First Ride: The 2020 Scott Gambler DH Bike is Light & Ultra-Adjustable

Jul 11, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  


Yes, the new Scott Gambler kind of looks like a Trek Session. After all, there are only so many possible frame shapes and suspension layouts, and in this case Scott chose a familiar looking Horst Link layout in order to be able to effectively tune the frame stiffness, and to direct the shock forces into reinforced areas. Now that that's out of the way, let's get into the more important details of this new, lightweight carbon fiber DH bike.

The Gambler's full-carbon frame delivers 200 millimeters of rear travel, plus or minus two or three millimeters, depending on the geometry setting and can accommodate 29” or 27.5” wheels. Adjustability is the name of the game here, and there's a wide range of settings that can be used to customize the bike to suit a certain track or rider's preference.
Gambler Tuned Details

• Wheel size: 29" (27.5" compatible)
• Rear wheel travel: 200mm
• Carbon frame
• 62° - 64° head angle
• 435 - 450mm chainstays
• Weight: 34.5 lb / 15.6kg (actual, size large)
• Price: €7,999 as shown / €4,999 frame w/ suspension
www.scott-sports.com/gambler-tuned

The Gambler Tuned is the first model to be released, and it comes decked out with all the fanciness, including the futuristic-looking Syncros Hixon iC DH carbon bar / stem combo. Other spec highlights include a Fox 49 fork and a DHX2 coil shock, SRAM's X01 DH 7-speed drivetrain and Code RSC brakes, Syncros Revelstoke DH aluminum wheels, and 29" x 2.5" Maxxis Assegai tires. All that will set you back 7,999 Euro, or the frame and suspension can be purchased for 4,199. Don't rush out to sell your current bike just yet, though; the new Gambler isn't going to be available until December 2019.


 Photo by clint trahan clinttrahan.com

The Weight Game

There are a few different schools of thought when it comes to determining the ideal weight for a downhill bike, but according to Scott engineer Tim Stevens, weight was “at the top of the criteria list.” Scott's trail and enduro bikes are some of the lightest in their categories, and the goal was to create a downhill bike that followed suit. There's no denying the fact that they've created a very light bike - the 29” Gambler Tuned pictured here weighs a scant 34.5 pounds (15.6 kg) on my scale, and the frame-only is said to weigh 2,650 grams (5.8 lb). The bike could have been made even lighter, but that would have meant forgoing the adjustable geometry features.

Along with creating a much lighter Gambler, Scott's designers and engineers also wanted to achieve the optimum blend of stiffness and compliance. They started by experimenting with different rear ends on the previous Gambler in order to see what riders preferred. The overall goal was to create a bike that had more torsional stiffness, but a bit of lateral compliance for comfort and traction. They also wanted to ensure that the final product had consistent stiffness levels from front to back – a bike with a stiff front end and a floppy rear isn't going to be all that enjoyable to ride, especially at the high speeds that go hand-in-hand with downhill racing.

The Gambler's suspension layout keeps the top- and down tubes free from direct shock loads, which made it possible to manipulate the carbon layup of each tube in order to create the desired level of stiffness. Scott says that the bike, similar to the Ransom, was designed to have a 'stiffness zone', which runs from the head tube to the down tube and then the chainstays. The upper half of the bike – the top tube and seatstays – is the 'lightweight zone', the area where it was possible to remove material and tune the amount of frame flex.

 Photo by clint trahan clinttrahan.com
The four position chip is used to adjust the bottom bracket height and suspension feel.
 Photo by clint trahan clinttrahan.com
There are two chainstay length positions; 435mm or 450mm.

All the Adjustments

There's an extremely wide range of possible setup option with the Gambler. The chainstay length can be set at either 435mm or 450mm no matter what wheel size you're running, and there's also a 4-position flip chip that's used to alter the bottom bracket height and shock progression.

For instance, if you're going to be riding somewhere super steep, running the bike in the shorter chainstay position with the chip in the lower, more progressive setting is the recommended setup. For flatter tracks, Scott suggests a higher bottom bracket, more linear shock position, and longer chainstay position. Of course, these are just suggestions, and there are a bunch more possible combinations, but Scott's setup guide does a good job of breaking down where each setting might work best.

That's not the end of the adjustments, though; another set of headset cups are included that can be used to alter the head tube angle by 1-degree in either direction, and there's a cup that adds 15mm of stack height, which will come in handy for riders who plan on running 27.5” wheels.

2020 Scott Gambler

Suspension Design

The Floating Link suspension configuration found on the previous version of the Gambler is gone, replaced by a familiar looking Horst Link design. The seat tube partially wraps around the shock, which now uses a trunnion mount and measures 225 x 75mm. Riders looking for a little more butt-to-tire clearance can run a slightly shorter stroke shock, either 72.5 or 70mm, in order to reduce the travel.


Early prototypes of the Gambler were seen with an idler pulley, but it didn't end up making it past the testing stage. There were benefits in some areas, but not enough to make it worth the additional complexity and weight, at least in the eyes of Scott's designers.

The amount of anti-rise on the new bike was reduced compared to the old model based on feedback from team riders, and it now sits at 40%. The main pivot was also lowered in order to reduce the amount of chain growth and pedal feedback.


2020 Scott Gambler


Geometry

The Gambler is now available in four sizes, from S to XL, with reach numbers that range from 400mm all the way up to 500mm. That's quite the spread, and it should accommodate the vast majority of rider heights. On the whole, the reach number for each size has grown by approximately 15mm. The seat tube angle was steepened on the small and medium sizes so that smaller riders can run low seatpost heights without worrying about the 'bzzzzzt' noise of the rear tire contacting the back of the saddle.


2020 Scott Gambler

Integration

Integration is a term that falls dangerously close to being a business-speak buzzword, in the same vein as 'synergy', but given what Scott have done with the Gambler I'm going to allow it. I mean, just look at that handlebar / stem combo – if that's not integration, I don't know what is. In addition to being lighter than a traditional two-piece bar and stem, the 300-gram Syncros Hixon iC DH bar is said to be able to withstand 260kg (573 lb) of downward force on each side and still return to its original shape without any deformation – that's one hell of a huck-to-flat. The concept may be polarizing, but it's a surefire way to attract plenty of looks in the lift line.


2020 Scott Gambler
2020 Scott Gambler
Scott created their own chain guide system that uses a two-bolt lower bash guard and a separate upper guide.


Scott did more than just combine a stem and handlebar – they also created their own proprietary chain guide system. Why? Well, as the development of the Gambler progressed they realized that they were making compromises to the frame shape in order to adhere to the ISCG 05 standard. By creating their own system, they were able to design a straighter chainstay and gain additional tire clearance, a similar story to what happened when companies began ditching front derailleurs.

The guide and bash guard weigh 113 grams, and the upper guide alone weighs only 23 grams. Rather than having the bash guard thread into the frame, it slides over two lugs that extend underneath the bottom bracket. There are elastomers inside those carbon lugs to help absorb impacts and prevent frame damage.

The final piece of the integration puzzle is the fender – similar to what Syncros created for the Fox 36, they've now made a fender that makes use of the threads on the 49's arch.



I've been able to get in two solid days aboard the new Gambler so far, just enough to start getting a handle on what this bike is capable of. The first was a day of shuttling on steep, rooty, natural tracks, and the second day was in the Whistler Bike Park, where I hit up everything from the techier bits in the Garbanzo zone to jump-filled trails like A-Line and Dirt Merchant. I kept the bike in the geometry configuration it came in, with the flip chip in the low / progressive setting, and the chainstays in the longest position. At 5'11" I went with the size large, and so far I've been very comfortable on it. I'm sure I'd be able to handle the XL if I wanted to really maximize straight-line speed and stability, but I'd rather feel like a pilot than a passenger, so the 460mm reach of the large works well for me.

The light weight of the bike is noticeable, but there's still plenty of stability on tap – you're not going to mistake the Gambler for an overgrown trail bike, which is a good thing. After all, part of the reason that DH bikes are so fun is that they let you get away with speeds and line choices that wouldn't be possible on anything else.

Even though it gained a little length and bigger wheels, the new Gambler is much easier to throw around than the previous version, whether that's while navigating through a tight, technical chute, or lifting up and over a chopped up section of trail. With the flip chip in the progressive setting, it takes barely any effort at all to get the shock to begin moving into its travel. That sensitivity came in handy on the more natural trails where I wanted as much grip as possible, but it wasn't as beneficial in the bike park – I'm planning on trying out the more linear setting next to see if the difference is noticeable. In theory, it should provide more support at the beginning of the stroke and make the bike ride a little higher in its travel at the cost of a little bit of bottom-out resistance.

 Photo by clint trahan clinttrahan.com
It didn't take any time at all to start feeling comfortable on the Gambler.

How about the wild-looking handlebar? I didn't get along with the geometry of the Hixon bar that comes on the Scott Ransom, but so far the shape of the Hixon iC DH is working well for me. It feels quite stiff, but not enough to cause any hand pain or arm pump. I did notice that some of the orange paint around the bolt heads is beginning to chip off, and there are a few sections on the Gambler's frame itself where chain slap or flying rocks have knocked off some paint – we'll see how it handles the next couple months of riding.

So far it's been incredibly easy to get up to speed on the Gambler – the handling is very intuitive, and I haven't had to exert any undue effort in order to get it to behave the way I'd like. With so many possible geometry and suspension settings, it's going to be interesting to determine which changes make the most difference. Stay tuned for a full review once I rack up enough miles of descending.








207 Comments

  • + 171
 The placement of the logo on front upset me more than it should
  • + 65
 Can't unsee that now.
  • + 26
 It looks really really misaligned. @scottbikes Could we get an official reply on this?
  • + 12
 No you're right. That's unacceptable decal placement.
  • + 84
 @Isey: We were all having a nice time, everyone was having a nice time...
  • + 25
 It was definitely a Friday job
  • + 3
 Yup...I can't unsee that now
  • + 13
 Now everyone gonna ask when I bought this Kona.
  • - 17
flag dubod22 (Jul 11, 2019 at 4:24) (Below Threshold)
 They just cut the bottom of the headtube down so users can futureproof themselves for Integrated Mega Turbo Bracing with Ultra Proper Ultimate Boost. 1.8mm wider than last years model but stiffer, more compliant and ultimately more advanced than NASA. ...courtesy of SRAM of course.
  • - 30
flag NYShred (Jul 11, 2019 at 5:40) (Below Threshold)
 Worrying about the weight of your bike is like worrying about the shade of pink of your thong.
  • + 27
 @NYShred: it's not Pink it's Fushia.
  • + 5
 @Sshredder: fuchsia*
  • + 6
 @daweil: we should share wardrobe ideas! Smile
  • + 7
 it's salmon
  • + 4
 Yes looks like jerry's decal placement
  • + 2
 @audric: "Scott, is your logo off center?" "Yea, I like it this way"
  • + 1
 lefty thingy
  • + 6
 @pinnityafairy: it probably looked straight after the fifth IPA on the Friday afternoon drink. "Hey Hank, did you finish that Gambler build?" "F#ck, I'll be back in 5...".
  • + 1
 Nothing is fucked here dude.
  • + 5
 Looks like the logo is trying to look around the cables.
  • + 83
 It’s been a while since we saw something so beautiful and so clean in the dh class of bikes... Smile
  • + 76
 You mean like a Session?
  • + 26
 Yeah, ever since Trek Session 9.9 29 came out in October.
  • - 5
flag bishopsmike (Jul 11, 2019 at 5:01) (Below Threshold)
 Old Gambler looked better.
  • + 4
 m.pinkbike.com/photo/17452588
Well have a look at this. This is the goods the past industry use to push on us. Thankfully were past this I hope.
  • + 3
 @Verbl-Kint: this has much cleaner lines than a Session. Trek lost its charisma 2-3 years ago! Wink
  • + 1
 OH MY GOOOOOD
  • + 5
 Yup really nice. Hope the paint is more durable than on the ransom.
  • + 1
 Uhhhh Carbonio , mouthwatering uhhh. Don't be picky, you guys !!!
  • + 0
 @bishopsmike: lolol are you are on Salvia
  • + 1
 I ought to be at 8K Euros...unclear if buying one in the States would be cheaper since no VAT.
  • + 61
 That handlebar makes it look like the bike has a Mono-brow
  • + 16
 I get what they are trying to do with a one-piece bar/stem combo, but the inability to adjust bar roll is simply a no go for me (assuming the sweep & rise is ok to begin with).
  • + 16
 @ka-brap:
While i have the same objections, i will say that for 95% of riders it may even be a good thing. The amount of bikes i´ve tried that had the bars rolled waaaaay back or forth is astounding and it was clear that none of those riders made a conscious decision to place them in that weird spot. Most people just put them somewhere when they build up the bike and leave it like that forever. So better to have a somewhat fitting position than one that´s absolutely ridiculous.
For people like us, who actually like to get their setup dialed perfectly, it´s probably not a good idea though.

Also, paint already chipping around the screw areas :-/
  • + 5
 @Loki87: I think for beginners and intermediates, less to pfaff with is always a good thing. But, for a pro-level bike and build such as this, where tinkering & puzzling is a common thing, this would annoy more than most. But I totally get the jerry-effect.
  • + 6
 Also .. I have seen way to many carbon handle bars snap on DH bikes. Bars alone are expensive to replace, now you have to replace this whole set up and I’ve seen how much the trail biker version costs, is a whole lot of dollar signs !
  • + 1
 @qman11:
Yeah, i´ve made it a habit to replace bars more frequently or if they suffered a particularly worrying impact. Even alloy ones. It´s just not worth my teeth and brain to have a bar break mid run. Luckily alloy bars are cheap enough to do this, but with something like this you either have waaay too much disposable income or you made a rather bad choice.
I will say though, there is another advantage to it.
You cannot overtorque your stem bolts and crack your carbon bar that way.
So if i was going carbon (granted i´d be willing to spend that kind of money on a stupid bar), this would probably make a lot of sense as overtorquing is one of my major concerns with carbon bars.

It´s still a stupid idea though Razz
  • + 1
 You snap bars because you are overtorque them

I have xc and trail version of the bar/stem combo and its awesome
  • + 41
 where is twin lock
  • + 16
 Haha..put a Twinloc on that one and Nino would still end up on a World Cup XC podium...
  • + 3
 @Vincent119: right behind MvdP.
  • + 1
 @TinoK
So glad someone made the twin lock joke!
  • + 35
 Definitely my favourite 2019 bike so far
  • + 1
 This thing checks all of the boxes - wish I hadn't just bought a V10 frame.
  • + 6
 @Loamhuck: Dude the V10 is dope. The grass is always greener tho...right? This bike checks all the boxs but hasn't had all the little bs sorted out yet. The first model year of anything(cars, trucks, motos, bikes, etc) is always a GAMBLE ;-) Let the guinea pigs finish the r&d for Scott and get the 2.0. Enjoy the new ride.
  • + 1
 @mtbyoda: Good points for sure, you really are a mtbyoda. I've been racing a mullet bike and was really hoping to 'have it all' and on paper this bike does - the long travel 29er trail bikes I've ridden leave something to be desired when aggressively riding. Good point on letting someone else guinea pig it and gen2 should be dialed. Cheers
  • + 2
 Everybody is making fun of the integrated cockpit, but I'm just sitting here drooling over that frame. It's so perfect. Fingers crossed for an update to the Ransom that ditches the twinloc and adds all the adjustments and paint job of this bike.
  • + 1
 Agreed. At last a properly engineered and appropriate weight DH frame, rather than the overbuilt monsters we’re riding now. My S Works demo frame is over 8lbs bare and has a carbon layup that’s something like 5mm thick. You could throw the frame off a building and not break it. I’m a 77kg rider and it’s way overbuilt for me. This Gambler looks the business!
  • + 20
 Whens the aluminium version avaliable?
  • + 5
 When will the old gambler finally disappear forever?
  • + 14
 I miss the previous generation´s look, you simply knew its a Gamby from first sight. Also I was a fan of that "heavy plow" styled manners of the bike in rough stuff. I don´t think the lighter always means the better. But yeah it looks fast
  • + 5
 The good part of it being light is ability. If you want weight to preload the suspension you can strap lead very low on the bike, further improving stability!
  • + 18
 Looks like a GT, i mean Session, i mean Kona.
  • + 1
 GT ? Which one because I fail to see any resemblance between a Fury19 and a Session.
  • + 4
 Definitely, my first thought was of an Operator.
  • + 2
 Using horst link layout doesn't make you share the same Design
tiny.cc/kbmk9y
  • + 1
 It is definitely not a Kona, not a Session, not a GT. If you are a bike nerd off course. For 99.9999% of folks who have ever owned a mountain bike this is the same damn thing, only colors are different
  • + 15
 Steepening the seat tube so the tire doesn’t buzz is huge detail that others (Santa Cruz) have overlooked.
  • + 13
 oh wow .. best looking downhillbike ever
  • + 11
 “What are thooooossssse!” Points at integrated stem/bar ‘thing’
  • + 4
 A 300$ gadget you Can replace after any Big crash... ALU STEM AND BARS !!!
  • + 11
 Looks like Operator. -A real Gambler owner.
  • + 10
 They should have called it something else. That is not a Gambler.
  • + 2
 I think this bike looks good but it sure does not look like a Gambler. Guess I am keeping my Gambler after all!
  • + 1
 The first gambler looked totally different to the second too, so it was never set in stone
  • + 6
 it may be the directions where we should go: so many options within one bike. I find it great, you just can adapt your bike to every terrain you gonna ride, that is like at least two bikes in one.
  • + 4
 Except you can't adjust the handlebar roll
  • + 7
 @mattg95: someone should make angled stem spacers shaped like a door stop to adjust bar roll
  • + 1
 Yeah I would like my enduro bike to be like that!!
  • + 7
 This bar and stem combo gives me diarrhea. Good thing i was already seated while looking at the pics.
  • + 7
 Sweet! But i liked it a lot more without color...
  • + 2
 DH bikes always put a smile on my face. As almost all new DH sleds are pure bred race machines these days, it's refreshing to see one that's adjustable enough to be set up otherwise. The Commencal Furious was gonna be my next bike for this reason, new Gambler is now worth considering. Looking forward to the full review. Please experiment with all the adjustments @mikekazimer including running 27.5 if you would be so kind.
  • + 5
 Scott: We've always made adjustability a priority...

Bar and stem: HOLD MY BEER!
  • + 4
 how do we feel about people named Scott riding Scott bikes? cuz my name is Scott and i want a Scott but.....Scott
  • + 7
 I mean, the bike literally has your name on it - it seems very appropriate.
  • + 1
 Be thankful you can even get a bike with your name on it! Big Grin
  • + 3
 So the only way to change bar roll is to adjust the head angle?
Thankfully they included the cups – 2 degrees of bar roll adjustment!
  • + 5
 Chris Porter's coming to hang a lead weight off it.
  • + 4
 Scott have got some interesting features on the new bike. Clearly they're taking a gamble.......
  • + 1
 Yeah I’d love a good Session on that bike...
  • + 5
 Fuck. This weighs less than my sentinel
  • + 29
 Everything weighs less than Transition trail bikes
  • + 2
 @gnarnaimo: haha ain't this the truth. My aluminum bike weighs less than their carbon!
  • + 4
 I had no interest in downhill bikes until I saw this!
  • + 2
 List the frame weight in grams and then list the complete bike in pounds. Pick a standard and stick with it you undecisive bike industry
  • + 4
 Hint. Pounds * 454 = g
  • + 3
 @FatTonyNJ: and I bet you like mixed SAE and Metric Fasteners in the same can. Good riding and happy trails.
  • + 2
 That’s the Canadian standard: mg,g,lbs,metric tonnes

cm,feet,metre,kilometre

And to top it off most people still talk about fuel economy in miles/gallon
  • + 0
 Haha so true!! We're so fucked up because of our neighbour... Here in Quebec we don't use that much miles per gallon but we always talk in pounds if heavy enough and still use feet a lot! loll
  • + 3
 @Timo82: pick a measuring method and be a dick about it ;-)
  • + 3
 I’m the biggest Scott fan out there and ride a Gambker 710 but please come in a different color
  • + 1
 Matches your McLaren
  • + 2
 That's a beautiful bike--easily the cleanest DH bike I've seen yet. How do people think this bike would do as an enduro machine with a single crown fork?
  • + 3
 I can't imagine that the suspension is optimized for pedaling and the seat tube doesn't look like it's long enough to take much of a dropper, so i suspect not well?

If we're sticking with Scott, what enduro courses are you riding that you'd be underbiked on the Ransom?
  • + 1
 @MarcusBrody: Oh, I'm thinking much more about aesthetics than actual function! With the flip chip on the linear setting, the long chainstays setting, and air shock, a single crown fork, and regular handlebars/stem, that would be a sweet bike, and probably super-durable. The dropper post might be the killer. I just like the lines and simple look. Totally superficial, and just dreaming/hypothesizing.
  • + 2
 absolutely ruined the bike for me. Of course aesthetics arent everything but they truly had a unique look before, and the ride quality is great. Looks like a catalog bike now
  • + 4
 Tehe, wheigs exactly the same as my enduro
  • + 1
 Add dropper, better gears, bottle cage and you have the super super+ Enduro.. or is this category a downduro / enduhill bike???
Freakin light for sure, it looks very known to say at least...
  • + 1
 Someone manufacture slots/grooves on stems already and fork manufacturers should put rails on steerer tubes to pair with them grooved stems.
  • + 1
 Or vice versa
  • + 1
 Aside from the bar not being aesthetically pleasing the overall bike looks pretty damn good. OK Pivot, ball's in your court now...
  • + 2
 This is one well designed bike. I appreciate their approach to adjustability. It also looks great, not like the new Demo.
  • + 1
 Wow.. another FSR based bike. I guess the engineers at Scott gave up on their wonky suspension design and just decided to do what most of the industry is doing.
  • + 1
 The way that the shock sits in the seat tube makes it look like a Maiden with less burley pivots. I kinda like the svelteness of it though.
  • + 3
 Someone at Scott has a McLaren P1 poster on their wall.
  • + 2
 5.8lbs frame weight? That's the same as a BMX street frame from the overbuilt era!
  • + 2
 @SCOTT-Sports what about an alloy version for those that are not fans of carbon?
  • + 1
 Alloy version coming to Aus in August going by the info I have
  • + 1
 Stuff ya lads, I like the bar/stem combo! The normal hixon sadly didn't feel quiet right at demo trade, but if it felt right I'd be there!
  • + 1
 Is it better to be integrated or ingratiating? Or should I be satisfied with being merely conflicted between an Old Bike and a New Bike?
  • + 4
 looks like an Aurum
  • + 2
 oh no, not that stupid fixed stem/bar combo againFrown first thing most people will change. other than that, nice bike!
  • - 1
 Yea it ruins an otherwise sexy bike.
  • + 2
 Alien must behind the tech on the cockpit. It looks weird but it must be well-performed
  • + 2
 It looks like these are companies are trading bikes and changing the decals..
  • + 2
 Seems like a gamble going that light and stiff. But the adjustable settings will for sure help your riding session.
  • + 3
 Looks like they went opposite way than specialized...
  • + 1
 Me: Think I need my bars rolled back a bit..
Integration expert: Go Fack Yarselffs
  • + 1
 what about 26" mullet style set up. can it handle 26" wheels hmmmmm hmm 26" aint dead
  • + 1
 I would not trust an Al frame for DH under eight pounds. This is carbon DH frame is less than six pounds.
  • + 1
 Handlebar from the rider's view looks like a bees face, minus the mandibles.
  • + 1
 love the fact it can be run with 27.5 or 29. All DH bikes should have this option instead of making people pick one.
  • + 1
 This is nice but not as nice as the new wardrobe is just purchased from Oak Furnitureland.
  • + 1
 They forgot to add ‘sticker placement’ into the ‘All The Adjustments’ section...
  • + 1
 Hard to imagine a cleaner look ... though I do think the Commencal, YT, Trek, and Intense also look great.
  • + 1
 Ultra adjustable - You can put it in half or in two parts like older models
  • + 3
 Don't say it!
  • + 1
 well it's been about a decade and a half since we had new iscg standards, guess it was about time...
  • + 2
 Why people always talk about Trek every downhill bikes? It's boring
  • + 4
 Because the Session changed everything in DH. Easily the most copied DH bike on the planet. Hell, even Trek barely change anything on their classic design, even as the bikes get bigger wheels, longer reach etc.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: okay that's make sense but with the comment "looks like a session" or "that GT session looks good."
Etc etc.. Hah whatever
  • + 2
 @indobiker: it's just that every new DH bike, at one point, did look like a Session. It was such a common comment that, over the years, became a joke like 'Norbs was robbed'.
  • + 9
 Brendog was robbed.....
  • + 2
 @Rubberelli: Damn. If only norbs could have pulled off that run at rampage a few years back... robbed
  • + 4
 @Rubberelli: I Wouldn't say trek changed anything with the session. It was an extremely common frame design even prior to the FSR/Horst-Link patents running out. Session was just another in a long line of 4 bar bikes with vertical shock placement. However "looks like a session" did become a meme and that's all that most people remember.
  • + 1
 @dfiler: The layout was already common but the 2009 session looked like a spaceship compared to everything else on the market at the time. It was also the first properly light DH bike (at least from a mainstream brand). It was so far ahead that the styling has barely changed in 10 years and nearly every other bike has a similar look (regardless of suspension layout).
  • + 0
 @Mini-Pinner: I too remember that in 2008, the Session changed everything: geo, weight, and how active the suspensionneeds to be. Every brand began designing their own rip off of it. But looking it up, there was a Session in 2005 that was not so revolutionary. Then a redesign in 2008 created what we today think of as a Session. I honestly dont even recall the earlier one.
  • + 1
 It was a good design but not terribly revolutionary. In fact, it is pretty generic. Hence the joke that everything looks like a session. It just happened to be the mainstream brand which randomly became the center of a meme. The session was a leapfrog past most of the other brands in terms of hyrdroforming and smaller tubing. But many other brands have done the same leapfrog past competition with bike releases. Trek just happened to do it in 2008. You could just as easily pick a different bike from a different year and say it too set a new bar for bike design. For example, the 4th gen V10.
  • + 1
 lol, its like you didn't read the post you're replying to.
  • + 1
 Looks like its made out of similar stuff that i have just thrown in my recycle bin!
  • + 1
 I predict the next Scott bike design will go back to the long chopper style seat and seperated rear shock setup.
  • + 1
 From the front, those bars look like the ridge brow of Quark off of Star Trek
  • + 1
 I see what you did there.....Trek Big Grin
  • + 2
 "Looks like a Ferenghi"
  • + 2
 How much down force does this bar generate?
  • + 4
 1.21 Gigawatts, give or take.
  • + 8
 I can ride my bicycle with no handlebars no handlebars no handlebars I can ride my bicycle with no handlebars
  • + 2
 That save at 4:42 though!
  • + 2
 Probably my favorite Gambler since the DH10.
  • + 3
 "Stiffness zone"
  • + 2
 Now this is pretty. My god.
  • + 1
 Really nice, easy on the eye good looking bike them bars tho, nah.
  • + 1
 Agreed, on both points. How the bar tilt will cater for the preferences of more than 10% of riders I don't know.
  • + 0
 @BenPea: not just that but if it broke for what ever reason, it's gonna be stem and bar to pay out for.
  • + 5
 @dagzin: Yep. A solution to an inexistant problem that poses its own problems. Only a marketer could defend it.
  • + 1
 Wow what a great enduro bike , lighter than some of the pro enduro bikes
  • + 1
 same weight as my transition patrol with my current "smash all things" build
  • + 0
 I love it Smile
Heres hoping for a slightly more Park focus bike with 180 - I don't need a Dual crown fork its flat here
  • + 5
 Then don't even look at a DH bike. Super Enduro bikes are what you should be looking for.
  • + 7
 Get a ransom
  • + 1
 @Calkodawg96: Scott still make the Voltage? That would be perfect. Commencal Clash too and there are a number of bikes from Propain, Cube and many other available in Europe I believe.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: Knolly Delirium can be run at 170 or 185 with longer stroke shock
  • + 1
 @dchill: Right on! the Clash or Delirium is what I woukd get if that was what I was after I like DH bikes too much though.
  • + 1
 Horst-link all the bikes!
  • + 1
 What’s the rear axle spacing?
  • + 1
 12x157
  • + 1
 When you paint the whole bike to match shock spring
  • + 1
 I want to see this in solid black on solid black
  • + 1
 Looks like a...oh hell never mind.
  • + 1
 I’d hate not being able to mess with the bar......
  • + 1
 I guess it's time for a new bike day
  • + 1
 A light weight adjustable voltage version should do it all
  • + 1
 frame 1lb lighter than megatower.
  • + 0
 That frame design must be an effective Remedy to overcome the Force of the Operator
  • + 1
 I do declare, this bike done gave me a powerful case of the vapors!
  • + 1
 Shoulda left some orange in that fork decal.
  • + 1
 Where’s the suspension lockout?
  • + 1
 Love the new session colourway
  • + 1
 that is a damn good looking bike.......except for dem bars.eww
  • + 1
 I'm not buying a carbon DH bike. That's for sure.
  • + 1
 Love my Ransom so it follows i'd prob love this bike, too.
  • + 1
 Hate that integrated stem... it ruins the look of the bike
  • + 2
 Me too. Jut not needed on an MTB
  • + 1
 let's be honnest, nothing new there...
  • + 1
 My Gt sensor weighs 33 pounds.. that Scott is freakn light!
  • + 1
 As Bruce Wayne once said, does it come in black?
  • + 1
 Is there an alloy version coming out?
  • + 1
 It’s got no twin-loc so i’ll take one.
  • + 1
 I don't need a DH bike, but now I want one Smile
  • + 1
 I would give those married stem/bar combo away
  • + 1
 Can you run 27.5 rear?
  • + 1
 Session got robbed
  • + 0
 Looks like a session
  • - 1
 It reminds me of every other bike.
  • - 1
 Impressive. Now just drop the bar/stem, add five pounds, and I’m in.
  • - 2
 Clicked Link - Looked at photo - Thought to myself, "isn't this a Trek?" - Read first line of article - Closed link.
  • + 3
 "Clicked Link - Looked at photo - Thought to myself, wouldn't it be hilarious if I made a comment about "isn't this a Trek?" - Posted lame comment that no one cares about - Closed link."

Fixed that for you.
  • - 1
 ways less then my bike I pedal up hills with... lol.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.102482
Mobile Version of Website