First Ride: Cannondale Moterra SL eMTB - Full Power Without the Weight

Feb 20, 2024
by Mike Kazimer  
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There are currently two main eMTB categories – lightweight and full power. The lightweight options typically use a smaller battery and a motor with a little less 'oomph', and handle similarly to a regular mountain bike thanks to their sub-45 pound weights. The full-power options are the shuttle truck replacements, the big behemoths with up to 85 Nm of torque and expanded battery capacities that allow riders to zip uphill and tackle ridiculously steep climbs. The downside to those full-power machines is that they typically weight 50 pounds or more, which can make them more challenging to handle, especially for smaller riders.

Moterra SL Details
• Wheel size: Mixed, dual 29" compatible
• 150mm rear travel, 160mm fork
• 62.5° head angle, 77° seat angle
• Shimano EP801 motor, 601 Wh batttery
• Weight: 19.5 - 20.6 kg (43 - 45.4 lb) depending on model (size M)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Price: $7,000 - $14,000 USD
cannondale.com
With the new Moterra SL, Cannondale sought out to create a best-of-both-worlds option, a full power eMTB that weighs under 20kg (44 lb). At the heart of the Moterra is a specially tuned Shimano EP801 motor with four different modes, and a custom battery that Cannondale says contains more watts per kilo than anything else on the market.

The Moterra rolls on mixed wheels, and has 150mm of rear travel paired with a 160mm fork. It's obvious that the parts were selected with weight in mind, which is why you'll find a Fox 36 instead of a 38, and EXO+ casing tires instead of the thicker (and heavier) DoubleDown or DH options. That said, even with tougher tires the weight of the Moterra SL would still be at least 5 pounds lighter than most full power eMTBs.

There are three models, with prices starting at $7,000 USD for the Motera SL 2 and going up to $14,000 for the no-expense-spared Moterra SL Lab 71.


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There's good chainslap protection, and a little rubber flap to keep the swingarm from munching rocks.
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The flexstays also get their own rubber covering.

Frame Details

The layout of the Moterra's carbon frame looks fairly typical at first glance – it's a Horst link design, with a 210 x 55mm shock delivering 150mm of travel. There's one thing missing, though – a set of chainstay bearings. Instead, the carbon chainstay has a flattened profile that allows it to flex, eliminating the need for bearings and hardware, which saves weight and eliminates the need for maintenance.

This isn't a new concept for Cannondale – they've used a flexing pivot on the Scalpel XC bike since 2002. While the design is essentially the same as what's found on the current Scalpel, the Moterra SL's flexing member uses a different layup and dimensions to allow it to handle the additional loads that accompany a heavier bike and more aggressive riding.


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I'm still waiting for Shimano to show the remaining battery level as a percentage number rather than bars.
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The Moterra is compatible with thru-headset cable routing, but thankfully it's not a mandatory feature, at least not on the SL 1 and SL 2 models, which have ports in the headtube for running brake, derailleur, and dropper housing. Those ports aren't there on the extra-fancy Lab 71 model, but I suppose if you have $14,000 to spend on an eMTB you can probably afford to pay someone to deal with any extra hassles associated with this design.

The headset cups can be rotated 180 degrees to change the Moterra's head angle by 1.2-degrees. The bikes ship with it in the slackest position, but if that 62.5-degree head angle seems like a step to far it can be steepened to a more moderate 63.7-degrees.

In addition to the head angle adjustability, there's also a flip chip on the seatstay that can be used to run a 29” wheel instead of the stock 27.5” option.


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All the brands. A SRAM chainring mounted to e*thirteen cranks connected to a Shimano motor.
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The charging port is located higher up on the frame, which should help keep it above the puddle level on most rides.


Motor & Battery

Shimano's EP801 is currently the lightest full power eMTB motor on the market, which is why we've seen it used before in lightweight models like the Orbea Rise. In the case of the Rise, the motor is de-tuned to have 65 Nm of torque, but Cannondale didn't go that route with the Moterra SL. Instead, they kept it at the full 85 Nm of torque and created four different custom ride modes that allow riders to choose from varying degrees of assistance.

If you've ever tried to ride a typical lightweight eMTB with a rider on a full power option, you'll know that it's a frustrating endeavor, one that usually involves a lot of heavy breathing, especially if that full power rider doesn't want to leave Boost mode. On the Moterra, that's not the case – the bike itself is lighter, but the output at the highest assistance level is the same as what you'd find on any full power eMTB with an EP801 motor.

Cannondale claim the Moterra SL is the 'lightest full power eMTB' on the market, and at the moment it looks like that's accurate. That lighter weight is due in large part to the custom 601 Wh battery – it weighs 6.8 lb (3.1 kg), which is over a pound less than what batteries with that capacity typically weigh. One feature the Moterra SL doesn't have is the option for an external range extending battery – 601 Wh is what you get.


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Geometry

The Moterra SL's geometry is closer to what you'd expect to find on a DH bike, and I'm all for it. The stability that comes from a slack, 62.5-degre head angle can help while climbing and descending, and the fact that there's motorized assistance means that potential sluggishness at slower speeds isn't really an issue.

The reach numbers are fairly moderate, with the size large I rode coming in at 470mm for a size large. That's matched with a 77-degree head angle, and a relatively high stack of 648mm.

The chainstays on the size small and medium are 449mm, and then increase to 453mm on the large and 458mm on the XL.



Models
297 U LAB71 Moterra Neo SL NA - BPT

Moterra SL Lab 71: $14,000 USD.

Build kit: SRAM XX Transmission, Fox Factory 36 fork, Float X shock. Code Ultimate brakes.DT Swiss XMC 1501 carbon wheels, Maxxis DHF / Dissector tires, RockShox Reverb AXS dropper post. Claimed weight: 19.5 kg (43 lb)


297 U Moterra Neo Crb SL 1 NA - JDE

Moterra SL 1: $8,750 USD.

Build kit: SRAM X0 Transmission, Fox Factory 36 fork, Float X shock. Code Silver Stealth brakes. DT Swiss XM1700 wheels, Maxxis DHF / Dissector tires. Claimed weight: 19.7 kg (43.4 lb)

297 U Moterra Neo Crb SL 2 NA - CRD

Moterra SL 2: $7,000 USD.

Build kit: Shimano XT derailleur, Deore shifter, cassette. Fox Performance 36 fork, Performance Elite Float X shock. Deore 4-piston brakes. Stans Arch MK4 rims w/ Formula front, DT Swiss 370 rear hubs. Maxxis DHF / Dissector tires. Claimed weight: 20.6 kg (45.4lb)




2024 Cannondale Media Camp

Ride Impressions

I was able to spend two days riding the Moterra SL1, enough time to get accustomed to the bike's handling and operation. The first day's riding involved multiple laps on rocky, twisty trails that were accessed by a mix of paved and dirt roads, with some steeper side options available to check out its climbing abilities.

Mode Selection / Range

The first of the four motor modes is Eco, a mode that's aimed more at battery preservation rather than providing a different ride experience. In that setting the Moterra feels like a lightweight regular trail bike – the motor provides just enough assistance to hide the extra weight of the motor and battery.

Trail mode felt similar to what you'd expect from a typical lightweight eMTB – it'll get you up a hill quickly, but it's more like being assisted by someone pushing on your back with one hand. In the Boost and Turbo modes it's a different story, and that's when it's like having an NFL player with both hands on your back actively shoving you up the hill. That makes it possible to get up extra-steep obstacles, ones that wouldn't be possible on a regular bike, no matter how big your quads.

I don't usually look at the display very often when riding, but some riders did mention being frustrated with the fact that the handlebar-mounted display only uses three colors, which means that two of the trail modes are indicated by the same green color, making it difficult to determine the mode at a glance. This is where Bosch currently has the advantage over Shimano – the top tube mounted display of Bosch's Performance motor does a better job of clearly indicating the mode and remaining battery.

That initial ride ended up being 17 miles long with 3,800 vertical feet of climbing. As always, battery life will vary depending on rider weight and terrain, but I think rides of around 4,000 vertical feet and around 20 miles of riding should be very possible in Boost mode, and those numbers will obviously be higher in Trail or Eco.

2024 Cannondale Media Camp

Handling

As far as uphill handling goes, the Moterra SL was easy to get along with, and that extra-slack head angle didn't pose any problems. The climbs weren't obscenely difficult, so I didn't get to really push the bike's abilities to the limit, but there were plenty of challenging punches that it dispatched with ease, and there were a few obstacles I'm sure wouldn't have been possible on a typical lightweight eMTB – that extra 25 Nm of torque is really nice to have on tap. I did have a few pedal versus granite moments, and I think 160mm cranks rather than 165mm would have been a better spec choice. I also would have gone with a 200mm dropper rather than a 170 on the larger sizes in order to get more room to maneuver when descending.

It's on the descents that the Moterra SL comes into its own, and this is where it really does feel very close to an enduro bike – it's much easier to get airborne than those 50+ pound machines, and there's an enjoyable poppiness to its handling.

One trail in particular was full of multiple high speed hucks to flat in a row – whoever built it had figured out how to build decently shaped lips, but apparently never got around to putting in any actual landings. Those Moterra took those flat touchdowns in stride, free of any bottom out clangs or clunks. The suspension was well managed on chunkier bits of trail too, with a good blend of support and traction.

The idea of a full power eMTB that doesn't weigh as much as a refrigerator is immensely appealing. I've ridden a good selection of the lightweight options on the market, and for the most part I haven't been blown away. The easier handling is a benefit, but the range never seems to be quite enough, and the lack of a boost mode that actually boosts usually makes me wonder why I wouldn't just get a really nice bike without a motor and save thousands of dollars in the process.

An eMTB with all the range and all the power at a reasonable weight seems like the ultimate goal, and the Moterra SL is a great example of what's possible. It's likely a glimpse into the future of e-bikes – just imagine what things will look like five years from now, especially as battery technology continues to improve.







Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,731 articles

177 Comments
  • 108 6
 I believe that chain stay protector over the flex stay is perfectly placed to hide cracks Smile
  • 4 5
 Flex until Bend..
  • 9 13
flag Blownoutrides (Feb 20, 2024 at 8:48) (Below Threshold)
 I have exactly one ride on a bike with flex stays, and they both snapped landing the first jump.
  • 22 1
 @Blownoutrides: So many unknowns in your statement. What bike brand/model, how big is the jump? Flat landing? Smooth landing? Whipped (side load land on the rear wheel)? etc.
  • 3 14
flag tullie (Feb 20, 2024 at 12:35) (Below Threshold)
 @Blownoutrides: you have one ride and snapped two bikes. Tell me more.....
  • 9 4
 Good ol' Crackenfail
  • 6 0
 @tullie: both, as in both flex stays
  • 46 1
 Ouch - $5.5K price difference for a 0.3lb weight saving, between two models that’ll probably function almost identically (Fox Factory on both, same-shifting Transmission XO1 vs XX1 etc)

You’d really have to want that Lab71 label..
  • 62 0
 Ha, peasant! Personally, I can't decide between the green and the red, so I'll take 1 of each. Good to have a spare lying around- for guests, you see.......
  • 7 1
 @dcaf: or when not if the motor packs up!!
  • 9 13
flag stravaismyracecourse (Feb 20, 2024 at 8:02) (Below Threshold)
 Claiming a bike is light weight and speccing it with Exo+ tires that will immediately fail is cheating. It's like Ferrari publishing their vehicle weights but failing to disclose that it's a dry weight.
  • 4 0
 But they also cancel the option to skip cable tourism. That is a major benefit.
  • 12 1
 @stravaismyracecourse: exo+ is fine for many situations.
  • 37 6
 So it's basically a full fat eeb with a slightly smaller battery and a flimsier build to keep the weight down? Be interesting to see how durable they are over a longer term test.
  • 32 3
 In 5 years.. He thinks we have 5 years left.lol
  • 12 2
 Take a big battery, Fox x2 and 38 and pooof…23kg
  • 2 1
 @scary1: what do you mean we? Bwaha
  • 12 1
 @High-Delberg: Stronger wheels, Double Down tyres...24+kg. Same as any other eBike...
  • 4 1
 Everyone else running a shimano system with a "custom" or nonbranded battery has been plagued with issues, I hope Cannondale did their homework on this one!
  • 12 30
flag suspended-flesh FL (Feb 20, 2024 at 9:16) (Below Threshold)
 Get a Surron. Stop pretending to be a mountain biker
  • 4 0
 It’s not clear to me why a range extender capability was ruled out. That’d be pretty killer IMO. Carry one on the bike, and one in a pack; you’d have a true all-day adventure machine.
  • 3 9
flag nozes (Feb 20, 2024 at 11:26) (Below Threshold)
 As in regular bikes,some people just want to ride easier trails,so no need for a electric motocross bike with pedals.
  • 1 3
 I guess I should have clarified that I LIKE Surrons and E-motos. Anyone remember the Cannondale Moto?

motocrossactionmag.com/biggest-disaster-in-motocross-history-the-story-behind-the-cannondale
  • 2 0
 @scary1: unfortunately, you're right.
  • 1 0
 @konatiexplosif: adiós, grandpa
  • 24 0
 Ah yes, e13 cranks and a Shimano motor - a time tested recipe for success…
  • 7 0
 I’ve always found it weird that neither e13 or Shimano has claimed responsibility for that, the shop I work at has replaced 8 motors in the last year with cracked spindles because of the incompatibility. We tell all customers to swap out the cranks as soon as they receive the bike. It sounds like they’re fine with Bosch at least
  • 5 0
 @the-other-skier: Yep, swapped mine out before using as well. Honestly, I've never really been a huge fan of e13 stuff and you can pick up Shimano cranks for so cheap its really not worth the risk.
  • 1 0
 @kitagawasan: I got xt ebike cranks for £43. Only real downside is 165mm minimum length, no real shorter options for Shimano motors yet.
  • 3 0
 @the-other-skier: isn't Bosch a different interface? The e13 cranks for Shimano motors seem destined to be paperweights...
  • 2 0
 @powderturns: yes, Bosch is Isis, same as brose. Definitely the better option if you ask me, there's loads of cranks available for them, Shimano, not so much.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Nah. Got Miranda 155’s on my Shimano 801 Rise. Purchased for cheap despite online hate. For a year no problems at all and feel no different to the $$$$ Hope 155’s on my Bosch Wild (it’s rock pinball on most of my local trails)
  • 27 8
 I can't fathom why the hell people would be buying a new ebike right now with Pinion MGU right around the corner.
  • 10 7
 Pretty much everyone else can. Smile
  • 11 2
 “Bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”
  • 5 2
 From what I've seen, it's going to be at least a gen 2 or 3 before the mgu gets widespread adoption, initial reports on the gen 1 suggest it's not great for mtb use.
  • 1 1
 Scuttlebutt is that the MGU is still a fair way off being available especially in north America..
  • 4 0
 I just bought a Relay. While I’m excited about the MGU, it’s gonna be a bit before it ends up on many bikes, and I specifically wanted a long travel, light one, which isn’t the most popular option, and therefore those aren’t going to show up till the other niches are filled. I was guessing it was at least 3 years out, so I bought what was available. And it’s got some quirks, but is the most fun I’ve had on a bike in years!
  • 1 1
 @kylar: i don't think any lighter ebike will ever have the mgu, it's pretty hefty
  • 5 1
 @sngltrkmnd: Exactly, eBikes are really good right now. Sure, they will be better next year, and even better the year after, but it would be a shame to miss out on the fun right now...
  • 1 2
 Well, first MGU is for a full power e-bike. It's also noisy and inefficient.
It's going to eventually provide some advantages for the Full power e-bikes but currently isn't a better solution for a mid-power working with less power/ battery anyways.
  • 1 0
 @SunsPSD: 100%. Downsides of the gearbox are more or less negated by the motor, and all the benefits are bigger benefits for ebikes. Makes perfect sense, but will never be a lightweight or efficient option, meaning big batteries are needed to not risk having to pedal a 50lb+ gearbox bike without assistance
  • 19 2
 "claimed weight: 20.6 kg (45.4lb)" I've owned 4 Emtb's. Two full size and two SL's. I weigh them myself down at the LBS. Claimed weight is ummm, manufacturers hyperbole and shouldn't be confused with the truth.
  • 4 0
 They normally weigh a size small or medium without pedals...

So when you stick a set of flats on there and yours is actually an L or XL it can easily be 0.8kg (2lbs) heavier...

The problem is all the brands do the same thing, nobody wants to look like theirs is really heavy
  • 21 7
 Didn't think I'd ever see the number '$14,000' associated with 'flexstay'
  • 2 2
 @cedric-eveleigh: I was more tryin make a joke but I'll be honest, what is the upside of having a flexstay on an electric bike? From what I've learned, flexstays are an unusual choice, possibly at higher risk of breaking due to material fatigue. The only upside is that it would climb slightly better? At least from what I can tell.
  • 15 0
 @gbonen3215: Less bearings to service and lighter weight. Carbon composites can be engineered to flex practically indefinitely - it just takes the upfront engineering effort and then the bike is better on several fronts.
  • 19 6
 Cannondale releases what will likely be viewed as an evolutionary bike in 5 years. Pinkbike comment section “I hate it”
  • 9 0
 I thought weight didn't matter anymore on bikes? Why is 18kg a necessary evil on a regular bike, but an 18kg sl ebike is needed to make it handle better? Why doesn't weight correlate to better handling on regular bikes?
  • 4 1
 You read that correctly. Weight now only matters on e-bikes.
  • 9 0
 I'm curious about the flex stays on this bike. I like less bearings, but that section looks super thin. Interested to see how it endures.
  • 3 3
 The thinner, the better. Thick flexstays are most likely to crack.
  • 7 0
 At this point, flex stays are such a mature product that I have no concerns, especially when they're based on other bikes from the same company that have been in production for a few years themselves.

My personal experience on them was a 140mm-travel bike I got in 2016, rode until 2020, then sold to a friend who still rides it. Both of us are 200+ lbs riding XLs. That bike is still riding as well as it was on day one and the stays look perfect. Not even any fatigue in the paint.
  • 6 0
 I beat the snot outta my 2022 Scalpel SE with with flex stays. I was ambivalent at first but am now a firm believer.
  • 1 0
 @sammybikes916: Hasn't the Scalpel had flex stays since the very beginning? That must have been two decades by now. You'd indeed expect that people would trust them. Everything about your bike bends/stretches/compresses/torques when under load. Heck, people seem to like coil springs again these days, apparently they don't expect them to snap.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: kind of. They've had flex stays forever, but the defined pivot point is a newer iteration . I got the bike cuz it ticked the boxes -120mm XC bike within my budget and was actually available. Didn't feel one way or the other about flex pivot. But it rallies harder than an XC bike should and any time I do a shock or pivot service im reminded that I don't have to worry about that pivot. 2 thumbs way up.
  • 1 0
 They've been doing flex stays for many years on the scalpel
  • 16 6
 bikes looks fine, but the huge canondale stickers looks ugly as F**
  • 2 5
 Cheap looking, I agree.
  • 10 3
 Funny, I actually think they look better being proportionally sized instead of the dinky little logos on an eyesore of a downtube. Looks more classic Cannondale to me.
  • 4 10
flag CamNeelyCantWheelie (Feb 20, 2024 at 9:22) (Below Threshold)
 Crack n Fail
  • 1 5
flag nozes (Feb 20, 2024 at 11:27) (Below Threshold)
  • 7 4
 @CamNeelyCantWheelie: they had some frames break in the 90’s. I know it’s a catchy little saying, but get over it
  • 2 2
 @kylar: CannotSale any CanO'Nails
  • 1 0
 @CamNeelyCantWheelie: nah, those just don’t have the same catch
  • 3 0
 @iduckett: Yeah I agree, it reminds me of their 1990s bikes with massive, for the time, downtubes.
  • 9 0
 Shame it’s got a sh-t shimano motor in it…!3 months off the trails , waiting for a replacement..!
  • 5 0
 It is really crap. It still amazes me how Shimano can get away with anything.
  • 10 2
 Somehow this thing looks a lot beefier than competitors SL eMTB's.
  • 4 10
flag AirBorneone101 (Feb 20, 2024 at 6:18) (Below Threshold)
 Yet a single pivot 20kg bike excites nearly no one
  • 10 0
 @AirBorneone101: not really a single pivot: flex chainstays make it more like a flexy-horst link layout
  • 7 0
 Because it's more a full power eMTB on a diet than a proper SL eMTB. The battery is still quite bigger than what you'd typically see on an SL eMTB (601Wh). Closest would be the Orbea Rise with the 540Wh optionnal battery.
  • 1 5
flag TannerValhouli (Feb 20, 2024 at 6:51) (Below Threshold)
 @AirBorneone101: it’s basically an Orange but with a motor lol
  • 3 2
 Yes because it’s a full powered SL… not a half e bike…
  • 3 1
 Yes because it’s a full powered e bike, not a half one….
  • 1 0
 I especially appreciate that each of these models has a properly stout 36 fork and piggyback rear shock, even the least expensive version.

While the e-bike specific FOX 34 is far stiffer than I expected it to me, I wish my Kona Remote 130 had been spec’d with the 34’s bigger sibling. I’m tolerating it for now but I did immediately swap the stock Float for an X2.
  • 3 0
 @alexridesbikes-13: Yes, plus the Range Extender on the Rise so I die before the battery (then Rise from the dead to ride again)
  • 1 0
 Yes, this is really a superlight full power mtb not a mid power super light.
  • 5 0
 DH head tube angle, enduro seat tube angle…… trail wheels and tires…. So it’s a full size e-bike with a bad lightweight choices, (not that those components are bad…. Just not appropriate)
  • 7 0
 @mikekazimer does the 801 still rattle on the way down?
  • 4 0
 This. As an Orbea Rise owner, I would never consider another Shimano driven EMTB unless I was convinced Shimano had finally fixed the rattling clutch issue.
  • 1 1
 @martinizer: installing an o-chain is supposed to be working to reduce the rattle.
Nevertheless, it be better if the issue didn’t exist at all.
  • 1 1
 @martinizer: As a Rise owner I’m always too busy when I’m going down to worry about a little extra noise beyond the wind, the tires, the rims and pedals hitting rocks and mates yelling garbage. I guess it’s a personal thing that upsets some journos (I think that Kaz might be one) and some riders, but riding downhill at speed I really don’t notice the rattle from either the Rise or the Wild (the Bosch motor rattles just the same as Shimano to my ears).
  • 1 0
 @bobjumpd: in my experience it depends very much on the frame if bosch or Shimano rattle blends into the background noise or not.
Been riding a Merida (the old version) a couple of times, and the rattling was VERY annoying.
  • 1 0
 @martinizer: have you ridden the EP801?
  • 7 1
 For a full power ebike I think it actually looks decent. 62.5 HTA is nice to see.
  • 6 0
 Nice work Cannondale. Hopefully this is just the first of many lighter weight, fully powered ebikes!
  • 3 0
 I broke my last cannondale at the flimsy front shock mount, hard to tell from the picture but it sure looks thin here as well. FWIW Cannondale was great about warranty and it was a fun bike to ride, but i wouldn't buy a used one, and therefore i wouldnt buy a new one either.
  • 6 0
 So add a 750Wh battery and then the other stuff and it's 22kg.
  • 7 0
 That's exactly what I was thinking, no one will notice a 1kg difference, but a lot of riders would appreciate 20% more range...
  • 4 0
 @Mugen: especially those of us riders who are on the proud side of 200#.

It’s enticing to think one could get 4000 vert/20 miles out of this rig, til you realize you’d better be a featherweight.
  • 3 0
 @Mugen: I'd notice 1kg. For me 40lbs is the ceiling. At or under 40lbs and the bike really does feel good, much over 40 and the cascade of heavier parts begins to be necessary which puts the weight up so they add more battery so the weight goes up more and they need heavier parts etc etc.
  • 11 5
 The $8,750 price point is pretty good! XO Transmission, Fox Factory, etc
  • 6 3
 A steal! Said no-one ever.
  • 3 0
 Manufacturers claiming light weight bike should state the weight of the frameset and reviewers should weight it at their own scale. Then only we may make fair apple to apple comparisons.
  • 2 0
 Is this the first longer travel bike that has flex stays where the flex is on the chainstay making it a horst-like link in stead of a linkage driven single pivot? Would be interesting to see the suspension kinematics on thisone!
  • 2 0
 I don’t get why Cannondale would design a bike around a Shimano motor then fit a SRAM Transmission groupset. Surely it would have been better to spec a di2 gear system so they could run Autoshift?
Other than that, I think it’s a great looking ebike.
  • 3 0
 With burlier Tires, Fork and Shock to match the 62.5 head angle intent you have the same weight as a top spec Orbea Wild. So is it better than that bike. I'd say probably not.
  • 14 13
 E-bike pricing has just gone mental these days. I just paid less than $14,000 after taxes and fees for my brand new Husqvarna 701 Enduro…. Which is still made in Austria, and has 73hp, and top of the line suspension… and a license plate.

When it comes to bikes I’ll stick with finding a year or two old lightly used “analog” enduro bike for half of retail price and spend the leftovers on weekends at Whistler and trips with the boys thank you very much.
  • 6 3
 E-bikes come with a motor AND analog propulsion. Your overpriced Husqy has only one of the two. \sarcasm
  • 6 1
 Good luck taking your motorbike to a bike park.
  • 4 1
 You could have bought a Honda CRF300l for about 5k instead of that 14k husky. One could apply your same argument to your moto choices. Buy what you enjoy and let others do the same. I wouldn’t spend 14k for an ebike any more than I would 14k for a Husky, but that’s ok, I’m happy others are enjoying whatever rides they choose.
  • 7 4
 Everyone: we want an e-bike that isn’t “challenging to handle”
Nobody:
Cannondale: How about a 62.5 degree head angle?
Everyone: …
  • 8 0
 I think for many people including myself, that is the most interesting number in this press release!
  • 1 0
 @Mugen: me too!
  • 3 0
 Not interested on ebikes, I'm here just for the video of Ratboy. Not disappointed but the Bronson 3 launch video is really something else
  • 1 0
 How much lighter is the Shimano motor over the new Bosch and was it really worth it? I thought the only reason bike companies voluntarily used Shimano was to get bundle discounts on the drivetrain, but only one model has a Shimano drivetrain so what the hell were they thinking?
  • 5 1
 No comment about that great video?!
I really like it! Its finally a really good Ratboy clip again.
  • 2 1
 GIANT TRANCE X ADVENACED E+ IS 3 POUNDS LIGHTER, BETTER BATTERY EFFICIANCY, MULLET, AND WITH FOX FACTORY LIVE VALVE WITH A TRUE 2 YEAR NO QUESTIONS ASKED CARBON WARRENTY AND LIFE TIME PER MANUFACTURE DEFECT AFTER 2 YEARS. THIS CANNONDALE IS WELL LATE TO THE PARTY. GIANT AND ORBAE ARE ALL KILLING IT IN THIS CATAGORY, ITS GOING TO BE VERY HARD FOR THIS BIKE TO COMPETE UNLESS YOU ARE A DIE HARD CANNONDALE PERSON AND JUST WANT TO SPEND MORE MONEY AND GET LESS PERFORMACE JUST TO BE ON A CANNNDALE.
  • 1 0
 I know that I'm very old, but I prefer my C'Dale bikes to be like my 1992 M700: Stupid light, stupid stiff, and stupid unmotorized. Even with those restrictions, they still cracked! Smile

Full Disclosure: That M700 was my first MTB. 30+ years and a few states later, I drive across the train station tracks at the Cannondale station every day. I ride at Topstone park. I have a soft spot for this company, Hope it works out for them, even though, at 53, I'm fighting against the ebike inevitability.
  • 9 8
 I believe the Giant Trance X Elite E bike is the lightest full power E-Bike on the market at 42lbs according to your review.
www.pinkbike.com/news/review-giant-trance-x-advanced-e-elite-0-2023.html
  • 12 2
 That's a 400wh bike without the extender, this is 601.
  • 5 2
 @zzz216: I see that, but full power refers to the motor at 85nm. So they probably weigh the same with equal batteries. But then you also would have to compare every component to make sure they were equal also. Trance has heavier wheels and Live Valve etc.. Total rabbit hole...lol.
  • 2 4
 That's only a 400Wh battery mate.
  • 4 0
 Hmmmm seems pretty great, which is annoying
  • 5 1
 Nah looks sick. Nice work Cannondale.
  • 1 0
 I've unlocked my Orbea Rise to output full EP8 power so it's very similar to this Cannondale (minus the flex stays). It's awesome, but the battery drains so quickly in full boost mode.
  • 4 0
 The weight is still there
  • 3 0
 That shimano build is embarrassingly inept. Hiding shit parts where they're less visible, but arguably more important.
  • 1 0
 Cmon 14 thousand whati s going on here I can get a brand new suzuki 750r for that much of brand new yamaha r6 actually cheaper then 14 thousand ...u can get 2 yamaha mt 07 for that much brand new
  • 2 0
 the most important question: is the battery easily swappable or like in the orbea / specialized / pivot? :-(
  • 3 1
 Lost me at flex stays on an ebike, high leverage ratio and a parts spec not appropriate for the geometry of the bike.
  • 3 0
 Throw a couple DH tires on there, inserts and a 38, then weigh it.
  • 2 0
 Exactly what I did to my previous gen neo. LOL! It's not light. Not light at all.
  • 4 2
 Honestly an amazing weight with that much power and battery juice. Solid geo as well. I think they did an excellent job.
  • 3 1
 If you want to spend under $14k on something exciting that has 2 wheels and a battery, buy a Stark Varg.
  • 4 0
 Yeah but… Cannondale.
  • 2 1
 First e-bike that has my attention. Looks very well executed on paper. Not interested in buying one, but like to keep an eye on how they develop over the years...
  • 3 0
 whats the deal with Acros and their plastic garbage
  • 1 0
 This seems like the most compelling e-bike in the lightweight category. Breaking the mold like this reminds me of the Cannondale of the 90's. I'm here for it!
  • 3 0
 nice and cheap
  • 2 1
 All in all it's not a bad looking bike. Those flex stays scare me. Plus I'm a diehard evil boyo.
  • 7 5
 Looks really good for an e bike.
  • 4 9
flag mi-bike (Feb 20, 2024 at 7:47) (Below Threshold)
 Looks crap for a bike
  • 2 0
 looks good. similar to new levo
  • 2 0
 E13 cranks on shimano again!!
  • 2 0
 get the heck outta here with that pricing...
  • 2 0
 I like the look of those smooth round rocks
  • 2 0
 I won't ever own another bike with a Shimano motor.
  • 4 2
 This is a really tough crowd.
  • 2 2
 The downside to those full-power machines is that... there's still no electrical plugs in the trees or in the rocks to refill them.
  • 2 0
 You just have to mine a little lithium mid-ride.
  • 2 0
 It really exactly like Spectral:on From canyon
  • 2 1
 Back in the work shop after a week .It'll be a joke !!!!! Nothing else happening PB ?
  • 2 0
 First pivot shuttle was under 20k with a full fat motor. Just sayin
  • 1 0
 Thanks for not testing the million dollar one! Patiently waiting for full-production Pinion MGU-equipped bike tests....
  • 2 0
 I remember when everyone called them Crack’n’fail.
  • 6 4
 CHAMPIONDALE
  • 1 2
 Or in French, Champinondale
  • 3 0
 Chip & Dale
  • 2 1
 @Hectorres2001: not to be confused with Chippendales..
  • 2 1
 Does the motor control unit come with a humidity sensor?
  • 5 4
 Flex stays on a CrackandFail, what could possibly go wrong!
  • 2 2
 Funny thing is... I've owned several Cdales over the years. Including the 3lb frame of the F1000 which I raced dual slalom on, dirt jumped on and ran urban on. I currently have the previous generation of this ebike. I've never had a frame fail. Mind you I'm not a light person. I've been blown out and bent pedals and all sorts of other things. Never had one of their frames fail me. Besides that, I think people forget that PON owns these guys now.
  • 3 1
 Dude flex stays have been around for decades now, were invented by Cannondale I believe, and now have been emulated and successfully implemented by dozens of brands. Not that concerned
  • 2 3
 Why would I pick this over an Orbea Rise.....? The flex stays should have stayed on the shelf.....at 95kg, I'm a flex stay breaker!
  • 1 0
 How have they not introduced a Super V(E)
  • 2 1
 Holy seatstays, Batman
  • 2 1
 Arch rims?
  • 2 0
 That was an error. They are actually WBT KOM Tough i30s. Oh, and 203 RT66 rotors, not 180s. Better, no?
  • 2 1
 The name is on point
  • 2 2
 My moterrabike filter missed this
  • 3 4
 Personally I see no reason to not get an Orbea Rise instead.
  • 1 2
 Over priced but sick . Not sure why that green isn't available .
  • 9 11
 jus give it a rest
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