Review: Mythos 3D-Printed Titanium Stem is My Kind of Excess

Feb 22, 2023 at 15:46
by Mike Levy  
photo
The £250 IXO is a 3D-printed titanium stem that looks like it could be from another planet.


We sometimes joke about reviewing stems because, well, let's be honest – as long as they hold onto the handlebar and steerer, they're usually not that interesting. Unless we're talking about Mythos' £250 IXO stem, that is. Pronounced "icksoh" and looking like something from H.R. Giger's catalog of bike parts, the IXO is manufactured via a 3D-printing process and the result is a see-through stem that Mythos says is both light and strong.

The IXO comes in 40mm and 50mm lengths, both with zero rise, a 35mm handlebar clamp, and a 38mm stack height. Claimed weight is 136 grams, but the IXO they sent me actually ended up being a bit lighter at 127 grams.
Mythos IXO details

• 3D-Printed titanium
• Lengths: 40mm, 50mm
• Rise: 0mm
• Handlebar clamp: 35mm only
• Stack height: 38mm
• Material: Aerospace-grade titanium (Ti6Al4V)
• Weight: From 136g (including hardware)
• MSRP: £250 (including UK VAT)
• More info: www.mythos.bike


Electron beam melting & vacuums

If you hadn't heard of Mythos before, there's a good chance you've never heard of their parent company, Metron, who has been making ultra-high-end components for years, mostly in the skinny tire world. The IXO is their first mountain bike stem and it's manufactured via a process called electron beam melting which does exactly what it sounds like. EBM is similar to the more common Selective Laser Melting in that both 'grow' the component via powder, but while SLM uses "normal" lasers, EBM uses a beam of electrons in a vacuum environment.


photo
Electron beam melting "grows" the IXO from titanium powder.


If you want to make your bike parts via EBM, all you need is a special gun that shoots out a beam of electrons from a super-heated tungsten filament at around half the speed of light, as well as a barrel or two of aerospace-grade titanium and a hell of a lot of know-how. Mythos is doing that at their Derbyshire facility in the UK, the same place where they manufacture their equally crazy-looking Elix stem that's even more expensive. After the stem is grown, its clamping surfaces are machined down to hold onto a steerer tube and a 35mm handlebar, and titanium hardware is used because of course it is.

Wondering why you can see through the IXO? Mythos says that they employ FEA (Finite Element Analysis) and CAD to figure out exactly where material needs to be and, as you can probably tell, where it doesn't need to be. The 3D-printed result is an alien-looking shape that Mythos says exceeds the 200,000-cycle test program at ISO-specified forces while also being stiffer under both bending and torsional forces than a traditional stem.


photo
The surface is inconsistent and rougher in some spots than others, a result of how it was made.
Mythos IXO
See those fins inside the stem? That's the result of FEA and CAD telling Mythos exactly where material is and isn't needed.


Alien looks, normal performance

The first thing I noticed about the IXO stem is that it looks a bit rough, especially in a few spots where the surface seems inconsistent. It turns out that this is a byproduct of the manufacturing process and has no effect on its strength or rigidity, Mythos said, even if it does seem odd compared to the forged and machined aluminum stems we're used to. "Many people believe that 3D printing produces a lower grade material, but EBM titanium actually matches or beats the material properties achieved by traditional manufacturing processes, meeting or exceeding all requirements of the relevant ASTM and ISO standards for Ti6Al4V (ASTM 1107, ASTM F1472, AMS 4999 and ISO 5832-3)," Mythos told me. So why not give the stem a smoother finish? Matthews explains: "Due to titanium being exceptionally tough, it’s extremely difficult to remove material evenly to produce a smooth or polished finish, and surface finishing the visible interior of the stem is incredibly difficult. This is why we decided on the raw as-printed finish. Plus, what’s the point of 3D-printing something and then making it look like it’s made with some boring old traditional manufacturing process?"

There are plenty of boring black stems to choose from and all of them cost a lot less (and some weigh less) than the IXO, but Mythos isn't trying to sell thousands of these things anyway. Personally, I love how it looks, especially on a black bike with a black handlebar, but I do have a soft spot for anything weird.

Forgetting about the price for a moment, are you a fan of the IXO's lines or would you prefer something a little more normal?


Mythos IXO
C'mon, doesn't this thing look amazing?


Installation is like any other stem; it should sit a few millimeters proud of the steerer tube, and it uses a no-gap faceplate and the same 5Nm of torque for all six of its titanium M5x0.8 x 14mm bolts. The steerer clamp tolerances are a bit tighter than other stems I've used and it needed a good push to slide down onto the tube (no, there were no burrs), but it all went together as intended. You'll certainly want to use a torque wrench for your fancy stem and read the instructions before picking up any tools.

The stem that the IXO replaced was a standard no-frills aluminum thing that definitely wasn't doing anything wrong, but the difference on the trail between it and the 3D-printed titanium Mythos unit was... Not at all noticeable, of course. What the hell did you expect? I know that Mythos says the IXO is, "16% stiffer in torsion, and 11% stiffer in bending, when tested side-by-side with an equivalent alloy stem," but I'll never feel that while riding my bike because it's not like any 40mm stem a soft noodle to begin with. I'm not saying that it isn't stiffer, only that I can't tell the difference, even when I clamp the front wheel between my knees while trying to twist and turn the handlebar in my faux-science test.


Mythos IXO
Alien technology?


So it's not a game-changer, but it also didn't do anything wrong while I used it, never creaking, groaning, or slipping, as you'd hope for such a high-end component. One thing to note, however, is that riders who've had stems take core samples from their knees might prefer a smoother backside to the steerer clamp.

If you were hoping for a groundbreaking leap forward in stem performance, this ain't it. The IXO does nothing wrong but it's also not going to change your riding in any way, which is pretty much what I expected. That said, if you're interested in the technology behind the stem and like how it looks, which describes me, I don't think it's all that crazy to consider given the other things we spend our money on.




Pros

+ 3D-printing titanium is cool AF
+ Polarizing looks

Cons

- Price to performance ratio
- There are lighter and less expensive stems
- Polarizing looks




Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesI'll admit that I don't really care if the IXO is noticeably better or not than an $80 stem because I don't think that's what it's about. If you want tangible performance gains, spend your money on tires, wheels, geometry, suspension, or lessons, not an expensive stem with an interesting backstory. Instead, think of the IXO as a demonstration of technology usually reserved for hyper-cars, aerospace, and the medical field.

No, I don't see myself buying a £250 stem, but the unrepentant tech dork in me absolutely loves the idea of a 3D-printed titanium anything and how it looks on my bike. Are you into it, or do you prefer a different kind of excess?
Mike Levy


Author Info:
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Member since Oct 18, 2005
2,032 articles

189 Comments
  • 138 3
 You're wrong.
  • 34 0
 My missus tells me that she's not always right, but she's never wrong.
  • 42 0
 I thought I was wrong once, but it turns out I was mistaken.
  • 41 0
 I’ve been wrong once or twice before.
  • 72 0
 "ChatGPT, design a stem no one will like except Brian Park."
  • 10 0
 "I am inclined to agree with you. But, then we'd both be wrong."
  • 8 0
 Some toys need lubricant after your purchase them to improve their efficiency. This one needs lubricant before to help you swallow its price and its imperfections.
  • 23 1
 So very wrong. There are some great applications of 3D printing. One off custom parts, parts that can only be a particular shape if 3D printed, custom sizing, rapid prototyping. This seems like none of the above. It's the bike industry's marketing machine slapping "3D printed Titanium" on everything to sell it.

LIke...
cyclingtips.com/2022/10/that-new-pinarello-bolide-hour-record-bike-is-3d-printed
Or this:
www.athertonbikes.com
Or this:
www.sturdycycles.co.uk

Other than looking like a bit of badly cast concrete this has little to recommend it.
  • 9 3
 @AdeMiller: To be fair, the Atherton lugs need to be 3d printed. Machining those would be impossible.
  • 9 0
 @Tmackstab: That's my point. 3D printed lugs to build a custom sized frame seems like a good application. Printing identical stems seems like a waste, you might was well cast or CNC them.
  • 3 1
 @AdeMiller: This seems all about the novelty more than anything. The BikeYoke Barkeeper is the epitome of stem design if you consider the strength, weight, and cost.
  • 2 6
flag baca262 (Feb 28, 2023 at 18:09) (Below Threshold)
 @AdeMiller: seriously? you said one thing and then you turn it around completely to "stay right"? your lot, and it's a specific lot, truly thinks people are stupid
  • 4 0
 @baca262: I think maybe you read it wrong. @ademiller is saying his 3 examples are good uses of the tech.
  • 1 0
 @AdeMiller: But half the speed of light means $$$
  • 1 0
 @WalrusRider: my 2010(ish) Straitline Pinch beauty begs to differ.
Still going strong
  • 1 0
 Yo mama!
  • 86 0
 Looks like a concrete.
  • 3 0
 Titanium cures all
  • 1 6
flag kpickrell (Feb 28, 2023 at 17:48) (Below Threshold)
 They machined (or reamed?) precisely the one area they should have left rough! They should have left the bar clamp areas rough to keep the bar from slipping. At least that would have been a useful feature...
  • 1 0
 Solid!
  • 12 0
 @kpickrell: they had to so it wouldn't crack the carbon bars
  • 2 1
 Or cast iron lol, also don’t want to be “negative” but how about a stem with some “positive” rise to it. Seriously though I’m tired of adding all those spacers under my stems, not everyone wants their handlebars low.
  • 1 0
 Bike industry really needs to make more components out of concrete for entry level models. Super durable. Roads are made out of it and look how well they hold up! (pretend pot holes don't exist)
  • 67 5
 Looking at those surface imperfections, I can't help but think of catastrophic failure from a propagating crack.
  • 20 0
 Yup. There are likely similar internal imperfections as well. The analysis should include a huge factor to account for it, but most of the SLM machine & material vendors will basically tell you that the properties are equal to that of a piece of billet (which is BS), so that's what a lot of companies follow. Hopefully they've tested a sufficient number of them to failure to account for the inconsistency from part to part.
  • 9 0
 Right! It looks like it would have all sorts of porosity and voids.
  • 13 0
 @DaneL: Ya we've been trying to 3D print some titanium parts for a medical device and the biggest problem is that the vendors just aren't honest about the properties. I've heard 3D Printing is having a hard time gaining traction in aerospace too for the same reason.

I would never run the stem personally even if it were free.
  • 2 0
 @Jsinisi: until there's A-basis material data from a trusted source (MMPDS), it will be easier to just design for machining in many cases (for aerospace, at least). The exception is where there are significant enough design constraints to justify the added testing that comes along with additive manufacturing. It tends to make more sense on things like commercial airliners where quantities are high enough to justify spending millions on weight reduction.
  • 24 0
 For something that is supposedly so precisely designed, it's slightly worrying that it weighs 9g less than they claim.
  • 3 0
 @Jsinisi: I’ve seen a LOT of traction for 3D metallic prints for aerospace. ESA is writing standards for qualifying parts based on intended application and some big name jet engine companies are going from 100s of parts to just one for large jet engines.
  • 4 0
 The surface of the machined part of the stem looks clean, though
  • 2 0
 Stick it on one of those german test machines that Bike Magazin used and see what it can handle. I reckon not much.
  • 3 2
 Yep. Titanium is no stronger than steel; just lighter. I'd be concerned if my bike made was made of steel and had inconsistencies like that.
  • 5 0
 I don't understand the advantage of the chosen process and material. The surface in this case does not look very nice and the manufacturing costs are high. There are also aluminum stems that are stronger, lighter, look better (imo) and are cheaper.
Syntace Megaforce 40mm/97g
  • 2 0
 the surface roughness is typically pretty bad for the fatigue life of printed parts. Oftentimes this can be more than offset tho by the gains in geometrical freedom that comes with 3D printing to lower peak stresses. This however will require adequate engineering and good understanding of the load cases the part will experience. for a stem this is probably pretty manageable, for many other parts a lot more complex.
  • 1 0
 @ndefeo96: but... its made at half the speed of light....
  • 1 0
 @enduroelite:
Dude. Seriously. It’s made at half the speed of light.
  • 1 0
 They have done testing with the finished product and it has held up, so I'd assume those inherent voids and such in the material have been taken into account. Perhaps they had to add material to compensate? This thing isn't even light after all! The Intend Grace EN is about 30g lighter and it is cheaper and it looks better!
  • 1 0
 @WheelNut: i agree and i would ride that thing. However it is worth noting that fatigue test results will typically have huge variability, so to get a high degree of confidence you'll need a big sample size, which is not typically done in bike testing afaik.
  • 1 0
 @SleepingAwake:
They should have posted all strength/fatigue tests for this article.
I dig the novelty of riding something that looks like it was finished with a chainsaw, but has the strength and durability of forged steel.
  • 2 0
 UL should develop common cycling standards and test marketed products and put their stamp on them, similar to most other consumer products they certify.
  • 1 0
 @LaXcarp: UL listing is astronomically expensive, especially with a product that has frequent design changes.
  • 1 0
 @ndefeo96: that markup is passed to the consumer and the consumer can be confident in the product being purchased.
  • 62 3
 9 out of 10 dentists recommend this stem
  • 11 1
 No they don't. It doesn't look expensive because of the rough finish, and their riding buddies are only interested in titanium printed implants and fillings.
  • 20 0
 @Mac1987: the rough finish surface imperfections and rapid crack propagation will lead to more emergency procedures for 9 out of 10 dentists.
  • 4 0
 @davidccoleman: exactly - those imperfections make me wonder about the integrity of the whole thing. I'm not techy enough to know whether that's a legit concern or not, but a machined stem would give me more confidence. I would be far more inclined to buy a chain guide with these sorts of imperfections from 3D printing vs a stem where a void could lead to a crack and catastrophic failure.
  • 1 0
 @davidccoleman: fair point
  • 1 0
 @davidccoleman: it's titanium dude. in the same league as steel. it's probably overbuilt as it is.
  • 4 0
 @davidccoleman:
Crack propagation is the first thing that came to mind for me..
Can 3D printing truly transcend this effect? If this thing came out of a casting looking like this, it would make a perfect doorstop.
  • 44 0
 Couple of things come to mind.
1. Ti64 isn't "incredibly difficult" to machine or polish, so it raises some questions around material properties.
2. The surface finish of the un machined areas looks like it has very high porosity. Scary.
3. Id be interested to know the achieved density.

3d printing is all good, but the resulting mechanical properties are wildly vast compared to billet.
  • 4 0
 All quality stem reviews should include a water displacement test
  • 2 0
 but... its made at half the speed of light....
  • 31 0
 Looks ok but prefer clean lines of CNC stems for less than 1/2 the cost and same weight, no thanx.....
  • 19 0
 Looks ok, but I prefer a forged stem that is less than a 1/3 of the price, same weight and is stronger.
  • 13 0
 Yeah, their tag line is basically, "3D printing is cool"
If 3D printing results in a product which takes 5x longer to make, costs 3x, doesnt offer significant improvements, and is unfinished, I'd say its not really viable yet...
  • 8 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Yeah those are fine, but I prefer my stem found hundreds of feet underground which was forged when a meteorite hit a dinosaur in the head.
  • 4 0
 But, you’ll be able to run your headset routed cables through your stem first!
  • 4 0
 @ReformedRoadie: If forging were newly invented, we would all be swooning over forging. Hydraulic presses the size of a house that make metal flow like liquid, perfectly oozing into the desired shape. Pressure that crushes imperfections into tiny, crystalline form, producing an internal microstructure that traces the lines of the product, making it stronger than the raw material from whence it came.

If we're going to 3D print things that don't need to be 3D printed, at least go all-in and make some alien, organic thing via generative design and / or topology optimization.

Additive manufacturing has some amazing applications. This stem is not one of them.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: thoughts on why no magnesium stems? Easton had one briefly. If people are looking to mute vibrations to lessen hand fatigue and arm pump, seems like it might be a good option.
  • 2 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Bunsen burners Wink

Seriously my guess is that is corrodes horribly? Unlike alu which makes a nice protective layer of oxidization, mag will just turn to swiss cheese.
  • 1 0
 @st-lupo: VAAST seems to have solved that for frames...seems like stems would be easy by comparison.
  • 2 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Unsure about the vibration attenuation of a magnesium stem - or any stem. Compared to the tire and grips / bar tape, any contribution from a bar or stem is low.

People often discuss the vibration attenuation of carbon handlebars, but the only noticeably harsh bar I've ever ridden was a particularly stiff carbon model, while the two most comfortable bars I've ridden have been the lightest carbon and lightest aluminum models I've ridden. This suggests the contribution to comfort that comes from the handlebar is primarily due to the stiffness (or lack thereof), rather than vibration attenuation.

Bar flex and stem flex have different impacts on comfort and control. A bar mostly flexes downward due to pressure from your hands, and each side is free to act independently. By contrast, movement from the stem is more from twisting, meaning both hands cannot move downward at the same time. Stem flex produces a poor balance of benefits to comfort vs detriments to control and precision. Therefore, it's best to allocate our precious grams to a less flexible stem and more flexible bar. Minimal flex in the stem minimizes the already low opportunity for vibration attenuation from the stem.

For anecdotal evidence, among the products I've tested have been a 74 g aluminum stem with a 810 mm handlebar and noticed no change in comfort (and, to the credit of the stem, only a slight detriment to control and precision), and a not-very-light road stem with enough flex to affect control and precision, yet no noticeable effect on comfort.


@st-lupo: There have been a couple magnesium stems, the most popular of which being a few generations from Easton, and a couple brands have used it for frames, as mentioned by ReformedRoadie. Corrosion was a problem with at least the first generation of Easton magnesium stems, but some versions had adequate resistance. The lowers of most suspension forks are magnesium, which are fairly reliable against corrosion.
  • 22 0
 I did some 3D printed cranks:
www.instagram.com/p/CF1tkkvHPLX
  • 1 0
 Did you do epoxy + press fit on the DS? Neat!
  • 2 0
 @WhoTookIt: Just press fit (axle in freezer, crank warmed). No creaking/ movement in over two years of use.
  • 22 0
 how come your cranks don't look like shit?
  • 3 0
 @Dopepedaler: those look fantastic,great job.
  • 3 0
 @nozes: Thanks for the positive comments everyone. :-)
  • 1 0
 @eddlessride: Those look beautiful mate. The item under current review? Not so much so.
  • 15 0
 They could have tossed it in tumble polisher to at least knock down those sharp edges and clean up those differing surface finished.

Also, though I'm glad they did the cycle testing, and mentioned it, so we can trust its pretty damn strong, they must be using a pretty low-end manufacturing process to achieve this strength, because other SLS/SLM or EBM titanium parts come out with much nicer finishes (Atherton lugs, for one example).
  • 18 0
 looks cheap but is expensive, so the wrong way
  • 19 2
 Doesn't come in 31.8 clamp size. I'm out.
  • 6 0
 That's what I say about my 142mm hub and look at my life now.......ruined.
  • 2 0
 Lord knows I heard that answer before... But she wasn't listening to me...
  • 1 0
 And 40mm is too long.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: but its made at half the speed of light....
  • 12 0
 Thanks for loving all things on the fringes @mikelevy
  • 1 0
 its made at half the speed of light....
  • 11 0
 So... expensive, ugly, likely weak due to stress risers and looks like a high school shop project.
  • 2 0
 @Dopepedaler: this stem is the answer to the question nobody is asking.
  • 8 0
 Intend stems :
-approx. half the price
-less than 100g (!)
-available in multiple lenght and both 35 and 31.8
-extensively engineered and tech details available
-made by a guy named Cornelius Kapfinger

Why pay for this then?

www.intend-bc.com/products/produktname-bc
  • 1 1
 its made at half the speed of light.... bruh
  • 1 0
 I was about to say that would be a cool stem for a build I am gathering parts for but then I saw it wasn't two piece.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: try Newmen. Similar weight, two piece, relatively cheap

r2-bike.com/NEWMEN-Stem-Evolution-SL-3184-Aluminum-318-mm-6-30-mm
  • 8 1
 I always love articles like this because it brings out every engineer or closet 3D printer to give inputs. They might not be wrong but it provides them an irresistible opportunity to use words like 'porosity' to impress the ladies.
  • 7 0
 If I'm a new company.. I shouldn't make the same length on the stem. I would make 36mm, 42mm and 48mm. people would buy it! I would buy it.. every one is on 35mm, 40 and 50mm. We need more sizes to choose.
  • 9 0
 And 48.99mm for the SRAMophiles out there.
  • 1 0
 @dlford: You win. hahaha
  • 5 0
 The level of flaws in the bonding of titanium powder shown in the one picture is astounding. Absolutely no chance of consistency in strength. Each flaw is a starring point for notch failure . I'm quite certain this process should have little or no flaws . Maybe it has all the strength it needs but all those areas where the material didn't fuse properly. No thanks .
  • 6 0
 I'll stick with my current stem and save the money for beer, but I do enjoy a review that starts out with an HR Giger reference.
  • 5 0
 Looks like some Fancy chisel work on a very expensive rock, rather then ectron beams, and vacuums on Titanium. Cool Prehistoric Stem
  • 5 0
 Feels like they should have a custom length available too? It's a unique looking stem, why not go the whole hog?
  • 7 0
 it looks like shit
  • 1 0
 it really does.
  • 2 0
 Sad that my first thought was " that will be fun to keep clean". And second was " Will they do a dental hygienist version in aluminium?"

Agreed that i don't think 3D printing is ready for mass market consumer product but give it a few years. The advantages in terms of design and reduced material waste are huge. Like the early days of carbon parts right now in this space.
  • 3 0
 damned, sorry, but not sorry... what an ugly thing. I printed Ti6Al4V, CoCrMo, 316L and many other alloy parts ttthat looked much better than this stem. I think the margin for progress in the process is still huge.
  • 2 0
 Given that it is only produced in 35 mm format it is obvious that it was designed for effect rather than performance (given that less than 1% of the rider population actually needs or benefits from a 35 mm bar - 95% of which are made too stiff, or too light so they break too easily).
  • 2 0
 As cool as that is, Point One Racing Split-Second 50mm stem came in at 126grams (nickel plate) with hardware around 10 years ago! Aluminium top cap so could have saved more weight with Ti. . Seems like for all the progress we have in this industry we are still going backwards at times
  • 3 0
 "Plus, what’s the point of 3D-printing something and then making it look like it’s made with some boring old traditional manufacturing process?"
I'd say it looks like it was sand cast actually.
  • 3 0
 Yet another commercial! And for a $300 stem (excluding VAT) that comes only in two sizes (40 and 50) and weights more than a Renthal Apex stem at three times its cost! Bravi!!!!!
  • 2 0
 Pair this stem with a 5Dev crank for the ultimate 1990’s inspired gaper ride. Parts that cost 2-3 times more than simpler, stronger and more reliable designs. Parts that *might* be strong enough for hard use, but weigh more so they can “look cool”.

Tubular structures are always the best option if possible. All of these “exotic” shapes are just dumb-and expensive.
  • 2 0
 the fact that it's 35mm clamp only is a problem...not because I am some nob that thinks 35mm bars are too stiff, but because you can't find a Ti bar in 35mm, and what the hell is the point of a Ti stem without Ti handlebars????


I might be mid-build on a Ti bike right now so this is extra important to me. lol
  • 4 0
 As much as I like nice parts I do have a line and this stem sits 100 feet past that line. To each their own though.
  • 4 0
 Ugly as hell My titanium look is the perfect shiny surface. This seems made from a rock fallen from space.
  • 5 0
 Looks like it was made in a shed. Would look good on an Orange.
  • 1 0
 I don't see the point. You could get a cast aluminum stem that would be far cheaper and about the same weight. I don't see any performance advantage except perhaps strength, but even then, you'd probably have to be hucking Red Bull Hardline or Rampage to see a performance difference.
  • 5 0
 Wish it cost more. Not exclusive enough for me.
  • 2 1
 Claiming that rough area behind the threads has no effect on strength or toughness is 100% wrong.

Either they are cutting corners for reasonable acceptance criteria, or don't know the nuances of controlling orientations for cantilevered surfaces and thermal dissipating media in EBAM. That part is a LONG way from having an acceptable surface finish behind the bar cradle, even for AM Ti in a recreational application.

For those who haven't had to do this in industry, if something makes the hair stand up on your neck when looking at it, you're probably correct to be suspicious.

Avoid.
  • 3 0
 If you want an unnecessarily expensive titanium stem, this is lighter and more pleasing on the eye - lockedcomponents.com/products/ronin-2-stem
  • 1 0
 Still heavier than a two piece alloy stem
  • 1 0
 It looks bad to me. I do not think it would break cos for that amount of material you can build 2 stems almost,so very overbuild due the material?
What is the cool part about that stem if it looks bad,it is very expensive and it is not light?it is 3d printed.Yes.
  • 1 0
 Not impressed at all. But I didn’t get to borrow it and write about it, Despite that, I’m not impressed AND until it includes the reignition of Swobo and includes buttercups for free with purchase, I’ll pass. Dude
  • 1 0
 Mr Levy and Bellingham folks…..on a side note, when I lived in bham, I’d venture up north to ride in van area but do you make it down to the pa area much when your getting more weather than us? Or with the advent of mudhuggers and dope high top riding shoes fo you just stay in bham?
  • 1 0
 "If you want to make your bike parts via EBM, all you need is a special gun that shoots out a beam of electrons from a super-heated tungsten filament at around half the speed of light, as well as a barrel or two of aerospace-grade titanium and a hell of a lot of know-how."

That's all I need? Hold my Molson Canadian der bud...
  • 2 0
 If Abbey Tools decided to ship tools in slightly less expensive boxes, I bet this is what one of the styrofoam inserts could look like.
  • 2 0
 Maybe refine the cement mix some more and up the resolution to 4k, thats not a quality finish that wows me regardless of cost
  • 2 0
 If I'm paying for Ti, I want it to look like Sweetwings, a Rootdown Ti, etc... not some BS my 15YO printed in the basement after yet another Baby Yoda
  • 2 0
 It's cool tech, but not that useful when companies like 77designz are out here with a dh rated 35mm stem that weighs 69g (nice) and costs way less
  • 2 0
 Pointless overpriced project, it's not even that light, looks awful, like it's made of concrete, alu is the correct material for stems and always will be.
  • 3 0
 Yabba Dabba Doo! I'm all in on the stone age look, more plz
  • 3 0
 I’d be impressed if it was forged…
  • 2 0
 Art for art's sake. Super high tech, expensive solution for non-problem. I guess if they can do it, why not?
  • 2 0
 I've always wanted a stem that looks like it was made in someone's garage while costing 8x the price of a normal one.
  • 1 0
 Aren't the areas where it's scalloped out (lines between face plate corners and steerer) exactly where most material is needed?
  • 3 0
 I'd rather have a thomson
  • 1 0
 I like it ,but people saying it is weak ?do they look at the inside shell of their helmets?it looks identical but in a bad way
  • 2 0
 The urge to get some sandpaper and just clean that thing up is overwhelming.
  • 1 0
 On the contrary, despite no more arcturians!!!!’ The new chromag stem is lovely and smooth and colored and not contrived in some freekeester review and I adore it!
  • 1 0
 The unfinished appearance will lead to countless, lengthy high-tech material/manufacturing process explanations. (high pitched giggle)
Ron Swanson
  • 1 0
 I can't even begin to imagine the x-ray of this, the amount of voids that likely will start cracking frrom a high stress component
  • 1 0
 If my Lodge pan has taught me anything, all that thing needs to look nicer is some crisco and a few rounds of seasoning in the oven.
  • 2 0
 CUES makes this affordable.
  • 2 0
 diety copperhead is 136g as well
  • 1 0
 My Locked Components 3D printed titanium stem looks more refined. And it's a few less quid less than this one.
  • 1 0
 Honestly, I love cool new things but this looks horrible and would never make its way onto any bike I ride.
  • 1 0
 What would happen if you put it in a vibratory rumbler to polish? would it have any structural issues?
  • 1 0
 That photo is a precise negative of my setup of aluminium stem and titanium spacers.
  • 1 0
 we will look back at the terrible finish quality and prices of these in a few years and howl!
  • 1 0
 Doesn't seem very light for a titanium 3D printed part. I guess at 80 grams it would make sense.
  • 1 0
 Why would I want a stem that is full of dirt, leaves, mud and other detritus?
  • 1 0
 Mythos sez stiffer than a traditional stem. Renthal sez hold my milling machine.
  • 1 0
 Just wait for the scratch and dent sale when the stems with the imperfections go on sale for 30%off
  • 2 0
 it has gills.
  • 3 0
 that's for cooling - if this stem gets too hot it breaks Wink
  • 1 0
 @Whatajohnny: you're absolutely wrong. They are speed holes. youtu.be/whnms4CLJys?t=45
  • 1 0
 I love how it looks broken already.
  • 1 0
 Shirley you can't be serious
  • 2 1
 Not AM worthy. Not PB worthy.
  • 1 0
 I stay with the barkeeper...
  • 1 0
 I hope those are titanium bolts
  • 1 0
 Of course
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: Uhhhhh Ti bolts in a Ti housing? Yeah best of luck with that....
  • 2 0
 nope!
  • 1 0
 Do they make a gravel version?
  • 3 0
 Only Ti and concrete.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: OMG - Next thing we will have a stem with a door into it that you can store a banana in. That is one ugly creation.

With the UCI now into gravel - you may be aware of Rule 5.4.1.1.1 "It is not permitted to ride a component that is uglier than a glass jar full of fermented smashed bovine a*sholes"

You could get fined 50 Swiss Francs
  • 1 0
 Just gravel finish
  • 2 1
 Buy a ENVE stem, same price but lighter
  • 2 0
 Or syntace megaforce, it’s forged (stronger), $75 and only 110g or so
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: Newmen Evolution SL is the price but lighter, and alloy with Ti bolts
  • 2 0
 *the same price

Also lighter than the Enve carbon stem
  • 1 0
 The megaforce comes with Ti bolts too. And it’s 91g for 33mm length.
  • 1 0
 The 77 Designz One Piece (enduro) stem is 69g for 120 euros. If you are in NA, I think VR1 sells the equivalent stem.
  • 1 0
 I knew you gonna test this!
  • 1 0
 is that made out of a cinnamon graham cracker?
  • 1 0
 Wrong application for additive and poorly executed.
  • 1 0
 A £250 stem that looks like my nephew made in STEM class, got it. Pass.
  • 1 0
 Probably better suited as a new form a pasta. It would hold sauce well.
  • 1 0
 Cool high school project.
  • 2 0
 Trash lol
  • 1 0
 My kids would love cleaning that thing with some pipe cleaners
  • 1 0
 Heat-treated by a nuclear blast.
  • 1 1
 I freakin love it. And so will dentists, if these snap like all the rest of you are saying
  • 1 0
 this is terrible, looks like something I would have made taking ME101
  • 1 0
 I don’t know if its my phone but this stem is not see through.
  • 1 0
 My stem has polarizing looks too……after I put on my 3D glasses
  • 1 0
 It's March 1st... not April 1st.
  • 2 0
 Looks like garbage!!!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a piece of porosity poop.
  • 1 0
 Kinda looks like a multi vitamin you can eat
  • 1 0
 This looks like a cheap sand cast part.
  • 1 0
 Que Si
  • 1 1
 3d printing is the future. Print your way to freedom
  • 1 0
 Stem the flow of this bs
  • 1 0
 looks like a rock
  • 1 0
 No pics from the front?







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