Review: Reeb's SST Does it Differently

Nov 21, 2022
by Mike Levy  
Reeb's new SST is a 120mm-travel trail bike built with 4130 chromoly steel tubes, but don't get any ideas about this being some sort of lead pipe hipster-mobile. In fact, Reeb describes the SST by using words like "high-tech" and "exploring the limits of manufacturing technology," as well as "indication of their investment in aerospace manufacturing experience, engineering, and materials." But it's also proudly welded in an old wooden barn in the tiny high-desert town of Lyons, Colorado, population 2,033. But it also has a Selective Laser Melting 3D-printed hollow chainstay yoke, seatstay clevis, and rear dropouts to cut grams and add strength.

In other words, the SST is the most beautiful set of rolling contradictions I've ever seen, and that makes it one of the more interesting bikes I've ridden in a long time.
Reeb SST Details

• Intended use: Trail riding
• Travel: 120mm rear / 140mm fork
• Wheel size: 29"
• 4130 chromoly, 3D-printed stainless steel
• 65.5° head angle
• 76° effective seat angle
• Sizes: XS, SM, MD (tested), LRG, X-LRG
• Weight: 31.3 lb / 14.2 kg
• Price: $9,850 USD (as tested)
• More info: www.reebcycles.com


If that sounds like your kinda jam, you can choose from two complete bikes. $6,495 USD will get you a GX build kit, RockShox Pike Select fork, and a set of Industry Nine 1/1 Trail aluminum wheels, or spend $9,850 USD for X01 AXS bits, a Pike Ultimate, and some very nice Industry Nine carbon wheels. A frame on its own costs $3,150 USD if you're going to use all of your worn-out stuff, but note that "on its own" means you'll also have to buy a 180 x 50mm trunnion shock that Reeb will sell you if needed.

Our medium-sized test bike is the X01 AXS version painted in what Reeb is calling Pacific Blue and what I'm calling The Perfect Color, and it came in 31.3 lb on my scale.



bigquotesThis isn't the bike for those do-or-die moves, of course, but I'm not here to tell you how to live your life or that the SST doesn't love to roll the dice every now and then. Mike Levy

Frame Details

Do you know why street tacos from a dirty food truck are always more delicious than those overpriced and over-stuffed designer tacos from a snooty restaurant? Because while the latter tries to squeeze in too many fancy ingredients, that guy in the truck knows that a bit of charred meat, good cheese, some fresh cilantro, and a little hot sauce is all a taco needs, no more and no less. That appears to be the same direction Reeb has taken with the SST; there's no hidden storage compartment, the cables don't disappear into the headset, and there isn't a geo-adjusting flip-chip or secondary shock mount to be seen. Instead, the SST sports clean, simple lines that'll look as good five or ten years from now as the bike does today. It's the antithesis of the Scott Genius, isn't it?


Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
The steel SST has a timeless, classy look that won't ever go out of style.


Reeb says that the chromoly tubes feature a custom profile, and the straight lines and pinned-on headtube badge help with that timeless look. Cable routing is external and held in place with aluminum bolt-on clamps, with the dropper post line entering through a small rubber port just above the threaded bottom bracket. Our test bike came with a wireless AXS drivetrain, but a traditional derailleur sees the cable routed on the underside of the not-well-protected chainstay; owners might want to add some sort of defense to keep noise and damage to a minimum.

Gussets on the top and underside of the toptube let Reeb provide a bit more standover clearance and give them a spot to mount the aluminum rocker, another component they manufacture in-house. Another neat detail worth mentioning are the replaceable steel inserts at the brake mount, which is also where you might notice that the dropouts look a bit different than expected. That's because they were SLM 3D-printed which, according to the Google, is when a power-dense laser is used to melt and fuse metallic powders, adding layers as it goes until a dropout "grows" into pretty much what you see on the back of the SST. The chainstay yoke and seatstay clevis are made via the same process, and Reeb says that those parts are lighter and stronger than they would be had they been machined instead of printed. An overseas company named IN3DTEC is currently manufacturing these parts, but Reeb is aiming to use a domestic vendor in 2023.


Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
Gussets let Reeb drop the toptube for more standover clearance and provide the rocker pivot location.
Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
3D-printed stainless chainstay yoke, dropouts, and pivot clevis' save weight and are an interesting touch.

Lasers growing stuff is interesting, but we did have a notable hiccup before we even started testing. This very SST was originally supposed to be included in the downcountry Field Test from Quebec, but our bike accidentally shipped to us with pre-production prototype 3D-printed frame components that were never intended to leave Reeb's HQ or even be ridden, so we had to wait for a production-spec rear-end to arrive from Colorado.



Geometry & Sizing

The SST is available in five sizes, ranging from a small with a 422mm reach to an extra-large with a 510mm front end, and our test bike is a medium that comes in at 460mm. Reeb specs a 140mm-travel fork that gives the bike a 65.5-degree head angle, but you can go with a 150mm-travel fork if you want a bit more room for error, although I suspect that might feel a bit unbalanced given the bike's 120mm of rear wheel travel. To each their own, though. Also, the extra-small SST is actually a degree slacker due to its 130mm fork and 27.5" rear wheel that helps to keep the front low and improve standover clearance.


The effective seat angle sits at 76 degrees, all the sizes get the same short-ish 435mm chainstays, and there's a healthy 30mm of bottom bracket drop. Speaking of healthy, how does a 210mm dropper post on a medium-size frame sound? Short seat tubes allow for a 150mm dropper on the extra-small, 180mm on the small, and 240mm on the large and extra-large frames.

Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
The 120mm-travel design combines a Hort Link layout with a flex-pivot to save weight and keep things simpler.

Suspension Design

Much like the bike itself, the SST's 120mm-travel rear-suspension design is simple and easy to understand but there's more to it than you might first notice. While it looks like a single-pivot layout, the chainstays sport a flattened section just ahead of the axle that's intended to mimic how a Horst Link functions but without the extra bearings and pivot hardware that you'd usually see here. That should make the system lighter and, I'd assume, improve the rear-end with more lateral rigidity since it's not held together with bolts. A massive aluminum pivot axle runs through from the non-drive-side, and steel hardware is used elsewhere. Reeb says that while the SST comes with an air shock from them, there's enough progressivity that'll it'll also play nice with a coil spring.







Test Bike Setup

Without any geometry-adjusting flip-chips or multiple shock mounting positions to consider, all you'll need to do is set up your suspension before hitting the trails. Unlike some other bikes in this travel bracket, I found that the SST has a relatively wide window that it's happy to live in, from soft and forgiving to firm but also still surprisingly forgiving. I was happy with up to 35-percent sag, especially as it was easy to reach the pedal-assist switch, but I could see myself adding a volume spacer had conditions been dry and fast. I ended up settling at 28-percent sag and the suspension felt just as active and supple, with the SST having a bit more party in its legs when set a little firmer. Even with less than 25-percent sag, the suspension was remarkably compliant without feeling too gooey.

Quebec Field Test Tom Richards photo
Mike Levy
Location: Squamish, BC
Height: 5'10" / 178cm
Weight: 150 lbs / 68 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @killed_by_death

Climbing

Some bikes in this travel bracket really lean into that firm, efficient suspension feel at the expense of traction, which is why a gooey enduro bike will often out-crawl your light and unforgiving cross-country rig up anything where grip is the deciding factor. Tires count for a lot as well, of course, but the SST does a really good job of sniffing out whatever tiny bits of traction are available when your only goal is to not dab, and it does that without feeling frantic or rushed. One of my favorite tangled messes of roots highlighted the difference; I often hear that telltale zzzzzzip of the rear tire spinning on the driest of days, followed by either me tipping over before I'm able to unclip or the least graceful save you've ever seen. But on the SST, I scooted up and over my nemesis multiple times without much fuss, a telling result considering that I pedal nearly every test bike up the same climb.

While there's plenty of traction, you'll need to be a bit careful about where you're putting your pedals; I managed to have relations with the Reeb's stem a few too many times when pedal strikes on tricky climbs stopped the bike instantly but not my body, which is always an embarrassing way to hit the ground. Pedal strikes are rider error, though - your feet are attached to them, after all - and I quickly got used to making sure I knew what my feet were doing. You'll need to be more aware of pedal positioning and your timing if your climbs are like mine, which can cost you some momentum in low-speed sections, but this isn't the bike for people who live and die by the stopwatch anyway.


Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
With loads of traction and middle-of-the-road handling, the SST is a great technical climber... Just as long as you watch those pedal strikes.


With tons of grip and a calm, planted demeanor, the SST eats up tight corners and switchbacks where it seemed to fit into awkward bits of trail that stymied other bikes a bit more. Again, this thing isn't even close to feeling sporty or fast but, much like your chunky but always strong friend, the SST manages to be surprisingly darty and agile when it needs to zig-zag through some tight trees or mess of rocks. And when you're faced with one of those do-or-fall-over grunts where you need to put down all your power out of the corner, it'll dig deep for any and all traction that might be there.

Off the trail and onto gravel road climbs, it's obvious that the SST's weakness is those long, steady grades where it's not able to use traction and stability to its advantage. When you've got time to think about things and nothing to do but pedal, the active suspension sometimes feels like it has a bit more than 120mm of travel; you might want to firm it up with the pedal-assist switch on the RockShox shock for those sorts of efforts.

The SST is a niche product compared to the sea of carbon fiber trail bikes out there, but it proved to be a surprisingly good all-around climber for anyone not concerned with all-out speed. It's not that it feels slow, but if you're expecting a race-y ride just because it only has 120mm, this ain't it. That's not what Reeb was going for, either, with the SST designed to be more of a stout trail bike that won't get nervous about a few rowdy descents, and it climbs accordingly.



Reeb SST photo by Max Baron

Descending

Short-travel bikes can often act a bit confused, almost like they want to party but they also can't hold their liquor, end up causing a big scene, and you end up needing days to recover. Sound familiar? You think it'll be fun, and it is for a while until those decisions start to catch up with you, and then you're upside down in the rhubarb. The SST can party harder than most, though, and you're less likely to end up with a hangover and no memory of what happened thanks to its easy-going suspension and handling.

Let's talk suspension first, with Reeb's flex-pivot Horst Link-ish system doing some very good things on the trail. It's quite active and supple over small impacts that you might not see but that definitely affect traction, and that goes a long way to make the SST feel more stuck to the ground than most bikes with this little suspension. That's a big help when it's really wet, really dry, or anytime traction is iffy, be it cruising down a section of tame singletrack at maximum pace or creeping into a vertical rock roll that demands zero speed and all the concentration. This isn't the bike for those do-or-die moves, of course, but I'm not here to tell you how to live your life or that the SST doesn't love to roll the dice every now and then.

When you do roll the dice on a short-travel bike, you might sometimes find that the geometry lets you get into situations that the suspension can't get you out of. Or vice versa. That's not the case with the SST, however, with the opposite end of the stroke being nearly as impressive. There's more than enough ramp-up with the RockShox air shock that my test bike arrived with, and there were times when it felt like I had an extra 10 or 15mm of help, especially on fast sections of trail with big compressions and holes when you're just trying to hang on for dear life. Reeb has done a hell of a lot with just 120mm of travel.


Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
Forgiving suspension means that you can get away with a lot aboard the SST, especially when it's wet or sketchy.


There's plenty of life to the SST as well, as you'd expect given that it's on the shorter side of the travel spectrum. Apply all the usual cliches here about it being playful and all that, but I think a big factor is actually how sure-footed the bike is; that stability gives you the trust to do those side hits and useless but fun moves, much like how a long, slack enduro bike can also be surprisingly playful for the same reasons. If you're confident on a bike, you'll relax and have more fun.

On the handling front, Reeb could have easily made the SST a too-slack, too-sloppy short-travel bike that's fun in a few places and a burden in most... But that's not what they did. Instead, the SST feels more middle-of-the-road; it has the stability and poise to not feel too on-edge when the trail gets really steep and sketchy but doesn't mind tame, meandering descents either. The first compliment comes from that classic in-the-bike positioning that most 120mm-travel rigs don't provide, as well as the 140mm-travel Pike that's an ideal match for the SST. Far from feeling unbalanced, the 140mm fork suits the SST's intentions and I don't think I'd want more or less travel up front.

If I had to look for some criticisms, which is exactly what we're supposed to be doing here, there are faster, more enjoyable bikes if your rides involve a ton of smooth, rolling terrain rather than sustained descents. Yes, the SST is a decent all-around machine everywhere, but it's far better suited to rougher trails and longer downhills where the bike's active suspension and forgiving nature work for your benefit.




Quebec Field Test Tom Richards photo
The carbon fiber BC40 also has 120mm but is built using very different ingredients.
The Fluid is in a different price bracket but made for the same kind of riding as the Reeb.

How Does It Compare?

A few short-travel bikes I've spent a bunch of time on recently were the Fourstroke LT from BMC, Allied's very impressive BC40, and the new aluminum Norco Fluid. Those three span a pretty wide range of intended use, with the 130mm Fluid and 120mm Allied both being more in line with the SST than the racier and much less forgiving BMC. Obviously, with low weight and carbon fiber in the recipe, Allied is taking a very different approach than Reeb, but there are some interesting similarities on the trail regardless of frame material and intentions.

If you're looking to do some racing, it's going to be the BC40 for sure and that's not a surprise at all. Likewise, if you're more into covering ground quickly - the BC40 is a rocketship - but either bike could also be your short-travel trail bike that's ready for more. While the ingredients couldn't be more different, the two bikes handle similarly on the trail; both are remarkably planted through any and all corners, and both instill more confidence than you might expect. They also share some rear-suspension attributes, although the BC40 feels sportier and more rewarding on the gas.

As for Norco's Fluid, it has a bit more rear-wheel-travel and is aluminum rather than steel, but it has a similar personality in that both it and the SST are solid, ready-for-anything trail rigs. Obviously, there's a pretty wide price delta between these three bikes but, that aside, I'd recommend the Reeb for anyone who appreciates something different, the Norco if you want the most bike-for-your-buck, and the Allied if you're a closet cross-country dork who wants more bike but doesn't want to go up the climbers any slower.


Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
TRP's brakes are quickly becoming some of my favorites due to their power and non-stop consistency.

Technical Report

RockShox Pike Ultimate Fork: The 140mm-travel Pike just plain works. It was super smooth right out of the box and required precisely zero attention once I had it set-up to my liking, which required about one minute of my time. If you ask me, many brands are putting too much fork on their trail bikes and that would be a surefire way to ruin this sweet handling package.

TRP Trail EVO Brakes: TRP has come on strong over the last few years and it's the same story with these stoppers. I'm not a huge guy, but they offer loads of power and, just as importantly, great modulation and control through the huge lever blades. There were also completely quiet, but I would like the reach adjustment to let them sit a bit closer to the grips for smaller hands.


SRAM X01 AXS Drivetrain: We've seen some of SRAM's clutches act a little softer than we'd like, but that's not the case with the derailleur on the SST. It worked well, shifted perfectly, and the wireless set-up really suits the SST's clean lines.

Nit-Picky: There are a couple of nit-picky things to note about the frame, including the lack of protection. I don't expect the barn-built SST to come with co-molded rubber padding as some high-end carbon frames do, but it should have something better than the thin black sticker that's currently peeling off the chainstay. Thankfully, this one is pretty easy to solve with an off-the-shelf solution or something homemade. Also, a large-sized bottle doesn't fit well inside the medium-sized frame without it constantly banging on the underside of the toptube because there's not much clearance. A standard bottle squeezes in but, for a bike that's likely to see all sorts of epic rides, it's worth mentioning that is the only bottle location.


Reeb SST photo by Max Baron
Ready for something a bit different? If you don't need much travel but want to do all the things, the SST could be your jam.



Pros

+ Supple, active suspension provides loads of traction
+ Well rounded but best suits rough, difficult trails
+ Relatively rare and absolutely gorgous

Cons

- There are sportier feeling 120mm-travel bikes
- A bit heavier than other options (if you care)
- Well rounded but doesn't suit smooth terrain




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesYou can spend a similar amount of money on a futuristic-looking carbon bike that will weigh less and do similar things, but the SST brings something different to the trail that many riders will appreciate. Great suspension performance and all-around handling are factors, sure, as well as how calm and surefooted it feels for having just 120mm of travel. There's something less tangible about the SST that resonates with me, though, with clean, simple lines and a no-nonsense attitude that says just as much about other bikes as it does about Reeb's approach. Mike Levy



275 Comments

  • 167 6
 That thing is sick. No notes. I'd much rather spend $10k and get something like this than an anonymous Asian carbon frame from (checks notes) RM, SC, or Yeti.
  • 175 12
 Are you kidding? This thing is horrible. They have extra exposed cables instead of neatly routing through the headset. The steel is needlessly durable against getting hit with rocks; when would a rock ever hit a mountain bike? It doesn't even have kashima
  • 61 1
 @4thflowkage: The kashima is found on the inside of the frame tubes, cause REEB is backwardz.
  • 9 0
 @bishopsmike: BEER is backwardz.
  • 5 0
 How can a bike not suit smooth riding? Ha ha
  • 7 0
 I think Kashima on the inside is overrated. Can't even see it so how is it doing anything?
  • 2 0
 @4thflowkage: IMO Water bottle mounts in places haphazardly placed within arm's reach are an immediate deal breaker.
  • 1 2
 You wouldn't and you won't.
  • 2 0
 @rip8569: Internal Kashima is for the ultimateute narcissist dentist who wants to know he spent more money on more bling than any other dentist in the HOA but wants to smugly grin at the dentist bragging about their never ridden SB140 hanging in the 4th bay of their garage
  • 16 0
 @blowmyfuse: Bit harsh on dentists mate, they have the advantage of already owning those little mirrors to inspect their internal Kashima.
  • 10 6
 I love this, it looks like everything I want in a bike, except for I absolutely cannot understand $3,150 for a steel frame. Made in USA is great, and so is the attention to detail, but part of the huge costs of Carbon bikes is the massively expensive tooling needed for the molds. With that absent, everything was looking like the absolutely perfect bike, fun geo, US made, unique material and the benefit of cheaper manufacturing of steel. Sadly gets even harder to justify with an entire Marin Rift Zone can start at $1700.. Not to be the price complainer but really hoped price would be one of the advantages of steel. And yet it's still going to top of my wish list.
  • 7 8
 @davemays: You're paying for expensive Colorado labor....not for some amazing bike.
  • 5 1
 @davemays: US welders make $20-30/hr. Labor in Asia is $2-7/hr depending on country and skill.
  • 2 2
 @davemays: Same here, I like everything about the Reeb, but I don't think the price is reasonable. Makes it kinda hard to justify honestly.
  • 5 0
 @greenblur: US welders can make a lot more than $20-30/hr. Maybe not for a bike company, but someone with the equipment and experience for custom welding jobs can easily charge $75/hr or more depending on the application.
  • 2 0
 @Muscovir: I mean, it's handbuilt in the US, not a layup job. Someone has to personally stack each and every one of those dimes on every weld. That's worth something. Can I afford one? No. Would I if I could? Maybe, but I'd have other options to choose from too.
  • 13 0
 @greenblur: I own my own business. If I pay for US labor, that person will need goods & services in the US and have funds to turn around and buy them from me or other businesses in the US.

If I pay $2-7 overseas labor, what will that person every buy from me, my neighbors, my state or country?

Barter and trade are the root of money and bartering that skips over your neighbor countrymen will eventually leave you no one to barter or trade with & no one can provide you anything in return.

Maybe we will eventually send all of our purchase power to China and they decide they want to come to the US and just claim our food production capacity through force.

For now, I'd rather not.
  • 2 0
 @greenblur: The two welders I know make *wayyyy* more than that
  • 1 0
 @enduroNZ: some bikes have travel characteristics that dull the trail too much and smooth trails can be a bore. Sometimes this is due to the components, kinematics, geometry or fit of the bike.
  • 4 0
 @blowmyfuse: Good perspective and I agree! I was just hoping that being steel would somehow allow the benefits above along with the material choice also carrying the benefit of being cheaper than the also made-in-Colorado $3200 Guerilla Gravity Trail Pistol frame, as I'd assumed cutting and welding the steel would be cheaper than the labor intensive layup process, and require no mold tooling. If the labor is comparable though, then seeing the 2 frames be pretty much the same price means they're probably priced right. A benefit of not needing mold tooling though is changes between model years and prototyping can happen much more easily.
  • 6 0
 @davemays: Though steel is less expensive compared to carbon molds, this frame is also utilizing several components that are 3D printed in metal. These components cost more per unit but don't have the same mold cost as carbon. I bet some of the price is due to these parts as well. (they probably also speed up the build process considerably)
  • 8 0
 @Spencermon: You're not wrong! I don't know the exact numbers for the domestically manufactured carbon bikes, but having worked in composites extensively in the past I can take an pretty educated guess on labor hours. Neither process, especially automated layup and resin infusion, come close to the amount of time it takes to fabricate one of these. We're always working to improve our production process and the 3D printed parts, while expensive, have major benefits in stiffness and strength, and definitely speed up some elements of production. That said... a baller powdercoat job, stacked dimes, or any of the numerous little details that go into making a bike like this just take time and it's not really our style to cut corners.
  • 2 0
 @adamszymkowicz: rate charged per hour by no means you’re putting that in your pocket. You’re also speaking in reference to an owner/operator, not an hourly employee.
  • 1 2
 @pmhobson: it’s rare. What he stated is true, do your research instead of relying on 2 friends
  • 1 4
 @blowmyfuse: you can f*ck off with your weird xenophobia.
  • 3 0
 @stevethespacecowboy: fantastic, I appreciate the education and have a greater appreciation for the process!
This is absolutely what I hope my next bike will be, and now there's no disappointment that the steel frame isn't "cheaper" than a carbon one. Really excited that a bike like this even exists.
  • 1 1
 @sophisticatedhonky: I’m aware of how subcontracting works, thanks.
  • 2 0
 @adamszymkowicz: What are you talking about? Coo Coo for Cocoa Puffs!
  • 1 0
 The Allied BC40 carbon frame is made in Rogers, AR. alliedcycleworks.com/pages/made-here.
  • 86 1
 It may not be the most sensible bike in the world, but it seems like a really great option if you want something out of the ordinary, that can be your companion for 99% of what normal people actually ride
  • 54 0
 I'm disappointed there no review of riding it backwards. Does it have a frothy head? Does it have malty undertones?
  • 55 4
 I actually just picked up an SST last week from REEB direct in Longmont, CO. (Ordered late September). It is absolutely gorgeous - love supporting local and US manufacturing.
  • 14 0
 Welcome to the club. Been riding mine since Sept and love it. Really suits the riding I like to do. Looks killer and, like you point out, has a team of local people/craftsmen who love bikes working behind the scenes.
  • 71 1
 The other cool thing about REEB, they also do their best to support and work with local companies. Not just USA, but actual local Colorado companies. REEB has always ordered all their frame stickers from us in Golden since day one. So you are supporting more than a single small company! and if you want to go all matchy, you can purchase fork stickers from us. Great company.
  • 3 0
 @VCGraphix: Do you guys make the chainstay protector, too?! Kidding, kidding. Super cool bike, with a great locally-sourced production concept.
  • 52 1
 It's so rad to see the new bike on here and stoked to see so many nice comments. I'm loving my bike, if you have any questions about it lmk!
  • 3 0
 Love the idea behind this bike and (most of all) that it's made in the US. Question: will the "qualifications" for custom geo be relaxed a bit in the future? I just ordered a Nicolai which I think caters to a similar market and they didn't require a test ride.

"Can I get custom geometry?
Come ride the stock geo and drink a beer with us after your demo. If you're 6'9" and the XL isn't big enough – we're the frame company for you. For most folks our stock sizing works well, so we only do custom geometry in very select cases."
  • 22 0
 @jdejace:
Right now, we are focusing on shortening up our lead times to ensure customers are getting frames in a timely manner. Custom geometry slows down our production, which we cannot afford right now with the amount of stock geometry orders coming in. In the future when we have frames in the shelf, we will be more open to custom geometry.
  • 1 0
 @prosauce: sounds good! Thank you.
  • 4 0
 @jdejace: what he said!
  • 1 0
 Hey Jeff, from the review above he makes it sound like it's really good for long climbs and descents (sound like Colorado where it's made) how is it here in the tight techy northeast?
  • 2 0
 @trener1: I'm 6'4" so I'm a little "tall" for an XL but I really like it. Where do you live and how tall are you? Where do you live?
  • 1 0
 hello JL, how do you go about choosing the right rear shock for this frame?
  • 3 0
 @Mobs: I prefer an air shock because it's a little more playful but I tested it with the coil and it felt really awesome too. The coil makes it feel very planted so if you're looking to have your bike feel like its velcro'd to the th ground with massive traction it's a good choice. Where you live and the types of trails you ride can dictate too. On the east coast it's tech climbs and short downhills so air makes sense for me. If I lived somewhere that had more fire road climbs and massive descents I'd probably switch to coil. Make sense?
  • 2 0
 @jeff-lenosky: Post your ride man! Would love to see what one of the legends is ripping on these days.
  • 1 0
 @jeff-lenosky: Hey Jeff, I live in Brooklyn, but ride at Stephans, Deer Park and some other NJ parks
  • 2 0
 @trener1: I'm in Brooklyn too and ride in NJ
  • 1 0
 @jeff-lenosky: Hey Jeff, I live in Brooklyn, but ride at Stephans, Deer Park and some other NJ parks
  • 1 0
 @eragot: Cool
  • 1 0
 @crowaan: I just posted a bike check on my Youtube channel check it out orr click this link if it works!
www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFRSb599j_U
  • 34 0
 Recently took delivery of my SST and got her built up single speed. After a couple rides I can honestly say it's one of, if not the best all around bike I've ever ridden. And it's a stunner in person. For anyone asking about the price - A beautifully hand made forever bike from a company that actually returns emails quickly and responds to all of my annoying questions? Worth every penny.
  • 1 0
 Singlespeed! Be sure to post it in one of the appropriate forums here. I would like to know more about that setup?
  • 1 0
 @wanderingbike: Will do. Honestly, thus far it's one of the best single speeds I've owned.
  • 1 0
 What rear shock did you go with/why and what front shock option did you go with, thanks Smile
  • 3 0
 @Mobs: Rock Shox Deluxe Ultimate. Wanted to keep things simple out back. Works pretty well. I've honestly never reached for the lockout switch, which surprised me. Feels firm while climbing, no noticeable bob at all, then opens up on descents. And I went with the new Rock Shox Pike Ultimate (44mm offset). I'm really liking this fork. Haven't tried anything from RS in a while, and thus far I'm impressed. I might try a larger volume shock in the future, but for right now I like this combo.
  • 32 0
 Brakes have "non-stop consistency" - does that mean they consistently don't stop you? I don't speak Canadian, much less, Levy-speak...
  • 17 0
 100% accurate, 50% of the time
  • 1 1
 I feel like SRAM are Non-Stop consistently too.
  • 33 0
 Why didn't you get Matt Reeb to review this one, eh Pinkbike?
  • 20 0
 Conflict of interest
  • 27 1
 Prosauce doing work.
  • 25 3
 Whats the story on the pupper in the background shot? Looks like a good boy.
  • 22 21
 Good boy? Far from it. He was caught rampaging in the January 6th insurrection and is a massive supporter of Putin's invasion of Ukraine. The little z on his collar is out of shot.
  • 4 0
 **scrolls up to find dog**
  • 18 0
 It should be mentioned that the guys at Reeb are there to talk to through the entire purchasing & building process. They are game to talk ideas or concerns. Can't say enough good stuff about their customer service. It's an absolute pleasure buying a bike from fellow bike nerds in Colorado that ride their bikes as hard as I do, and build bikes to handle all that abuse.
  • 4 0
 Backing this up as well. They're a solid crew from front to back. Getting my Sqweeb last year couldn't have been easier.
  • 2 0
 They even went as far as sending me pics of my frame in the paint booth. Just awesome.
  • 21 0
 Sexiest trail bike ever.
  • 5 0
 This thing belongs on a poster....
  • 18 2
 That's a very respectable weight for a steel FS bike, only 1-2lb more than my Orange - which has really similar geometry but probably rides totally opposite.
  • 8 1
 Anyone have an inkling as to the frame weight? Thats what really matters here.

If its 3kg or under, I don't see any point in using aluminum or carbon fiber outside of XC racing. Steel does feel good to ride, it can be so much cheaper than carbon, and is the lowest eco footprint of the bunch.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: sans shock it might not be too far off. 3.5+ would be my guess, interested to find out.
  • 1 3
 @hamncheez: I ride a steel FS bike and I don't disagree with you for an all-rounder or enduro bike, but I can't see a steel frame ever having quite the same liveliness as a good alu or carbon short-travel trail bike. The Orange I mentioned above often feels like it has less than its 110mm rear travel, not more Big Grin
  • 20 0
 @chakaping: It must be hard getting to your documents with only 110mm of drawer travel.
  • 2 0
 @davidrobinsonphoto: Very rewarding though.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: 7-8lbs w/o shock (closer to 7 for small, closer to 8 for XL) is what Reeb stated on (if I recall correctly) on the Blister podcast.
  • 4 0
 @jdejace: While I'd still take this over, say, a Tallboy or SB-120, ya that weighs enough to where I can see the point/perspective of going carbon in this travel bracket.
  • 6 3
 @hamncheez: yup, I can see people making that choice.

The thing about a lightweight frame is that it's not free of compromises, even ignoring durability. Seb Scott talked about it in his weight article (rigid sprung mass vs total sprung mass and unsprung mass), and I think you'd probably lose some of the SST's characteristics on the descent that a lot of people would consider positive traits if you went with a lighter carbon frame.

If someone wanted to bias their short travel bike towards a bit more climbing efficiency on smooth trails (Levy makes it seem like a wash on tech trails given the traction advantage) based on their preference I think that's totally reasonable. But I have a hard time believing a lightweight carbon frame with the same components will descend like the SST. At the end of the day I think almost all modern bikes are good and it's all about picking the (relatively modest) compromises that fit you and your riding best.

Maybe a more interesting comparison in terms of cross shopping would be a mid travel carbon bike. Does the extra travel make up for some of that traction on the climbs and confidence on the descents?
  • 2 6
flag Muscovir (Nov 22, 2022 at 3:48) (Below Threshold)
 Meh. Once you'll add reliable wheels and proper tires it'll be quite heavy. Add DD Minions front and rear and a set of DT Swiss EX471 rims and you'll easily have a a 16kg bike.
  • 6 0
 @Muscovir: Why would you put DDs on a 120mm travel bike
  • 2 4
 @hamncheez: Because why would you want aggressive, new-school geometry that could happily take on a black diamond trail and then pair it with garbage tires?

Exo and Exo+? Thin, flimsy, unreliable, no sidewall support. They don't do a bike like this justice.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: Drop Maxxis and go with Schwalbe Super Trail tires. Everyone has blinders on when it comes to tire options these days.
  • 1 0
 @stevemokan: I switch between different tires a lot. A Magic Mary Super Trail Addix Soft in 29x2.4 is actually pretty much the same weight as a Minion DHF DD MaxTerra in 29x2.5. Both about 1250g. Weighed them myself.
  • 21 11
 I don't care what my enduro bike weighs, as it's built up to be thrown down anything without worrying about it. But at $10k with fancy kit like i9 carbon wheels and only 120mm travel, I would want something that weighted a lot less than 31 point something pounds. It's pretty much the same weight as that Norco, just 2.5x as expensive (yes I know it's low volume, etc etc). Surely a weight starting with a 2 would make it more fun on the sort of trails 120mm bikes are built for
  • 54 5
 It's the same weight as the new Yeti SB120, but it seems to ride better overall (plus it's cheaper)... and I think we can all agree that we'd rather support a kick-ass company like Reeb over Yeti any day.
  • 7 0
 @stevemokan: that's fair - I'd certainly rather support REEB! And avoid the dentist comments...
  • 10 8
 @stevemokan: But that's a low hanging fruit. Yet another niche bike desperately searching for suitable riding conditions.
Enduro weight and efficiency but XC capabilities.
  • 9 0
 @stevemokan: Agreement on the rest, though. Plus, steel bikes are naturally cooler than carbon ones.
  • 12 0
 I think being overly obsessive with weight on a bike like this is kindof missing the point, it's also worth considering that the frame weight is the main differentiator between the other options and it really isn't that far outside of what you would expect. You are talking between a 1 and 2 pound difference, if that, something I doubt most riders would notice in non-rotational weight.

You can get it sub-30lbs if you really wanted to with a Spire-like build (SID, inline shock, narrower rims/lighter wheels, etc), which I know some folks have done. Mine with a DBCoil IL, carbon wheels, and a 150mm Lyrik weighs ~32lbs, so dropping in a lighter fork, shock, brakes, carbon bars, etc would def get you below 30, if that is what you are after.
  • 4 1
 If you ever have the opportunity to put a "trail" wheel/tire set on your enduro, try it. You might be surprised how much of the difference while climbing is slow rolling grippy tires, inserts, beefy rims. Or vice versa put your enduro wheelset on your short travel bike. I'm not saying there will be zero difference in a pure efficiency test on a smooth track, but it's probably less than most people think. Do a couple laps back to back on your short travel bike with/without a full water bottle if you don't have the wheels to experiment with more concretely.
  • 2 0
 @shinook: Even if you are interested in saving weight, I'd still go DB Air IL over the SIDLuxe. It's worth the 150g penalty for an infinitely variable climb switch and 4-way adjustability. The M/M tuned SIDLuxe on my Spur was too easily overwhelmed.
  • 10 0
 I’ve had a 120/130 Spur since 2020 and got my SST to replace a Ripmo. Riding the SST about 8/10 rides now. It’s a bit slower on climbs according to time, but it’s way more fun — even better on downhills. My first two rides were a 4.5 hour backcountry shenanigan ride then Snowmass bike park. I had as much fun as the Megatowers and Spesh Enduros.
  • 8 0
 When I first saw this bike at the Sedona Mtb Fest I knew I had to have one. I recently sold my Sworks stumpjumper frame to buy this frame instead. Got all my parts ready to go for the custom color I’m having done. Can’t wait for this bad ass build. Now I just gotta wait till Feb 1st when the frame ships out. Great info in this review, thank you.
  • 8 0
 I've been riding mine since September. It's turned out to be the perfect full suspension bike for me which is anytime I want a little more bike than my hardtail. It handles all the super tight rocky mess of trails we have on the east coast wonderfully. I'm not a big bike park rider but I'm betting it'll do everything I want there too no problem the couple times a year I go.
  • 6 0
 “Short-travel bikes can often act a bit confused, almost like they want to party but they also can't hold their liquor, end up causing a big scene, and you end up needing days to recover”

I feel seen
  • 6 0
 say what you will, its one thing to make a bike for yourself, its a totally different thing to make bikes for the public effectively. these bikes look unreal, love the 3D parts and local manufacturing from reeb
  • 5 0
 God -- that Pacific Blue really is the perfect color. Gorgeous bike. I don't think it'd suit my combination of terrain + riding and one-bike-budget. But damn if one of those things changes, this is a bike I'd be into.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: it's nice but head to their website and check the city lights colour... oh my i think i need to be alone....
reebcycles.com/products/sst?variant=40813647888521#product-anchor
  • 1 0
 @p0rtal00: yeah, those are both gorgeous.

I have silver Pike like on the bike shown in the article. I think I'd pony up the extra cash for a frame that matched it if a silver as sparkly as City Lights was possible
  • 7 0
 i really enjoy Mike's writing. Great review.
  • 5 0
 mike, how did you feel about the sizing on this bike? would you have been better suited to a large size frame with a 482mm reach in your opinion?
  • 2 0
 +1
  • 1 1
 @stevemokan: that would probably be way too big for him and screw up the feel and handling, especially on a short travel bike like this. 460 reach is just right for someone at 5 10 like mike (or me). If you are the kind of rider that really wants a super long and extra stable bike for fast chunky descents, you'll also probably want a lot more travel than what this offers.
  • 3 0
 @mtb-thetown: i’m 5’10.5” and reeb recommended a size large for me.
  • 1 0
 @frigofff: the guys in the shop LOVE long bikes and I like them a little short for my height. It really depends on how you wanna ride it. If it's super tech I'd downsize and more bomber than the large could be good. That's the beauty of long dropper posts these days and getting away from seat tube in correlation to frame size.
  • 6 0
 Should have been compared to a Cotic FlareMax over the plastic fantastic race bike from Allied.
  • 3 0
 This bike is on my short list of dream bikes, but I have on emake or break question - can it easily be ridden single speed?

I'm aware of the funk la ruta and know that it's can be single speed, but I get the impression that bike is more intended for xc/adventure
  • 4 1
 can't anything be singlespeed with a tensioner?
  • 2 0
 I set my SST up single speed using a Rohloff tensioner and it's honestly one of the best single speeds I've ever ridden. It likes to be mashed and scoots up steep tech far easier than I anticipated. And I haven't used the lockout switch once. It has surpassed my expectations in SS form. Should you get one you won't be disappointed.
  • 6 0
 Basically a modern Turner 5Spot. That bike was 15 years ahead of its time. Holy shit it was good.
  • 1 0
 That was such a nice bike! Friend had a custom version with mixed matched rear end from a different model to set it up for slalom racing. Definitely can't beat the classic double triangle frame designs. They always look good and everyone seems to praise there looks.
  • 1 0
 Came here to say EXACTLY that! Different materials and all, but still.
  • 1 0
 If you run even further back through the Turner 5 Spot heritage, you'd arrive at the Turner FTF aka Burner (the original "Session", and the shape that launched a thousand look a-likes). My wife has got a '94 Resto rebuild with the polished DH rocker (3.6"!); it's superb.
  • 1 0
 @Corinthian: I didn't go quite that far back, staring with an XCE, then progressing to a 5-Spot, RFX and Sultan V.1 and 2, a finishing off with a Czar. Such cool bikes!
  • 3 0
 The REEB Squeeb is also a pretty dope bike... may be my next frame.
Once you get over the slightly higher weight on paper, and just ride it... you realize that everything about the frame is just dialed: great suspension design, great balance, extremely comfortable climbing up steep stuff.
  • 9 3
 I’ll take this over a Chinese Yeti any day.
  • 6 0
 *Vietnamese
  • 2 0
 I'd like to get a REEB in the fleet someday... really like what they're doing. There was a great podcast with one of the REEB guys I heard a while back, good listening- can't find it to link it on my work PC, unfortunately.

TRP brakes look a lot like Shimanos; not identical by any means but they give me a generation or two back Shimano lever body vibe. I wonder if they're using the same OEM.
  • 4 0
 TRP is the performance arm of Tektro. They don't really feel similar at all. I prefer TRPs over Shimano.
  • 1 0
 TRPs can run the non-finned Shimano pads, so you're not far off there.
  • 2 0
 @weekendupdate: they can run the finned ones too, just looks a little odd.
  • 3 0
 Most importantly, TRPs don't have a wandering bite point.
  • 3 0
 TRP > SRAM and TRP ≥ Shimano. TRP brakes have been on every bike I've owned in the last 3 years. Literally, get the bike, FB Marketplace the brakes they come with and put TRPs on.

What I would say is the TRP's #1 asset is that they just work. No finicky anything - no rattling pads, no wandering bite point, no stuck seals, no "bleed them every week" issues. They manage to just work while also being more than powerful enough with modulation for days.
  • 2 0
 there have been a few podcasts with them. as a reeb owner, I always like to hear what they have to say; sort of like listening to what Neko has to say on bike design, they are a bit more transparent about the design process. I really liked the pocast with prosise on the build bikes podcast
  • 2 0
 @CycleKrieg: I hear nothing but good things about TRPs and I am stoked they're now showing up as OEM equipment on some bikes.
  • 2 0
 But... "I would like the reach adjustment to let them sit a bit closer to the grips for smaller hands." this 1000%
  • 1 0
 @phalley: I bought aftermarket levers for my dhr Evo to get the closer. Which is dumb because they are the same lever blades as the slate. They just need to thread the adjustment screw more.
  • 1 0
 @CycleKrieg: I got some dhr evos to replace code rscs. Best brakes I'd ever tried. Until I got some formula cura 4s and put them on my other bike. 1/3 the price for formula, and they ate much more powerful, but still also have better modulation. Now I wish I'd saved my money and got two sets of formulas.

The trp does have better lever shape and adjustments, but otherwise the formula are just better. I don't know yet about long term durability, but I'm gonna out some MTX pads in the trps and hope that brings them up to par with the formulas.
  • 5 0
 I totally dig the cable routing, not through the headset, it's externally except for the dropper post cable. Great!!!!!
  • 4 2
 I love everything about this bike, but damn!, 10 grand for a steel framed bike? And 6500 for the “budget” model is far from affordable. If made in Colorado is the important factor here, then Guerrilla Gravity might be a better option?
  • 2 0
 "This very SST was originally supposed to be included in the downcountry Field Test from Quebec, but our bike accidentally shipped to us with pre-production prototype 3D-printed frame components that were never intended to leave Reeb's HQ or even be ridden, so we had to wait for a production-spec rear-end to arrive from Colorado."

Glad to hear there was a better outcome this time than when Pole allegedly made a similar mistake.
  • 2 0
 Saw this and was very much reminded of the Cotic Flaremax. I think the Cotic is lighter than the Reeb. Pinkbike did a great review of the Flaremax. Don't think Reeb are available in the UK.
Good to see all manufacturers aren't following the same route.

I have owned alloy and carbon FS and I was sceptical about steel FS bikes. All I can say is that I enjoyed test rides on the Flaremax and Jeht and intend to buy a Cotic next year. (new colours?)
  • 7 2
 I just like Reeb cause it's Beer spelled backwards
  • 11 0
 As a frenchy, I would have preferred a bike named Eniw, but unfortunately it doesn't exist (yet).
  • 7 1
 Gorgeous*
  • 7 0
 Also "Hort link"
  • 10 0
 But a great read nonetheless. After the CT layoffs I'm not complaining about quality editorial content on PB
  • 2 1
 @TEAM-ROBOT: It's missing a pivot on the chainstay to be a real horstlink, no? I mean, it's got the little flexy bit, but it's basically a single pivot - not that that's a bad thing.
  • 3 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: Have you seen how little a bearing actually moves on a Horst pivot? The flex point they have engineered is in the Horst zone and does the job just fine. If they had relied on the seat stay to flex over it's full length like most of the XC bikes it would be a single pivot faux bar.

The geometry of the rocker and it's pivot locations has a big affect on how much the Horst or Faux bar rear pivot has to rotate. You will see that most of the flex pivot bikes have a similar shape to the rocker to further reduce the amount of rotation needed.
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: from the article:

"While it looks like a single-pivot layout, the chainstays sport a flattened section just ahead of the axle that's intended to mimic how a Horst Link functions but without the extra bearings and pivot hardware that you'd usually see here"
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: The link actually pivots and, somewhat interestingly, has some preload to it. When the frame arrives, you actually have to sorta pull the link up to put load on the stays to install the shock, so they do actually flex enough to have some effect.
  • 1 0
 @shinook: ok x 2 hahah. If the flex in that stay is as good or similar enough to a traditional horst link kinda makes me wonder why more companies don't do it - maybe the reliance on aluminum for a long time?
  • 1 1
 @jesse-effing-edwards: yeah you definitely wouldn't want to do this to aluminum and I think we are seeing more and more companies do this in their carbon fiber frames.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: So far it seems like more of an XC application where there is less movement. Big fan of simplicity if it works as well.
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: Nah, the flex pivot thing has been done in aluminium successfully. EG: Alloy-version of the Scott Spark, previous gen and current gen both had flex pivots and they've been just fine.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: Thanks for the correction. I would have thought that version of the Spark was a linkage-driven single pivot and not a 4-bar layout
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Well it is a linkage-driven single pivot system, but it also utilizes a flex "pivot".

Usually on these "faux bar" type systems, there would be a pivot somewhere along the seatstay above the rear axle (as an example see Kona Process 153). The Scott Spark doesn't have that pivot. Instead, the seat stays can flex slightly upwards. But they only do it by a couple degrees. It's so few degrees of movement that you won't visually notice it.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: Is the pivot (or flex) being on the seat stay (old Spark, Process7u) vs chain stay (old Specializeds, this bike) the determining factor here?
  • 6 3
 That REEB is almost as light as a $10k carbon fiber Yeti 120. Might have to go for custom paint to get that Dental White finish though.
  • 1 0
 Seems like a neat bike-and well made. But....I'd love to see a comparison with the Sqweeb V4 with both travel options. Pretty sure the Sqweeb weights about the same with an air shock, geometry is similar, and pedaling efficiency is about the same too.......
  • 4 0
 As a sqweeb owner myself, I do say the SST is hands down the sexier bike.
  • 2 0
 @adrennan: SST is tidier looking, but I'm more concerned with performance. Why buy a short travel bike when the longer travel equivalent weighs the same, pedals the same, and descends better?
  • 11 0
 I have both, a SST and a Sqweeb v4 @ 150mm in the rear.

They are both great, but I have them build entirely differently. The Sqweeb has a heavier coil shock, burlier fork @ 170, inserts, heavier wheels, and slower tires. I built it out like a big bike and it rides like that. I have my SST built out probably burlier than most with a DBCoil IL, Lyrik, Dominion A4s, I9 Enduro wheels, and some other heavier components. My Sqweeb is within a 2-3lb difference of the SST based on my scale.

I admittedly haven't tried the Sqweeb in the 130mm setting, so I can't compare there, but I feel like with the Sqweeb you have a much more planted feel than with the SST. The SST always feels pretty composed even in really rough chunky stuff, it continues to track well, but it transmits more feedback to the rider. It's also more lively riding and takes rider input better than the Sqweeb does IMO. Both track well, but if you are barreling into some really rough rocky or rooted sections, the Sqweeb is more planted and comfortable than the SST is. I feel like the SST pedals more responsively than the Sqweeb does, but that could be because of the tires/wheels/inserts that are different between the bikes.

I think the way to look at it is that the Sqweeb can size up and the SST can size down. You can make the SST a more "downcountry"-esque bike with XC tires, Pike, inline shock, etc and it take it well, but you can't really do that with the Sqweeb. You can also run it into the aggressive trailbike category with a Lyrik/Coil/etc. The Sqweeb can run a 170 fork, 150 rear end, or it can run in the same category as the SST with 130 rear and aggressive trailbike components. Both can be trailbikes, but they lean away from each other depending on how you build it out from there.
  • 1 0
 I'd like to see the Squeeb adopt some of the styling details of the SST. Love those straight tubes, and something similar could be done ala Nicolai (even the gussets are similar). I remember the Squeeb V1 actually had straighter tubes but they revised it with more curvy tubes later.

Bikes look same damn good with straight tubes and seat stays that line up with the top tubes.
  • 6 1
 Proof read your articles, good lord.
  • 1 1
 @mikelevy - Typo in the first paragraph under "Frame Details", it should read flip-chip, but instead says flip-ship. Under the photo of the non drive side rear end (right above the "Suspension Design" heading) it should read Horst Link, not Hort Link.
  • 2 0
 No-nonsense everyday trail bike. Cept for the price Big Grin . I appreciate it's origin and design though - I hope more companies find ways to bring manufacturing back into their home countries.
  • 2 1
 @mike Levy - Typo in the first paragraph under "Frame Details", it should read flip-chip, but instead says flip-ship. Under the photo of the non drive side rear end (right above the "Suspension Design" heading) it should read Horst Link, not Hort Link.
  • 1 0
 Levy, that is one stunning bike, material, travel, and color. You are the expert impossible climb climber and I disagree that pedal strikes are rider error as you are so readily willing to take the blame for poor geo decisions in the engineering and marketing depts. An article on PB proved the miniscule CG improvements with low low BB's amount to nothing. Pedals on the floor kill it for me, I'd send it back to the engineers with a note, Fix It.
  • 2 0
 I disagree with his assessment of this, I ride in pretty rooty terrain and don't have this problem with my SST at all.
  • 1 0
 "Do you know why street tacos from a dirty food truck are always more delicious than those overpriced and over-stuffed designer tacos from a snooty restaurant?"

The answer is that they aren't. But some people feel so much cooler and more interesting buying food from a truck than from a restaurant that their memory of the flavours is warped. Most people are quite literally more interested in what other people believe about them (and their food choices) than what they themselves think. And this causes them to do silly things like buy lower quality food (and bicycles) than they could do. And then genuinely believe that they must be enjoying it more than they think.

You should stop caring about other peoples perceptions of the choices you make. Don't buy a bike that you think will make you look cool. Buy a bike that will give you the most enjoyment on the trail, even if you wrapped the whole thing in a sheet and couldn't see it. Even if you rattle canned the whole thing brown and sharpied out all the logos. Your own enjoyment is more important than the enjoyment you fake on instagram.
  • 6 1
 Iron Horse MKIII?
  • 1 1
 That's what the linkage reminded me of, well done Big Grin
  • 3 0
 Lovely bike. Function and fashion. Good job reeb! It’s nice that not all bikes have dh geometry.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy cheese on tacos?
  • 1 0
 Cojita, yum...
  • 1 0
 TRP's brakes are quickly becoming some of my favorites due to their power and non-stop consistency. Non-stop consistency is probably not the greatest thing to say about brakes.
  • 4 0
 What a beauty, these are the kind of bikes I like reviews on.
  • 2 0
 This would be a brilliant short travel Enduro, if that's your thing. It has the geo and suspension layout of a Spur, with a more fork and shock options and the feel of steel.
  • 2 2
 I mean yeah, but only if you're REALLY into steel. Otherwise, there's better options geometry-wise for a "mini-Enduro". Think Norco Optic, Norco Fluid, Santa Cruz Tallboy, Propain Hugene, Canyon Spectral 125. All of those are less expensive too.
  • 2 0
 @Muscovir: None of those are MUSA or have any of the soul the REEB does...
  • 1 3
 @therealmancub: "Soul" lol. I like the Reeb SST a lot, but that's a bit ridiculous, don't you think.

Also I'm sorry to be that guy, but as a European, I don't really care about "made in the US". I see why it is important to you, but for all I care the Reeb could have been made on the moon.
  • 3 0
 DREAM BIKE!! I've been waiting for this review for my next steed and I'm beyond stoked!!
  • 6 7
 New Poll:

Who lines the valve up with the tyre brand logo and who lines it up with the tyre model logo?

New Question,

Would it be a great idea for wheel makers to make two holes in the rim for two valves to make the OCD of both poll takers sorted?

New Fact:

This way you can have one valve thats all bunged up with sealant and one working..
  • 5 0
 Go grab a drill and add yourself an additional valve hole. I'd suggest adding two 90 degrees away from the original valve hole, that way you don't just drill through the rim seam. Then you can have three valves per wheel, or just cover over the original one with rim tape
  • 1 0
 @vtracer: You're on to a winner there, might I suggest four valves for perfect balance of the wheels otherwise the bike would be wandering all over the place.
  • 1 0
 Some manufacturers only have the brand logo on both sides, so line it up with the brand logo to find it quickly while racing in case of a flat, that’s always been my justification anyway. I’ve had to remind myself countless times to look for the logo rather than the valve stem.
  • 2 0
 @mrift04: Yes, but the forth must be off by a single spoke to bother OCD people
  • 2 0
 Long time bike shop tech, here. I pick a label and install the tire. 99.9% of customers never notice, so being picky is a waste of time. I just want the .1% of the population who does to see a label near the valve.
  • 1 0
 @vtracer: Na na, I think I can drill through the weld/joint, has to be a valve every 90 degrees, maybe even one at every spacer between spokes?
  • 2 0
 Max pressure info is the correct way fyi Wink
  • 3 0
 @ThomDawley: I can get there very quickly if I have four pumps of all four valves...
  • 6 0
 Lined up in between the 2 X's on MAXXIS, as they only put the model on one sidewall.
  • 4 0
 New game, four valves on one wheel. Setup tubeless (maybe no sealant though)

Four players each with one track pump attached to each valve

Each person gets one pump at a time

Person that ends up blowing the tyre off the rim looses
  • 2 0
 I do recall my friend who's been a wrench for 30yrs said you did/do that with tubes to better track down punctures. As well he said back in the day tires used to put labels on one side only to assist proper install direction along with the arrow. He actually had a customers bike recently with OG Holly Rollers with old style labels and only on one side. On a side note, holly roller on the rear with a knoby on the front is hands down a good time, ran dual Holly rollers for years on my SS HT. Not a faster rolling tire out there and it really teaches you how to find traction and be nimble with your weight movement. I was regularly faster then most on trail rides and never felt a need for more tire. Granted most of my riding was done in limestone quarries and sand with roots and pine needles so there was either lots of traction or almost none regardless of tire.
  • 2 0
 Saw these running around Outerbike Moab. Definitely one of the most eye catching bikes out there.
  • 2 0
 Rode one there (in XL), and generally agree with the review. Fantastic bike, great traction, and QUIET. Nicest crew to talk to, too.
  • 2 0
 @32x20: Does it still climb well with such sort chainstays and long front end on XL? Would have thought it will be unbalanced.... I reckon the review of bike with short, one sized chainstays would be way different on XL than on M frame. Wonder if Seb being 6'3 had same impressions as Mike
  • 2 0
 @gooral: I seem to get on with longer bikes with short stays, so not sure I’m really qualified to answer. This and the big CBF bikes (Canfield Lithium and Revel Rail29) were the standouts at outerbike for me, and they’re all in the shorter chainstay/long front-center realm.

The difference between this and the bigger bikes was not huge. Still wish @prosauce would weld one up with another inch of travel.
  • 4 0
 Beautiful work of art.
  • 3 0
 Is the SST named after SST Records? I like to think so.
  • 2 0
 @stevemokan: My SST is in fact named after the Descendents. I call it I don’t wanna grow up.
  • 4 0
 More likely Steel Short Travel, but I like your style.
  • 2 0
 In coming cease and desist from Greg Ginn any day now.
  • 2 0
 Marino review one day? At least with Made in Peru, it's a little bit more affordable.
  • 3 4
 But then it won't be made in USA, which is for some reason, judging from comments, apparently a good thing...
  • 1 1
 I wish Marino would do a flex-stay vertical shock linkage driven bike. I just can't get on with the crude look of a single pivot without a link. Even here in the USA we've got Ferrum bikes that does a steel single pivot and I still can't get on with those farm-gate looks. The Reeb SST and Swarf 130/155 are sooo much cleaner looking by comparison. Marino still deserves credit for custom hardtails though. Still need to have them make a cheaper plus-sized compatible version of the Destroyer 650b.
  • 3 2
 "It's the antithesis of the Scott Genius, isn't it?"

Despite all its proprietary bits, at least a Genius still takes a standard size shock!
  • 4 0
 This does take a standard size shock though? 185x50 is a very common metric-standard size. Just a 185x55 with a 5 mm spacer.

I love the new Genius, but ironically it actually doesn't come with a "standard" shock. It may be a standard 185 mm eye-to-eye length, but the shock itself is anything but standard. The NUDE technology is fully proprietary to Scott.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: The article says 180x55.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: The SST uses a very standard 185x50 shock. It does not say 180x55 anywhere.
  • 2 0
 think i’d be more interested in ns bikes made a full sus using their surge evo setup. tho probably wouldn’t sell
  • 1 0
 Steel, beautifully clean lines, progressive geometry, single-pivot swingarm, just enough suspension travel, radiates nostalgia - I love everything about this.
  • 1 0
 Sharp bike. I've got a white SST frame set for sale on the pink bike buysell! Built for a show bike, now it needs a good home. Check it out in the trail frames section!
  • 2 0
 Man that’s clean looking, nice job!
  • 2 0
 Reeb spelt backwards is "Beer" for those that like useless information.
  • 2 0
 Always love me a Levy review.
  • 1 0
 I love it, but would swap those alu Industry9 wheels for something in half price and upgrade the suspension instead
  • 1 0
 We sell LOTS of custom bikes... anything is possible!
  • 1 0
 @jeff-lenosky: Good to know! Thanks Jeff, it really looks fun to ride even from picture
  • 1 0
 A short travel bikes that is better on Chunk and Smooth trails? Sounds like my kinda XC bike.
  • 1 0
 Is this the same premise as a Swarf Contour/155 but with flattened chainstays rather than seatstays?
  • 1 0
 The paint job reminds me of one Gary Fisher bike from way back, but this one is even more fetching
  • 1 0
 The sst is one of the most exciting FS bikes I've ridden in a while. Bravo REEB.
  • 1 0
 All that talk about hangovers in a bike that is beer spelled backwards
  • 1 1
 Is smooth terrain not part of well rounded anymore? Frown Bike is cool, i'd like to hang one on the wall and look at it.
  • 3 0
 Smooth terrain, gravel bike.
  • 2 2
 And another bike I’ll drool over, then go buy a dirt bike with the same money.
  • 1 0
 Day 1 of asking for a PB Staff Trail Dog Check video
  • 1 0
 That's a thing of beauty. Love it.
  • 2 0
 I want this bicycle.
  • 1 0
 Yes! A proper mountainbike!
  • 1 0
 That is a thing of beauty. Take my money
  • 1 0
 So is 27 around anymore? Does everyone want 29” or what
  • 2 0
 Beautiful bike!!
  • 1 1
 Steel bikes are like vintage-spec guitars: They were good then because you didn't have a choice.
  • 1 1
 Thanks but I'm good, I already have a Transition Smuggler. It's carbon, came with a shock and still cost less.
  • 1 0
 Love it!
  • 1 0
 SST can rip SST?
  • 1 0
 A modern flux.
  • 1 0
 Cheese on a taco?
  • 8 9
 Oh look! A steel Norco Optic
  • 2 0
 I mean yeah, granted, everybody and their granny now tries to make some sort of copy of the Norco Optic - but for a good reason. It's a great bike and a formula worth copying. If it makes for more amazing bikes; copy away!

And since this is steel, it will definitley scratch the itch for some people, for whom a carbon bike just wouldn't do the trick.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: It used to be the Transition Smuggler everyone was copying the geometry of. I'd suspect the Optic was just an evolution of that anyway (and was the Smuggler inspired by the Process 111?).
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: Wouldn't say so. IMO the Optic marks a distinct point of transition from old-school to new-school. The Smuggler was significantly shorter in reach and wheelbase, had lower stack, a shorter rear end, a taller seat tube, slacker seat tube angle, steeper head angle and was overall a bit more poppy instead of burly.

So the Optic is significantly different from the Smuggler, where as most 120-130mm trail bikes that came out after the Optic are more or less the same geometry-wise, even 3 years later.

Nevertheless I'd love to see Transition come out with a new version of the Smuggler. The more great bikes the better.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: The gen 2 Smuggler (the carbon one) was launched a year before the Optic I believe, and had pretty similar geometry (1 deg steeper HA at 66deg).
Personally I had a mk1 Smuggler with slackset and offset bushings, it was rather more planted than poppy.
I do agree the Optic seems to have become the template for the modern short-travel shred sled though. Possibly my favourite genre of bike.
  • 4 5
 Looks flexy
  • 11 0
 You misspelled sexy
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