with geo. My Spire is unstoppable on fast rough stuff, its surprisingly playful when at speed, jumping natural doubles, and into janky stuff. But at slow speed, techy stuff, it can be a handful for sure, and my Sentinel was more comfortable in those situations. All in all, my Transitions have been great bikes, and I'm a bit of a fanboy of the brand for sure
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: my nukeproof is 495(xl) they do have xxl also. I’m 182cm and fit is great, used to have k3 evolink which is also good fit. You can watch my gravel road riding here for example: www.instagram.com/reel/CuaUi5lsax1/?igshid=MzRlODBiNWFlZA=
  • 1 0
 @Sambolo: You are using alot of body to move that big bike around... im good thanks lol
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: yes I do, depending on trail, it’s not a problem to me, it is mountain biking for me Smile
  • 49 2
 "If you don't have anything nice to say don't say anything at all."
  • 41 3
 Crickets.
  • 13 0
 If only people practiced that adage in the internet age … what a different world we would have.
  • 2 1
 @sanchofula: being anonymous to eachother ruins everything
  • 2 3
 @sanchofula: Being nice isn’t always a nice thing to do
  • 28 1
 This article makes me want to ride Pole!
  • 4 10
flag GBangShredder (Jul 7, 2023 at 10:16) (Below Threshold)
 Underrated comment.
  • 2 0
 "lol dude, what are you riding?" "a pole."

god damn it son
  • 1 0
 Good old dad joke strikes again
  • 1 0
 I ride Pole for the dad jokes alone.
  • 30 6
 Are Pole bikes the new Ellsworth?
  • 6 3
 At this point in mountain biking era, Ellsworth currently look better than Pole, "design wise" but like, what would you choose? Less of two "evils" lol
  • 3 0
 I had two Dares back in the day and they were nice bikes, and well made. But they pedalled well. These.....high pivots with no idler wheel. Can you say chain stretch and pedal feedback????
  • 1 0
 I mean if we castrate the dangling bottom bracket / crankset, it actually won’t look so bad. What I don’t get is other brands are using their manufacturing idea (machined aluminum glued together) and making it like good. Take the Unno Ever 29.
  • 1 0
 @lehott: I know of one Ellsworth Joker, an '05 model, that is still intact and hitting whatever jumps are going in at the trails it's owner rides. Amazing really, and not just for an Elssworth, so ya never know.
If only it could fit 29" wheels.....
  • 1 0
 @RayDolor: Do you have any idea how many Jokers with broken swingarms I have seen? Don't ask. The reason they got rid of the design. And this is from the shop that Dangerous Dan was home to that promoted the brand.
  • 1 0
 @corerider: And yet this specimen endures, quite the mystery, no?
I had been informed of one more swingarm upgrade was not failing at all.
This must be what my bike got.
And the Beat(down) goes on......
  • 1 0
 @RayDolor: Well, it is simple to make, implement and does work. Whether it works well or not is debatable but my experience with all high pivots is poor. Yes, they go down well, are sensitive and modulate well, but the pedalling aspect is bad (hence the high idler wheel invention) but the ONE thing they are bad for is brake jack/issues. Since the swing arm is uniform (not a four bar link) the braking hardens the suspension, often when you need it. My 2003/2006 Foes Flys both had rear axle mounted brake mounts (a floating brake) with an arm attached to the main frame to make the brake a four bar link by design, and it worked excellent; no issues at all. At the cost, you would think Pole could have done something similar (since the floating brake has no patent). One other good point of high pivot, single arm rear ends is the simplicity of pivots, usually on one set of bearings to worry about. Less flex. But the single bearing setup takes ALL the forces; lateral, rotational and torsional. This spread out on four bar designs and four bar designs have proven, without a doubt, they are superior especially with the Horst Link, which is now no longer under patent protection so there is no excuse to not use one.

My old riding partner had a Mountain Cycle Shockwave (1998 or 1999, I think) and although long travel and plush, had terrible pedalling characteristics and horrible brake jack. Sold the frame after only 2 or 3 months I think. The aforementioned Foes Flys I had (both the 2003 and 2006 models) were uni rear ends but the main pivot was just above the BB, like a four bar link design, and had no issues in suspension or pedalling, and coupled with the floating brake design, was probably the best FS bike I have had, although the Knolly Podium I have is four bar, excellent pedalling, great suspension suppleness........hard to say.......
  • 26 4
 Well looks definitely were not a priority.
  • 14 5
 Agree x1000^^^

What happened?!? The Pole Stamina’s were drop dead gorgeous…! Polarizing sure, but industrial design elegant.

At best, these new designs are… ungainly. Yikes…
  • 10 0
 I don’t know. I kind of dig the downhill bike. The rest of them… you might have a point.
  • 8 0
 @flow-state: Polerizing, you mean?
  • 1 0
 @flow-state: Stamina and Machine indeed were beautiful bikes imo. The newer ones do not match them, but I like the fact they stand out from the crowd, and if you see one up close, they really impress. And my „trail motor off“ is a monster to ride.
  • 19 0
 Isn't that really cheap???
  • 8 0
 Something's gotta be off on their prices. The sonni complete is only $800 more than the frameset.
  • 3 0
 Check out the homepage. Looks like taxes are not included in the price...

It's more like 5300€ for the trial version without motor. Still not to bad I guess
  • 16 0
 While the concept of an E-Downhill bike throws my lizard brain into fight or flight mode, it could open up a lot of new riding opportunities. Maybe next year rampage might see the first bottom-to-top runs.
  • 24 1
 Of all e-bikes, a DH makes the most sense to me - most capable downhill, then a built in uplift to get back to the top. And the extra weight low down is probably mostly beneficial.
  • 4 2
 @alexhyland: yup trail ebikes or even enduro are a waste.of time. Either make those with small motors or just own it and go big or go home.
  • 1 1
 @Balgaroth: I’ll agree on big motor trail eebs under 150mm rear being a little pointless, but 150mm and up is perfectly fine for any gnarly shuttle trails that aren’t straight up pro lines.
  • 1 1
 Why? Most DH bikes are either shuttled or use a chairlift, and this only shows the stupidity of ebikes even further and the demand to use the motor even when it is of completely no use. At least on an enduro bike you have to go up but when the bike is taken up for you the motor makes NO sense at all (and I don't see any sense in a motor to begin with). If you can't go up you can't go down, and if you think cheating on the up is a good thing you will be in for a shock to discover that the down actually requires work and fitness too, something ebikes don't do anything to develop.
  • 2 0
 @corerider: clearly you are not a DH rider. When the Bike Parks are closed DG riders don't ride Enduro all of a sudden, they just start riding DH tracks and organise shuttles to do so. Also if you somehow belive that rising 2500m of elevation on an eBike with a focus on going fast on a gnarly DH track on the way down is not a big workout you clearly never ridden an ebike nor a proper DH track.
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: I have ridden the Shore for 42 years, which includes Squamish and Whistler. I am more than aware of what it takes. Speaking of which, if your motor fails halfway up how much fun is it to pedal the rest (assuming you can) compared to a regular bike where the up commitment is a given. BTW, 2500m of rise is 7500 feet, and that would be herculean under any circumstance. I doubt motor or not one could bite that off.
  • 1 0
 @corerider: I don't know what sort of spin you do but in my group 1000m elevation spins are pretty standard for enduro and to double that with a battery wouldn't be that hard.
  • 9 0
 I really hope they can come out with a Pinion MGU variant soon. The Voima frame would be perfect for a gates drive with the high single swingarm, you wouldn't need a split rear triangle or anything. Seems like a match made in heaven.
  • 1 0
 Agreed, would love to see an MGU on here plus coil both ends then all boxes are ticked
  • 4 0
 @rojo-1: pretty sure Pole / Leo will adopt whatever the best option is at any given time, and that definitely looks like the path forward. They are crazy nimble from a design / manufacturing standpoint.
  • 2 0
 Or Intradrive (basically the same thing)
  • 1 0
 @rojo-1: here here
  • 1 0
 Yeah, sort of shut up and take my money moment indeedSmile
  • 11 1
 " Yo dawg I heard you like Clevis " - Xzibit
  • 2 1
 And heard you don't want to bother with coil shocks. With all that extra effective eye-to-eye length from yokes, probably not many coils are going to be approved/happy on those bikes.
  • 5 1
 @justinfoil: The mounting used in these frames enables the shock to articulate around two axes, thus most likely saving the shock quite a bit from unwanted stresses.
  • 3 0
 @jukka4130: not talking about bad-trunion-like mis-aligned forces that would be mitigated by a spherical eyelet bearing. Talking about making the effective overall length longer in a single direction, coils don't like this because the lower eyelet connection to the damper shaft isn't very large in cross-section and tends to break clean off with big ol' yokes, and this has one big-ish and one small yoke
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I can see your point very well. Yes, coil shocks do not like yokes in general. However, Pole frames aren't known for breaking shocks which would make one assume that this isn't an issue. CC Kitsuma Coil with its 10mm(ish) shaft is on the list of build upgrades on Pole's site.
  • 1 2
 @jukka4130: this is failure on shock designer's end, yes it's a twintube but still, it is more than possible to make one with bigger shaft diameter
  • 1 0
 @baca262: Indeed. The shaft diameter, along with the material used, has a massive effect on how strong the shock is. On top of that, the eyelet itself and the interface between that and the shaft has to have a sound design to cope with the stresses on the long run.
  • 1 1
 @jukka4130: cc double barrel at 3,5" stroke was a complete joke
  • 13 7
 I love the look of the macro images of the Pole bikes with the Raw CNC aluminum, but they are just so ugly from any more then 6 inches away.

Hanging the BB and chainring so far below the downtube feels like an accident waiting the happen. While it won't happen often it looks like a near vertical extension down that will eventually get caught on something and result in a very sudden stop.

What is the design advantage of making the front triangle so shallow? If they carried the downtube to the BB it would seem safer, stronger and more practical (Water bottle).
  • 7 1
 Attach the head tube more directly to the rear suspension
  • 11 1
 The cranks are in the same place as any other bike. If you did that on a normal looking bike, you'd be smashing your downtube. How often does that happen?

Not defending them, personally I think it's ugly how the downtube doesn't tie into the bottom bracket.
  • 2 1
 I wonder if it also creates efficiencies in the machining process for the frames - allows more to be milled from a shape of alu?
  • 14 0
 Not going to argue that the front triangle looks rather "unorthodox", but disagree with your statement that because of the downtube being higher and the bb "hanging" below it, it somehow makes it more prone to get caught or hit things.
If the geo and bb height is not completely out of whack (and it's not), then your chances of hitting the bb/ring are not any higher, regardless where the bottom tube is - or whether it's there at all.
  • 6 4
 @arek: I dont think the issue is that the BB/ring are more likely to hit, its that with such a large vertical interface it is much more likely to get hung up when it does hit something which will likely result in you going out the front quite spectacularly.
  • 10 0
 @mtmc99: How often do you make contact with things above the bottom half of the chainring? Or with the bottom of the downtube? Because that would be the only scenario where something like you described could happen.
  • 2 5
 @arek: To the first question: never cause the downtube gets in the way. To the second question, I've definitely scraped that area of the downtube rolling something that likely should have been a drop so its probably not too big.

So you are likely right that the chances of getting up into that area isnt a huge concern (or that you were in for a rough time either way so maybe it doesnt matter).
  • 2 0
 To make the front shock mount strong enough. If the DT would be lower, a cross brace between the DT and TT would be most likely needed to create a strong enough structure to mount the shock.
  • 2 1
 I would say it's going to be more of an accident while am accident is happening. It's not going to get caught any more that a regular bike while riding, but when you inevitably screw something up and drop the front, or are drifting to your crash site, the greater vertical interface might help things along!

The original Stamina was gorgeous, and am obviate of lust for sure. These aren't everyone's bucket of loan, but I can appreciate it, and would certainly ride one.

*But I love weird shit
  • 1 1
 @Canadmos: it isn’t often but had it happen on large logs. My point is just that if you hit it on that pole you are coming to a sudden stop
  • 1 1
 @mtmc99: exactly.
It doesn’t happen often, but it has happened at least to me a couple of times over the years
  • 7 0
 These bikes look like proper bruisers. Is there anywhere in Finland with terrain appropriate for bikes like these? Most of Finland is super flat.
  • 4 0
 Leo the owner / engineer spends a lot of time riding in Spain, etc. and is quite a fast sendy hombre
  • 1 0
 Sweden is not too far a drive is it? I have heard there are good bikeparks in Sweden, but I've never been unfortunately
  • 4 0
 Do I *need* 200mm rear travel on my enduro bike? No. Do I really really want to try it? Yes. I'm wondering what it would be like to truly ride a bike where I absolutely am not concerned about the bike itself when hucking to flat. (although usually wheels are the weak spot anyway)
  • 9 2
 Huck to flat, Pinkbike, Pole. This seems familiar for some reason.
  • 4 0
 The voima is one of the best handling bikes I've ridden. It's not light, and the seatpost insertion is ok, but man it was amazing suspension and super fun to ride some gnarly squamish lines.
  • 17 15
 From some of the comments that exude an ignorance of engineering/design I will assume most of you have never even seen a Pole bike in person, much less ridden one. These bikes are leading the advancements in Mtb design and ride exceptionally well. For those who adhere to old-school mantras like, "a bikes category/use is defined by it's travel numbers", "long chain stays don't work", "carbon frames are best", "those reach numbers are too long to work", etc. enjoy your Specialized, Trek, Giant and enjoy the benefits of mediocrity! Status quo companies simply copy the best; Specialized quote, "We have no intention of ever developing 27.5 wheeled bikes." Now that's a company you want to support!
  • 5 4
 If you really are willing to throw away aesthetics for performance, the Structure wins. Linkage forks just work better. Problem is they're ugly as sin.
  • 16 2
 We found Leo’s burner account!!!
  • 6 4
 @TheR: haha!!! Nope, just someone who's actually ridden the bikesSmile
  • 3 0
 @manco: I’ll give it to you, though. They may be ugly, but they sure are interesting. Wouldn’t rule them out, personally.
  • 1 0
 High pivot with no idler wheel is a recipe for disaster. I was around in the late 90's and the design of the high pivot went away for a reason. Ride one and find out, and not just downhill. Pedal it.
  • 1 0
 @corerider: O-chain, Intend Rock steady, WRP Centrehub can solve that
  • 2 0
 I'd probably own a Pole bike just for the brilliant engineering and manufacturing, if it wasn't for the weird quirks and idiosyncracies in their geometry and design. If they just made one normal bike, they might have a winner. But not like this.
  • 2 0
 Geo looks weird but is dialed. Never felt so comfy sending it and my junk doesn’t fall asleep on climbs anymore. That seat tube angle ought to be standard issue.
  • 2 0
 Looks are in the eyes of the beholder, but there’s no quibbling about how these ride: it’s top notch. Should you ever go for one, you‘ll love it.
  • 5 0
 Are they trying to get people to buy a full bike as opposed to a frame?
  • 3 0
 Yeah the price of a complete bike is surprisingly low compared to the frameset. I never got that. Are OEM components that cheap for bike companies?
  • 1 0
 The complete price is for a relatively basic spec, goes up to a more normal price with decent parts.
  • 14 13
 Problem with all the "looks" haters is that you all probably drive pick-up trucks, live in a generic house and never consider buying fine art... soooo why should we care that you value your brilliant aesthetic over amazing riding bikes?!?!
  • 3 0
 Squilliam Fancyson over here bro lmao
  • 1 0
 I spent money and time in training camps and trials practice and now my best bikes are a 2017 sight (130/150mm) and pipedream moxie 140mm front for winter and muddy days. Even in the gnarliest trails. First improve your skills then upgade your bike
  • 10 7
 how is this company not bankrupt? is it some sort of money laundering operation
  • 7 4
 Shout out to Pinkbike for covering innovators like Pole and so many others! Much appreciated!
  • 1 0
 And every other bike media?! Wtf
  • 1 0
 Not beautiful, but surprisingly nicely priced. Build kit specifics aren't available yet, but for under $5k for the trail-non e-bike it could be appealing. Just not visually appealing.
  • 2 2
 This is suuuuuch an interesting post, I was all over the longer vibe….. then shattered my elbow meaning I have one arm longer the other now….

Im aboard a BTR Belter hardtail now (L) , 470 reach, 160mm lyric ultimate & 61ha(static) literally loving life!

Understanding where you body needs to sit for control of the bike is so important even more so than any suspension…..all jokes aside I’d take the Pepsi challenge on anyone who k ow how to weight & unweight a bike that (similar height to me) this thing is ni-on unstoppable!

Numbers matter!
  • 1 0
 Maybe you can get a custom handle bar made, or install your stem a little crooked?
  • 4 0
 Oh snap - take a look at these beauties.
  • 1 1
 Adjustable reach headset cups are a fantastic idea. Being able to tailor the reach is a feature I wish more frame makers offered. I predict you'll see more of this from other brands. CNC precision made chunks of aluminum are dime a dozen these days.
  • 4 0
 Come back Orange all is forgiven
  • 1 1
 So both bikes have up to 200mm of travel, identical head angle ranges and very similar geo, as well as similar kinematics. I don't see the point in the Onni. Shit, the Voima even has longer chainstays than the Onni, so in some ways, it's actually more of a DH bike than the Onni is.
  • 4 4
 Every mouth breathing moron on PB: “Ha, ha, ha It’s ugly and has a funny name.”

Translation: “It makes me feel good to insult things I don’t understand and / or can’t afford.”

These things are super well engineered engineered, cheaper than a SpecialCruz, and faster (at least for me).

If you’re in the market do yourself a favor and check these out. They friggin work.
  • 1 2
 They are so well engineered they are engineered engineered and there are no bad customer experience stories on the internet at all.
  • 1 0
 DH bike with a Fazua Ride 60 motor would be the dream!
Take the battery out and use it as a regular meat-bike for park days, put the battery in for e-bike self shutteling. Why aren't anyone doing this?!
  • 3 0
 The Onni side shot makes it look like a 26"-29" mullet.
  • 7 3
 They out-orange orange.
  • 7 5
 "Wow! Pole have really started to make some good looking bikes" Puts on glasses "Oh, My bad..."
  • 4 1
 I like how they conveniently left weight off the spec sheets
  • 5 1
 Saw at Sea Otter It is probably one of the lightest DH bike on the market.
  • 4 1
 I wish they didn’t look like that
  • 3 1
 Downduro is now officially a bike category (look at the S/Onni's geo table).
  • 1 2
 “Trail Models - Vikkelä” having 168-200mm travel. Seems misleading to call this a trail bike (or even an enduro). Also looks heavy AF.

(full disclose, my daily driver is a Spire, but I and Transition, don’t consider it a trail bike)
  • 2 0
 Well, they are not light, but you can hit the gnarly stuff with them. I own a Vikkelä, and I‘m now selling my trailbike because it has become redundant.
  • 1 0
 In one of Pole’s videos on the Vikkela, they mention that it’s lighter than Specialized’s cf enduro frame.
  • 2 0
 The Voima is the best bike I’ve ever owned/ridden. 50lbs of badassness! It just rips on everything!
  • 2 0
 Same. I like my Voima better downhill than my analog, which I already really liked. Thought it would be a bit of a clumsy beast. Was completely wrong. Crazy how the weight disappears. Favorite bike ever by a country mile, motor or no.
  • 1 0
 @Blownoutrides: I concur. I have an awesome 32lb Intense M9 and a 29lb Intense Uzzi, and the Voima blows them both away by miles! It’s not even close!
  • 5 3
 Holding out for 220mm of rear suspension.
  • 2 0
 I wanna try that DH and the EDH. I like the way these guys think.
  • 2 0
 Soon on a trail near you, or maybe not.
  • 2 2
 Maybe I’m missing something, but I’d imagine chain growth would be an issue with the pivot placement. It already looks weird, why not throw an idler in there?
  • 1 1
 For that price and the intended use case it should really include a shock with piggyback. Hopefully that Deluxe was just for photos.
  • 4 0
 They all have piggyback shocks. They're mounted sideways.
  • 1 0
 I guess...they dont look like everything else. Not sure thats a good thing.
  • 1 0
 While I don’t think they’re very pretty bikes, I am loving the super short seat tubes.
  • 1 1
 Love the C3PO gold, cool bikes and a head of the times. I remember big brands telling me my 29er Gary Fisher was never gonna happen and 29 would never be a thing.
  • 1 0
 "four models that are split into two categories" - what you did there pinkbike, i see it
  • 4 3
 Wow. an inline shock on a long travel bike in 2023 is wild.
  • 4 0
 Tilted at a 90 degree angle.
  • 1 1
 @SimbaandHiggins: I see it now. Still pretty wild imo
  • 1 0
 they put 'em sideways
  • 2 0
 @danielfloyd: its not inline, its a piggyback, its just not visible in the photo
  • 2 1
 Boost or superboost rear hub? 73 or 83mm bb?
  • 3 1
 Boost rear hub, 73mm BB
  • 2 2
 Will these frames be able to fold for easier travel like the earlier models
  • 1 0
 These poles will be fulfilling to straddle.
  • 1 0
 If you told me the Sonni was the Grim Donut V3, I would believe you.
  • 1 0
 They never should have got rid of the stamina....
  • 1 0
 Giving orange a run for their money! Bravo!
  • 1 0
 Elevated chainstays look cool af.
  • 1 0
 I am a big fan of these bikes actually
  • 2 2
 "you loose control in the mid stroke or something like that."
  • 5 5
 Bad from far, but far from good
  • 5 4
 Ever ridden any Pole full-suspension bike?
  • 3 0
 @manco: I used to ride mine when I could keep it from eating itself.
  • 2 2
 i like em, but they are too long
  • 5 4
 My eyes are burning
  • 4 4
 Whens the huck to snap test?
  • 1 1
 The fxxk is super enduro....?????
  • 4 0
 Enduro thats super
  • 1 0
 @Monkeyass: That would be it Big Grin
  • 3 5
 I dont care how it rides or how its made, it looks so awful lol. kind of reminds me of one of those horribly designed wallmart bikes
  • 3 2
 Uglyass bikes...
  • 1 0
 Looks like a cricket.
  • 6 7
 Surely an Unno is better value?
  • 9 2
 Something to consider. Unno Burn top spec build $11,498.00, Pole Vikkela top spec $6,400.00 (shipped).
  • 5 4
 @manco: gb84’s observation is still valid
  • 5 1
 @scary1: ? Both cutting edge tech but one is approaching double the cost. That seems to be an untenable comparison.
  • 2 3
 @manco: I can get more money. I can’t get the desire to ride hideous
  • 1 0
 @scary1: What are your fav Mtb's? Do you have any fav's that are somewhat unusual?
  • 2 0
 @manco: I have a g1. It’s my favorite bike ever. Had a 222 but it didn’t like me.
  • 6 8
 I'd rather quit riding and take up kak like Padel or Lawn Bowls than ride this.
  • 2 0
 Haha! So you're really more concerned with other riders perception of you than than actually mountain biking?
  • 3 3
 No.
  • 8 11
 Damn why are they so ugly though?
  • 11 0
 I saw a Voima recently and I don't like ebikes or even Pole bikes, but it was impressive in person
  • 5 8
 this stuff wins the fugly bike award easily. What a waste of resources!
  • 1 0
 I love playing golf with one club too!
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