10 Mountain Bike Hip Packs Ridden & Rated

Aug 19, 2019
by Nikki Rohan  



It’s kinda crazy: the “fanny pack” was originally used for trail riding in the formative years of mountain biking, but as recently as five years ago, riding with a “bum bag” or “man purse” was a recipe for the kind of ridicule reserved for kooks and ugly Americans abroad in Europe. But, It turns out those early mountain bikers were onto something.

Fast forward to the rise of enduro and racers' need for speed sans hydration bag (and the brilliant creation of the marketing term “hip pack”), and voila! Nowadays there are companies that ONLY make hip packs. Sneer if you want, but for running hot laps under two hours, enduro racing, or any go light and fast but carry the essentials bike endeavor, a hip bag is definitely the way to roll. Here are ten we tried out to help you pick the right flavor for your adventures.

Disclosure: At a hair under 5'5" I can ride either a medium or small bike frame depending on the company, the design, and the geometry. Over the last five years I have spent most of that time on a small frame with a mixture of short and longer travel bikes. So how does that have anything to do with Hip Packs you ask? Well, on a lot of the small frames there isn't enough room to mount a water bottle, especially if I am running a piggy-back shock. Bottom line--I have to carry my water in some form or fashion so whatever pack I carry has to accommodate accordingly. Also note that I do prefer a hip pack to a full hydro pack for 90% of the riding I do, as I prefer the weight down lower on my back.



Nikki Rohan running a hot dusty lap on the Whoopdee Trail at sunset.





Camelbak

Camelbak Podium Flow Belt 21oz


Camelbak Podium Flow Belt 21oz
• MSRP: $45.00 USD
• Colors: Black, Burgundy/Lake Blue, and Camelflage/Brown Seal
camelbak.com

For a svelte little hip pack, the Podium Flow has damn near everything on tap. It comes with a 21oz bottle topped with a Mud Cap which fits securely into an ergonomically angled elastic sleeve. Thee's an integrated tool pouch, a zipper secured pocket large enough for a phone, reflective bits for low light visibility, breathable mesh, adjustable waist buckles, and a robust cordura type fabric for the exterior—not crash proof but tougher than skin. Overall, the Podium Flow Belt 21oz weighs in at a paltry 6oz (190 grams) and has 2 liters (120 cubic inches) of storage space. Packed efficiently, that’s enough storage space for a multi tool, some quick links, a chain tool, a tire plug kit, a tube, CO2 cartridges, phone, and energy bars/chews, with maybe—just maybe—space for a tissue thin wind jacket. This little dance number will fit anywhere from a 28” to a 46” waist. Not too shabby…but how does it ride?

The angled elastic water bottle sleeve was the first thing that really called to me with this pack. Not only did it include a secure and functional water bottle holder, but an updated Podium Dirt Series bottle was included with the purchase of the pack. "Secure" is the key word here, because the thing I hate most about hip packs is when they feel flimsy and flop around. While I occasionally had to tighten the waist buckle (like I do on almost all packs), the bag itself felt secure, it didn't slide around on technical terrain, and the water bottle never launched out like a projectile. I did have to stop to remove/replace the bottle due to the tight elastic sleeve, which can be cumbersome if you are used to drinking on the go. Two liters of cargo space were ample to carry all the trail riding necessities listed above, excepting a light weight wind shell. However, If you keep your spare tube affixed to your frame, that would free up enough space to stash a thin jacket.

This is the hot lap hip pack dreams are made of. Its one of the best value packs in this review. What I liked best was the fact that it has a sturdy, yet comfortable design, making it super practical for shorter rides where you need only to carry water and bare minimum supplies.

PCamelbak Podium Flow Belt 21oz
Camelbak Podium Flow Belt 21oz

Front and back of the Camelbak Podium Flow Belt 21oz


Pros

+ Secure single bottle water storage
+ Waist buckle tightens from both sides
+ Best value
Cons

- Minimal cargo capacity
- No location to stash a light jacket





Bontrager

Bontrager Rapid Pack


Bontrager Rapid Pack
• MSRP: $60.00 USD
• Colors: Black, Black, or Black
trekbikes.com

Bontrager comes out swinging with their affordable Rapid Pack. Pony up $60 USD and you get a svelte black hip pack (222 grams/7.8oz) with two zippered compartments separated at birth by a water bottle sleeve. The left-hand compartment has internal mesh pockets for gear organization, as does the right, and the right also includes a key fob and a compression phone sleeve that likely won’t accommodate anything larger than an iPhone 5. The exterior fabric has a four-way stretch component (94% nylon/6% elastane) which makes stuffing that sucker easy to do. How much can you stuff? Exactly 100 cubic inches, or 1.64 liters. Svelte this little number may be, but it’ll match up to a dance partner with a not so svelte 46” waist. How well does it dance for $60?

The first thing I noticed (and liked) about this pack was the wrapped design. Unlike most packs that sit above the lumbar, this one is designed to stay close to your body and securely wrap around the waist. As discussed above, I really dislike a flopping hip pack and the Rapid Pack clung to my waist like a limpet, eliminating that potential distraction. Similar to the Camelbak, this pack holds one water bottle (approx. 21oz hydration capacity), making it best suited for shorter rides where the amount of water you need is limited to a single bottle plus whatever you can carry one on your frame.

Performance wise, the bottle sits securely in the middle of the pack and up against your back. That's a hard to reach location. As a consequence, I had to stop pedaling to drink. And, it's held tight enough that slipping it back in one handed while on the move simply was not happening. The pack has cool little storage compartments within the zippered pockets designed to stash your tools in an organized fashion. I was able to fit all my basic necessities, including a lightweight jacket, thanks to the stretchy nylon fabric, dual compartments, and separation of that cargo capacity. One problem I did run into was finding a hand pump short enough to squeeze into the pocket. A long, hard, non-malleable item doesn't fit comfortably into a curved pocket. Luckily, I found a sweet Crankbrothers Gem in my stash that I squeezed in and solved the issue.

I wouldn't trust the nylon fabric to last forever, and you might not want to get caught in a rainstorm, but all in all, Bontrager has designed a great performing product that stays put on your back like nothing else. It's perfectly suited for shorter rides with a limited but useful cargo capacity for basic necessities.

Bontrager Rapid Pack
Bontrager Rapid Pack

Two views of the Bontrager Rapid Pack


Pros

+ Curved design for secure fit
+ Waist buckle tightens from both sides
+ Competitive price for similar products
Cons

- Durability (not waterproof)
- Difficult to fit mini-pump/shock pump in cargo space





Platypus

Platypus


Platypus Chuckanut Hip Pack
• MSRP: $50.00 USD
• Colors: Carbon, Green Ranger
platy.com

Available in a 3 liter size, the Chuckanut (named for a small mountain range in Bellingham, Washington) features a .5 liter Flexible Soft bottle (taste free hydration on the go!); a fleece lined device pocket to protect your phone, or whatever breakable things you ride with; a comfy, mesh covered foam back panel designed to channel heat away from you; a couple waist belt stash pockets; a securely zippered main pocket with internal organization; a “shove it” style external pocket for pads or extra layers; a loop for a bike light; and a carry handle that doubles as a hang loop for drying. Overall weight is a par for the genre, and it weighs 8oz, including the Soft bottle. Construction is a mix of stout 160 denier and 210 denier water resistant nylon with YKK zippers.

This small low-profile hip pack falls into the same hot lap category as the Camelbak and Bontrager packs. The main difference, however, is rather than having a storage slot for a traditional water bottle, the pack comes with a .5 liter (16oz) soft bottle that is stored in the inside compartment. This amount of water is likely only sufficient for shorter rides, but is a good supplement if your frame can accommodate a bottle. With this design, you definitely have to stop and take the bottle out to drink, but an added benefit is that as you drink, the flask flattens out and it weighs less than a traditional plastic bottle. The pack itself has a nice, 3 liter capacity with a built in organization system for storing essentials. I was easily able to pack it with my hand pump, tube, dynaplug tool, tire wrenches, multi-tool, bar/gel, keys and phone, alongside the water bottle. The pack also has wings with small elastic cargo pockets that wrap around the hips to help keep the bag in place while riding (I didn't notice any flopping or sliding during my test rides). The little side mesh pockets on the wings are pretty useless for anything other than a single gel pack, but allows easy access if you like to eat on the go. What this pack had that the others didn't, was a bit of a kangaroo pouch with two compression straps in the front that is perfect for stashing a jacket or armor. This feature allows a nice bit of extra capacity without having to go to a larger bag.

The Chuckanut is a sweet little hip pack perfectly designed for shorter rides with just enough storage for everything you might want to carry. I really like the addition of the kangaroo pouch for stashing random accessories especially if you don't like to climb with your knee guards up or around your ankles. The pack has a competitive price tag and if water is the least important part of the storage equation, this is a great option.


Platypus
Platypus

Front and flip-side of the Platypus Chuckanut Hip Pack


Pros

+ Waist buckle tightens from both sides
+ Expandable exterior flap for jacket/armor storage
+ Competitive price for similar products
Cons

- Limited water storage/capacity
- Non-zippered very small wing storage somewhat useless





High Above

High Above


High Above Lookout
• MSRP: $100.00 USD
• Colors: Black Camo with Maroon, custom options
highabove.net

What High Above brings to the table for $100 USD is a hand crafted hip pack with all the details sweated out by JC, a passionate rider and pack designer. "What kind of details," you ask? Waterproof and bombproof VX shell material for one. Heavy duty nylon webbing? Check. Three internal pockets to organize your riding essentials? Check. Breathable back panel? Check. Super durable YKK #8 zippers for max weatherproofing? Check. Plus an extra zippered external pocket for still more stuff. And extra long para-cord pulls to make opening/closing easy, even with cold numbed or adrenaline shaky fingers. Yup—it’s got those, too. Oh, and a water bottle holster (aka “rocket” in High Above lingo) is included with each pack, or for $20 extra dollars you can purchase a second one—the Lookout has been engineered to accommodate two. But wait....there’s more: each pack includes two stretchy shock cords that mount onto matching external points to secure knee guards for the pedal up. Last, but not least: a key clip. Don’t like camo? A few dollars more allows you to select custom colors for wings, body, webbing, and buckles. So, not cheap, but this pack is hand crafted and engineered to go the distance. Carrying capacity for the Lookout, according to JC, is a very unscientific, “three beers or so.” Overall weight with the included bottle rocket is twelve ounces. This little black dress of a singletrack slayer will fit anyone from a small (25”) to a size large (38”-ish) waist.

The Lookout is a super versatile hip pack that checks all the boxes. For most of my testing, I only included one water bottle rocket (attached on the right side), but having the option to attach a second is super useful. The strap that holds the bottle rocket(s) is pretty straightforward and once attached, there is no need to worry about Velcro failures or projectile bottles—they're not going anywhere. As for the flop factor, so long as I cinched the waist tight during my rides, there was no flopping and minimal side to side movement. The cargo capacity was sufficient for all my tools and snacks, and while the Lookout doesn't offer a lot of cool little compartments to hold each and every item, it does have more than enough pockets to keep everything from mixing together into a "find the widget" blob. I also really like the addition of the simple shock cords for on the go extra storage of armor or a jacket. But, the thing that really wins for me with this bag is that you can customize the colors and have your own unique hand made, exceptionally durable little bag for trail missions.

Everything coming out of Bellingham, Washington these days is pretty awesome: the people, the bikes...all quality. And this hip pack is no exception. It has the cargo capacity that you want for short or longer rides, the water storage to match, and the coolest customizable color options around. The only thing I would love to see added is a little waist pouch for on-the-go snacks, but when you are hand making a product, adding something like that may not be as simple it seems. For the price, this little number is high on my list as a "go to" pack for hot laps and three-hour adventures.

High Above
High Above

Front and back of the High Above Lookout


Pros

+ Customizable - choose your own adventure colors/designs
+ Durable/waterproof
+ Can add/remove storage holsters for 1-2 water bottles
Cons

- No hip pocket storage for easy access snacks
- No built in freezer to keep the beer cool






Mission Workshop

Mission Workshops AXIS VX


Mission Workshop the Axis VX Modular Waist Pack
• MSRP: $185.00 USD
• Colors: Black, Gray, and White
missionworkshop.com

I know, I know—some of you reading this are saying, “$185 USD for a bum bag?!?” Well, uber hip Mission Workshop goes there with the Axis VX Modular waist pack. Why the hefty price tag? Maybe because designing a top shelf waist pack with cutting edge fabrics isn’t cheap. Or maybe just because they can. The nitty-gritty: VX-21 diamond ripstop fabric makes up the body of this pack. This fabric has greater abrasion resistance, tear resistance, and weather resistance per gram weight than nearly anything else you can use other than knitting together pixie wings sprinkled with powdered unicorn horn. Inside the Axis, VX you’ll find a key clip, an internal zippered pocket, and 2.5 liters of storage space—enough for tools, tube, a packable shell, your phone, and a beer or two. Outside you’ll find a mini U lock holder and a laser cut waist belt that keeps a comfortable low profile for “forget about it” use that snaps together with a unique magnetic clip. Bonus: the straps can be stowed away to allow the pack to be fastened to any of Mission Workshop’s Arkiv line of bags (hence the “modular” in the pack name). With the waist belt deployed it will fit up to a “Fat Bastard” sized 50” waist. Total weight is 8oz. But, is it worth the money?

It's hard not to compare this pack to the High Above Lookout. Both are hand made in the USA using the same top-shelf fabrics, zippers, and buckles. The main difference between the two is price and functionality. Price: California vs. Washington. The High Above is almost half the price. If you go onto the website of Mission Workshop for this bag, you find a sexy model dude maybe riding a bike with his fanny pack tossed over his shoulder. Go to High Above and you see mountain bikers. Functionality: the Axis VX bag is a sweet little storage pack with ample cargo capacity for your basic supplies. It sat comfortably on my back with minimal flopping or sliding. What it doesn't have is a place to stash a water bottle. Nor does it offer a built-in water bladder. It also doesn't include any waist belt storage pockets or cool little compartments to organize tools. Mission Workshops does, however, have (hands down!) the best buckle (Fidlock) out of any of the bags I tested!

The bottom line is that, while this is a super cool looking fanny pack with a very MADE in the USA feel, it isn't designed specifically for mountain biking and therefore. it lacks some of the key features dedicated bags offer. If all you need is a bit of cargo space for your rides, and you have a extra money to burn, this is a great option. Funny enough, I got the most compliments when I was testing this pack. With a couple additions, this simple, but expensive, hip pack could be great.

Mission Workshops AXIS VX
Mission Workshops AXIS VX

Two views of the Mission Workshop the Axis VX Modular Waist Pack


Pros

+ Hand made in the USA
+ Durable/ quality fabrics and materials
Cons

- Expensive for what you get
- No water bottle storage





Neon Retro D.A.R.E.

Neon Retro D.A.R.E. Fanny Pack


Neon Retro D.A.R.E. Fanny Pack
• MSRP: $17.00 USD
• Colors: High Vis Yellow with Hot Pink lettering
amazon.com

As simple as simple gets: an adjustable waist belt and two zippered compartments. Zero water carrying capacity. Cargo capacity? Unknown. Weight? About 5oz. Waist size it will fit? Probably yours. Zebra skin tights? Not included.

You asked for it, you got it. Here is the thrift store "affordable" hip pack for all you complainers who scream at high-dollar, activity-specific designer gear, and who swear the cheaper stuff is just as good. Yes, I actually went on a couple rides with this pack, and the resulting experience filled me with complete appreciation for the design teams of the other packs. First and foremost, the only positive thing this pack offered was just enough cargo space that I could (barely) cram all my basic necessities into its two storage compartments. I had to use short hand pump, though. The width across this pack is rather small. Second impression: without the cool little internal storage pockets for organization, everything amassed to the bottom of the pouch in a messy pile. But yes, it did successfully carry my essentials. When it came to actual riding, the waist belt continually loosened up and it flopped around so badly on my back that I found myself constantly stopping to slide the effing thing back into position, and re-cinch the belt. I didn't verify whether or not it was waterproof, but I'm sure the neon color will scare off aggressive wildlife or Tinder dates.

For under $20, you get what you pay for: retro style without comfort and trendiness or functionality. But hey, if cheap is your thing and you prefer to save your dollars to buy new tires for that twenty-six inch bike, this pack proves that there are options out there.

Neon Retro D.A.R.E. Fanny Pack
Neon Retro D.A.R.E. Fanny Pack

Neon Retro D.A.R.E. fanny pack details


Pros

+ Trendsetting
+ Affordable
Cons

- Poor design for storing loose items
- No hydration capacity
- Loosens and flops around when riding





Osprey

Osprey Savu


Osprey Savu Lumbar Bottle Pack
• MSRP: $55.00 USD
• Colors: Slate Blue, Obsidian Black, and Molten Red
osprey.com

There is a helluva lotta bang for the buck with Osprey’s Savu Mountain Bike Lumbar Pack. This little single track dance number is made from a reassuringly burly 900 x 600 Denier polyester fabric, and utilizes a cushy foam back panel with breathable mesh on the wings. It’s got a zippered main compartment with internal tool organization, a smaller top zippered compartment, as well as two zippered wing pockets for stashing whatever your trail riding essentials might be. All in all, the Savu has 4 Liters of stash space. That's enough for a tube, food, a packable shell, tools, and a phone, with room to spare. There are also two compressible water bottle holsters, a tail light hook, and a hang/carry loop. All that weighs in at .81 lbs, and it will fit anyone with a 25” waist on up to the same fat bastard 50” waist of the Mission Workshop’s Axis. It’s got a lot going on, and the price is right.

I was most intrigued with this hip pack. I tend to waffle on whether or not I prefer bottles to a bladder hydro system, so having a bag that can go both ways is ideal. The Savu, however, only goes one way—one bottle or two bottles. But, when you're not using the water bottle storage option, you can unbutton a flap and the pack then molds seamlessly to the curvature of your hips. Complicated in words, yes, but super functional if you decide you only need one bottle instead of two. For the price, this bag is competitive with other 3 to 4 liter cargo capacity, bottle-carrying hip packs. It has a single, amply sized, open storage bay on the interior for all the tools and snacks I need for a longer ride, but four liters of cargo space means I can take my pump, tube, food, keys, phone - and my whole tool roll - which has my spare hanger, chain link, bandaids, electrical tape, Benadryl, emergency blanket.... you get the idea. So long as I snugged up the waist belt, the bag stayed put whether or not I had one bottle or two bottles stashed, and it didn't feel as awkward and unbalanced as I expected with a single bottle. A couple things to note, like the Bontrager and Camelbak, a small jacket is about all I could squish into this pack and there was no place to strap knee guards if that is something you prefer.

I've always been a fan of Osprey and the Savu just drove home the point that Osprey sure knows bags. This hip pack is a durable and clean looking no-frills design that will get you through a three-hour ride any day of the week.

Osprey Savu
Osprey Savu

Front and back of the Osprey Savu Lumbar Bottle Pack


Pros

+ Option to use 1 or 2 water bottles
+ Waist tightens from both sides
Cons

- Minimal organizing pockets in cargo area
- No external straps to carry armor





Dakine

Dakine Hot Laps 5L Waist Bag


Dakine Hot Laps 5 Liter Waist Bag
• MSRP: $75.00 USD
• Colors: Black
dakine.com

Dakine was in the hip bag driver seat from the beginning. They’ve whipped up the Hot Laps 5-liter waist bag for those days where a pack is overkill but their smaller 2-liter bag isn’t quite enough. This pack is constructed using burly, 200 Denier bluesign approved nylon, and includes a nice Hydrapak 2 liter/70oz lumbar reservoir with a hose that slips around the waist and snaps into a magnetic buckle, a breathable “Air Flow” back panel, a “Phaser” bite valve, a divided, mesh-lined pocket to keep your stuff neatly organized, and a couple straps for attaching armor for the pedal up. The Hot Laps 5 liter weighs in at 16oz/.471 kg, and has 5 liters of cargo capacity (keep in mind that the included water bladder will claim 40% of that space). Worth it?

With a whopping 5 liters of cargo capacity, you can take just about everything you ever wanted on your ride, along with your partner's ego, as you fly past them while wearing this pack. Dakine has a done a great job with winning the water capacity game with a bladder that holds 70 fl. oz. (2 liters), that's way more water to ride with than a traditional hot lap would ever require. The pack has two separate compartments: one open type on the back for the water bladder and another with multiple storage compartments in the front. While the pack doesn't offer any zippered wing pockets, it does have a small mesh pocket on one side that will fit a gel or small snack. The waist buckles from one side while the hose wraps around the waist and connects to the other side magnetically. There are two small cinch straps on the wings to help adjust tension, too. Fully loaded, this bag can seem a bit much for a hip pack, but once you put it on and start pedaling, you'll barely notice it's there. Another nice feature is the addition of two hook and clasp straps on the bottom of the pack to hold armor or a jacket. While I would prefer to have them on the top (less trail debris), that also wouldn't be super convenient for accessing your tools or snacks mid-ride.

At the end of the day, this pack is as close as you can get to the cargo and hydration capacity of a full backpack minus the shoulder straps. It holds plenty of water for long days on the bike and has an ample amount of storage for everything I find necessary to carry. I wouldn't mind a zippered wing pocket or a flap that comes around the front to better hold my jacket, but for the price, this is one of the best deals you will find.

Dakine Hot Laps 5L Waist Bag
Dakine Hot Laps 5L Waist Bag

Two views of the Dakine Hot Laps 5 liter Waist Bag

Dakine Hot Laps 5L Waist Bag
Dakine Hot Laps 5L Waist Bag

Bottom cinch straps on the Dakine Hot Laps Bag


Pros

+ Large cargo and hydration capacity
+ External armor/jacket cinch straps
Cons

- No water bottle option
- No zippered pockets on the waist/hip belt





Patagonia

Patagonia 9 Trails


Patagonia Nine Trails Waist Pack 8 Liter
• MSRP: $119.00 USD
• Colors: Forge Gray, Tasmanian Teal, and New Adobe
patagonia.com


"Patagucci’s" Nine Trails Waist Pack features a removable 1.5 Liter HydraPak reservoir, stretch pockets that will accommodate a variety of bottles should you opt out on using or desire to supplement the included reservoir, robust DWR treated 210 denier Cordura material on the outside, 200 denier polyester lining on the inside, one zippered waist belt pouche for gels or bars, two zippered compartments for tools and what not, a padded waist belt, a breathable back panel, and it weighs in at 380 grams (13.4oz). Size wise, according to their website, it will fit anywhere from a 26” to a 34” waist. So, How’s it ride?

This do-it-all hip pack has been in my hands for the almost two years. I've taken it on more rides than I can count. It's big, yes, but that means it has gobs of carrying capacity. It also has all the features, storage pockets, and quality that you find in some of the top packs in this review. While this pack only buckles and tightens on the waist buckle from one side, once you cinch it down, it stays put. Depending on how loaded it is, there is minimal flopping (stuff any pack to the gills, though, and a certain amount of flop will arise). I never noticed it sliding around like I did with some of the smaller packs, and the weight feels pretty evenly distributed, regardless of whether I'm using the water bottles or the bladder. The pack has one zippered waist compartment (as compared to two on the EVOC and zero on the Dakine) that is perfect for easy-to-grab snacks or a multitool. The other side has a hook system to adjust the length of water hose to your waist. The water carrying capacity of 50 fluid ounces is on par with the other large hip packs reviewed here. For me, that's usually sufficient for a three to four hour ride. You can also carry a bottles on the two side sleeves (the EVOC bag has a slightly better design for this that includes cinch straps). Another really cool feature of this pack is that if you unzip the front panel, there are two compression straps which allow you to strap a jacket or armor onto the pack.

I love supporting companies that try to do the right thing. There is something to be said about knowing where your materials come from, the impacts of DWR treatments, and reducing our footprint on this planet. For those reasons (plus more), I am a big fan of Patagonia. With the Nine Trails hip pack, they have designed a competitively priced, "go out and shred for hours" pack that has all the bells and whistles you need for single track missions.

Patagonia 9 Trails
Patagonia 9 Trails

Front and back of the Patagonia Nine Trails Waist Pack 8 Liter.

Patagonia 9 Trails
Patagonia 9 Trails

Front pouch and optional water bottle carrying capacity of the Nine Trails waist pack.


Pros

+ Ample cargo storage for long rides
+ Front pocket has integrated hooks to carry armor/jacket
+ Durable material/ water resistant
Cons

- Pack size not super ideal for sub-two hour rides
- Prefer a magnet to a hook for water hose attachment





EVOC

EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3L


EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3 Liter
• MSRP: $115.00 USD
• Colors: Black-Carbon Grey, Sulpher-Moss Green, and Carbon Grey-Chili Red
evocsports.com

Evoc has the 3 liter Pro for longer go light and go fast singletrack missions, where a single frame mounted water bottle isn’t gonna cut it, but a pack would be too much. The bag weighs in at 430 grams (.95lb), plus a HydraPak (130 gram, 2.9 liter bladder) with a magnetically secured hose. The back panel is well ventilated, and the wings have a breathable mesh against the body. There’s a separate compartment for the bladder, as well as a zippered compartment with internal mesh sleeves for tool storage, and two zippered wing pouches for smaller essentials. Don’t feel like carrying that bladder? You can max out the 3 Liters of cargo capacity, and carry two bottles at either end of the main compartment. There’s also a hanger hook and a tail light loop.

There is a saying that good things come in small packages. This hip pack is everything you could want smashed into 3 liters of perfection. For starters, the pack has a very unique EVOC designed waist cinching system that includes a Velcro strap under a secondary buckle that allows for extra tightening along with two Ventiflap pull tabs on either side of the closure strap to adjust the tension. Fully loaded, the bag barely budges when riding, regardless of how technical the trail gets. I was out on trail for almost five hours and, once I had this pack fitted to my torso, I never once had to adjust things. After filling the 1.5 liter (50 oz) bladder, I was able to pack in all of my tools and food for a long day out on the trails. Packing a full day's adventure into a 3 liter space was a tight squeez. After I had loaded my tool roll, tube, pump, food, phone, and more food, there wasn't room for my jacket. But, thats where those extra mesh pockets on either side of the storage area came in handy. They're designed to hold bottles, but are perfect stash spots. I used one for my Patagonia Houdini jacket (it compresses down to about the size of my fist), and I could have brought along a bottle to increase my water capacity if the included 1.5 liter bladder wasn't enough.

Fully loaded, I thought the bag would feel hefty on my lower back, but it was designed to distribute the weight evenly and I barely noticed it once pedaling. The back ventilation system was also really good—no overheating or sweating, despite the muggy, post summer weather. At the end of the day, this hip pack was one of my favorites. I could pull the bladder and put a bottle in it for shorter rides, or pack it to the gills for longer ones. EVOC nailed it with this versatile hip pack.

EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3L
EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3L

Front and rear-view of the EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3 Liter.

EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3L
EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3L

Unique waist belt and optional water bottle carrying capacity of the EVOC pack.


Pros

+ Lots of usable pockets
+ Designed for water bottle storage or bladder usage
+ Unique waist belt keeps pack tight and secure
Cons

- Front pocket is difficult to close up when fully packed
- Bladder hose gets in the way if not properly stored





Summary

When purchasing a hip pack the things you need to focus on are what length ride do you want to cover, what features do you want the bag to contain and do you prefer a bladder or water bottle storage?

Camelbak Podium Flow Belt 21oz: Hot lap hip pack dreams are made of
Bontrager Rapid Pack: Curved to fit your body and carry the bare necessities
Platypus Chuckanut Hip Pack: Small yet mighty design, perfect for hot laps
High Above Lookout: The best 'choose your own adventure' hip pack available
Mission Workshop the Axis VX Modular Waist Pack: The pack you want to be seen in
Neon Retro D.A.R.E.: I dare you to try to tell us cheap fanny's work just as well
Osprey Savu Lumbar Bottle Pack: Solid reputation gets the job done pack
Dakine Hot Laps 5 Liter Waist Bag: Everything you want at the right price
Patagonia Nine Trails Waist Pack 8 Liter: Clean design with room for all day adventures
EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3 Liter: Nailed it with this versatile pack



About the Tester:

Nikki Rohan stands 5'5" and weighs 135 lbs with a 28-inch waist, 37-inch hips, and 35-inch chest, and wears a size small helmet, size large gloves, and EU-41 shoes. She typically falls between a size small and medium bike, and wears a US 8.5 shoe. She resides in Hood River, Oregon, with her husband, Colin Meagher, her two kids, a dog, and a grumpy cat.





259 Comments

  • 119 1
 really precise and pleasant article !
  • 5 34
flag Laymo (Aug 19, 2019 at 12:12) (Below Threshold)
 They all have the same weakness, they have all the weight tugging on your stomach and bouncing around. If you want to eliminate this problem and keep things stable, strap in and TOP UP!

www.amazon.com/TOP-UP-Multifunctional-Resistant-Backpack-Traveling/dp/B07CKT7R57

A chestpack allows for quicker access in emergency situations, if you wanna ditch the trendy fancy fanny pack. Great for solo riders who are armed and dangerous:

www.amazon.com/Helikon-Tex-Bushcraft-Line-Chest-Numbat/dp/B07PQX21WS
  • 12 0
 agree - but there's one they needed to add to the pile:
shopboardwalkvintage.com/shop/marlboro-fanny-pack-w-plastic-water-bottle
  • 4 0
 @shredddr:
110% correct. This has got to be one of the best packs ive ever worn. Tons of storage, perfect bottle placement, strap is wide and wings provide a great fit.

Ive been running one for years, only to replace it with a High Above pack (Which I love) I still wear the Marlboro pack every now and then and its always stays in the van to lend out.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/16254407
  • 3 0
 @xxsurlyxx: i bought a second one thinking I'd give it away, but found no takers. I have two boys now, so I guess they will each inherit one someday. lucky them. but yes - it's an awesome pack - mutli tool stuffs nicely into the little horizontal pouch on the left, and I can fit two packs of smokes in the pocket above it - it's perfect. I guess it could be better if I could fit an olde english 800 where the bottle goes. now I'm rambling...
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: had one!
  • 101 1
 It's all so well laid out. Give that woman a promotion!
  • 33 83
flag pakleni (Aug 19, 2019 at 6:25) (Below Threshold)
 Agree, but..
She's a woman.
She has a waist.
It's easy for her.

On thr other side, me who has no waist (actually i have one but it's not concave but convex) will have some difficulties to fixing somehow this goddam bum bag and prevent it to become knees bag
  • 44 3
 @pakleni: if only there were something a little higher... Like, above the waist. Back? Yeah back bag! wait that doesn't sound right
  • 6 0
 @pakleni: It would seem having some sort of waist would be a prerequisite. I still don’t see the advantage of a hip bag over a small hydration pack. Obviously, I’m no trendsetter.
  • 16 2
 @pakleni: sounds like you have an ass problem too. Squats bud, squats.
  • 8 1
 @pakleni: It's weird to me that so many people voted down your comment. There's nothing in the least bit wrong with it.
  • 11 0
 @pakleni: Not sure why everyone down voted this. Women typically have wider hips and a more distinct waist which is no doubt very useful for keeping a hip pack in place without having to cut off the circulation to your lower half.

As a male with a slim build a hip pack is pretty much never going to work for me. Not saying that should stop anyone else from using them but it’s something to keep in mind if you haven’t worn a hip pack before and are reading these reviews.
  • 80 1
 That D.A.R.E fanny pack is to be worn over the shoulder an FULL of the devils lettuce
  • 15 31
flag unrooted (Aug 19, 2019 at 5:05) (Below Threshold)
 If only they could make it more obvious to the pigs what one might have in that bag.
  • 20 18
 @unrooted:
Hey man, cops waste a lot of time on victimless crimes, and occasionally there's a bad egg, but they're not pigs.
  • 3 14
flag priest55 (Aug 20, 2019 at 0:42) (Below Threshold)
 @unrooted: fell hook line and sinker for that Black Lives Matter bollocks didn't you mate....
  • 32 1
 lets call a spade a spade here, there bum bags
  • 21 0
 or Assebag
  • 11 0
 ^ this

or worse fanny packs
  • 27 1
 Fanny packs are the answer to over population.
  • 1 1
 So would you rather have back sweat over you bag or......depending how low the bag sits
  • 7 3
 @Riyadh: I prefer fanny sweat over back sweat any day of the week.
  • 30 4
 *they're
  • 2 1
 @unrooted: back sweat aint getting to the treats inside a back bag. How protected are these ass bags?
  • 2 0
 I get the impression some people posting here don't know what a fanny is..
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: I do...and I'm a bit of a fanboy for good quality Fanny's...
  • 1 2
 @megatryn: Ok bring that fagiole over any minute of any day and see what happens to his douche bag.
  • 44 15
 Everytime I see those I am asking...do you even crash? What´s the idea to put a bottle directly to backbone?
  • 24 15
 How many times do you crash direcly on your back? Maybe a failed Wheelie or something. What's more dangerous is a phone in your pocket, a filled water bottle is almost a additional protection layer.
  • 43 3
 @Tiez: it´s not about how many times, once could be enough
  • 19 2
 @Tiez: It happens. My best friend is in a wheelchair as a result of such a crash and I know a few cases of people with cracked ribs from this type of incident. High-speed OTBs on mellower trails were involved.

Also, while your phone example is certainly valid, the closed end of a bottle of relatively stiff. I'd hardly call it protection and wouldn't bet against it acting as a fulcrum if you land right on it with your spine.
  • 8 10
 Do you even bike?
  • 9 1
 Well yeah, this is the very reason I don't like the idea of carrying hard materials (bottle caps, phone, pump) directly against my back. You may not often land directly on your back but more than a few times you roll over once to lose momentum. Something down there doesn't seem good. Actually the full length water bladder in a regular Camelbak has saved my back a few times though of course this only works when there is still enough water in there. I now ride with an Ergon BE1 which has a low 1.5l bladder and back protector. So I'm already protected against everything in the bag. The phone goes in a pocket between water bladder and a harder shell on the outside, so that's fine too. As for the pump, even if a frame doesn't have room for a bottle it usually still has bottle mounts. Sometimes in the front triangle, sometimes below the downtube which is still fully acceptable for mounting your tire- and shockpump there.
  • 2 0
 @bok-CZ: with the evoc pack i have, the bottels sit on the side, so no problem here, also i try to pack somithing soft close to my body, to „protect“ from the hard stuff. Idk if it really helps????????‍♂️ But it feels good
  • 5 4
 You *are* using a *plastic* water bottle, correct? If not, it’s the recommended material for this purpose.
  • 10 6
 @aerik: If someone crashed hard enough to sustain fractures or spinal injuries, it seems pretty likely the pliable, plastic water bottle is not the root cause.
  • 2 0
 @Tiez: I recently got a pair of Ion shorts with a nice padded phone pocket. I was very pleased to see that
  • 9 1
 I wish I could find the article from the 90’s where someone fell some ridiculous amount of distance onto their back, like 30 meters, their friends thought they were dead for sure, but the guy was wearing a camelback...and was only a little scraped up, maybe @RichardCunningham remembers, because I believe it was in an MBAction mag, or maybe it was in Zapata Espinoza‘s magazine???
  • 5 2
 Frame bag FTW.
  • 4 1
 The last time I crashed with a phone in my pocket, it was completly bent, glad nothing on my body was broken.@crashtor:
  • 7 0
 @unrooted: That happened to my father while he was on his dirt bike on a desert ride. He thought he was bleeding out after a nasty OTB - but it was the hydration bladder contents.
  • 12 2
 @vinay: crashing on your back is one reason I’d prefer a full hydration pack to a fanny pack. My camelbak has saved me from 3 hard crashes onto my back I wouldnt have walked away from, and a few other minor ones that could have been worse. Downside: They’re hot as hell to ride with.
  • 1 0
 @Tiez: I try and tuck n roll so basically every time
  • 9 3
 I don’t crash, or try very hard not to. I admit I don’t have as much fun as others may, but crashing at my age means missing work, or paying stupid expensive bills, and missing riding time. I’ve broken ribs, sliced open skin, knocked my head silly. Not fun. So I don’t crash, and haven’t this year. I’ve had awkward situations, but no at-speed crashes, and I see the car park, most of us aren’t crashing. Think of all the types of riders, you are a minority if you regularly crash.
  • 4 0
 I prefer to use a lumbar bladder system. I was hoping the Camelbak Repak Lr 4 would be on this review
  • 4 1
 @Tiez: There are lots of body parts where I don't mind getting a beating, but my spine just isn't one of them. I'm really bad at driving go-karts. It's been a while, but last time I had a go I broke three karts I was in (they gave me another one every time the last one broke) including a broken steering column. My phone (a Nokia 1000) was in my pocket under the seatbelt and the screen was completely mangled. Set me back 20 euros to have it fixed. Either way, the body is quite tough and phones may not. But I wouldn't have liked to have had that phone behind my spine.

@SacAssassin : Yeah, that was my thinking too. I'd take a sweaty back over a broken back any day. That said, I appreciate the lower water bladder I have now but wouldn't go without some back protection. The Ergon BE series of backpacks (I've got the BE1 as mentioned) takes a level 1 CE certified back protector so it still saves my back when I'm out of water. In fact, I've got three of those bags with only one back protector, hose and water bladder. I shift the entire contents to the next bag when the current one is soaked in sweat.

@deadtime: I don't ride particularly fast but I do try to push my limits in situations that may result in a crash I can get away with and this includes crashes where I'd tuck and roll. Actually, situations where crashing is not an option scare me most. Indeed learning to drive a car to me felt like the scariest thing ever because I felt it was the first thing I'd learn where crashing simply isn't an option! It kind of depends on my mindset, but I think I'm going down on at least half my mountainbike rides. Not just stupid failures. For instance sometimes I take a soft or loose corner and try how fast I can ride it. Fun thing about sections like that is that crashes like those are usually quite painless.
  • 2 0
 I have the Osprey Savu and it sure feels great not having anything on the back especially on warmer days. But the lack
of protection from the bag contents is a concern. If I am out for a technically challenging ride I’ll take the hydration pack - it has a plastic amour plate fused right onto the bladder (Osprey Zealot).
  • 4 2
 I fell on my back a few times while wearing the Evoc 3L. No problem there. Actually it works like protection, as long as you don’t carry any bigger hard objects like big allen keys, shock pump, or any pump. It is worth mentioning that Evoc has a thick foam layer between it and your body.

But! I have serious concerns about the Bontrager pack. While falling on a plastic water bottle may not be a bigger deal for your lower back muscles in illiac or rib area, falling with your spine directly on the fricking bottle cover, being the hardest part of the bottle, may give you some quality hernia or at least a killer muscle spasm. My friend fell on his back wearing a back pack with thermos inside, and still hasn’t fully recovered for 2 years. He had muscle spasms for months.
  • 1 0
 The first thing I noticed was that the Camelbak crew seem to be on the same wavelength, with bottle mounted at an angle
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Good to know. Just checked out the EVOC 2 weeks ago and while it felt comfortable trying it on in store, wondered how it would be if I took a tumble.
  • 1 0
 @SacAssassin: it always depends what you put into it. I don’t like too heavy and too packed packs as they bounce too much on descents. I stopped using backpacks for that reason (although they are invaluable on long rides on hot days. For me personally It’s ok to have a water bottle/ bladder in it, snacks tire levers, keys, wallet, phone, spare hanger, maybe a thin jacket, and that’s it. I carry tools in OneUp EDC pump under the water bottle in the frame. Tube glued to the frame. A cool feature of a fanny pack is how easy it is to strap it to the handlebars for a longer climb,
  • 1 0
 @SacAssassin: I agree I have landed hard enough on my back to cause the bladder to fail. I think that helped me walk away from falling off some northshore
  • 3 0
 I was waiting for this comment and the subsequent reams of replies. If there's one thing you cannot predict, it's how a crash will go; each one is different whether low speed or high speed.

I'm really starting to warm to the idea of a 'hip-pack' (it's a bum bag), but the idea of having everything concentrated around my lower spine doesn't exactly give me a warm fuzzy should the worst happen.

I think ensuring there's a good level of protection between you and your items (such as in an EVOC back pack), should mitigate the worst effects of slamming directly onto it. The problem is the water bottle, plastic or not, if it's full and tightly sealed, it's gonna do some damage...
  • 3 0
 @unrooted: I fell 20 metres off the side off the French Alps and landed on my 2 litre Camelbak. Doc said i'd have been paralysed if i wasn't wearing it!
  • 1 0
 @priest55: it’s a mental game man. If it makes you feel uncomfortable to wear one because you are afraid of hurting your lower back then you should absolutely not use it, whatever the reality may be like. 3 days ago I saw a dude fall from 3 meters on his back onto logs and boards. Nothing happened. Bloody nothing happened. Yet people break their backs in winter on slippery stairs. I don’t use backpack because they jump
in my back when I jump which makes me feel sketchy. On the other hand tightening them limits my breathing. So...
  • 1 0
 learned hard way - going OTB wearing dakine hot laps with pump stored inside. Kidney area hurt like a b*&^ch for 6 months.
These kind of packs are good for soft stuff only. Water in the reservior could actually act like a protector.
  • 1 0
 @sekiller: Yeah totally agree with having water in reservoir over a water bottle.

And @cheesedh, holy shit dude!
  • 1 0
 Had a big otb in Morzine the other year wearing a bumbag with a bladder in - landed fully on my sacrum not feeling anything but when I stood up I felt like I was pi@#ing myself - I immediately thought the worst and started checking myself for any sort of numbness but I was all ok - turns out I'd burst my (bag's) bladder on impact and it was leaking! It certainly saved my ass - literally!
  • 13 0
 I run a Dakines 2litre hot lap which is a smaller bag to the one reviewed here with a bottle holder on the belt. I like it, bigger enough for storage of everything I need without being too big that bit move around inside/end up packing it out bits that you don’t really need. The only reason why I ended up ditching the bag was a new frame with bottle mounts (so can carry two bottles)
  • 2 0
 I have both versions the 2L and the 5L. The 5L is better in terms of the strap, and the feeling on your back. so I end up riding with the bigger version.
  • 7 0
 The 2L hotlaps is excellent. The stealth one also great for very short lunch rides when you can survive without a bottle or have a cage on the frame.
  • 3 0
 Another 2L Hot Laps owner here. I don't get the bigger one, I can fit everything I want in/on the 2L one already. I usually carry a tube, tire lever, CO2, multitool, phone, keys, wallet, snack. Can also throw an extra bottle on there for longer rides.

What else do you really need?
  • 2 0
 @pwn1: i went from the original HotLaps (either .5 or 1L cant remember) which i LOVED, do the 2L which i LOVE EVEN MORE!!!

Plenty of room just just about anything you should need, plus the water bottle holder so i can carry 2 bottles (1 bike, 1 bag) great build quality. love dakine
  • 2 0
 I’ve got the 2L as well and dig it but does anyone else have an issue with the strap loosening?
  • 2 0
 I would say if the 2 litre is two small it’s worth getting dakines gripper pack to store a inner tube and two co2 canisters on the frame if the frame allows (meant too be able to put tyre levers in as well but they fell out). Tube won’t get as mucky as if it was only stopped on with tape.
  • 2 0
 +1 for the Dakine 2L Hot Lap bag. I run a few year old version of it for 95% of my rides and it's perfect. I'm not going on epics, I'm away from the truck for 4-5hr at most. Anything that I want easy access to (or doesn't fit in the pack) goes in my Endura shorts like my phone and gels, or a thin base layer.
  • 13 0
 Don't get me wrong. These 'bike specific' packs do look great, but when people complain that they are too expensive, they are not comparing it to some florescent 90's beach accessory! They are comparing it to the hundreds of bum/fanny/waist packs already available out there for other outdoor pursuits. Most have all the same features and are no way near that kind of money. I have a Deuter Belt II for shorter rides and a 750ml water bottle on my bike. The bum bag comfortably fits tube, multi tool, phone, keys etc. It's waterproof, adjustable and discreet... It is absolutely fine and cost me £7! SEVEN POUNDS!!!!!!!!!
  • 2 0
 Deuter is great! I have a medium one, like 1L, but their bigger ones are not much cheaper than let’s say Evoc.
  • 5 1
 Agree, the D.A.R.E. pack is funny, but not representative of what you can get for cheap. But folks selling $15 bags in eBay aren't buying advertisements on PB, so you know.
  • 1 0
 They should be paying you to wear it
  • 1 0
 @nordland071285: shhhh, don't tell anyone
  • 1 0
 Exactly! I have a £10 bum bag from mountain warehouse that fits all my essentials in, including a tube, pump, and lightweight gilet, or a 350ml bottle as a supplement for hot rides when I don't need the gilet. Ok, it wobbles a little bit when you're really moving on the bike, but stays in place excellently well otherwise. Don't see why you need to spend upwards of £50 on a bag unless you have no room for a bottle on your frame
  • 11 0
 Osprey Savu needs a video to show its versatility to better understand how the bottle sleeves buckle and/or unsnap to lie flat. I finally gave in & took my tube out of it and strapped it to my frame which gave me way more room in it for a jacket. The bottle holders can be used as added storage space if you unbuckle the snaps. I put my TLD Raid knee pads in the one bottle holder, cinched the 2 compression straps down on them and used the elastic band to make sure they didn't bounce out. They held them in place on the climb. I wouldn't go downhill or over bumpy terrain too far but it did a great job holding them for a climb and bomb down ride.
Loaded with knee pads : www.pinkbike.com/photo/17627288
1 bottle sleeve unsnapped/flush & empty: www.pinkbike.com/photo/17627284
Both sleeves snapped & full: www.pinkbike.com/photo/17627278
  • 1 0
 I'm looking at one of these. What is the largest bottle you can fit before there's a real risk of it / them falling out? Could it take 2 x 750ml bottles easily?
  • 1 0
 @Mfro: how much is 750 ml? I carried a full size bike roadie bottle in it fine. When you undo the snaps, you can fit a full size Nalgene bottles in it.

The bungee has a tension clasp to allow you to tighten the cord down over the neck plus the 2 compression straps. Since the sleeve is semi-rigid, the bottles stay still and cant really do any sort of trampoline effect to get momentum to pop out.
  • 1 0
 @bizutch: its around 25 oz
  • 3 0
 @Mfro: so I just checked and absolutely yes. The 2nd pic I posted, the blue water bottle is 750ml and does perfectly fine.
A Nalgene is 32 oz. & I'm not gonna try riding with one of those on my butt
  • 1 0
 @bizutch: Cool - thanks mate. Off to spend more $$ I go!!
  • 13 2
 Nice writeup, but the mix of units is a hot mess! Volume in liters, oz. and cubic inches, weight in oz., lbs. and grams, seriously?
  • 6 5
 Get used to it..
  • 34 0
 You know what they call a Quarter Pounder with Cheese in Paris?
  • 12 1
 @winklrn: a royale with cheese
  • 12 4
 @winklrn: Instant diarrhea with cheese?
  • 3 0
 @BCtrailrider: I heard you can even get it with a beer
  • 4 0
 @BCtrailrider: Look at the big brain on @BCtrailrider!
  • 2 1
 @awhite76: you gotta have an opinion
  • 6 0
 @jorgeposada: ah yes, the McSquirt
  • 7 1
 I think you were a little unfair to say that the Dakine pack has no water bottle option and leave out the fact that their 2L pack has a tidy little bottle stow that clips out of the way when not in use..and can also be used as a jacket stow such if your bike has a bottle cage mount, just saying
  • 5 1
 yup, this really should have been split into 2 reviews, hip packs with bottle holders and hip packs with built in hydration pack. sure there are some cross overs, but you cant discount a bag for not having a water bottle holder when you said it holds more water than you could ever need on a "hot lap"
  • 6 0
 Hip packs have regional popularity and for good reason. If you ride in hot climates (think Arizona) and need to carry significant amounts of water they do not make sense. If you ride in deep backcountry (think remote BC) and plan on long rides with questionable weather you need a good back pack. However, if you are doing normal rides (20 miles or less) in temperate climates hip packs win hands down. Speaking for North America, the hip pack epicenter hovers somewhere between Hood River and Bellingham. The farther you radiate away from the hip pack epicenter, the less frequent they become. I would also like to point out that the acceptance and appreciation of hip packs has moved into the Sea to Sky corridor. 5 years ago they were rare and southern Canucks were still clinging to hydro packs for trail rides. Not so much anymore, hip packs galore! Dont believe me? Come to WA, BC or OR and if you find a hydration pack at a trailhead, there will be a good chance it will reside on a 26" wheeled bike (or possibly a fat bike).
  • 1 0
 True, I always wear a backpack and ride 26. Don't use the bladder, water bottle on the frame.
  • 1 0
 Backpack has saved me on numerous crashes. I had first generation Camelbak, bladder would burst when I crashed on my back, MEC would warranty it but they soon caught on that it was crash related.
  • 3 0
 Nailed it. I ride a fat bike with 26 inch wheels. Wear a Evoc FR Trail Blackline 20l that fits 3l water bladder, 6 beer, first aid, Silky Big Boy saw, tools and it has spine protection to boot. Has room for pads, clothes, electronics, etc. Granted some of that crap may inhibit the protection, but when shit goes down, its nice to be covered.
  • 2 0
 @bsedola: yeah, love the Silky Big Boy for trailwork.
  • 4 0
 I bought the evoc bag featured above this summer when needing to replace my old (I mean 10+ years old..) camelback. I have up until this point dismissed fanny packs as a silly fad and stupid looking, but honestly that bag is seriously good. The elastic waist band was the biggest or only reason I chose that bag over all others, as it actually allows me to cinch it down but still be able to breathe without the buckle digging into my stomach or being too restricted. It's snug but secure.
  • 3 6
 Glad you came out bro Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Agreed. My wife got me the Race 3l with the bladder for a gift, I never thought I’d use the bladder, just the bottle and a place to keep my phone, but that thing is really amazing with a bladder in it for not bouncing at all. I’ve even done longer rides with a bottle and the bladder full and it’s been surprisingly stable and comfortable.
  • 4 0
 I'm pretty upset with this article. Over the past two years I've acquired an Osprey Seral and the Bontrager Rapid Pack. The Seral is great for longer rides when it's above freezing. I use the Rapid pack in the winter when I need to use the insulated bottles. But if I had known I could have saved a lot of money with that sweet, sweet DARE bag, Amazon could have had my money a long time ago...
  • 4 0
 I've had a High Above pack for three years and it has been so solid! Wing pockets are my only gripe, but I've done some massive rides with 2 bottles, a water filter, and my fanny pack full of snacks! Definitely worth the money as the only marks on mine is salt from sweating
  • 4 0
 I just got their new Nexus pack. I'm so excited to try it - its got so many fantastic ideas designed into it.
  • 3 0
 @ratedgg13: Dammit. Bought the Lookout earlier this summer - must have been just before the Nexus arrived.

I really like the Lookout, and it's completely replaced my Camelbak Skyline for all short/hot rides. I have to say though, it's a surprising amount of weight to have hanging around your waist (water bottle, keys, phone, tube, CO2, small pump, little first aid pack...). When it's cinched tight enough not to be bouncing around on regular trail features, I really notice how it pulls on my lower stomach - and oddly enough, I notice the extra weight of the water bottle on my far left side when in the air, too. I find the shoulder straps on the Skyline to be far more comfortable, but man...the heat advantage for the hip pack is awesome! No more sweaty back....
  • 4 0
 I clicked to add the standard "hur hur hur, fanny pack" comment, but actually realised that i need one of these to bridge the gap between camelback M.U.L.E rides and no bag at all rides (my frame doesnt have bottle mounts)

Damn it.

Bum bag.
  • 4 0
 very well written but i do have a problem with the bontrager review, you say that you cant fit anything more than an iphone 5 in there but i fit my note 9 in there no problem. also as far as a pump goes you can put it between the water bottle and the strap, i have used lezyne and crank bros in there just fine.
  • 4 0
 Agree, lots of room for my Pixel 3, and I've used both an SKS and Lezyne mini pump in mine. Even fits a Topeak mini-shock pump in there. Plus I can pull my bottle out and re-insert on the go no problem. Could not do that with my Dakine Hot Laps.
  • 4 1
 Whenever I can, I go for the hip pack. Backpack only comes out for longer rides where I don't know if there will be water on the way. I have the Bontrager pack - I often use the bottle compartment to store a light jacket in there, bottle goes on the frame. Holds all the essentials, even elbow protectors (strap them to the belt). I have been using this pack regularly for 2 years and it's still going strong.
  • 11 5
 And these are better than Camelbaks because...?
  • 13 1
 Enduro!
  • 3 6
 Some people are complete wimps...
  • 11 2
 Sweat, lower center of gravity, no floppy hose, can access storage without removing pack (just turn it around), more comfortable, and you will be forced to ride faster so you dont get laughed at.
  • 1 1
 @JDFF gives good points...I ride in a hot climate...a back pack is HOT, no matter what! When it's 90 and humid the less material on your body the better! I also get tension in my shoulders from any bag I tried.
But the point of riding faster so you don't get laughed at...really? Why are people so concerned with the fashion and what other people think? I've been using different hip bags for a long time and never gave any shit about what anyone thought...it works for me, that's all that matters, and, when you're a good rider people give you respect no matter what you wear!
  • 2 1
 have you ever ridden with and without a backpack? did you notice any differences?
  • 4 7
 @GlassGuy: whenever my back is getting hot I just fill my water bladder with air which reduces the amount of surface area between my back and the pack...I'm still not convinced that fanny packs are anything more than a silly fad that will be gone in 3 or so years.
  • 4 0
 This^^. I read the article hoping to see a good explanation but did not see anything. But I am getting an enduro bike so I ordered one.
  • 5 1
 @unrooted: I'm confused....are you making a joke or serious? If your back is hot you fill your water bladder with air?? Then why even have the backpack on?? What do you drink?? And, "fad"? Hmm...something that works really well for a lot of people. Not really a "fad", especially considering they've been around a long time, but too many people are concerned with their fashion to accept changes from the norm. I was using one years ago(pre hydration backpacks widely available), then got two backpacks....massive sweat, discomfort...back to hip bag and I don't even know I'm wearing it. Plenty of water...pump, tire, tools, snacks, phone...and I don't have to take it off to access my stuff..non sweaty back, no shoulder or back discomfort...a big win in my book. And I'm certainly not a "wimp" Wink
  • 2 1
 @laxguy: 100%. Huge difference in riding with a backpack or not. #1 reason I don't like riding in a backpack is because they are hot and don't let air flow through your back well enough. The weight is fine, but even just a light backpack with not much in it will cause me to get hotter earlier. Tension in the shoulders isn't an issue, but that may just come down to the individual.
  • 2 2
 @GlassGuy: its another way of saying fashion doesnt matter. Let your riding do the talking and dont worry about what other people think. Duh.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: well sorry, that's wasn't how it read to me...."you will be forced to ride faster so you dont get laughed at." Seems more like being embarrassed for wearing it
  • 2 2
 @unrooted: You realize fanny packs have been around for decades...?
  • 1 1
 @gnarnaimo: so have tool-bags...
  • 1 1
 @unrooted: Did I claim tool bags were a fad?
  • 1 1
 @gnarnaimo: I think you missed who I was calling a tool bag.
  • 2 0
 If you live in a hot climate its worth noting that the Camelbak podium flow pack has an insulated sleeve for the bottle which works pretty well, keeps my drink relatively cool even in 100F temps. I don't think any of the other packs have that feature.

I ride with two podium dirt series bottles, one in the bottle cage and one in the hip pack, and I'm always pleasantly surprised at how cool the second bottle is when I swap it into the cage. (no insulation in the bottles themselves cause the larger insulated bottles don't fit in my frame)
  • 2 0
 I often use my ski-specific hydration fanny pack, also insulated to keep it from freezing, but in summer it keeps it cool.
  • 2 0
 @brodoyouevenbike: but those swix packs are 80% water, they flop around something dreadful
  • 1 0
 You can buy those separately as well.
  • 2 0
 Comprehensive write up - a lot of useful info. (Plus bonus pic of Luna the rescue mutt!). I’ve been using the Bontrager Rapid Pack for over a year and it has served me really well for my 60ish minute after work loops here in Bellingham. It’s holding up just fine after >100 rides.
I recently picked up a High Above pack for a bit more cargo capacity and I’m impressed with the features it offers. One distinct difference to me is the way the cinch mechanisms operate on these two packs: the Bontrager is a “set and forget” affair, whereas the waist setting of the High Above loosens up each time it don or remove the pack. A small area for improvement in my opinion.
  • 4 0
 Up there a bit early eh! Thanks for the constructive feedback. Sitting in a rental car office in Iceland... waiting
  • 1 0
 @nkrohan: For the Volcano sacrifice ceremony???
  • 2 0
 I have a camelbak hip pack with the bladder and more recently picked up the Savu from Osprey. I feel the bottles are easier to manage for me personally over having to fumble with the bladder for each ride. Hot summer day, two water bottles, cool fall night, one bottle, it's just so easy. The storage is good as mentioned and I love the fit of the pack (having a Osprey toddler carrier I knew the quality and fit was going to be good and it was).

Bottom line, for the price I can't see why you wouldn't get the Savu, unless you want a bladder!
  • 1 0
 Ironically, the only reason I bought the Savu was to tip my toes in the hip pack waters without fully committing at the higher price.
Plus, most of the ones all have the Hydrapak bladder and magnet, which I am NOT a fan of.

Savu, with the Dakine lower straps & the Camelbak bite valve & magnetic clasp. Done...
  • 5 0
 As seen in the cities of the world, these are apparently meant to be worn over your shoulder, not around the waist.
  • 2 0
 High Above has two new packs with a Fidlock bottle. Freaking genius!. I have the Dakine 2L and 5L and use them for short and long rides respectively. I prefer them to backpacks as I don't like straps on my shoulders, especially when I wear a Gopro Chesty. I'm holding out for a High Above double Fidlock bottle version as that could be my go to for everything but all day rides. A bottle on the frame and zero, one or two on the bag, no sweaty back or uncomfortable shoulders, perfection. C'mon High Above!
  • 1 0
 Oh man thats awesome news. I wish mine had that. I love my Fidlock bottle I have attached to my frame. On their site they have the option for two bottles. Its unclear if that means two attachment or just a spare bottle.
  • 2 0
 Fidlock needs to come out with an insulated bottle.
  • 4 1
 Missed the reasonably prices Deuter Pulse 2. £20, diagonally mounted bottle and has lasted me 3 years in shitey British weather.
  • 1 0
 ive got the larger Camelbak Repack, bought it on a whim from a shop when I was in for something else and rarely use anything else now. For the big big days or guiding days im on a 20L Evoc Trail FR but much rather run lighter for myself on small, medium and fairly big days.
  • 1 0
 All great brands, however, I was gifted something by these guys over two years ago, still going strong & the bladder holds water longer than normal systems, BUT we all know if your not doing something right if you have a lot of water left over during the long rides.
sourceoutdoor.com/en/hydration-packs/161-hipster-hydration-belt
  • 2 0
 I’ll second that, the source hipster hydration pack is also one of the most comfortable I’ve ever worn, due to the hip areas being an elastic material. So you can really cinch it down so it stays put, and it won’t become uncomfortable (especially if you have a thin waist with the hip bones right there like I do). Stays put well enough I’ve never used the removable harness it comes with, even when I wear it lower on my hips.
  • 4 3
 Hydration packs are personally I guess. I don't know how anyone can ride with a bum bag. Even when strapped way to tight they shift downwards over rough terrain and bounce uncontrollably when full. So uncomfortable. USWE for the WIN!
  • 4 0
 I've had the same experience with multiple hip packs. It's exacerbated by the fact that I'm skinny and have no hips. It's impossible to keep the bags from migrating south over the course of a ride and basically pulling my shorts off my ass. I've given up on them and gone back to backpacks. I never have to think about them.
  • 2 1
 Very much a personal thing. I have both and use both, but for comfort i prefer the backpack (and its not even an Uswe). The hip-bag is only used for quick rides with a bottle, where i don't want to deal with the hassle of a hydration bladder.

In contrast to what Nikki writes, one can pull and replace a bottle in the Bontrager pack one-handed while riding, although its a bit fiddly.
  • 1 0
 I've used a few different ones for a long time and rarely have this issue...occasionally a strap may loosen a tad and the bag is a little loose...cinch it and I'm good. Maybe try a different bag
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: I'll second that. I have no problem pulling and replacing the water bottle while riding.
@SunsPSD And I'll add that I have no problom with it moving around or shifting. It fits tight around my hips and doesn't move. Even with an extra large waterbottle. For ~90 minute rides, it's now my go-to and not having a sweaty back is incredible. Also no problem fitting in a Lezyne pump. But I usually just bring CO2 and plugs.
  • 2 0
 I've been working the same fanny pack on rides under two hours since they were last common on the trails. Bags, while essential for some rides, feel gross. Here's to the fannies!
  • 2 0
 No mention of either the Deuter Pulse Three or the Camelbak Repack LR, both of which I've been thinking about as these are the only ones available in my part of the world. :'(
  • 6 1
 what's wrong with backpacks?
  • 1 0
 Nice one Nikki!

I'm curious who at Dakine ever thought straps on the BOTTOM of the pack were a good idea - only to have the jacket get ripped off. Move the straps to the TOP of the pack, and it'd be dialed.

The EVOC is pretty rad, especially when you toss the bladder and just run two bottles - they just forgot to put straps on the outside for jacket/pads.
  • 2 0
 IF YOU ROLL UP WITH A BACKPACK YOUR ALL READY DROPPED. SAME WIFFA ROOF RACK OR TUBES IN YOUR TIRES. DOUBLE RING 26” GET WITH THE TIMES THIS IS THE 90S AND WE DONT HAVE TIME FOR BACKPACKS
  • 2 0
 I have a backpack, tubes in my 26 inch tires and 2X????, NSR rack redeems me though!
  • 2 0
 To all you worried about carrying a water bottle on your back, get one of these rubber, foldable bottles. They are great as take up zero space when empty www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01MTZ19VT
  • 1 0
 Nice read. Just think back in late '90's racing Motorcycle Enduros, we used fanny packs loaded with tools (extra 2-3lbs), AND 100oz. Camelbak's loaded with food, misc bits, and a 21" tube. I felt like a Sherpa......compared to the needs for MTBing. I have seen Camelbak bladders blow outs and riders get up and walk away no issues (normally high speed). I have take many hard hits both on bikes with and without motors and have been fortunate enough to walk away with no back contusions or abrasions. *Current MTB hydro setup is lightest model Camebak with option to fill up to 100oz/snacks/quick side pockets for extra links/ holds phone/key ring /spare contacts, and attach tube, air cartriges and multi tool onto bike with a frame strap.
  • 2 1
 The ease of using hydration backpack and being able to drink and not have to mess around with removing and replacing water bottles all the time makes me wonder why I want a hip pack. The backpack doesn’t bounce around carries everything i need and If I don’t need water I just remove the bladder. I see absolutely zero advantage in using a hip pack. What am I missing here?
  • 2 0
 So many examples listed in the comments as to why the hip bag is preferred by many...backpack can be super hot, can create shoulder tension or back pain, hip bag is smaller, you don't have to take it off to get to your stuff.... Mine doesn't bounce around, it has a bladder with a hose that wraps around my waist with easy access....way more comfortable than having straps around my shoulders and a thick layer of matrial resting on my back
  • 2 0
 Because most of the times you dont need that much water for a 2 hour ride.
  • 1 0
 I am constantly adjusting the shoulder straps on my backpack, loose for uphill and tight for downhill. With a hip pack it is set and forget. For less than 20 mile rides it can't be beat in my opinion. Also if you need more water than one bottle and have water sources on the trail, a sawyer water filter and a cnoc pouch way about 125g vs. however much weight your water and bottle are (probably over 500g difference even for a 21oz bottle). Also the weight of my hip pack is a pound lighter than my backpack (Osprey Syncros 10 vs. Bontrager Rapid). It's like bike backpack manufacturers haven't caught on to what ultralight hiker backpacks have been doing for years. Even my Osprey Exos 58L is only 300g heavier than my 10 liter Syncros without it's top pocket. Also I refuse to use a bladder even when I use a backpack because the water is always warm and tastes like the hose.
  • 1 0
 Yikes, weigh not way. Hah
  • 2 1
 Nice article, but I don't see any ratings. The article title makes the reader believe that the reviewer will actually rate these bags based on some scale. Basically what I got from the article (other than the basic DARE pack) is that "They're all good, just different. Pick based on what features you prioritize."
  • 1 0
 Quite a good write-up, but I still cling to my old Blackburn Mississippi. Secure, roomy, thick enuf waist belt to strap a good kytel fixed blade knife quick-draw sheath. And it is cushy indeed when the bike bucks me off right onto my back. Good luck to all youse with the fanny packs.....
  • 1 0
 My solution... Mountainsmith Day pack. If you need more than 2 water bottles, will also carry a good sized bladder. In that case I add the modular shoulder straps. Weight is still carried low, so your back has freedom, but they stabilize a larger load. Works great!
  • 1 0
 Great review Nikki! I've been wondering more about these lately since my 3L pack is often overkill for my rides. But going out with no pack means sacrificing snacks or tools and one of these might be just the right size. PS: You and your husband are living the dream out in Hood River. Always cool seeing Syncline on PB.
  • 1 0
 It's worth noting for the Osprey they have a lifetime, no-questions-asked repair guarantee. They fixed up a six year old Raptor of mine that's been through the wars with new stitching, zips and buckles - all for free. I was just without it for a few weeks.
  • 1 0
 Minor comment on the Bontrager pack: I have no trouble taking the bottle out or putting it back in, one handed, while riding on mellow trails. I can imagine it being tricking if your pack pockets are empty, but I usually have Stans/Tire pressure gauge/C02 and my car keys in there, which kind of spans open the bottle sleeve.
  • 3 0
 Really well written reviews, great job on this. Big fan of the Osprey myself.
  • 2 0
 i don't actually care much about hip packs , i just wanted to say that the writing was good. "clung to my waist like a limpet" more stuff from nikki rohan!
  • 1 1
 I'm not one of those "waaaah you didn't review the product I like" people, but I just wanted to let yall know that Mountainsmith Tour is the OG shreddy fanny pack. I wear mine for any ride that doesn't require 3L water, and it's pretty much the same design I had as a little kid in the 90s. 2 super-secure bottle sleeves, compression strap system that keeps it snug to your waist no matter how much you've stuffed in there, stretchy mesh pockets on the waistband for wrappers & small stuff, shock cords to keep an extra layer handy, and a key leash.
  • 1 0
 I've got a Mountainsmith Fanny and a basic 90's fanny pack (looks like a mix between the Dare bag and the High Above), and I'm often torn between the two. The problem with the Mountainsmith is that its heavy and it can easily be filled to uncomfortably levels of weight. In both assbags, I don't like bottles, so a 1L soft bottle is nice, but I actually like the way the more minimalist bag fits, although the straps are uncomfortable at times.

I'm glad I got both for free because I'd have a hard time spending money on a hip bag, but I rarely wear a backpack so their social acceptance is welcome.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: Yeah I've actually used my mountainsmith as a full blown day pack quite a bit, but when you're loading it up with a bunch of weight it really matters how you pack it. Using the bottle sleeves (vs just throwing platypus bladders in the main pocket) is much more secure / less bouncy - I've done 2 750mL bottles, rain layer, warm layer, lunch, tools, shock pump, water filter, etc and it felt fine (better once I drank some water though).

It's def more space than I need for short rides, but it's perfectly comfy when compressed down so I just leave all my mtb shit ready to go in there.
  • 1 1
 My fav summer time ass pack.
  • 1 1
 There is a small Ukrainian brand Hardride, that makes the best hip packs hands down. Big enough for the essentials, lots of organizational features to keep your stuff neat, bombproof material. No unnecessary straps and laces to complicate things. Will never use anything else as long as they are in business. hardride.com.ua/tovar/hardride-waistbag Oh and it is less than 30 bucks.
  • 1 1
 “No unnecessary straps”. Oh like the ones that are awesome to have so you can carry pads or a rain jacket? Also no bottle or bladder capability?

Yep definitely a “best hands down” product. Haha
  • 2 0
 I'm so glad you mentioned whether it was difficult to fit a pump in these. For long rides, a CO2 alone doesn't give me peace of mind. Great writeup!
  • 3 0
 Osprey, - No external straps to carry armor. Do you really expect to carry armor with your waist pack?
  • 1 0
 A full roundup with a hundred comments and no mention yet of Ortlieb. FWIW- two years in I still love my Ortlieb hip pack, the only fully waterproof option available (and it really works!)
  • 1 0
 The REI one I have is really good. I know you can't review 'em all but it is worth considering for both space, and for a really solid structure that doesn't slouch horribly like the Osprey version.
  • 1 0
 Baby got pack! Nice write up. Been rockin a highabove pack for the last three years. After a collarbone, it was uncomfortable to wear a pack for a while. Now I just prefer the not having a back warmer.
  • 1 0
 On the camelbac I’ve been able to fit a tube + money/tire irons in the outside pocket by folding the tube in longer flatter segments leaving more room in the main pocket for whatever you need (jacket, snacks whatever)
  • 1 1
 pump, tireplugs and multitool get you a really long way. especially on these 2hr-ish rides. would really love to hear the story of someone getting terminally stuck on such a short ride and in proximity of zivilisation, that would actually justify strapping one of these on just to take more weight and 99.9% useless stuff with...
  • 8 5
 Pros: handmade in the USA. So is this like USA made cars?
  • 6 1
 Similar to British Dental Plan, looks good on paper but the execution is lacking ....
  • 3 2
 @justincs: much like Canadian...........erm don't know what you do apart from sing about being a lumberjack. Xx
  • 5 1
 @fatduke: I'm a lumberjack and I'm ok...
  • 1 0
 @justincs: Bucking and splitting has been shown to boost testosterone
  • 1 2
 The original. D.A.R.E program was rolled out to get elementary school kids to squeal on their parents. Law enforcement would go to school and show young children pictures of paraphernalia and tell them their parents were sick and needed help if they seen these items around their home.
  • 2 1
 I thought it was to pick out the parents you would rather have.....
  • 3 0
 Nice work Nikki and Colin!!
  • 1 0
 Also don't knock the Patagonia black hole 2L pack. Fits 2 bottles, ample room for a tube, multi tools, CO2 and plenty of room to spare even with a few snacks in there.
  • 2 0
 I have used 2 of the packs in the review and she is in my opinion, spot on about their pros and cons. Great read!
  • 1 0
 $14 for a snap on bottle holder that'll work on probably all of these. I have one on my Dakine pack so I have that + the bladder for longer rides.
  • 3 0
 wait? no place for a hand gun holster on any of them?
  • 1 0
 great article! i just got my custom High Above Cascadia 2 days ago. very high quality coming from Dakine Hot Lap. love supporting local business here in PNW too!
  • 1 0
 Or you can buy a Motorcycle hip pack for 1/3 of the price: www.acerbis.it/motorsport/en/product/off-road/bags/0017032#a_page
  • 4 4
 Water bottle on frame, tools in small saddle bag, cookies, jacket and phone in small frame pack and you wont need a hip pack.
  • 2 0
 I agree, but in summer heat it is nice to have extra water bottle with you, and your phone and first aid if you don't have pocket for it.
  • 4 0
 I have been riding only wearing my fanny pack and DC shoes. Way more ventilation and better for my environment.
  • 3 0
 As she stated in the article, because she often rides a small sized bike, there's no room in the triangle for a bottle with the rear suspension taking up the majority of the space....
  • 1 0
 @jorgeposada: What model DCs you like to rock?
  • 1 0
 @DhDWills: Honestly I was off DC for a minute, had a few high end pairs fall apart after few street rides. Meanwhile I have a pair from highschool that are older than most people on this site that I dig with. These new ones are simple Pure SE black but they reversed the pill pattern and they lock up amazing on the pedals. Not five ten sticky but $40 is hard to beat. Five tens are too sticky for me on street or dj riding, save them for the fanny pack trails.
  • 1 0
 @jorgeposada: DCs are great for gripping the pedals and the price is much more reasonable than 5.10. But the soles shred and develop holes pretty quick for me. Than again, my 5.10 got holes in the bottom too. They lasted maybe a little longer....
  • 1 0
 @DhDWills: Ya the new reverse pill pattern sole with sticky rubber hooks up great and $40. Similar to Vans but not as deep honey comb soles. I wouldn't rock them in cold wet winter conditions but that is what the five tens are for. Honestly Merrel is making some interesting designs and look winter MTB worthy. Not the usually mega deep lugs.
  • 4 1
 No Camelbak Repack?
  • 2 0
 Finally I can use my moonbag again!
  • 2 2
 Great style of writing and very informative! I was considering the Dakine 5L but this article pretty much seals it.

+17363 internet points for calling it Patagucci
  • 2 2
 Thanks for talking about the dare bag. I love the thrift shop but it's clear some things aren't up to the standard needed for biking.
  • 4 0
 Like e13 products
  • 1 0
 in this excellent comparative, there is no the Henty Enduro backpack,, a great product
  • 2 0
 All TLD with a camo pouch..........
  • 1 0
 rollin to the bean for a tuna melt
  • 3 1
 why would anyone buy anything other than osprey packs?
  • 3 1
 I fanny pack and I love it. No going back....
  • 3 0
 No Source Hipster!?
  • 2 0
 Been very happy with my Savu.
  • 1 0
 XC skiers have been using "hip packs" for decades. Nothing new under the sun here!
  • 2 0
 Very good and complete review. This Nikki is going places.
  • 1 0
 Camelback LR4. Stable, plenty of storage options, side pockets, compressible, light.
  • 1 0
 Why would anyone ever use a Fanny for anything other than making sweet love too? OMG!!!!
  • 1 0
 Also check out porcelain rocket's 'dumpling' bag: porcelainrocket.com/collections/seasonals/products/dumpling !
  • 1 0
 Walmart also has some pretty cheap but good options. Just keep your expectations in check with Walmart stuff.
  • 4 2
 Fanny packs
  • 2 1
 Great write up. Now I've got the Evoc bag on the wish list
  • 2 1
 Comprehensive write up. Nicely done.
  • 1 0
 Perfect timing hah! Thanks for article!
  • 2 1
 Finally I can use my moonbag again Smile
  • 2 0
 I love cheap fannies.
  • 1 0
 How about a whole pack of fannies?
  • 1 0
 love my Dakine bag. I use it for dirt bikes too
  • 1 0
 Nice article; how do you like the pump? (Crankbrothers Gem).
  • 1 2
 These should not be called hip packs since they don't really stay on your hips during the ride or after a big jump! Call them chest packs or breast packs instead!
  • 2 0
 Such a HIPster review.
  • 2 1
 Can't believe the Osprey Seral wasn't even mentioned in this article.
  • 2 0
 I could only pick one pack from each company and the Savu seemed more unique than the Seral - just because a pack is omitted from this review doesn’t mean it’s not a great choice.
  • 1 0
 No love for the Source Hipster?
  • 1 0
 Kinda curious... why didn't they use the Camelbak Repack?
  • 3 0
 I could only pick one bag from each brand so I picked the one that was more unique in my opinion. Just because a model is not included does not mean it’s not a great option.
  • 1 0
 @nkrohan: I was just wondering... I didn't say anything regarding options haha. Thanks for the info
  • 1 0
 Cargo shorts + frame storage.
  • 1 0
 Lowe alpine Mesa 6 is great also. Super comfy and stays put
  • 1 0
 I find hip packs to be uncomfortable ... much rather have a back pack
  • 1 0
 I like my pinchflat designs dropped pack. Hand made here in Bend, OR.
  • 2 1
 I would not pay over $60 for any of them.
  • 1 0
 Missing the Henty.cc Enduro pack... definitely one of the best!!
  • 1 0
 Where is the Weevil BurroSak??
  • 1 0
 @nkrohan will the Camelbak fit an iPhone Plus? Great review btw!
  • 2 1
 Great write-up
  • 1 0
 Syncline rules
  • 1 0
 That view of Mt Hood is fantastic in the top of page pic.
  • 1 0
 Fanny Packs
  • 1 0
 Top of the page well.
  • 1 0
 Great article!
  • 1 3
 "Ugly Americans abroad in Europe"?
Glad the writer made it clear she's a woke moron.
So. Brave.
  • 3 6
 but where emoped rider can stash spare battery??
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