Tech Week 2023: 6 New Rain Jackets to Keep You Dry

Oct 24, 2022 at 17:37
by Mike Kazimer  

How much priority you place on the performance of a rain jacket likely has a lot to do with where you live. Desert dwellers who rarely ride in the rain obviously aren't going to have the same criteria as someone in the Pacific Northwest, where fall and winter can bring weeks of wet weather at a time. The same goes for riders who care more about durability than light weight, or who are willing to sacrifice some performance for a lower price tag.

What follows are six new options that cover a variety of styles. Some are obviously more expensive than others, but once again, it's simply a matter of figuring out your priorities (and your budget). Dropping $300 on a jacket that's going to see action once a year is a whole lot different than spending that dough on one that you're going to use 100+ times a season.




Pearl Izumi Summit 3L Jacket

Pearl Izumi says the Summit 3L WxB jacket is 'ready for the wettest, rowdiest rides.' It's fully waterproof, with taped seams and a hood that'll easily fit over a helmet. There aren't any pit zips or other means of ventilation, so it's best suited to those chillier, extra-wet days. The fabric of the Commit has a nice soft feel to it – there isn't any annoying crinkling or rustling when you shift positions, and the overall cut is comfortable without being too baggy or aggressively tight.
Summit 3L Jacket Details
• 10k / 10k waterproof + breathable fabric
• PFC-free DWR treatment
• Waterproof YKK main zipper
• Two zippered pockets
• Colors: sage/sunfire, black
• MSRP: $175 USD
• More info: pearlizumi.com

Pearl Izumi do have a higher end, more breathable option in the works called the Summit Pro NeoShell. That jacket is claimed to move a basketball sized volume of air from the jacket every minute, although its $375 price tag doesn't look as attractive as the Summit's more reasonable $175 MSRP.

There are also pants available to go along with the Summit 3L. The $185 pants are made of the same waterproof material, and have an adjustable belt, a zippered side pocket, and plenty of room for wearing kneepads underneath.






Rapha Trail Gore-Tex Infinium Jacket

Rapha's Trail Gore-Tex Infinium jacket is designed for changeable conditions, those rides when it's windy and pouring rain one moment and calm and drizzly the next. It's not 100% waterproof, but that's by design – there's a panel underneath each arm that's designed for breathability, allowing for more airflow during hard efforts. The rest of the fabric is what you'd typically think of when someone refers to a Gore-Tex jacket – it'll easily shrug off a steady rain, and keep the wind out too.

The overall design of the Trail jacket is fairly minimalist, with just one external chest pocket on the left side, and an internal chest pocket on the right. The hood is large enough to fit over a helmet, with a drawstring at the back to cinch it down. The hem of the jacket is also adjustable to help keep water from sneaking in from below.
Trail Gore-Tex Infinium Details
• Made from Gore-Tex Infinium - windproof, breathable, highly water resistant
• Adjustable over-helmet hood
• Inner and outer chest pockets
• Colors: black, blue, purple, blue-green
• MSRP: $375 USD
• More info: rapha.cc

The price is on the high side, but Rapha does offer a free repair service for the lifetime of the garment to help reduce the sticker shock a little bit.







Yeti Turq Commit Jacket

Even if you're riding a different brand of bike, Yeti's apparel lineup shouldn't be overlooked. The collection is extensive, with everything from shorts, gloves, jerseys, pants, and the Turq Commit rain jacket shown here. The branding is pretty minimal, and it's available in two other colors that aren't as flashy for riders who don't want to draw too much attention to themselves.

Personally, I'm a fan of brighter colored rain jackets – it's nice to have a pop of color to cut through the dark dreariness. The Commit's fabric is light yet still tough enough to withstand the abuses of mountain biking, and it compresses easily into a small bundle, making this a good just-in-case option that won't take up too much room in a pack.
Yeti Turq Commit Details
• Toray waterproof 3-layer fabric
• Two-way front zipper
• Two zippered hand pockets / vents
• Colors: turquoise, black, atlantic
• MSRP: $300 USD
• More info: yeticycles.com

The fabric also breathes well, and the chest pockets are well located, preventing the 'I'm trapped in a trash bag' feeling that can come with heavier, less ventilated options.







NF Mid-Weight Jacket

NF's Mid-Weight jacket is handmade in Canada out of the same tough, stretchy material that's used in their DP4 pants. It's not the absolute lightest jacket out there, but it could be a good option for late season laps in the bike park, or during a drizzly day of shuttling. NF says it works best in temperatures below 50-degrees F, and in a drizzle to light rain. In other words, many of the days during a typical Pacific Northwest winter.

It's certainly possible to go out for a pedal with it, just keep in mind that it doesn't pack down that small if you do end up needing to stash it away. The arms are cut to extend slightly over the back of each hand, another measure to help keep rain at bay.

NF Mid-Weight Details
• DWR coated fabric with 10% stretch
• 3 zippered pockets
• 2-way main zipper for ventilation
• Colors: black, taupe, fireweed
• Made in Canada
• MSRP: $259 USD
• More info: ridenf.com
There aren't any pit-zips, but the main zipper can be zipped upwards to help keep air flowing. Other details include two zippered side pockets and a zippered breast pocket, and a hood that works best under, rather than over, a helmet.






Patagonia Dirt Roamer Storm Jacket

Patagonia's Dirt Roamer jacket is an anorak-style option, with a ¾ length, two-way front zipper. A three layer H2No fabric is used to shed the rain, and it's treated with a PFC-free DWR coating for further weatherproofing.

There are generous zippered side vents to improve airflow, along with making it a little easier to get the jacket on and off. When it's not in use, the Dirt Roamer can stuff into its own rear pocket for storage - it packs down to about the size of an 8” hoagie (I'm going to start using sandwiches as a unit of measurement whenever possible from now on).
Patagonia Dirt Roamer Details
• 3-layer H2No waterproof / breathable
• 3/4 length front zipper
• Side zippers for ventilation
• Can be stuffed into rear pocket
• Colors: black, wavy blue
• MSRP: $319 USD
• More info: patagonia.com

Patagonia is well known for their eco-conscious efforts, so it's not surprising that the fabrics used to construct the Dirt Roamer are 100% recycled. In addition, there's a prominently displayed link on their website to that allows potential buyers to browse an extensive selection of used clothing - going the used route for a rain jacket makes a ton of sense.







Ion Shelter 3L Jacket

As the name implies, the Shelter 3L uses a three-layer fabric with a 10k/10k water column / breathability rating, and a DWR coating on top of that. There are zippered underarm vents, and a generously-sized main zipper pull. That might not seem like an important detail, but I've found myself saying bad words on more than one occasion due to zippers that are hard to operate with cold, wet hands, so it's good to see that Ion went with a more substantial option.

A microfiber cloth on an elastic band is located inside the right zippered pocket, which is convenient, although it might not be that useful after a few extra muddy rides. Either way, I appreciate the concept.
Ion Shelter 3L Details
• 100% recycled 3 layer waterproof / breathable fabric
• Zippered underarm vents
• Integrated lens cloth
• Colors: evil amber, black
• MSRP: $280 USD
• More info: boards-more.com/

I'd put the Shelter 3L in a similar category as the Pearl Izumi 3L – it's a jacket that's best suited to the really grim days, the ones where you're not going to be taking off a layer any time soon. It doesn't pack down super small, so it'll work best on rides where you don't need to worry about finding a place to store it. It's not an ultralight option, but the flip side is that the fabric feels like it should hold up well, even if it ends up getting dragged on the ground a time or two during unplanned mid-ride dismounts.



Tech Week 2023 is a chance to get up to speed on the latest mountain bike components, apparel, and accessories. Click here to view all of the related content.




178 Comments

  • 175 7
 Does anyone find that when they ride in rain jackets it just makes you extra sweaty inside the jacket? Rain or sweat you still end up wet...or maybe that's just me
  • 43 1
 Yes, that’s the case with pretty much all waterproof materials during high output activities.
  • 27 0
 Boiling in a bag they like to call it. Appropriate!
  • 34 4
 Yes and for that reason, buy whatever you can find at the best price. It'll get wrecked quickly and lose waterproofing quickly so what's the point. I tend to just wear as much wool as I can then leave my jacket for wearing only if I stop
  • 13 0
 @jenksy: it’s pretty simple to reapply a dwr treatment once it loses the coating.
  • 25 5
 MTB specific functional textiles are a scam. None of them work after getting some mud and wash cycles. Maybe a 300+$ jacket makes sense if you're a roadie , for us it won't.
  • 3 0
 @SickEdit: I like the lower cut at the back to keep mud out of my crack and the arms usually seem to be cut different with longer cuffs to cover you when in a riding position.
That said I got my dakine riding jacket that I loved stolen out of my truck a year or so ago and can’t bring myself to buy another
  • 6 0
 Yeah but it holds the warmth
  • 7 0
 Of course. This is the nature of waterproofing. Creating a membrane that lets out air from the inside and blocks water from the outside is always a give and take game. I'll usually leave it off on the climb and prefer riding in wool that can still insulate when wet and then throw it on for the down if a gentle rain. The other challenge with a traditional 3 layer construction that offers more breathability than a 2L with a liner is that membrane is easily impacted by your sweat and gunk and will rapidly lose it's breathability if not cared for correctly. 2L has to have an added liner to keep the membrane clean that usually adds bulk and decreases a bit of breathability as 3L usually refers to a liner welded to the membrane and then an outer protective fabric welded to that. Good reward when needed but not without a cost for sure.
  • 5 1
 Depends on the amount and temperature of the rain.
  • 2 0
 Try a jacket made of neoshell or futurelight. In my experience, both materials breathe really well and little to no condensation builds up.
  • 3 0
 Happens to me also. Like many of the replies I'll keep the jacket off as long as I can and just use it for the ride down. If it's particularly chilly I'll bring a second shirt to change into for the descent so I won't get a chill. Been working for me so far.
  • 8 2
 @snl1200: Exactly. Waterproof is easy. Breathable is easy. Waterproof and breathable are basically exact opposites so making a fabric that does both well is very difficult. Its like trying to make a tire with the best grip and rolling resistance. Its just cant happen. Its always a balance.

I find some ski/snowboard outwear to be fantastic at it but the key difference there is temperature. Its cold so you are sweating less in general unless you are hiking at which point its stops working so great.
  • 2 1
 I was just thinking this. The idea of pedalling in anything that holds any moisture in or out sounds terrible. I could maybe pull out one for the ride back down, but on the way up it's basically Tshirts for me until 10deg Celcius, then maybe some sleeves and possibly a vest if it's gets really cold. But a windbraker when there is no wind? No thanks. Looks cool though.
  • 2 0
 @fiekaodclked: Tried both, still sweat like crazy. Double weave softshell is the only thing I can wear and move in without sweating like crazy. Might be easier in ski touring or hiking where you can just slow your pace but for mtbing I feel it’s harder to control your output.
  • 6 0
 yup, I have the highest end, most tech rain jacket money can buy. After 30 minutes of pedalling I may as well be wearing a garbage bag. When It rains I just accept I will get wet. Waterproof pants and shoes on the other hand, game changer
  • 3 0
 Yep, I only use a basic shell if I know I'll be coated in mud at a bike park, if I'm just trail riding I might as well just get wet.
  • 2 0
 Yup, might as well F it and wear a wetsuit. Accept the wet and will keep you warm!
  • 4 0
 @sino428: Yes- I find a good analog for biking though is ski touring where typically the climb is hugely aerobic and hot followed by a descent that is exposed and cold so you have some big extremes. In touring it's all about the layering game and the zipping game. Biking is usually warmer but same game- breathe on the way up and block on the way down. Better zips can help- like I'm not sure why more companies aren't using a poncho zip up the sides that doesn't interfere with a full pit zip. Zippers add weight/ decrease waterproofing but I think the trade off is worth it if well placed. A jacket that you can open up- like ski touring pant- for the climb while still covering your shoulder/head would likely help a bunch.
  • 2 1
 Cheaper jackets for sure, my $800 (I didn't pay full price) goretex shell does a pretty good job keeping me dry both ways
  • 1 0
 This is why leatt shells are great. Not the fabric- they have the clip so you can fully unzip it and it'll hold the two sides together so it isn't a flapping cape. Closest thing to breathable on the climbs. Otherwise it's a garbage bag like the rest (albeit with a couple other cool MTB specific features).
  • 1 0
 Mountain Hardware stretch jackets are surprisingly breathable.
  • 3 0
 just a cooool $300 to hotbox yourself...
  • 4 0
 @snl1200: I think it's easier to just carry a light cheap windbreaker in your bag for the downs if it's that bad. If it's more XC constant pedalling, I'd just rely on marino wool and maybe a vest for the core. Biking most often happens above zero so you really don't need that much clothing for the, but maybe backup if there's a mechanical.
  • 5 0
 yep. Gore tex and other membranes alike work by humidity and temperature differential. That means that they do what they're supossed to when is cold and dry outside, and warm and damp inside. Also, they rely heavily in the water beading off the outer fabric, cause saturated fabric won't let moisture out.

For all that reasons they're esentially useless for aerobic activities in the rain.
For mtb you need something that is actually waterproof (unlike breathable membranes) and have built in vents that you can open and close. Good luck finding it, other than hiking ponchos and workwear :/

It also sucks you can't find mountain boots w/o membranes anymore.
  • 3 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: I'm 100% with you. A thin layer of merino wool covering any exposed skin, and a windproof vest and gloves for chilly temps, is what I put my trust in. Already using knee/shin pads and overshorts over thin leggings to cover my lower half.

Gotta carry a spare set of clothing for any destination that calls for particular good grooming. Too optimistic to think a jacket and lower intensity level can keep clothes underneath fresh and dry.

If I were to plan for freezing weather, I'd opt for active heating, like $80 heated socks. I've seen those $240 SealSkinz heated gloves, but not yet comfortable shelling out that much money for temps I don't spend much time in.
  • 3 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: 100%- I always have a Patagonia Houdini in a small bag on my bike. I have a rain jacket that sits in my basement and I can count on one hand the times I have brought it with me biking in the last three years. I also know that some of that has to do with living in the mountains and the reality is our wet season is snowy... so I ski and for the rest of the year the Houdini is a gem of an item to take the bite off of a cold descent and packs to smaller that a fist. Were I to live in Victoria still or in parts of the UK- trying to find something to deal with the deluge and stay active over the winter would likely be more pressing.
  • 3 1
 @IsaacO : No, used to have that problem with heavier rain shells from the big name companies. All seemed seals with pit-zips. Then, I found the Outdoor Research Helium. Light as heck (about half the packing weight of most shells) and fairly breathable. The hood on that one fit over the helmet. I used it a few times this summer already - once in on/off showers from light mist to medium shows, another one with showers for 15 minutes, and finally one with heavy downpour for half hour with hail. I was fairly dry above my waist. In all those rides the last one had to go uphill for about 2km and another few kilometers back to the car. The jacket was also on sale the previous year at around $80CAD. So, I'm pretty happy with the jacket. I'm not paying over $100 for a rain shell.
  • 1 0
 FACTS!
  • 4 0
 @jenksy: Um, you do know that you can easily reapply DWR to jackets.......
  • 2 1
 @VTMB: Aye, and that works really, really well...
  • 3 1
 @jenksy: yes it does. If you apply the dwr correctly it works just fine.
  • 2 2
 I like how two people who apparently don't sweat downvoted my comment. Couldn't imagine there was much to find issue with there but apparently so haha.
  • 5 0
 I have a controversial take on this. I don't own a waterproof riding shell - only a windproof one. The windproof shell wicks, and it wicks really well. When you pull it out of the washing machine the inner layer is noticeably less wet than the outer shell.

The reasoning behind this decision is thus: If rain is in the forecast I just don't ride (where I live, that's an option). Having said that, even if it does rain on us, you don't get less wet with a waterproof shell due to the sweating, so I just throw on my quick-drying windproof shell and let it work.
  • 2 0
 Depends where you live and the type of ride. I almost never wear a rain jacket here in the the northeast us but I wore one pretty often in pnw
  • 2 0
 It matters what your jacket is made out of. If you want to stay dry (not just DWR), but have something that's actually super breathable, to an extent where it's no longer windproof like Gore-tex, but good enough most of the time, try a Polartec Neoshell jacket.

For example: www.foxracing.com/product/flexair-neoshell-water-jacket/26140.html

Polartec says it's the "world's most breathable waterproof fabric" and in my experience, it's pretty amazing. I loved my kitsbow Trials jacket until my luggage got stolen...

If you're really getting out there, this stuff really starts to matter.
  • 1 0
 The only solution I’ve found for this is Gore-Tex Active. It’s the only material that’s legit breathable enough for us sweat hogs, but you’ll pay for it.

The Dirt Roamer Storm pants are pretty great too, so I’m guessing the jacket would have nice breathability too.
  • 1 1
 @DrPete: ...or alpaca fabric. wicks moisture and will still insulate you when wet. Yes yes yes...living fabrics don't poison and suffocate your skin like plastics will.
  • 2 0
 @SixxerBikes: what are some solid alpaca products you’ve found?
I know alpaca is the ultimate but it’s also $$$
Merino wool rules and products galore but I know alpaca is better but there’s not much out there
  • 1 0
 I’m looking forward to the e-bike rated jackets. No sweating in those…
  • 1 0
 I think that most people in the world simply do not need a "breathable" waterproof jacket. You need one when purposely riding in the rain for longer periods of time. Most people have a luxury to not ride in the rain and choose their time and of course when the rain catches you, you need some cheap not breathable bag just to keep you warm. You need one when 100% commuting by bike or live in the PNW Wink Otherwise, it's a waste of money.
  • 1 0
 I just bought an Endura MT500 waterproof jacket and I had the same concerns. On a warm day in the park ridding it all day I haven't sweat a bit with a a merino jersey.
  • 1 0
 @bogdanc: I have the Endura MT500 jacket which I use for commuting primarily and occasionally for trail maintenance. It started leaking near the seams soon enough. But for riding mtb, I usually just wear a T-shirt with the sleeves cut off regardless of weather. I create more sweat than could possibly poor from the sky anyway.
  • 2 0
 @snl1200: +1 for the Houdini jacket. Great bit of kit. had mine for a few years now.
Too hot, fits in your pocket. Does a great job keeping you warmer when its windy or a bit chilly and keeps the splashes off you.
  • 2 0
 Cut the sleeves off an old rain jacket, you won't be disappointed!
  • 1 0
 @formerbmxguy: 100% this. I buy a cheap shell/ spray jacket, cut the sleeves off to make a waterproof vest.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: They come in pretty handy when shoveling snow and skiing. Waterproof doesn’t mean it’s solely for rain.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, bike jackets without venting are just dumb.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: Used to spay scotchguard on non-waterproof jackets in the 80's made them quite water resistant. So I would expect by now a DWR treatment would work well.
  • 1 1
 Not on a #Ebike it doesn't.
  • 4 0
 Wool wool wool. And a windbreaker.
I'm 46 years old, I've been riding mountain bikes for 32 full years; I've been commuting to work in Vancouver for the last 17 years and have driven roughly 20 of those days. That's roughly 6,400 trips. And that's excluding the roughly 3500 mountain bike rides I've done. But enough about me, let's talk about me: I've bought thousands of dollars worth of waterproof pants and jackets and shoes and have found that after nearly 10,000 bike rides, A: make your peace with Mother Nature, and B: wool is king/queen.
  • 2 0
 @chubby5000: merino. short and long sleeve. preach brother.
  • 3 0
 @SickEdit: Exactly! Just thinking about tossing away $300 on a jacket that will be destroyed in a season makes my wallet squeal. Ain't gonna happen. But if any of these companies would like to sponsor a fat, slow old fart and supply me with a few jackets, I'll gladly accept.
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: look on Poshmark, search alpaca, select mens sub category....then go wild.
  • 2 0
 @SixxerBikes: appreciate the info. I’ll give it a look now!
  • 3 0
 @chubby5000: That's it. I hate paying for wool but am moving over to it for all my riding. Wool is king... it would be a little more supreme if manufacturers could figure out some weaves and finishes that were a bit more resistant to tearing and puncturing... but still well worth the trade off.
  • 1 0
 @litany: do you have that flexair jacket? I'm wondering about sizing and they don't have anything on the site.
  • 53 0
 The screams for budget vs baller 2.0.
1. Garbage bag
2. Cheap Walmart/target non cycling rain coat
3. Costco/rei/cabellas Branded jacket
4. Low/mid/high cycling jackets as per this article.

Overall a good range of price points here but don't know why anyone would wear a super high end jacket to then crash on the first ride and tear it to shreds. Cycling specific jackets are nice but i lean toward mid tier box store brands.
  • 5 1
 I simply never crash!
  • 2 0
 @pink5050.
Yep. I have a 25 year old Race Face jacket with huge pit zips, as well as a crappy old windbreaker from a big box store. Maybe not stylish, but both do the trick. Plus I don't care if I crash and rip a hole in them.
  • 5 0
 Not sure where these high ends jackets from the comments are coming from, but I've crashed on mine several times an no rips or tears, just a scuff mark or two. My cheaper jackets I've had got rips within a crash or two.
  • 1 0
 @tvan5: style and terrain i guess. I regularly impale myself (and said clothing) on misc trailside objects. I have a few shorts that are more duct tape then fabric and many Swiss cheese arms of long sleeve jerseys.
  • 1 0
 They could just include that in the product test, can't they? Bicycles and components are also being put through a reasonable amount of use and abuse during their tests. Surely they can also grind the clothing (or at least elbows, shoulders and knees) across some rocks and thorns to see how they hold up. After all it is a major consideration for anyone splashing money on this stuff so I'd say it is the whole point of the test too.
  • 2 0
 @srh2: Rocking my MEC copy of a Roach jacket after 25 years with zip off sleeves. Jacket is still 95% waterproof after all these years of winter riding weather.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: Nice! Love that it has zip off sleeves!
I've found that a lot of my old mountain bike and snowboard gear has held up far better than the newer stuff.
  • 45 7
 $300 for a rain jacket?!?!?!
  • 62 1
 And not even Ebike rated..
  • 26 1
 You don't have to buy it, but big name 3L laminate (Gore-tex, etc.) shells have cost $300 and up for about 25 years or so...
  • 7 2
 Not uncommon and often warranted in the hiking/mountaineering world.
Probably not so great for mtb where it might get damaged too easily.
  • 6 0
 “Retail is for suckers”. No one pays that, all the Euro sites sell the stuff for way cheaper even with shipping.
  • 2 0
 I always buy the previous year's model. Most of the time they are 50-80% off.
  • 29 0
 Am I the only person who gets years of use out a rain jacket? And I live in wales!

I only swap them if they’re so old that the water proofing has gone or they get crash damaged so I do wonder how many of the more expensive jackets actually get sold.
  • 24 0
 You're not alone - a rain jacket shouldn't be a disposable item. Assuming you don't regularly crash into scree fields they should last for multiple seasons.
  • 21 0
 My patagonia rain jacket lasted me 6 years of riding, dog walking, and 8 hour outdoor work days before I finally traded it in for $130 off a new one. Can’t overstate the value of a trade in program like that. Also repair tape is key.
  • 3 4
 I always TRY to save these, because I started off buying $200-300 jackets that STILL had me sopping wet, and eventually got DWR wear on high friction areas. I can wash in another round of DWR that lasts a season at best.


They all end up like sopping wet trash bags...so why not just spend $15 on trash bags?

I just buy Frog Togg $30-60 jackets now. The Xtreme Lite is holding up insanely well and I'm not afraid to actually wear the damn thing compared to a $300 jacket I treat like a egg that still ends up cracked.

I don't cry when I have to tape it, packs down to nothing, and I actually would take it over some $200 jacket in a heartbeat after owning multiple of them.


THEY ARE ALL TRASH BAGS WHEN BEING USED FOR RIDING IN THE RAIN. $5 to $4000, it doesn't matter
  • 16 1
 Ridiculously overpriced.
  • 13 0
 Who is wearing these jackets? Get wet from rain for free or get wet from sweat for $300?
  • 14 1
 I'd rather get wet than risk damaging a 300+$ rain jacket during a ride.
  • 8 2
 Get an endura one for 100 quid. Sick.
  • 1 0
 @Jaib06: I once won a good bontrager rain jacket in fantasy downhill, that's the one I'm using. But I'd never pay the full price for that
  • 6 0
 @Jaib06: Last time I looked, the Endura MT 500 jacket had a price of £ 230.-, so pretty much the same price range as the ones in the article, the main differences being that it’s not made of recycled material, and it’s made in China.
  • 3 0
 Grab a Gore-Tex Paclite hoody for around $150-$175 on sale. Totally waterproof and super breathable. Kept it in my pocket for summer pop ups and it kept me completely dry without steaming me to death inside.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: Yeah absolutely, the cheap ones however, like the singletrack or the hummvee are actually 100 quid.
  • 12 0
 I'm a simple man. I don't fish or bike in the rain.
  • 1 0
 I don’t spit into the wind.
  • 1 0
 I'll bike in the rain in the summer. I'll 100% stay home if it is below 55 and raining.
  • 11 0
 Anyone else remember when Pearl Izumi used to be the "expensive" brand?
  • 15 0
 Patagonia is usually worth the cost to me, but I always wait for sales.
  • 3 0
 I thought "that Pearl Izumi is kinda expensive" then scrolled the rest of the way down........
  • 11 0
 Props to Pearl for being the only price that's not shameful
  • 5 0
 Anyone looking for a good solid waterproof jacket that blows all these out of the water?
Look into Stone Glacier M5 jacket. A hunting company so the sleeves are shaped similar to a riding jacket as it’s meant to not have arm length issues when using Binos and the back is longer too because it’s usually worn with a backpack. Both huge pros to the jacket

Then the real deal being the waterproof and breathability of jacket
31K waterproof and 27.6K breathability
That’s more waterproof and breathable than Goretex Pro
FAR FAR above all the jackets on here and then only costs $329
Not too bad!
Highly recommend checking into

I do wish that Dakine still made their old Goretex riding jacket that was only $120. It was 20K/20K waterproof/breathability. Sure are solid jackets
  • 1 0
 Also to add in… the repair department is top notch at Stone Glacier and the gentlemen behind the company are awesome too! Makes the gear and supporting them all the easier and better
  • 4 0
 Back in 2014 I bought a Endura fs260 pro for $70 and it's seen it's fair share of wet here in Pisgah and it's still like new and performs like a champ. I know fabrics may have evolved a bit but I have a hard time believing a $300 jacket performs that much better than what I have.
  • 4 0
 These days every imaginable price seems to just fly. Paid 2800 Eur for a Propain Spindrift with Fox 36 Factory, RS coil shock, Formula Cura 4, Truvativ carbon cranks, and GX drivetrain in 2019. Go find such a bike now, or any Enduro in the 3k range.
  • 2 0
 @sorrymissjackson: they're having a 20% off US sale on the Tyee AL. $2700 for GX, a Yari fork and Deluxe Select shock, Magura MT5s, a Newman wheelset, and Schwalbe rubber.

Ain't saying it's amazing but holy cow does that seem like a deal, especially if you wander along to the Trek website. Shame I can't afford it, or that I don't need that much travel
  • 4 0
 I find hardshell rain jackets to be pretty miserable to ride in - even the fancy Neoshell-like fabrics just don't quite breathe well enough and I end up wet anyways. Even though its expensive (overpriced for sure), the GTX Infinium stuff on the Rapha jacket is a pretty cool option that breathes a ton better than a hardshell. I recently snagged a Gore brand jacket on big time sale that uses GTX Infinium in the body and a hardshell on the shoulders and arms, and it works ridiculously well for riding.
  • 3 1
 Seriously I have the Gore Infinium jacket, basically exactly same as the Rapha and it’s $180 not on sale. Insane markup.
  • 3 1
 @analog7, the jacket you have is more softshell and less rain jacket than the Rapha. The Gore Infinium label is sort of misleading - it's essentially used to designate that a jacket isn't fully waterproof due to the use of more breathable materials, but it doesn't denote where those materials are used. With the Rapha, it's waterproof except for panels under each arm. With the Gore Lupra (that's the one I'm assuming you're referring to), the waterproof material is only on the chest, upper arms, shoulders, and hood.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: fair enough. Probably worth a few bucks more. I will say I really like the Lupra for what it is as I think it avoids being a trash bag while still keeping you dry enough in a shower. If it’s down pouring I’m usually staying home.
  • 1 0
 nothing can breathe when it's 100% humidity out (when it's raining)
  • 8 1
 A lot of people here concerned with the prices. Avoid skiing, whatever you do.
  • 2 0
 Same applies to ski gear as bike gear - buy last year's model or the year before. Buy lightly used from people who skied 3 days per year. Plus the boom-bust cycles of snow/no snow make even more people just bail and sell their gear. I just bought last year's $1000 skis for $350.
  • 5 0
 Wet weather riding is such a foreign concept to me. We can barely ride 24 hours after a significant rain event on my local trails.
  • 1 0
 Same here. Sometimes it's multiple days after.
  • 1 0
 Same. And even if I did get to ride in the rain, I'd rather just get soaked in rain over sweat.
  • 1 0
 I live in an area that is wet in the winter. I ride gravel roads to stay in shape and explore when the trails are muddy and susceptible to damage from biking. There is no such thing as bad weather, only poor clothing choices.
  • 1 0
 Come ride the coast of BC. It rains for months. The trails are armoured & ride super well in wet weather.
  • 3 0
 Ultimate direction - super light, durable, great fit for riding and if it’s good enough for ultra trail mount Blanc fine for trails. About 100 usd. Montaine, Patagonia and arcteryx also superb if you can find a deal….. bike specific jackets tend to cost more, perform worse and don’t pack down as light or compact. My 2 cents.
  • 2 0
 Personally I don’t buy rain jackets that aren’t from companies with fantastic warranties. I bought a very cool one from a well known ‘action sports’ company and the costing started to peal off within 18 months. Tried to work with the company and they wouldn’t help me out at all. Hello Arcteryx and Patagonia.
  • 1 0
 Completely agree. For something like a rain jacket paying the premium for the warranty is well worth it in my mind.
  • 1 0
 And don´t buy rain jackets with no-name membranes especially when they have a rating below 20.000 or none at all.
  • 2 0
 When it comes to staying comfortable, bicycling in the cold and wet is by far the most difficult activity. I avoid most trails when they are wet. There are a few trails in the area that drain well enough to ride a couple of days after rain but generally winter riding for me is gravel and road. Gravel is a lot of fun for exploring and road is what gets done when time is limited. The main issue with riding in the cold and wet is the speed and effort variations during a ride. It is easy to dress if you are just riding uphill for an hour at 250W or just riding downhill for an hour. The problem is when you go up hill for 15 minutes, then back down 10 minutes. There is no way I can do a mixed ride like that in the wet when it is below 50F without unzipping and zipping up a jacket. Shakedry is the best I've used but even it needs to be zipped up and down to regulate temperature. When you are out more than 90 minutes a good jacket is critical. Cold and dry or warm and wet are no problem and much easier to deal with.
  • 4 0
 I choose always to ride without a rain jacket since it's always more fun when you're wet.
  • 2 0
 that's what she said ?
  • 2 0
 Actually this is legit so much fun being soaking wet, pouring rain and splashing through puddles and just being fine with it.
  • 1 0
 MEC , the jacket is made by Showers Pass. 2 1/2 to 3 hours in the pissing rain before it lets the wet in, I think they go for a little over $100 Canadian, pack down real small. The only real down side is you need to purchase the hood separately, the pants are good to and for $80 cad.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Do you have advice about a nice waterproof rain jacket that stuffs really small to have in a bag for just in case to complement my thicker one that I use for downpours? I have a couple old road biking ones but I want ones that maybe have a hood.
  • 1 0
 I have the original Patagonia Dirt Roamer jacket that is not fully waterproof and it is the best I've found for a balance of breathability and protection. It looks like the seams are fully taped and while there isn't a membrane the DWR and tight weave do a pretty amazing job of not letting water in. I wouldn't use it for some kind of expedition where I might be out in the cold rain for hours, but for most bike rides it seems like the sweat spot for many riders.. I think it is discontinued for now, but I'm guessing you might find one on sale somewhere, brining it to a more reasonable price point.
  • 1 0
 They still make it, the Storm version didn’t replace it, it’s just another option. I agree with you about it being the best jacket I’ve ever worn. It’s the only jacket I’ve had that actually strikes the right balance between breathability and protection
  • 2 0
 you can get a water proof jacket from decathlon with 30 euros. why anyone healthy in their mind pay 300 euros just because it says "Fox" or "Rapha" or whatever the next "big" brand is
  • 1 0
 I can't stand the amount of crap thrown about by brands. If you are exerting yourself even remotely hard, you are going to get wet. Just focus on staying warm.
www.bikeperfect.com/features/bespoken-word-nothing-is-waterproof
This is the best article I've ever read about the subject.
  • 4 0
 if it doesnt rain i dont need a jacket
  • 3 0
 The new copilot from 7 Mesh is also worth a look. It has a cool feature for carrying it when its not in use.
  • 3 0
 Never predicted a world where my preferred Pearl Izumi gear is "affordable" compared to the market.
  • 3 0
 I’m happy with my 7mesh, still ashamed on how much I paid. But it’s a pretty good jacket
  • 2 0
 I'm ashamed of where they are made. Overpriced and overseas.
  • 2 0
 If you want fully breathable and fully waterproof then use an umbrella, otherwise no matter what the price accept your gonna get wet at some point.
  • 2 0
 Hands free downhill? That spring centered handlebar from that other article is making more and more sense now Wink .
  • 1 0
 Buy a used Arcteryx, Patagonia, RAB, Mountain Equipment or NF gore-tex jacket off eBay, they work just as good and are cut for articulated climbing movements, not too dissimilar to cycling.
  • 1 0
 I'd like to see an article with a bunch of cheap ass jackets that will 'absolutely do the job' but cost a fraction. Hell, throw in some Value Village and/or consignment scores for good measure.
  • 1 0
 Kinda pricey but I've been using the Eddie Bauer Super Sevens Rain Jacket... Does surprisingly well at all things bikes and staying active. Aso has a better fit than what the jackets pictured do.
  • 1 0
 lost my favorite old dakine windbreaker earlier this year. fell out of my pack on the trail. trying a patagonia houdini jacket this year. $100. usually only use on the way down unless caught in a downpour
  • 2 0
 Who's supposed to pay that much for a piece of plastic? Damn I've been running the same 20€ jacket for 9 years and still keeps me dry every time I ride in the rain.
  • 1 0
 Side question:

What are you guys doing when your rain jacket has lost its function?

Spraying with something?
Or get it in the tumbler drier?
  • 1 0
 Wash, and then whilst still wet, spray down with rewaterproofing spray, then wait to cake in, tumble dry. Might need a bit of fabric freshener to get ride of the artificial smell.
  • 1 0
 @Hamburgi I only tumble dry waterproof bike gear to avoid wearing out the water proof coatings
  • 3 0
 Fjallraven has rain jackets that are fully rain proof reversible. Using wax to seal the jacket I just wash it out in the spring/summer then reapply wax in the winter. I’ve never had a synthetic jacket that can stand up to the same amount of abuse and water.
  • 4 1
 SOCAL = No rain = $300 more in my pocket
  • 7 1
 You need it living in Cali.
  • 2 0
 What a rip off! Just buy jackets that are a few years old, pay less than half price. I'll look at these in 2 years time.
  • 3 0
 3/4 length zipper jackets deserve a special place in hell
  • 1 0
 My issue is I find most rain jacket to just be a big tarp to wear in the dryer interior.
  • 2 0
 bless...I'm on the couch w a beer when it rains.
  • 1 0
 They don't let you ride mountain bike trails when it rains here in the midwest...
  • 3 0
 All overpriced!
  • 2 1
 Or buy a comparable jacket on Amazon for $50. Where do they get off asking $350??? That Yeti jacket looks cheap as isht.
  • 1 0
 Nothing works for MTB, but luckily most waterproof jackets works for eBikes. The perks of riding on easy mode.
  • 1 0
 my dentist sowed me this article. getting cavities just looking at the prices.
  • 1 0
 Finally raining around here in southern Indiana for the first time in a month. Trails have been a dust bowl.
  • 2 0
 Shoot that Rapha shell is only $375. I might grab two!
  • 1 0
 Came here to read about cheaper alternatives in comments section. Thank you guys!
  • 2 0
 Rain jackets without Endura?
  • 1 0
 mtb is not mountaineering or ski touring! Who needs those tech mtb jackets when basic one does the job!
  • 1 0
 Does anyone do an ebike specific jacket (and trousers)? Everything else has an ebike version so why not coats?
  • 1 0
 Seems a big excessive, there were only 4 new types of rain invented this year.
  • 1 0
 Six jackets (not cheap) and only one with the real features of waterproof and breathable? Ummm...
  • 1 0
 Should have included the leatt all mountain 5.0 jacket in the list
  • 1 0
 The real question is, how do they smell?
  • 1 0
 Just go buy a $100 REI rain slicker and be a dick about it
  • 1 0
 Cycling has gotten too boutique.
  • 2 0
 Lmao rapha
  • 1 0
 So nothing in the $125-$175 price point, get f*cked
  • 1 0
 You must have scrolled past the Pearl Izumi jacket.
  • 1 0
 Ha ha I just got two MEC pertex shells for 240 CAD.
  • 1 0
 Pearl Izumi has the best value of this pack
  • 1 0
 Damn you wouldn't want to fall off and rip those jackets..the price!
  • 1 0
 minimum 175$....lol .....ok
  • 8 10
 A free repair service isn't a perk if the jacket is twice the price... I could just buy another when it wears out. cough cough Rapha
  • 25 5
 Price aside, I'd say in general it's better to repair something than to throw it away and buy a new one.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: You should do a long term test on the Rapha, let us know how it holds up to some genuine mountain biking.
  • 3 0
 @DizzyNinja: As opposed to disingenuous mountain biking?
  • 1 0
 @HB208: even good rain jackets are 50bucks...
  • 1 1
 Who rides in the rain
  • 3 0
 Me.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Me too. The Endura MT500 or the Single Track II offer a very nice bang for buck tho.
  • 1 0
 I certainly try not to.





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