1up USA Quik Rack - Review

Apr 4, 2017 at 12:55
by Mike Levy  
1up USA Quik Rack


1up USA is a relatively small company that manufactures their bike racks, as well as cargo carriers, trainers, and rollers, in their Wisconsin headquarters. Unlike the very large majority of tray-stay racks out there that employ a single adjustable arm that cinches down over your bike's front wheel, their Quik Rack makes use of two arms, one at each end, that fold down over each wheel. The arms only contact the tires - there is zero metal-on-metal touching – and the rack folds both up and down to allow access to your trunk.

1up USA sells single-bike (1 1/4'' and 2'') and two-bike (2'' only) racks, as well as add-ons and burly 'Super Duty' models, but it's their standard two-bike, $529 USD Quik Rack that's reviewed below.

Quik Rack Details

• Contact w/ only your bike's tires
• Carries two bikes (+2 add-on available)
• 2'' hitch bar
• Aluminum construction
• Expanding wobble-free hitch system
• Anti-theft expander bolt
• Compatible w/ 16'' to 29'' wheels, up to a 52'' wheelbase
• Compatible w/ up to 3.125'' tires
• Weight: 48lbs
• Made in the U.S.A.
• MSRP: $529 USD
www.1up-usa.com


1up USA Quik Rack
Ratcheting arms close down over both the front and rear wheels.
1up USA Quik Rack
The arms come down over the wheels, and the coupler squeezes down onto the tires.


Construction and Design

A normal tray-style rack features one adjustable arm that grabs your bike's front tire up against the fork, as well as a wheel strap to hold the back-end on the tray. Sure, some companies do this a bit differently, but Thule, Yakima, Küat, et al. pretty much follow a similar recipe. 1up USA does not, however. Instead, the Quik Rack employs symmetrical arms at the end of the trays that both go down over each wheel. They don't need to be up against, or even close to, your frame or fork, with the support coming from the arms encompassing about half of each wheel.

The arms also have a cross-section coupler that can be repositioned to better fit different wheel sizes, although this does require some tools to do, and a set of snap-on adapters grip pinner road bike tires as well. The rack can carry everything from kids bikes with 16'' wheels to rigs with massive 29+ rubber.


1up USA Quik Rack
Lift up on this red lever to re-position the arm.
1up USA Quik Rack
The linkage locks down onto these teeth to hold the arm in place.


A ratcheting linkage is used to re-position each arm and hold it in place, so the Quik Rack's arms actually lock into position whereas the single arms on other tray-style racks are held in place by them ratcheting down onto your bike's tire. To open the arms, you pull up on the anodized red lever that frees each arm to fold out; the bike goes onto the tray, and then both the left and right arms can be lowered down over the wheels (without needing to pull on the release levers) evenly. The arms can't open unless you pull the release lever, but you can cinch them down over the wheels more as required.

1up USA's choice to use two ratcheting arms rather than a single arm per bike, as well as having a slight height differential between the inner and outer trays, allows for one very important fact: you can easily keep multiple bikes from making contact with each other, without needing to lower seats or rotate handlebars or brake levers to prevent one bike from trying to beat the shit out of the one next to it like they're angry siblings strapped into the backseat during a long road trip.

Instead, it's as easy as using the dual arms to have one bike sit a little more to the left or right relative to its neighbor.
1up USA Quik Rack
The height differential between the trays, and the ability to stagger the bikes side to side, means that the Quik Rack only sticks out 24.5'' from the back of my hitch receiver when folded down.

This also means that 1up USA isn't forced to have a ton of room in between each tray, letting the two-bike version protrude a reasonable 24.5'' from the receiver (this will vary a bit depending on how deep the hitch bar is loaded into the receiver) when folded down, and just 9'' when folded up.


1up USA Quik Rack
  It sure looks sturdy.


The Quik Rack's aluminum frame consists of a bunch of different pieces all bolted together and attached to a burly looking hitch bar with a built-in expanding edge to hold it into your vehicle's receiver. The wedge is tightened by turning a monster-sized, theft-resistant hex bolt with the supplied hex key. It's not a lock, but the chances of a POS scumbag having a recessed hex key is slim to none, and the access to it is nearly completely hidden inside of the hitch bar. If you're really concerned (and it doesn't hurt to be), you can pick up 1up USA's locking hitch pin, as well as their separate wheel locks that run through the arm and between the spokes, both of which sell for a reasonable $19 USD. My test rack came with the latter but not the locking hitch pin, which is probably the setup that I'd recommend.


1up USA Quik Rack
It sticks out 24.5'' when folded down.
1up USA Quik Rack
And just 9'' when folded up.

1up USA Quik Rack
Pulling up on the spring-loaded black bar allows the rack to be folded up and down.
1up USA Quik Rack
1up USA uses a security hex bolt to tighten the rack into the receiver with an expanding wedge.


The Quik Rack folds up vertically, so it's out of the way when it isn't carrying your baby, down flat when it's loaded up, and also tipped down to allow access to your trunk or hatchback. A simple spring-loaded bar locks the rack into each position, and you only need to pull it up to let the rack rotate up or down.



Performance

The Quik Rack comes completely assembled – you just need to slide it into your car's receiver and fold it down – so there was zero chance for me to lose any bolts or tiny washers before I got everything set up. It cinches down with that aforementioned expanding wedge and security hex bolt/key, which takes all of thirty seconds, and 1up USA also includes a Velcro safety strap that you run over the rack and through the loop in your receiver assembly. The strap feels kinda hokey, especially given the entire package's sturdy construction, but it's probably a better fallback than nothing at all.


1up USA Quik Rack
  You can easily carry two bikes (or four if you have the bolt-on addition) on the Quik Rack without them making any contact whatsoever.


Here's a list of tasks that are more difficult than loading two bikes onto the Quik Rack: tying your shoes, making microwaveable oatmeal for dinner, putting on a pair of pants. You get it the idea. Lift the red levers to let the arms be folded out like wings, then put the bike on the tray and snug each arm down over the tire. If the bike is in the middle of the rack and the arms are brought down an equal distance, the bike will sit dead center behind your car.

If you want to stagger the bike to the left or right to prevent contact with its neighbor, which seems to be the bane of so many other designs on the market, you simply don't fold out one arm as much as the other so that the bike sits off-center. I've had at least six different types of bikes on the rack and had zero issues with any of them touching so long as I used the arms to stagger them off-center, regardless of frame size or bike type.

When you get to the mountain, lifting up on just one of the red levers to let a single arm rotate out of the way – you don't need to back both of them off to get your bike – and it's free. You do need to hold the release lever up throughout the entirety of the arm's travel.
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Keeping the bikes from touching is pointless if they fall off the rack on the way to the mountain, but I don't think that could ever happen when it comes to the Quik Rack. I mean, you'd have to really mess up the loading; like, actually forget to clamp one of the wheels with an arm, to have a bike eject at any point. And the bikes also feel pretty solid once they're on the rack due to the arms holding both the front and rear wheels, whereas a more traditional rack only grabs the front wheel.

The expanding hitch did back off a bit just once after about a month of use, but I suspect that this was everything settling in – it never happened again.
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The Quik Rack has been completely trouble-free while I've had it attached to the back of my derelict van that's probably worth less than the rack. I'll be honest, though: with so many separate pieces and so much hardware holding it all together, I expected something or other to rattle loose, or maybe the aluminum teeth on the ratcheting system to wear down to nubs and not hold the arms in place. None of that has happened yet, though, despite months and months of use during what has to be the worst winter that I can remember. This thing looks like it'll last forever.



Thule T2 Pro review test
Thule's T2 Pro
Kuat NV 2.0 review
The Kuat NV 2.0


Quik Rack vs T2 Pro vs NV 2.0

Let's compare 1up USA's standard two-bike setup to two other racks, both of which are surely more commonly seen and that we've recently reviewed: Thule's T2 Pro that I tested in November of last year, and Küat's NV 2.0 that was reviewed by Mike Kazimer this past January. At $529 USD, the Quik Rack is surprisingly the least expensive of the three, despite it being manufactured in the USA, with the T2 Pro costing about $20 more. At $629.00 USD, the Küat is by far the priciest of the group, although that does include the NV 2.0's nifty built-in repair stand (pictured below).

A single-bike add-on for the Quik Rack costs a hefty $199, although the two-bike add-on for the T2 Pro is $399.95, so they're both the same. The two-bike extension for the NV 2.0 is $429.00, again making the Küat the more expensive setup overall.

Both the NV 2.0 and the T2 Pro feature integrated cable locks that extend out from the rack itself, whereas the Quik Rack makes use of standalone locks that have to be purchased separately from 1up USA for $19 each and run through the folding arms to lock only the wheel or wheels to the rack. Best to pick up a cable lock for the Quik Rack.
Kuat NV 2.0 review
The NV 2.0 is expensive, but it includes a built-in repair stand.
All three racks do the same job, sure, but there's a clear winner in my mind.

The T2 Pro is a high-end unit, but the ratcheting arm (pictured to the right) that I used most often felt loose and rattle-y after awhile, and you're likely going to have some handlebar-to-seat contact if you don't slide the trays laterally to create more clearance between the bikes. A good rack, but not trouble-free, then. Kazimer clearly liked the NV 2.0 a lot and had no real issues with it but, at least to me, it doesn't appear to be as bomb-proof as the Quik Rack, and it costs $100 USD more.

If I'm buying one of those three, it's going to be the Quik Rack.
Thule T2 Pro review test
The T2 Pro's ratcheting arm became loose and rattle-y after awhile.



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Issues

The Quik Rack is probably the most secure and easiest to use rack that I've ever had, with one somewhat annoying exception. The spring-loaded release bar that needs to be depressed to fold the rack up or down is kinda of a pain in the ass to use, especially because the rack's pivots are still quite stiff despite months and months of use throughout a whole lot of terrible weather. That in itself is a good thing – I'd rather it be stiff than loose and full of rattles – but having to reach up and over the rack to pull the bar, combined with the stiff pivots, makes it feel a bit awkward. Also, the release bar will often only disengage the detents on one side, even when I grab it smack dead in the middle.




Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Quik Rack isn't quite perfect, but it's damn close. Not only is it less expensive than its direct competitors, but it's also easier to use when carrying more than just a single bike and it's more robust. Yes, $529 USD is a lot of money no matter how you slice it, but 1up USA is producing the best rack on the market for that price. - Mike Levy






Must Read This Week

261 Comments

  • + 51
 where have I heard this name before?
  • + 72
 If you add 6 to the name you might have your answer.
  • - 37
flag darkmuncan (Apr 6, 2017 at 5:11) (Below Threshold)
 OneUp Components...

www.oneupcomponents.com
  • + 52
 @darkmuncan: Thanks, Cpt. Obvious!
  • + 34
 I've had a 1up bike rack for around 10 years, before OneUp Components were really a thing. I actually thought the opposite when OneUp came around. I can't believe we're just now seeing a review on these. It's hands down the best bike rack I've ever owned. All aluminum, no steel to rust, easy to use, tilts down, expander bolt eliminates play in hitch, plus you can run only one tray when it's just you. It folds up tight against the bumper when not in use, allowing the tailgate to be accessible without even moving it. I got a second one when they came out with black to match my black Jeep, but the first one was sold on Craigslist in like-new condition after like 7 years.
  • + 7
 Here are some pics of the black version running single tray. Note I can use my tailgate without ever moving the rack in this config, and I have a second tray I can add on when needed.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/14585591

www.pinkbike.com/photo/14585590

One of my old one at around 7 years old:
www.pinkbike.com/photo/14585646
  • + 3
 @BaeckerX1: I LOVE my 1up-- it's so damn well built it's even acted as a bumper several times unscathed!
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: Did you buy just a single tray, then add another tray to it as an extension? Or do you buy the 2 tray, and remove one?
  • + 1
 @Kichu182: I bought the single tray plus an add-on. If you buy the 2 tray, you're stuck with 2 trays always. You can't separate them. I bought the Super Duty single since I do a lot of offroading with it, but there are a couple single versions. Super Duty is more expensive, as is the black anodizing.

Super Duty Single (Only works with 2" receivers):
www.1upusa.com/product-SDquikrackblack.html
www.1upusa.com/product-SDquikracksilver.html

Regular Single (Works with 1 1/4" and 2" receivers via removable adapter block):
www.1upusa.com/product-quikrackblack.html
www.1upusa.com/product-quikracksilver.html
  • + 6
 @BaeckerX1: I've had one for about 3 years now. The release bar can be annoying, but after a few months of use you should know its nuances pretty well. Usually, the problem is binding so you just need to move the rack on it's pivot point back or forward and the release bar will free up. Another option would be to grease the grooves that it sits in.

Despite that one "issue" it's still the best rack I've used and is still faster to load/unload and is more secure than any other rack I'm aware of.
  • + 2
 @Kichu182: The downside of the single is you can only extend to three trays. Having two trays on at all times has never been an issue for me. The rack is marginally heavier but worth the versatility of being able to pack 4 bikes.
  • + 2
 @BaeckerX1: same reason i bought a 1Up last year. 99.9% of the time I am carrying a bike, I am just carrying one and the ability to leave the rack on and not mess with it if i need to open my trunk is a massive feature. i had a Kuat that i returned becuase in the 2 days i had it, it annoyed me to lower the tray 6 inches every time i needed to access my trunk.

I agree with the one negative that the springloaded mechanism is kind of a pain to deal with. I wish they would use some kind of lever like Kuat does. but thats a small quibble. Overall the rack is bombproof. Looks great. Super easy to load and unload and when im not using, it stays out of the way i basically leave it on 24/7 with a Master lock inserted into the hole where the hex security bolt is accessed.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/14586244
www.pinkbike.com/photo/14586243
  • + 2
 @dbendixen: I don't really consider it an issue, just takes a little arm strength at times. I could probably do something to make mine easier to pull the release bar, as well as swivel up and down, but I get some piece of mind from how securely it locks into that slot and never felt the need to.
  • + 2
 @dbendixen: I have the Kuat Vagabond X on the roof. I'm not a fan of having 4 bikes that far out from the back of my vehicle. That's me personally. If I'm carrying 4, it's 2 on the back, 2 on the roof. Smile
  • + 2
 @BaeckerX1: agreed. have had mine goin on 8yrs. zero issues.
  • + 1
 "make 1 up yours"
  • + 2
 @BaeckerX1: I came to the comments to share how amazing this rack is but clearly, that's been taken care of.

I run the regular 2-rack version with two additional trays when I'm with the family (1/2" wrench allows for a quick change to fit my son's 16" wheels). I also have the Quick Rack Adaptor that allows additional trays to be mounted on a different vehicle...2 racks in one. And it can accommodate fat bikes with a kit. And they sell a slick storage mount for the garage.
  • + 1
 @kboss: Storage mount? Garage you say? Ooooh. I didn't know about that. I need to look into that. Thanks!
  • + 36
 The 1up racks have gradually taken over in my riding group. As other racks wear out, they are inevitably replaced with some version of the 1up system. They sell themselves. Look great, solid aluminum construction that doesnt rust or fade or weather, and ridiculously easy to use. Highly recommend to anyone looking for a rack. It'll be the last one you buy. You wont be disappointed.
  • + 17
 This. Same story over here. In my riding group, we disagree on suspension kinematics, wheel size, tire pressure, and politics. However, everyone agrees on the 1upUSA bike rack. Best bike purchase that isn't a bike.
  • + 6
 Absolutely agree! Buy 1up - buy once.

Buy thule, yakima, Kuat, etc: you might as well budget spending an extra $600 every 3 years because the plastic will get brittle, the steel will rust, and the thing will fall apart.
  • + 7
 I went looking to find a used one, and they're almost impossible to find. I think that speaks volumes about their longevity and desirability. Got one a couple years ago, and couldn't be happier with it. Doesn't rust to pieces like much of the competition, and the 1-bike unit is super light so I can leave it on the car without worrying about my wimpy little hitch.
  • + 1
 @jaydubmah: Really, man how is my T2 still holding up after so many years?

I get you like the 1up, but don't make shit up. No one pays MSRP for one either.
  • + 2
 Best rack ever, I have one that holds up 1-4 depending on how you set it up and it's been going strong for years now! Such solid construction and maintenance-free reliability
  • + 2
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: With all due respect, that's great that your T2 is still going strong.

But where I live in Western Canada, we put racks through their paces 'cause of the weather. Our roads are salted heavily, lots of snow, rain, etc - so it's a reality that traditional steel / powdercoat racks crap out.

My friend's T2 lasted... 3 years.
  • + 1
 No matter what bike I have on my rack, the rack always steals the show. I couldn't be happier with mine after 3 years of use with zero issues. And the 1 1/4" single rail was a big selling point for me for my hatch. I have an add on rail that I use when needed.
  • + 1
 Do you know if a road bike with 25c tires would fit in? Would I need an adapter or something?
  • + 1
 @Jo-rides: It will work just fine with those tires.
  • + 2
 This reminds me of what made in USA products used to be: ugly but well engineered and reliable. A shame this isn't the case for many American things nowadays.
  • + 12
 Mike Levy, have you played with the speing tension for the black position bar? Getting that dialed helps immensly. Too much tension and it won't depress enough or be very challenging to get both sides released at once. My quick rack have been mounted on one of our vehicles almost constantly for 4+ years and shows little to any weathering after 4 Colorado winters and 300+days/year of sun.
  • + 1
 That's what I was going to say. That sleeve dials all the way down to lock it in or out to allow it bar to be compressed/depressed. I thought mine was broken as I could only get one side to release until I realized it just needed to back that sleeve off more.
  • + 4
 It will move if it's not in the full backed off position, too. ended up barely getting the rack to move once, scraping a bunch of annodization off the black bar, until I realize this. once I made sure it was snugly all the way in the backed off position, never happened again. That said, I wish 1up would come up with a foot lever, to the point that I've thought about coming up with one myself.
  • + 1
 double post
  • + 2
 Yup, I did thinker with the tension a bit. It just seemed a bit finicky overall. Not a big deal, but worth noting.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: where did my post go? somehow only the double post is left. Anyway, reach under from the bottom and pull the bar, much easier than trying to push it from the top. Also the 1.25 inch model can take more bikes, just needs the add-ons, and finally the best thing about this rack is that I can fold it up and stick it in the trunk of a golf with space to spare when not in use.
  • + 1
 I found a little bit of lube on the main bolts every few months lets this thing swivel with ease. Without that, it's a bit more of a pain to get it up/down.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Also, just so you know, no need to worry about the teeth on the slider wearing down. No issue after 2 seasons. The first gen sliders were smooth and didn't even have the indents at all, and the rack never slipped open or came loose. The little red levers held tension fine without any indents.
  • + 2
 @BaeckerX1: I actually asked them why they went to the toothed rails when my second tray showed up with them, & they said it was because of problems with one specific tire type.

I actually kinda wish I could just go with the smooth sliders: I never had an issue with loosening, & the little tension that you feel like you have to fight against to get the lever to pop up only started with the toothed ones.

Rack was quieter opening & closing too.
  • + 2
 My 1UP has some corrosion on it from mag chloride, specifically after coming home from a holiday visit in southern climates back to Ft. Collins during a pretty major storm in the Springs. Everything was covered with that brown ice we get and I notice washing the truck and rack that there was discoloration and some pitting that was starting. Point is being all aluminum means it won't rust in the rain but if you have it on in the winter here it's like alloy wheels or anything else aluminum, magnesium chloride will corrode it. FWIW, I've have mine now for about 6 years and it came with the smooth glider bars. I always struggled with keeping them tight, they can wiggle loose. You'll notice it when the bike is shifting left-to-right a little going down the highway. It doesn't seem likely that it would loosen up enough to lose a bike but still disconcerting. I replaced my original bars with the toothed ones to ease my mind.
  • + 1
 @Gunnar-Guy: Bingo. As soon as I saw the ratchet on this review, thought I need to get those. I haven't had any problems with the smooth, but would feel better with the revised glider.
  • + 10
 Bets bike rack for 1-3 bikes. I have had mine for 6 years and nothing has come loose. Some mild bolt corrosion in that time, but I suppose that salt will get to it when you leave the rack on the car for two years straight.... seriously the best rack out there.
  • + 8
 I'd like to see a review of that banger the rack is attached to. That....thing...looks like it has seen some sh*t. I bet those questionable bumper stickers are the only things keeping it in one piece. Is it even street legal!?
  • + 4
 It has seen some shit over the last decade that I've had her. Many, many road trips, and many more stories Wink
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: buddy imports them into BC from Japan if you ever want another.
  • + 8
 They also forgot to mention how it folds up when not on the vehicle. It folds up pretty small to stash away. I had a single on the roof and bought the hitch mount. I like the fact that I was able to add the roof mount to the hitch mount, and it's a 1 1/4". They don't recommend more then 2 bikes for that hitch.
  • + 4
 To be fair most racks for 1 1/4 don't reccomend more than 2 bikes
  • + 6
 They say the single is rated for 3 bikes at 50lbs each. I wouldn't be concerned to even run 4 occasionally because any bike I ride weighs about half that much.

www.1upusa.com/product-quikracksilver.html
  • + 6
 So I have a 1up on my roof rack and a second separated shoulder. It is the same tray as the hitch mount and the piece is sold separately. There's nothing to buzz or thwop, it is quiet. It is rock solid.I guess I'm installing a hitch.
  • + 6
 I have both the 2" and 1 1/4" for my vehicles going on 7 years now and I love this rack. Many of my buds have purchased these racks as well. I've seen many a Thule/Yak/Saris hitch rack rust and rattle out in a few years or less. This has not happened with the 1Up. I have had to replace some bits, but mostly due to me hitting things. Mike's review is spot on. Certainly not perfect but the best out there. There are some points I'd like to add.

The original 1 1/4 rack allowed for 4 bike trays. I've seen this rack and the newer one is actually burlier. I think he bumped it down to 3 supported because there was a lot of flex in the system with 4 bikes and you start pushing the Class1 tongue weight of 200 lbs. With the 2" rack and 4 bikes you still get some flex but it's more reasonable. I've had 4 DH bikes on some gnarly Jeep roads and I was more worried about my Jeep than the rack. One thing the pics don't show is each tray is higher off the ground as you get further out. So your much less likely to bottom the rack out when driving over humps. I cringe every time I see other racks with 4 bikes hit a bump and harshly bottom out the rack.

All parts are AL or Stainless steel, including the bolts, this is huge when living in a coastal area that loves to over-salt the roads in the winter, like I do. I leave my rack on year round and after 7 years very little corrosion/wear is showing. You do need to pull the rack out from time to time and grease the ball joint and the sleeve. I have had the rack rust into my car after I left it in for 3 years straight.

All parts are also replaceable and listed on their website. So if you back your car into something, like I have a couple of times, you can order the parts for reasonable $ and have it running brandy new. He's also made the rack backwards compatible with older racks so things like FatBike tray arms can be purchased and installed on any version of their rack.

Yes, it is very difficult to raise/drop the rack with bikes on it. It's not too bad with 1 or 2 bikes but 4 is kind of crazy. You are talking close to 200 lbs. of rack and bikes your moving and it can be done solo, but not very easily. You do need to check the hitch bolt from time to time. I have had mine loosen up. Other than that the rack rocks!
  • + 3
 I had the 1 1/4 which adapted to a 2". Worked great for 2 years of three downhill bikes and then cracked at the weld. 1up has a lifetime warranty and after a quick call and sending a photo, they replaced it.

For three or less bikes the 1up rocks. For more than three, I love my Recon Rack.
  • + 5
 I have one that replaced a Kuat after I got rear-ended (thanks Kuat for saving my truck!) and love it. However if you are concerned about security there is one design flaw: the trays that the bikes sit on are mounted to the main piece with two simple bolts/nuts. Of course you;d have to have a pickup or something to throw the bike into after (if it was locked to the ratchet arms), but with a cordless driver and socket I could probably have the tray off a rack in about 5 seconds.
  • + 1
 Or just let the site or of the tires. Pretty much any wheel friction mount rack is victim to an effortless theft if there is no cable lock by just deflating the tires and giving a tug.
  • + 1
 Correction: let the air out, not site
  • + 6
 There was a sweet Volvo S70 wagon with one of these racks on the back of it in my neighborhood. The absolute zenith of industrial design. Needs a raw banshee on it and bobs your uncle.
  • + 3
 I've got a one up and a banshee but it's not raw....yet
  • + 7
 I want one of these, but unsure about starting over with a new sticker collection. Got some pretty rad stuff on my existing rack.
  • + 3
 These are the best tray-style racks. My wife has had a single model on for about four years and it still looks brand new. No janky plastic used anywhere. If you're carrying more than 2 bikes, a vertical North Shore style rack is the way to go IMO. But, for 1-2 bikes or for use on a car, 1up is the ticket.
  • + 2
 my only issue with the north shore racks is that they don't play well with certain bikes, like my spartan. big lower headset cups are a problem.
  • + 2
 I've had one of these for about a year on my 2016 Outback. I primarily bought it because it's the only rack that I can keep on my car full time and still open the hatch without touching the rack, provided only one attachment is on the car. It's really convenient and saves the car when someone inevitably sits on the remote and pops the hatch open.

Something else worth pointing out is that stacking the attachments higher away from the car also prevents the rack from hitting the ground. I've had long racks before (more later) that, when you backed out of a driveway that had any grade to it, the rack would scrape the ground. By raising the attachments further from the base, it prevents the rack from hitting the ground.

I found it to be really secure, the only "problem" I have is that, similar to this review, the retaining bolt backs out over time. I've had this with every rack I've used and I think it has to do with the rack moving around, along with temperature fluctuations causing it to loosen a bit. The rack itself never gets loose, but I always check it before going on a long drive or about once a month.

I went from a Kuat Transfer, which I had really bad experiences with. The rack constantly came loose in the hitch and would rattle around all over the place, one time I swear my bars came within an inch of my rear window. Even when everything was tightened, the rack still moved a fair amount and shook around like crazy. It also sagged under load whenever more than 2 bikes were on it, the rack sagged towards the ground. I scraped it a few times backing up with bikes on the rack, as a result. Granted, the Transfer was much less expensive, but this is one of those things that the investment justifies the benefits, I figured the $500 was a small price to pay compared to what someone opening the hatch into the rack would do to my car.
  • + 2
 Although these racks aren't as nice, BNB racks are really cheap and do the job. Where i work(Royal Distributing) sells them for $99 canadian. Pretty strong racks too. They're called the tailgater pro hitch mount and the stabilizer platform hitch mount.

The tailgator does 4 bikes and the stabilizer does 2 but they also sell the extension to go up to 4 bikes for $30 bucks.
  • + 2
 Bought mine around Thanksgiving. Easy to use and completely bombproof...got rear ended two weeks ago (guessing 15-20 mph), rack smashed the center of the other cars bumper and came away with only tiny "bends" on the edge of two parts. Spent one minute filing down the edge...good as new! My car was untouched...the hitch mount slid further into the receiver also ( maybe absorbing some energy?). Also, mentioning the "difficulty" of the release lever...pull it from the outside, don't reach between the car and the rack to do it...Anyhow, I'm backin' it.
  • + 2
 I've had a 1up on my car since 2013, i rarely take it off the car so it's almost always in the elements. Still works as good as it did on day 1, though it is pretty filthy. The price is a bit high but it's worth it if you have a receiver on your car.
  • + 2
 The review sounds good and all but I'll stick to my North Shore Rack. The ease of loading it, having it tilt out of the way for the rear hatch, and it's solid AF! Yes you have to build it compared to this 1up but it only takes 30 min and a bit of grease. Plus, I feel like the ratchet teeth will wear down over a few years use.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy Hey, nice review but it should be noted that 1UP's NEW website is www.1up-USA.com. I only know because I just got off the phone with them looking for parts and the informed me that they have a new page. And yes the old site is still up... Probably why I didn't receive a reply from their contact form...
  • + 2
 I have the 1Up roof rack. It's definitely the best rack I've ever owned and seems bombproof, with three niggling complaints:
1. The wheelarms rattled a little at highway speeds when the rack was empty and closed, which apparently is a problem people complain about - that got annoying fast. 1Up folks did not have any solution for me, but I bought a $2 pack of small clear silicone pads from Home Depot and stuck one at the top of each inside arm - perfectly silent and invisible solution, and I hope 1Up have adopted it!
2. Having the levers on the backside is even more annoying on a roof rack. If only there was some way to engineer it to have the lever on the front but the brace on the back, it would be absolutely perfect. The lever is pretty tough to operate sometimes and the teeth seem pretty worn down, but I didn't know I could play around with the spring tension.
3. The grey anodized coating started to quickly wear and peel off after about 18 months - at the front of the rack and around the areas where it attaches to the crossbars (basically, where it probably gets the most wind & contact wear). The aluminum underneath is not super noticeable in the grey, but I bet if I had ordered the black version (which I wanted but was sold out) I'd be pretty pissed.
  • + 2
 I just got a 2" super duty a couple weeks ago. Very happy with it, but it could have been packaged better. There were a couple areas where the rack punctured the packaging material and the aluminum had taken some road rash because of it. Also, I don't know if it was because of vibration during shipping, but where the ratchet rests, the aluminum already showed serious signs of ware. Everything still works, and honestly I haven't even complained about it to 1up because the product still works so damn well, but I have a black version so the scratched aluminum really does stick out.

Anyone have experience with 1up customer service? I've heard mostly good, mixed reviews.
  • + 3
 One of the big reasons we got a 1up is we don't have a lot of room to store it when it's off the car. The 1up folds up smaller than any other rack and can easily fit in a trunk or small space.
  • + 1
 That was a big selling point for me too!
  • + 2
 The reviewer did not mention that this is also the only rack capable of off road use, for me that puts it far above all other racks in terms of reliability and usefulness. Kuat is garbage, thule garbage, yakima garbage...They all state boldly DO NOT USE OFFROAD, except 1up enough said
  • + 1
 I have owned 2 1UP racks. The first one I was rear ended with a bike on the rack. It was embedded into my vehicle after the accident. It ripped off the other guys front end as he hit me on the right rear. It saved my vehicle from further damage.

So I replaced it. I will not use any other hitch rack. I have the 2 bike option. It has carried everything from my 29+, Trek Remedy , Domane and my wifes 47cm road bike. Great construction. Great customer service. Built in the USA.

Get one. Best rack I've ever owned.
  • + 1
 It's not really mentioned in the article, but I compared the North Shore to this one. I chose the OneUp. The North Shore is pretty cool . . . but I also occasionally want to carry a road bike (GASP!) on my rack. (I'd also LIKE to carry a CX bike but S-1 > N+1.) The OneUp carries my MTB, my road bike, my son's 24" MTB, and my daughter's 16" BMXy bike.
  • + 1
 Hey PB

could you please rate 4 bike versions of bike racks?

4 bike racks are far more tricky to get bikes on without bar and seat interference. Every rack I have encountered work pretty good with two bikes.

Maybe rating only 2 bike configurations constitutes 1/2 of a review? These reviews really inform my purchasing decisions. I would be so stoked to see part two- the 4 bike review!!

Thanks either way. Your reviews are awesome!!
  • + 1
 FWIW - I've used mine in a 3 bike configuration (borrowed a buddy's single extender) - carried an XL mtb, a woman's M mtb - and a 58 cm CX bike at that same time. Only my XL mtb had a dropper. It is absolutely the same carrying 3 as it is 2. I'd imagine 4 would also be easy to align.
  • + 1
 It's the most bomber rack ever. Period. I messed up the tilt bar one day and didn't check that it was clicked in place. I hit a bump on I5 and the rack dropped to the pavement at 75 (still in hitch) with 3 high end bikes. I drug it for at least 300 yards before getting a spot to pull over. No damage to bikes and the rack just looked like it had spent a few minutes in a belt sander. 3 years later and it's still totally solid. Made in USA goodness!
  • + 3
 If only they had a Canadian distributor. I wanted one of these but the exchange rate and the cost of shipping across the border put it out of my budget.
  • + 3
 My thoughts exactly. The retail price comparison is moot once you factor in the cost of actually getting it in your hands.
  • + 3
 @djyosh: Probably worth making a deal with somebody on the other side of the border to take delivery for one, then roadtripping down to pick it up.
  • + 1
 As much as I've heard about these being the best out there, the unit I would need, all in black of course: a single heavy duty, an add on rail, and 2 fatbike adapters, with shipping is $865.61 US. Today, translates to $1161.17 CAD. Simply too expensive. And yes, I know you get what you pay for.
  • + 1
 Best bike rack ever! I have the 2 tray super duty with 2 add on trays that are easily added and removed as needed. People always ask about the rack and I have made at least 6 referral sales this year. Hey 1UP how about a referral incentive program??!!$$ Great product, thank you.
  • + 1
 My favourite part about this rack is the add-on system. You can buy the single rack, and add on extra trays depending on the day. I ride solo a lot so having one 1 tray on my car is awesome as far as being compact. And if I ride with buddies, I add on the second tray. Not sure if the review touched on this (I didn't read it, I don't need to be told a millionth time how SICK these racks are) but if you have a small 1 1/4 hitch you can have up to three bikes on the rack, compared to the usual two.

So if you ride solo a lot, and never shuttle more than 3 bikes (on the hitch) buy the single rack plus an add on tray. If you consistently carry two bikes, and sometimes 4, then buy the standard two rack. The standard two bike rack can't be downsized to one.
  • + 1
 Best rack ever! I've had four trays on top of my car year round for the past six years. Used nearly every day and have never had an issue (except that one time I drove into the garage with the bikes on),and even then one up was on top of it sending me new parts for free so I could get back on the road. Cannot recommend these enough!
  • + 1
 I consider buying one of these and like always, checked my local ( Chicago ) craigslist first. Nothing . But there were three Thule XT 990. One was close and looked like new in the add so I went to take a look. Mint shape, like used once maybe. Dude was asking $125 and took $120 because I didn't have change. Actually offered him 140 wouldn't take it. Works like a champ and has a locking hitch pin that doesn't rattle. Tailgate folds down on wagon with bike on it, clears no problem. And yeah the bar has to be lowered down and two wheel straps tightened. A whole three steps. I can live with it for know.
  • + 1
 Just got my quick rack yesterday and it looks awesome. Just wondering if anyone has mounted one to a Sprinter with the factory hitch. Seems there is very little clearance for handlebar width between the rear window of the Sprinter Van and the bike.
  • + 1
 "Instead, it's as easy as using the dual arms to have one bike sit a little more to the left or right relative to its neighbor."

Can attest to this function working even on the super-duty 1+1 setup I have, which has less of a angle between the first and second bikes than does the dedicated 2-bike model. You just open up both arms all the way, position the bikes, and crank down the arms.

2 all-mountain bikes arrived safely at their destination, snug in their racked positions, at the end of the somewhat rough Middle Fork/hot springs forest service road, aboard a 1UP attached to a Ford Raptor being driven at the maximum reasonable woods-driving speed.

Same Raptor backed into a Toyota Camry with same racks attached (no bikes), one of the rack trays twisted slightly but was easily pushed back into place, unlike the Camry which was totally fkd.

I like how you can spell 'Delica' with 'derelict'. Oh wait no you can't. Damn.
  • + 3
 She's my Mitsubishi Derelict.
  • + 1
 Love almost everything about my rack except it is a big pain to pull the black bar to lower and raise the rack when you have 3 or 4 trays on the bike. It is very difficult to reach and pull from so far away. You have to bend down under the rack to reach it and it makes it hard to simultaneously lower or lift the 250 lbs of weight on the rack.
  • + 1
 Had my first one for 3 years. Got rear ended by a Camry going about 15 to 20mph. Bent aluminum rack frame and broke a weld on the hitch insert area. Rack still worked but it was sketchy. Immediately bought a new black one. That was 2 years ago. 0 issues with the in 5 total years of use and it protected my car from an accident. I use the old rack arms In the garage as my bike stands.
  • + 2
 My Raxter Rack is very similar in design, but much simpler. I can say the concept is a great one that works very well as a hitch rack.
  • + 2
 I just got one of the 2 bike with another 2 bike add on so I can transport 4 bikes! It looks awesome and performs better than it looks! WOuld buy over and over!
  • + 2
 I work at Earthroamer and we put these racks on our rigs albeit a little modified. Excellent construction, and a nice utilitarian look.
  • + 2
 Eartheroamers are my dream auto!
  • + 1
 I had a nut back off and disappear from the bolt holding one of the uprights on - the bike somehow stayed on. Solution: get longer bolts for the uprights and drill cotter pins into them - no more lost nuts!
  • + 1
 If it's locked in by a security nut, if someone is able to acquire one of them, doesn't that mean they could just steal your rack and bikes? Or is every security nut for the wedge different?
  • + 1
 So, they use a custom size. you can't actually buy this particular wrench from anyone else. that said, if a bike thief were smart enough, he could call up & ask for one. but it's not been a big problem, apparently.
  • + 1
 theyre all the same. so if someone really wanted to get one and steal your rack, they probably could. i have a simple master lock down there just to prevent someone from doing that, although it seems unlikely.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/14586685
  • + 2
 Best rack on the market. You're investing a lot of money into this hobby, so you might as well take care of that investment with a rack like this.
  • + 4
 also made in the USA which is great!
  • + 1
 Are the trays anodized or powder coated? I have an older model where the trays are the former and they have been bombproof. People have had peeling issues with the powder coated trays.
  • + 1
 Ano. The black turns a little bronze over the years. I leave mine on full time for the last 3 years and it's a little brown, but I'm good with it.
  • + 4
 No plastic parts to break!
  • + 1
 Ive had my Yakima Hold Up for 5+ years now, love it, couldnt see myself getting anything else. Got it new for $250, looks good, compact fold-up position, works well. Id buy another one in a second.
  • + 0
 I've never considered buying this rack because of price. By that I mean that i can find near new or New Yakima or Thule racks on Craigslist for almost half of retail. Paid $250 for my Yakima HoldUp with locks from a girl who impulse bought it a month earlier.
Have never seen a 1Up rack for a low sale price online. I'm assuming the only people who get them discount since they aren't on every retail shelf in the country is shop rats and industry folk.
  • + 1
 Best rack on the market. Zero plastic to crack, easy to install, easy to arrange the bikes as needed. The fact that it's actually cheaper than Thule and Kuat make it a no-brainer.
  • + 1
 Does anyone have any experience trying to load a commuter bike with full fenders on to a 1up rack? Maybe it's possible by having it offset much more in the front wheel's direction?
  • + 1
 look at their website, I believe they have an attachment for bikes with fenders.
  • + 1
 I've been waiting for a proper review of this rack and have been curious about this as well. The 1Up solution appears to be a piece of pipe insulation wrapped around the wheel mounts and not exactly ideal for fragile plastic fenders and hardware. Perhaps the fender mounting hardware could be temporarily loosened to allow the fender to ride on the rear tire and be stable without damaging the fender. Otherwise, this seems to be one of few drawbacks of an otherwise solid design.
  • + 1
 How about a basic tray with a solid upright in the middle...tie the top tube to it....
  • + 0
 One thing I didn't see mentioned - can you angle the rack away from the vehicle so that you can access the trunk without removing the bikes from the rack? I have the Kuat and it's a really convenient feature that I find more important than I would have thought.
  • + 2
 @trillot Yes. You can even do it with bikes on.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: agreed, but in my experience you then have to half crawl underneath the bikes and rack to pull the rack back up to flat position. and that takes a fair bit of muscle in a very awkward position. so I avoid it if at all possible. but awesome rack though; wouldnt have anything else
  • + 1
 @kliss: It is a bit awkward, but I usually just reach my arm under, pull the bar up while pushing on the frame of the outward bike for more leverage, rather than trying to lift the tray. It's pretty easy to lift this way. The way the bikes are in the rack via the tires, I'm not worried about my big mountain bike taking the lifting force at the wheels. My wheels take far more sideloading on the trail. That being said I don't really have to do this very often, typically only when someone forgets to put something in the trunk after we're already loaded up and ready to head out.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: Wait, does the rack lock down past horizonatal for you guys? All I have to do is pull, as the last notch for the lockbar is at the horizontal position. it just rests against the crossbar for the plates when I lower it for trunk access. Incidentally, if anybody has a 2008-2011 imprezza hatch, you can open the trunk with 2 trays folded up.
  • + 2
 "The Quik Rack folds up vertically, so it's out of the way when it isn't carrying your baby, down flat when it's loaded up, and also tipped down to allow access to your trunk or hatchback."
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: My bad - should spend more time reading than looking at the pics!
  • + 4
 Questionable bumper sticker...
  • + 1
 Hillarious if you are 13.
  • + 2
 Not really... It's short for "Sedona Experience"
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Kinda like the WTF (Welcome to Fruita) stickers eh?
  • + 1
 just made a 800 mile trip to tahoe and back with the roof rack version of the 1up usa with a dh bike and the wifes enduro and had no issues.
  • + 3
 ill stick with my NSR that trashes my crown.
  • + 0
 I'll stay with my rat rack, way better than NSR
  • + 1
 Mistake it's a recon rack, very similar to a rat rack. But still better than NS rack.
  • + 1
 I like how each tray gets progressively higher than the last. I have the Yakima Hold up 4 bike rack and the rack bottoms out on water bars sometimes.
  • + 3
 Best rack I've ever owned. Period.
  • + 2
 Have owned mine over 2 years so far and it still looks and operates like it did when new!
  • + 4
 love the product...
  • + 2
 Yes, best rack I've used (and the only one I will ever use). ...And I've played with a lot of racks. Wink
  • + 2
 Well it's either this or that plywood ramp. I think I'll go for the ramp and build a rack.
  • + 1
 Haha. Nice.
  • + 2
 I've had mine since 2011 and it is still in great shape. By fare the easiest to use and most durable bike rack I have owned.
  • + 2
 Glad it takes smaller wheels...I'll never change up to those 26" wagon wheels!
  • - 1
 Does anyone have a pic of the rack on a tacoma? Im curious of the clearence between bikes and the tailgate since the hitch of the truck is flush with the bumper rather than the setup here. Sounds like dropping the rack to get inside the truck would be a real pain. But maybe a 3 bike set up with first bike in the middle of the rack when only carrying one or two bikes will still allow you to drop the tailgate.
  • + 1
 The rack also folds rearwards at a 45deg, this might allow you to access your tailgate. (See image below)
3.bp.blogspot.com/-EQvsTccY5tY/VSL5PiYlSBI/AAAAAAAAI5Y/kbGlAYmvy0U/s1600/IMG_20150405_150819.jpg
  • + 2
 They make a hitch extender you can use if you have clearance issues, but I've only ever seen it needed on a Wrangler to clear the big full-sized spare tire on the back.
  • + 2
 No need for a hitch extender on the taco..., just adjust how deep you insert the rack. I've got one, bomber setup. And what @redrider3141 said..., the rack tilts back 45 to access the tailgate.
  • + 1
 I have a 2014 Tacoma TRD off road, i tilt the rack down w/ bikes on it to open the tailgate. it works fine w/o extender, but i'll install the extender for long trips so i don't have to drop the 2 bikes before opening the tailgate. i've had a double for 2 years and no problems even off-roading, i think if it looked like i would hit the rack i'd remove the bikes and fold up the rack over that section. but i don't do any crazy offroading with bikes on... or off
also, the way the hitch mounts, there is zero sound / rattling.

i can't recommend the OneUp enough! 10/10 points
  • + 1
 @Bear-B: Thanks guys, The issue is I sleep in the back of my truck and have to get in a out quite a bit. So having to drop the rack every time to get in there is going to get annoying. Sounds like the extender will solve the problem.
  • + 1
 Best rack I've ever used. I've had mine for a couple years and it holds the bikes securely on crappy dirt roads and anywhere else. Worth every penny.
  • + 3
 Looks like a wheelchair rack, sorry Frown
  • + 1
 $529 usd = $710 cad. It'll be a while before you see any used ones being sold for half that! Unfortunately, for now, i'll stick with the tailgate pad.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the review, been thinking about buying one and im sold now! Can you only order them from the company? I havent seen them anywherr else
  • + 1
 AFAIK, direct sales only.
  • + 1
 best rack I ever had. Its the greatest and soooooooooooo robust. My 951 loves it
  • + 1
 The guy helping you with the demonstration made things look pretty smooth. You should use him more often.
  • + 2
 North Shore rack is the best ! It takes 5 seconds to put the bike on !
  • + 1
 Sweet L300. Fighting the urge to get one to go with my L400. Best wild camper / bike rigs out there.
  • + 0
 We had one for each car, but now down to one car - selling the extra right now!
It's a beauty! If in Canada/Van area - save on the shipping etc
Check out my profile!
  • + 1
 I think I saw @mikelevy 's van last time I was riding in Sqampton. Sweet rig.
  • + 1
 Best 2 bike rack on the planet. I have over 20000km of use. Still strong.
  • + 1
 Why no comparison to the Inno - Tire Hold Hitch?

It's $445 retail and is the closet comparison to that of the One Up.
  • + 2
 Such a great rack. Nothing but praise for it for me.
  • + 1
 Love love love my 1up rack. I have the super duty with three trays for my sprinter van. Such a high quality unit.
  • + 1
 same questions after every single review of their products: what about an Euro version?
  • + 1
 meaning a license plate holder with light? They do actually make one as an accessory.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: more like a ball hitch version and a full lighting system
  • + 1
 great to seen an all metal product. if i didn't have a truck they would have my money!
  • - 2
 the bolt comes loose so often i ended up puttong a dfat eyelet in the rack amd got a heavy duty carribeaner to attach from rack to hitch as a precautionary measure. i never felt right driving knowing that stupid wedge bolt is loosening all the time. really dumb idea and even dumber is the Velcro strap they give you
  • + 3
 Took mine with 4 bikes to Red Bull Rampage (9 hour drive) including riding the old Rampage site and no issues whatsoever with the wedge bolt, or anything else for that matter......bombproof. Not sure what the deal is with yours. Best rack ever
  • + 2
 The thing is you're not towing with it, so almost all of the force exerted on the rack to hitch interface is downward and side to side when cornering. There isn't any force pulling it out, and these forces that do exist help to keep the rack in via friction. Load it up with bikes and don't tighten the bolt and see how difficult it is to pull out. Also, I can attest to this because I once made the stupid mistake of putting it in my hitch, going to look for the 1up Allen key to tighten the bolt, getting distracted, then driving on the highway 20 minutes to my friend's house with my bike on the back before realizing I had forgotten to tighten the bolt. Didn't lose the rack. I've never had issue with my bolt coming loose, and even if it does work somewhat loose, it would take a significant outward pulling force for the rack to come out. So unless you're accelerating off the line with a McLaren P1 or Bugati Veyron with a 1up on the back, I doubt you'll ever lose the rack. Almost 10 years and never had an issue here. I don't even add any extra pull-out security. It's just a feel-good measure for people used to hitch pins when towing (completely different forces being exerted).
  • + 1
 @Twoplanker110: Its not just me everyone else I know with this rack has to re tighten the wedge bolt every other ride. If you want to risk yours go for it. But after seeing how loose that bolt gets im not going to sit back and watch my rack and bikes go surfing down the highway behind me
  • + 0
 @BaeckerX1: meh, like said before not risking it.
  • + 1
 @Yody: I don't really have issues with the bolt backing out. At least with mine I don't think it's the bolt getting loose so much as the expander ball making a divot in the hitch over time, so it just needs tightened. Most likely the bolt isn't loose and wouldn't come out. There are things you can do to prevent a bolt from backing out if you really think that's the case, loctite, teflon tape, etc. Hardly something to be concerned about. As I said, haven't had an issue in 10 years. With the new style SD rack, I keep the lock on mine over the bolt hole so I rarely check it and it's been fine. If you want to add something for a little extra security, that's cool. Whatever makes you feel better.
  • + 1
 @BaeckerX1: wrong. When you drive uphill the normal force supporting the rack separates into horizontal and vertical components. There are absolutely forces working to pull the rack out of the receiver. The friction between the rack and receiver is not a reliable factor of safety. Would be interesting to hear the designer try to justify this design.
  • + 2
 @TrainingWheelz: You're wrong man. Years of real world use have proven you wrong. Give it up and stop trying to armchair engineer. You obviously don't know what you're talking about.
  • + 2
 What I would do for a quick rack right about now!
  • + 1
 Well it is spring break...
  • + 1
 Does anyone have any experience of importing one of these to the UK, does it fit a UK tow hitch?
  • + 2
 Will not fit euro hitches.
  • + 2
 If I didn't have a van that my bike rolls right into, I'd buy one, up.
  • + 1
 1up rack w/ eco hitch on my 2015wrx, life is good!
  • + 1
 the salt would eat that like a cop does a donut. raw
  • + 1
 Could this be the 1 I choose
  • + 1
 Favourite feature is the delica
  • + 4
 Same.
  • + 1
 wait a minute, you drive to the trails??
  • + 3
 What if you live in a city?
  • + 0
 @lee-vps-savage: I live in a city. No driving to the nearest trail. 2 min out of my door.
  • + 2
 @Axxe: Well aren't you the lucky one Big Grin
  • + 2
 Long live the Delica!!
  • + 1
 Hands down, best racks ever built.
  • + 1
 Love my 2 bike Super Duty! Fits my 27+ Timberjack without any issues
  • + 2
 North Shore rack. Done.
  • + 4
 I have a Yakima because I got it cheap on Craigslist, but if you want a zero issue rack to shuttle people with, the north shore is the only option.
  • + 1
 @ClaytonMarkin: I'll stick to my NSR too!
  • + 1
 $629? Ha, I could buy six bikes from Walmart for that.
  • + 1
 Stop reading after 1 bike only for 1 1/4'' hitch...
  • + 2
 I have had the 1/4 inch version for six years. I use it as a one bike and two bike rack mostly. But for short shuttles I have used it as a three bike rack (on the 1/4 hitch) for bike dh bikes.
  • + 1
 @jasonw: how sturdy is it as a 3 bike on a 1 1/4 hitch? I'm looking at it or a Kuat transfer which hold 3 on 1 1/4.
  • + 2
 @tcmitchell: Very sturdy. You do get some up and down flex on bouncy roads but it's not too bad. Pretty much the same flex you get with 4 bikes on the 2" rack. I have no problem ripping up access roads in my WRX with 3 big bikes loaded up. The ability to trim the rack down to 1 bike is real nice on the smaller car.
  • + 0
 @tcmitchell: FWIW, I worry far more about the hitch attachment to the car with mine than the rack. the rack & receiver are so stiff that everything gets transferred to those bolts/the sheetmetal they're bolted through. I wouldn't be concerned about the rack at all, I'd even put 5 bikes on it if I stuck it in a 2" hitch(the 1 1/4" version comes with an adapter plate for 2" receivers.)

The 1 1/4" receivers are only rated for 50lbs of tongue weight. That's by far the biggest concern. the transient loads to those mounts with 2 bikes probably exceed 1000lbs of torque when you go over a bump.

In the past, I've thought about a new style of mount for the back of cars for bike racks specifically, instead of a repurposed trailer hitch, but the bike rack market is just too small, for how many different mounts you'd have to make for different cars.
  • + 1
 You can mount up to 3 bikes on a 1 1/4" version. Have done 300 mile trips with no problems.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: dunno which 1.25 receiver you're talking about, but mine is rated for 150lbs tongue weight
  • + 1
 @tuskenraider: Thats great to hear. My curt receiver is rated to 350lbs of tongue weight so I should be good. Thats great to hear that I can carry the same number of bikes on a better rack.
  • + 2
 @stonant: You are correct, not sure where I got the 50lbs from. Regardless, the rest of my statement still stands: I'm far more worried about the attachement points of the hitch to the car, than I am the durability of the 1up rack.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: I hear you on that.
  • + 1
 @tcmitchell: from what I can tell the rack is totally fine. There is a fair amount of flex but I have not seen any ill effects.
My bigger concern is with the car subframe and the tork on the hitch. I used it as a three bike for about four years on weekends shuttling up local mountains in Vancouver. I now have a truck for big shuttles and use the 1up just for one or two bikes now.

I was thinking of getting the 2 inch heavy duty for the truck so I can haul 4 bikes when the bed of the truck is full.
  • + 1
 Will trade a NSR 4 like new for a 1 up 2 bike carrier anyone?
  • + 1
 looks like something i could build in my shop
  • + 3
 then do it
  • + 1
 You could def copy it if u had one to measure..guess its all about how much labor/time it would cost u.
  • + 2
 @jrocksdh: and a great lawyer to get you out of the patent violations. Innovate don't immitate. f*cking leeches.
  • + 1
 They are great. I have a 2 bike!
  • + 1
 I would love this rack but the price ...
  • + 1
 No security bolts or straps at all ????
Too easy to steal your bikes?
  • + 1
 Please start putting trailer lights on these things!!!
  • + 1
 I agree with the part about trailer lights. I know in Germany you need to have lights and a license plate visible on your rack. I don't know the laws in America about such things, but there is a good chance the laws are not consistent across all the 50 States. To my knowledge there is no bike rack sold in America with lights, nor a license plate holder. So I hope to see, at a minimum, the lights. I don't want somebody rear ending me and my bikes because they did not see my brake lights. I hope it becomes at least an option for purchase from 1up USA.
  • + 1
 love my 1up, had it for 3 years and it's great.
  • + 1
 So 1000$ to carry 4 bikes?
  • + 1
 Why does it have to be so ugly?
  • + 2
 Sweet van.
  • + 1
 Nice rack...beat up vehicle...seems legit
  • + 2
 Oneup doenst go on sale.
  • - 1
 It's a bad design not using a hitch pin! (velcro strap is a BS substitute) any issue with the expanding wedge, even dirty threads, could lead to the rack falling off.
  • + 2
 ive read up extensively on these racks before i bought one and everyone said "im worried about the lack of hitch pin" but no one has had their rack fall off. seems like it just doesnt happen.
  • + 1
 @sooner518: @TrainingWheelz There's no tow force pulling the rack out. See my post in this thread about accidentally driving on the highway without the bolt tightened up. Razz Trust me, it's secure (not that I'd want to ever do that again).
  • - 4
flag TrainingWheelz (Apr 6, 2017 at 13:32) (Below Threshold)
 Opinions and one lucky experience don't make up for design flaws on safety critical parts. I'm surprised it's legal to sell this.
  • + 3
 @TrainingWheelz: Design flaw? You really should go take a physics course. There is no tow force being exerted on the rack. An expander bolt is more than enough to keep it in the receiver, as well as eliminate play and wobble as a bonus. These have been on the road for a long time. Have you ever heard of one flying off anyone's vehicle? They're based and manufactured in America, the most litigious nation in the world. If it was a design flaw they would have been sued out of business a LONG time ago. Some people are just paranoid and afraid of anything new/different.
  • + 3
 @TrainingWheelz: how is it an opinion and "one lucky experience"? this literally doesnt ever happen. everyone who has one of these racks raves about them. everyone who has owned one of these racks is "lucky" that the "design flaw" didnt cause their rack to fall out?
  • + 2
 @sooner518:
It does happen. It is very VERY rare but over on MTBR's huge thread about these racks there are a couple post about them coming loose usually in extended off road situations. I love mine but being paranoid I have it chained to my hitch so it can't come off. I've never needed that chain but it makes me feel better having it there and I trust it more than a velcro strap.
  • - 1
 @BaeckerX1: The force of gravity combined with vertical accelerations of the rack (momentary unloading of the rack) would be more than enough to walk the rack out of the receiver on a long uphill drive, especially a bumpy logging/shuttle road. There is no fail safe to ensure that the wedge is properly tightened and the rack is secure. Except the Velcro strap (a cover your ass band aid). I'm sitting at a trail head and the car next to me has a 1up rack and the strap isn't there.
  • + 1
 Rack city
  • + 1
 Rack rack city
  • + 1
 Ten Ten Ten Twenty on ya ti............s
  • + 0
 Buy a Raxter. Much better and simpler.
  • + 0
 Super Mario brothers had a 1up to get another life! So great!
  • + 1
 Gnarly vehicle.
  • + 1
 Love my OneUp
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