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First Ride: Guerrilla Gravity's Updated Smash

Apr 4, 2023
by Dario DiGiulio  
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After debuting their Revved carbon technology a few years ago, Guerrilla Gravity has been incrementally updating their lineup to feature more of this novel carbon construction. The thermoplastic carbon fiber composite touts a host of different qualities to traditional carbon fiber, and can be manufactured in-country with relatively little waste. GG has started making the chainstays of their bikes out of their Revved carbon, starting with the Trail Pistol and Gnarvana before moving to the Smash.

The updated Smash still sports the ability to convert into any of the other GG models, with their lineup of aftermarket seat-and-chainstay kits that provide different geometry and kinematics. Sitting in the middle of their travel range, the Smash is positioned as the ride-anywhere all-mountain bike, with enough travel in reserve for some pretty serious terrain.
Guerrilla Gravity Smash V2

• 29" front and rear
• 150mm frame travel, 150mm fork
• 64.7° head angle
• 440mm chainstays
• 10mm reach adjust headset
• Sizes: 2, 3, 4 (446-510mm reach)
• Weight: 33.5 lb / 15.2 kg
• Made in Denver, CO
• Frameset: $3,295 USD
• MSRP: $6,995 USD (Race Build)
ridegg.com

The updates to the Smash are subtle, but significant enough to warrant some attention, so let's dig in.

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The V2 now features a carbon chainstay.
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And still sports a hanging water bottle mount.

Frame Details

The front triangle of the Smash is unchanged from the prior generation, and as a result the front-end geo remains the same. There are some geometry tweaks that come along with the Revved rear end, primarily in the form of longer chainstays.

When the original aluminum Smash came out, it featured 429mm stays in all sizes, but that number grew to 434mm for the V1 Smash and now to 440mm for the V2. Stay lengths are not size-specific, but should be better balanced for the range of reaches available. I think size-specific rear end geo is the way to go, but given GG's aftermarket stay kits and the logistical nightmare that would ensue with a sizing component, I understand why they didn't go that way direction.

The biggest changes brought on by the redesigned rear end of the Smash come in the form of weight, stiffness, and kinematics. The Revved chainstays achieve a claimed 50% increase in lateral stiffness while also reducing weight by 90 grams when compared to the aluminum predecessors. The V2 Smash sees a 5mm increase in travel, now sporting 150mm in the rear, with a 5% increase in suspension progression. Guerrilla Gravity has also done away with the Crush/Plush flip chip, opting instead for one position that optimizes climbing and descending performance slightly better than the prior generation.

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A clean exit.
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This one, less so.

Guerrilla Gravity continues to employ their unique solution to cable management, with a bolt-on cover that requires no cutting or zip-ties. It seems some GG owners have found this solution a bit frustrating, as containing all 4 cables while installing the cover can be a bit of a mess - so one clever owner came up with a 3D-printed cable management solution that integrates with the existing bolt holes.

I haven't found the cable cover to be all that fussy, and definitely prefer any form of external routing to the fully-internal game most brands are playing these days. The upper exit of the cable cover is a little funky, though, as the cables tend to push up against the handlebar as opposed to lying naturally in front of the bike. Some creative arrangement could probably solve this, but it's a bit of a frustrating quirk in the meantime.


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Terminator Grey
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Colorado Racing Green


Build Options

There are 3 build kits, with 2 color options for each kit, plus one special Launch Edition build with a corresponding colorway. The V2 Smash is also available as a frameset, and in GG's custom a-la-carte builder.

The available builds are as follows:

Ride ($4995 USD)
NX drivetrain, Code R brakes, RockShox Select suspension, and Sun Ringle Duroc wheels.
Rally ($6295 USD)
GX drivetrain, G2 RSC brakes, RockShox Ultimate suspension, and DT Swiss M1900 wheels.
Race ($6995 USD)
XO1 drivetrain, Code RSC brakes, Fox Factory suspension, and Crank Brothers Synthesis Alloy wheels.
Launch Edition ($6995 USD)
Same build as the Race, but with a GX/XO1 mixed drivetrain, and a DHX2 instead of a Float X shock.

For folks who own a V1 Smash, updated aftermarket stay kits will be available for purchase in the coming months. You'll be able to update your existing bike to the latest model without swapping the entire frame, and GG will even offer the kits in current and old-model colorways.


Riding the Smash

I've been riding a Size 4 Race build Smash for the past few weeks, and have a few thoughts to share on the updated all-mountain ripper.

As one of the more well-populated travel brackets in the current market, the 150mm all-mountain bike can go a variety of directions these days. Some brands are pushing that travel as their race-focused enduro rig, others are maximizing efficiency and simply keeping some extra travel on tap. Within that spectrum, Guerrilla Gravity has slotted the Smash right into the middle, as a bike that feels pretty happy doing just about anything.

The do-it-all nature of the Smash makes for a bike that's easy to spend a day on, be it on relatively tame terrain or scraping up big climbs to reach nasty descents. The pedaling performance was quietly impressive, with enough traction for janky maneuvers, but plenty of support for buff singletrack and long logging road grinds. I tend to prefer a more active suspension for grip on both climbs and descents, and the Smash delivers that without feeling too wallowy.

Descending on the new Guerrilla Gravity is best characterized by how balanced you feel in the bike - neither too far over the front or off the back. I'd chalk a lot of this up to the longer rear center, but also to the high native stack of the frame. This makes it possible to really maximize the rider space over the bike, allowing for a more neutral body position through changing terrain. I've been riding the size 4 Smash with the reach adjustment in the short position, as the 500mm reach feels like the ideal max for me on a bike of this sort. All that reach and a longer chainstay make for a pretty sizable wheelbase, but the Smash doesn't feel too tricky in tighter terrain. A bit more body language is required to get things set up for steep and tight turns, but you're well-positioned in the middle of the bike to get things pointed in the right direction.

One little complaint that might bother long-term owners was the water bottle clearance. With the toptube-mounted arrangement, it's hard to fit a full-size bottle, and even on the size 4 frame a large bottle would rattle against the downtube on descents. That said, you do have a second mount location below the shock, so conceivably you could fit a second micro bottle down there, if you're not using the space for tools or spares.

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Goes to 11.
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Ample room for better rubber.

Build Kit Thoughts

For the most part, the build kits on the V2 Smash make sense to me. I've been riding the Race build - the most expensive of the bunch - and though it works quite well, there are a couple things I changed to better suit my needs. I swapped out the EXO/EXO+ tires for stickier and meatier options, as the slimy roots here in Bellingham don't look kindly upon hard compounds or thin casings. On the wheel front, I found the Crank Brothers Synthesis Alloy wheels to be quite comfortable, though the hub engagement was bad enough to be frustrating at times. Pedaling out of corners was sometimes met with an awkward lurch until you hit the point of engagement, though this is something one could get used to after a while.

The e*thirteen cockpit is solid and hard to fault, but I swapped it out for my personal preference of a 40mm stem and some higher-rise bars. Luckily, as I mentioned earlier, the Smash has a fairly high stack as-is, so I didn't have to employ any crazy-high bars for the steep tracks around here.

The Fox Factory 36 has been excellent so far, with a ride feel that complements the rear suspension quite nicely. I'm sure a lot of people will be running the Smash with coil shocks, but I think the air spec suits it nicely for the majority of riding. One little detail I loved seeing was the BikeYoke Revive Dropper; this is a truly excellent component, and the longevity and serviceability make for a great investment.

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Photo by Yoann Barelli, Rider: Nate Spitz

Overall, I think Guerrilla Gravity has made some nice incremental improvements to their jack-of-all-trades bike, with plenty of room to adapt to a variety of use cases. I really enjoyed the balanced feel, and though the bike was quite neutral it stood out in just how easy it was to ride in a wide breadth of terrain. Add to that the aftermarket adjustability of the modular frame platform, and you have a very wide range of use out of just one American-made frame.




Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
201 articles

254 Comments
  • 214 32
 i know aesthetics shouldn't matter but honestly, i'd never buy a bike i thought was ugly
  • 197 13
 When you are spending thousands on a bike, aesthetics absolutely should matter.
  • 77 8
 @JonnyTheWeasel: Yes! And I’m tired of people pretending they don’t!
  • 20 63
flag honda50r (Apr 4, 2023 at 7:57) (Below Threshold)
 @JonnyTheWeasel: I don't understand how spending more money makes superficial qualities more valuable?
  • 72 3
 @honda50r: It's simple really. If the bike is ugly, then I don't want to spend thousands of pounds on it.
  • 22 18
 For all the GG haters - what is it about the design that you don't like?

Most people think the head tube is too large.

The Last Tarvo looks A LOT like the GG front triangle but lacks the GeoAdjust headed and has a different shock mount orientation, are those more appealing to GG haters?
  • 16 1
 GG's are not the prettiest but they function so well that you're willing to overlook some minor offenses like the head tube size (which houses +/- 10mm of reach). The ability to switch to a completely different bike for a few months and then swap back keeps things fun and versatile, especially when the 'new toy' gremlins come to town.
  • 42 5
 @PHeller: For me it's a combination of the bulbous head tube (including the ridiculous overhanging lip where it meets the fork crown), the awkward angles of the down and top tubes, the rough look of the carbon finish and the cable routing (rather make it external than cover it in such an ugly fashion). I've never liked the look of them, but that is a purely aesthetic assessment. However, as pointed out above, when you're spending this kind of money, you want to have pride in your machine and it's only natural that you buy something for more than its basic function.
  • 8 1
 @bunjiman82: I would say that the awkward angles are a bit difficult to see in reality though. Some of these points are only really noticeable in pictures, although the powdercoat being a noticeable exception.

Aesthetics are highly subjective. For example, I think the new Bold/Scott hidden shock bikes are freaking gorgeous but so many people hate them, and instead think a farmgate looking high pivot idler equipped downhill bike is the sexiest thing.
  • 56 0
 Might be the beer goggles, but she looks good to me.
  • 9 1
 @honda50r: Because if I'm spending good money, I like to be able to be able to look at it and go, "Damn that looks good."
  • 13 2
 @camcoz69: I don’t think they look too bad, either. Kind of grows on you.
  • 14 4
 Wait until you see my Gnarvana in Yoan Merlot with gold accents and all orange fox suspension. It’s…an acquired taste.
  • 35 14
 When you live in Colorado, you buy this bike (or a Reeb) to flex on your local Yeti tribe undoubtedly crowding the trailhead. The looks don't matter as much when you can shut up any dentist by telling them your bike was made right here in Colorado.

You also buy a GG if you want a carbon bike without an expiration date. I've yet to see comparable carbon enduro bikes last as well as these.
  • 4 19
flag KK11 (Apr 4, 2023 at 10:22) (Below Threshold)
 Yawn. GG lol
  • 18 9
 @ryanandrewrogers: true that.

Then you get into arguments with dentists who think that their Pivot or Yeti is for sure manufactured in AZ or CO because the company is based out of those respective states.

Nah man, your shit is made overseas. My "ugly" bike is made right down the proverbial street.
  • 31 1
 @ryanandrewrogers: I don’t know. I live in Colorado, and I can’t really say any of that is a concern of mine, or anyone else I can think of.
  • 28 6
 GG owner here. Also owned a few mid 00's WRX's and Lancer EVOs, similar aesthetic situation

Customers drawn to the machine / brand for function & value (pre-2021 GG price increases). Refinement takes a backseat to performance and brand ethos. Small companies doing it well but can't keep up-to-date & polished as fast as the bigger players. For the owners that cherish them, attributes that start out as ugly become the quirks make the thing special. Personally I dig the not-so-serious metal asthetic, and I like the quirks - I appreciate droolworthy bikes but don't need mine to resemble a Ferrari if I'm going spend my time beating the shit out of it. And I love that it's been the most durable bike I've ever owned. Can't say whether the rest of the Subaru / Mitsubishi owners' cliches transfer though (dunno how much GG owners are into vaping at meetups ;P )

I'd love to see a new lineup refinement with a slimmed revved front end, geoadjust headset V2 with angled cup options, internal frame storage, and a raw carbon color option. That may justify the current MSRP.
  • 8 1
 @TheR: Then you're not the target market, and that's ok.
  • 18 5
 @PHeller: Oh, I think it’s cool they’re made Stateside and in Colorado in particular. But it’s an odd flex on owners of other brands. Who cares? Not me or anyone else I know.

Also, I’ve never witnessed any turf wars in Colorado between roving bands of local Yeti “tribes” and GG riders. Far more people own Specialized out here than both those brands combined. It’s just not happening.
  • 3 0
 @chrod: "I'd love to see a new lineup refinement with a slimmed revved front end, geoadjust headset V2 with angled cup options, external cable routing a la nukeproof giga, and a raw carbon color option."

Agreed. I've been patiently waiting for GG to refine it's manufacturing processes to give us lighter weight frames with the same level of durability.

Also wouldn't mind having more space in the triangle for bottles and traditional cages, but at that point the frame ends up looking a lot like a LAST.
  • 8 1
 @PHeller: The shock location has always bugged me. Seems out of place on a bike with such an oddly shaped front triangle.

Was willing to overlook some of that when GG frames were competitively prices. Now not so much.
  • 12 1
 @TheR: I don't think people actually flex. I dont. When people asked me why I bought a GG, I just say it's because at the time they were affordable, I liked the modular aspect, and I liked that they were made in Colorado.

I don't throw shade on any other brands unless someone is misinformed about where their stuff is produced. I don't like people thinking their Yeti or Revel is made in the USA, simply because I think we need clearer information about what is, and isnt' made here.
  • 10 3
 @TheR: Very respectable sir, but I live near Denver-bros and Boulder-bros. I swear some trailheads up here are a neverending bro-off to see who's more of a "native".

Not that I can afford to or even attempt to keep up. I'm proud enough knowing my humble Commencal was made in Taiwan or elsewhere in Asia just like every Yeti, Revel, and Alchemy I see on the trails.

Before I get downvoted by some boutique brand bootlickers look it up yourselves. Yeti in Vietnam, Revel moved to Taichung in February, and Alchemy hasn't made an Arktos in-house for years.
  • 11 0
 @TheR: agreed. It’s not happening. And I don’t know anyone who buys a bike to flex against other local brands. In fact I ride with a lot of people who ride yetis and revel. No one cares.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: you make a solid point!
  • 2 2
 @Clifflane3: Well, I don't think anyone is genuinely starting parking lot beef, picking fights, or spitting on lesser non-Colorado brands.

But, when seeing the prevalence of "local" brands there is a reason that is not rooted in practicality or performance. It isn't supporting local either, since these brands barely do.

In my honest opinion, it has got to be the trailhead "flex" aspect that sells some of these. Because there are options that cost less, perform better, and actually support local. These bikes are not so unique that they should be as prevalent as they are here.
  • 5 2
 I got rid of my Ripmo for this very reason. It just didn't have a lust factor. Now, I always turn around and look at my Propain after every ride.
  • 3 0
 its starting to look better, it used to be uglier
  • 3 0
 I rode an Ibis for years, and loved it. I have no shame.
  • 2 3
 @TheR: I love the other side of the Atlantic. Why would I care if it’s made in America
  • 3 8
flag mariomtblt (Apr 4, 2023 at 13:21) (Below Threshold)
 @chrismac70: cuz we're #1 boy!! haha!! downvote me idgaf
  • 3 0
 @chrismac70: I’m confused. I never said you should.
  • 5 1
 @PHeller: I will say that GG is a little more appealing to me than they would be otherwise because they’re made locally. It’s definitely a positive factor if I were to buy one. But I’m pretty agnostic about where other bikes are made—won’t keep me from buying other brands, either. And there is local economic benefit to these other companies being located here, even if manufacturing is not.
  • 20 0
 Do you guys actually get into arguments about bikes at trailheads? Never once have I bothered to initiate a conversation, or had anyone approach me, about my bike's brand, components, etc. Why are you having imaginary arguments with imaginary dentists?
  • 10 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: re: " It isn't supporting local either, since these brands barely do."

These brands actually do a lot for the local community. Yeti, GG, Reeb, Commencal, Orbea, Canfield, many more are very supportive of the local community, cycling but also business, engineering, manufacturing, etc. in both highly visible and under that radar ways. These things definitely play into why people buy the local brands, aside from having local customer support and employing friends at said companies
  • 3 0
 @honda50r: I think part of the issue is that most modern bikes are pretty awesome. You could choose between a lot of bikes that are going to suit your needs and be quite impressed with a lot of the ride characteristics. So if performance is pretty closely matched between two brands it is perfectly reasonable to select based on the aesthetics. No one is going to buy a horrible bike just because it’s pretty, but if you have two excellent bikes and you think one is ass ugly it’s an easy choice.
  • 7 0
 @chacou: You're right.

They deserve lots of credit for fostering support here. My mind was more on the labor-intensive side of bike production- manufacturing domestically, a far costlier endeavor. That is where a lot of my respect for GG comes from because they're keeping it all here. I quite like Taiwanese frames too (I ride one and it rocks), but some of the brands here aren't very upfront about their production origins.
  • 2 0
 @Austin014: Exactly my point.
  • 2 0
 @Austin014: no, the guy is full of shit.
  • 7 0
 I own a GG, my second. Both have been great. Supporting local manufacturing was a big plus for me. They also do a lot for local trail advocacy in terms of fund raising and gave me a discount for being a member of a local group. Yeti have given bikes to raffle to local groups and Orbea smashed it when they moved to Boulder making a very sizeable donation to sponsor the Ore Chute trail. As somebody who's heavily involved with local trail building and maintenance this stuff makes a difference to me.
  • 6 7
 @JonnyTheWeasel:

If I'm spending money on a bike, looks don't matter nearly as much as function.

If the best riding bike looked like crap, I'd ride it.

Aesthetics are for art and fools who don't ride, just saying ....
  • 4 0
 @sanchofula: Bikes can be both. Like I said, if I'm dropping thousands of pounds on a bike, I want to like the look of it.
  • 1 0
 @honda50r: if the bike was great but you looked like you were flying a big giant genitalia, be my guest. I'll wait for the lower longer slacker one
  • 3 1
 @ATXZJ: I agree, it’s mostly the shock location for me. And the top tube still has the remnants of a hunchback, thanks to water bottles.
I don’t know if it’s just the looks or if it’s because the shock is mounted mid downtube and more perpendicular angle than other downtube mounted designs but it doesn’t look quite right to me.
  • 3 0
 @sanchofula: But here’s the thing: it’s not like you have to pick either/or these days (or ever). Like you have the choice either ugly, great-functioning bikes on one side, and great looking turds on the other. That’s not the case. Those qualities are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Stop it!
  • 1 0
 @mariomtblt: lol not in mtb... Not by a long shot.
  • 6 1
 @chrod: I have no shame admitting how much I love the look of my 05 WRX wagon. Had a 2020 sti and ended up going back to a mid 00’s WRX for a few reasons. Perhaps similar to a GG bike, the aesthetic grows on me when I appreciate the functionality. Probably just associating the image with the performance, but it works for me.
  • 4 0
 @emptybe-er:
The thing is, with the shock mounted that way you can actually fit two water bottles: one below the top tube and one below the shock. That's the way I roll. So, yeah, it's function over form but it works well when you need to load up on liquid.
  • 3 2
 @dirtdiggler: Ok so water bottle function over better shock/frame function. Dumb.
  • 2 0
 @dirtdiggler: I guess a 40lb trailbike would be a good workout but other than that I can’t fathom adding more weight to this thing.
  • 4 0
 @Chondog94: "Perhaps similar to a GG bike, the aesthetic grows on me when I appreciate the functionality."

100% hit the nail on the head.

I miss my old '06 STI for the same reasons. Box fenders, rumbly exhaust, simple durable AWD, and readily available parts that fit like Legos. If it was a wagon not a sedan I'd have kept it forever, I tell myself. Wink
If I sold my GG I'd be singing the same song about the bike that could be any 3 bikes in less than 2 beers' time.
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: what suboptimal shock/frame function are you referring to?
  • 1 1
 @jdejace: shock placement
  • 2 2
 @jdejace: mid tube load/stress
  • 2 0
 So, is this ugly?
  • 5 1
 @emptybe-er: but it weighs less then a pound more than a yeti sb140 yet is more capable and I'd bet good money more robust
  • 2 0
 @bunjiman82: I own the previous smash. The finish is a powder coat of paint. I know because I chipped it to the Carbon layer.
  • 4 0
 @catweasel: Good point. I wouldn’t let a lb decide which frame I’d ride but I can’t wrap my head around adding 2 water bottles worth of weight to any heavy-ish 29’er or any bike, but I know it’s all relative. Some people love to haul stuff on their bikes, I want my bike stuff-free . Different functions, different forms.
  • 3 0
 @camcoz69: that green is stunning.
  • 4 2
 @emptybe-er: um…what function do you lose by mounting the shock that way? Nothing. Its function over aesthetics. Smart.
  • 2 0
 @jamesbrant: Agreed. Green isn’t my favorite color but damn…that looks sick!
  • 3 0
 Of course, more comments on the looks than anything else... If you mentally Photoshop the shock out, it doesn't look too weird (ignoring the extra day head tube). Or at least not to me. I think it's because the shock just looks plonked there, as opposed to being carefully located inline with the top or seat tube - it's a bit Huffy/Carrera style. And why not put the external-internal cable routing underneath so at least it can act as a rock guard?
  • 4 0
 @PHeller: shock/linkage position look like 2 systems just forced together and the headtube bumper
  • 1 1
 @dirtdiggler: You don’t lose any function in particular. And I’m not solely referring to the top tube (shock position also), so it’s not just aesthetics. I’m referring to the functional purpose of the bike. If water bottle storage is a design-altering parameter, the design has not been optimized for the functions I need my bike designed for. The design has been compromised to fit a water bottle.
Also, there’s nothing technically special about the suspension design so it should be more refined looking imo. That shock angle in the middle of the downtube just does not look purposeful at all.
  • 1 0
 @dirtdiggler: That being said it’s not like it’s really an ugly bike and I’m not bagging on it, just sharing my opinion on why some might find it that way. It took them forever, kind of like fezarri and pivot took forever, but they did lower the standover.. so I bet eventually they’ll mount the shock like normal folks too.
  • 2 6
flag jimmyricard (Apr 5, 2023 at 4:53) (Below Threshold)
 @ryanandrewrogers: lol. If they were actually native they wouldn't be claiming a united state because their people pre-date the states. Every time I see one of those "state native" bumper stickers it makes me chuckle to myself how stupid it actually is for a non American native to claim, and THEN to flex it is even more ridiculous and laughable.
  • 6 1
 @dirtdiggler:

One small additional plus to this shock location / linkage design: super minimal rotation at the shock eyelets.
  • 3 1
 I think the bike looks just fine. It's just that beefy headtube area which makes that Fox 36 look more like 32 lol.
  • 2 1
 GG: When you feel like a YT is just a sexier bike than you deserve...
  • 3 0
 I would like to hear from their engineers….
  • 7 0
 @Stumpclumper: Agreed! From an engineering standpoint it's actually an optimal position as there is minimal rotation of the shock as the suspension compresses. This leads to less friction since the shock doesn't rotate. As mentioned, the position also frees up the triangle for 2 water bottles. On my size 3 I could fit two bottles with a Float-X shock without any issues. ridegg.com/blogs/dispatch/dampening-not-damping
  • 1 4
 @therealnobody: Absolutely laughable! It looks so freakin' dorky too.

Like, I'm so proud of you for inhabiting the Denver metro area for your whole life! Here's a sticker champ!
  • 3 0
 @PHeller: Yoann Barelli sure makes them look good - never watched one of his vids and said, ooh that bike is not aesthetically pleasing. Poetry in Motion.
  • 2 0
 As an Ibis owner, am I allowed to comment here?
  • 2 0
 It's not that Aesthetics don't matter. It's just that a lot of people (me) have a much different scale and preference... Marin Wolf Ridge? nah, no way. Ibis curved top tube? just doesn't bother me that much.
  • 1 0
 In Vitalmtb review you have much better photos of a green frame. It looks weird in PB photos,a black frame and bad photos made the bike no favor. So check other reviews and videos and you can see the bike is particular but not ugly I think. In other color look much better.
  • 1 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: "You also buy a GG if you want a carbon bike without an expiration date. I've yet to see comparable carbon enduro bikes last as well as these."

GG came outta the gate hot with claims of significant strength increase with their Revved carbon. However, I have yet to see them follow up with further information on this like reduced warranty rates or anything similar. Additionally, if their strength claims are true it would seem like Revved carbon to be an ideal choice for a number of bike manufacturers to move to either through licensing or doing a similar knock off.
  • 4 0
 @hellbelly: They're already making a sturdy frame with unique manufacturing methods at a lower price than any domestically manufactured competitor, lets's not run the price of these up by demanding lifetime warranties too. Warranties are very rarely a reflection of how reliable a bike is, merely how overpriced it was.

Most other brands aren't interested in improving the materials they make bikes out of because their frame providers in Asia are very efficient at providing high-quality low-cost carbon/aluminum. If the factory isn't domestic there is no quick way to test new manufacturing methods.

Revel is prototyping a thermoplastic frame, but since they now manufacture in Taiwan it could be a long time before that technology makes it to the production line.
  • 2 1
 @ryanandrewrogers: I really do not care about warranties. Their claim of 300% higher impact strength over traditional carbon is a big number and I want to know how they've held up beyond anecdotal reports.
  • 1 1
 @hellbelly: Yeah that is a pretty big claim. Quite doubtful of it, and impact strength is such a fickle thing to measure. Depends on how the carbon was laid in that specific part of the frame, how much resin is in there, and shit, I'm sure even the paint job on top matters to an extent.
  • 5 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: I read the 300% increase in impact strength is a claim coming from the composites world regarding carbon reinforced PEEK which is what these bikes are made of. I trust that number but GG is just quoting other people's data as far as I can tell. I'd like to see some actual testing of the frames as opposed to those silly vids they came out with early on. And if they're going to be silly, run over them with a truck, throw them off cliffs, it doesn't have to be lab work although that would be even better. I have one of those ugly Merlot Gnarvanas - I love it. I'm not very good AND I'm trying to race this year so it's seeing plenty of impacts. So far so good as it's toppled end over end, whacking trees and rocks along the way. Myself, on the other hand, not holding up so well...
  • 1 0
 Ya they remind me a bit of a yeti, that distinct Colorado look. Seems to be an acquired taste both very bulbous designs.
  • 107 6
 Pinkbike: I want a locally made affordable bike.
GG: here’s a bike that’s the same or lower price than overseas carbon
Pinkbike: f*ck that.
  • 10 21
flag tajtigabor FL (Apr 5, 2023 at 4:08) (Below Threshold)
 Pinkbike: I want a locally made affordable bike *that doesn't look like it was sketched by a motorcycle designer to a paper towel and accidentally it went to production like that.
GG: here is a bike that looks likeit was sketched by a motorcycle designer to a paper towel and accidentally it went to production like that.
Pinkbike: f that
  • 2 0
 Well freaking said
  • 44 2
 It's weird reading all of these "its an ugly bike" I have a gnarvanna and always get complimented on its looks.
I love my GG.
  • 13 1
 @y2todd

The bike looks much better in person, it’s the lack of dimension/ depth perception in the photos that make all the angles look out of plumb and awkward looking. I am fan of the GG.

But, to be fair, I am a big fan of ibis bike designs. My opinion may be skewed…
  • 1 0
 Same. Although my Spire looked really good.
  • 4 0
 Same. I love how my Pistola looks. It's a sexy bike with an industrial aesthetic that gets a lot of compliments wherever I go. It stands out in a good way.
  • 2 1
 I doubt it’s sarcasm.
  • 15 1
 I don't own one, but a friend does. they're good looking bikes. The internet just has a ton of people who think the best way to be witty and insightful is to hate on something. Few bikes are objectively ugly.
  • 7 1
 I think the bike looks great.
  • 38 7
 440 mm chain stays on all sizes - for me as a smaller rider definitely a deal breaker. we need size specific geometry!
  • 16 2
 And for me as a taller rider, please longer than 440 on the biggest size!
  • 13 4
 Agreed. I don’t see why they have been given a free pass on this just because of the way they choose to sell their bikes
  • 15 0
 I'm very surprised they didn't go with a flip chip on the stay, for a choice between two lengths. That would have been a good parallel for their modular approach to reach adjust with the headset.
  • 7 1
 @stormracing: a friend of mine is super tall, it's funny how we have the same struggles with bike or clothes fit. Same complains, just opposite direction.

But really, we're talking about being centered in the bike, but how is this supposed to work if reach difference from smallest to largest frame is 50 mm having the same chain stay length. I'd rather have an aluminum frame that has 7 sizes with specific geometry and anti-squat values than an 500 lighter fancy carbon frame that is offered in 4 sizes. And I won't even start questioning how the same bike is supposed to work perfectly for both 60 kg and 90 kg riders in terms of strength and stiffness.
  • 6 1
 Short king summer
  • 17 2
 As a more fun rider, please 430 chainstays
  • 6 0
 Since they do the seatstays in aluminum, I really don’t get why they don’t just do either a bunch of aluminum seatstays to have different chainstay lengths, or do a few different lengths with flip chips. They could definitely offer 430-460, maybe even bigger, chainstays for all their bikes if they wanted to.
  • 5 1
 @stormracing: if you're interested in the bike you can put the 450mm Gnarvana seat stays on the Smash if you want. They have the same shock length, just 5mm difference in stroke. Lowers the BB a bit, not much especially if you run a 160mm fork. It works well on the size 4 IMO.
  • 1 0
 @TheSlayer99: This.
Since they're manufacturing everything in-house on a common front triangle platform, buyers should have a rear triangle option for the shorter rear center. (hopefully this is in the works)
  • 2 0
 @stormracing: And the Gnar does climb surprisingly well for what it is.
  • 1 1
 @thustlewhumber: ditto.

I do love the idea that 10 mm of chainstay length radically affects weight distribution.
  • 2 1
 @stormracing: me as an average rider - haha... look at you short gnomes and long noodles Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @Pelmenium: Atherton bikes - custom and then you can have what you want (although it is made in the UK rather than the US).
  • 2 0
 for me as a 5'10" rider, i want every bike to have 440mm chainstays Smile
  • 2 0
 The longer chain stays are necessary to accommodate long travel bikes with large rear wheels. If you want shorter chain stays, choose a shorter travel bike or run mullet. I ran mullet on a Megatrail and Shred Dogg, it was great! Of course, 27.5 front and rear is better, but the cool people think mullet is better.
  • 2 0
 @sanchofula: you think? there are long travel 29ers with short stays.

I know you're a fellow Canfield-stan, the lithium has 430 stays, which is plenty short. i do like the spastic nature of my ESD at 417, but that's mostly because you're always up and moving on a hardtail anyway.
  • 2 1
 @sanchofula: that actually doesn't work because mullet bikes typically have longer chainstays than 29-ers for better handling characteristics apparently.

in terms of space for the 29-er rear wheel: there is a solution for this, it's called super boost. Pivot bikes manage to have 430 mm chainstays in the smallest size at 165 mm of travel in Firebird and they even have a dual link suspension layout that requires extra space for the linkage behind the bottom bracket. I hate to say it, but I think long term super boost offers more options for frame designs, maybe it will domintate in the future.

Actually I like 27,5" front and rear, currently waiting vor my Nomad 5, 425 mm chainstays in size s, can't wait Smile
  • 1 0
 Shorter chainstays can just be realized with the appropriate front triangle, can't you? Just shift all the pivots on the front triangle and the shock mount forwards and the entire rear triangle along with the rear wheel just tucks in. You're going to change that front triangle for different sizes anyway and at least you can keep the rear triangle the same for all sizes yet still have the rear center that suits you. I thought Norco does it like this too.
  • 2 0
 @TheRamma: or - if you had the predecessor to the Canfield Tilt, the Canfield Brothers Riot, like I did, I had 414mm chain-stay. Super fun, but things got sketchy at high speed! I have a Smash now. More stable, still fun, but on techy step ups, etc- miss the super short stays of the Riot.
  • 1 0
 @aaronka970: My BTR Ranger size large has 415mm chainstays, loving it. This is a hardtail but their Pinner full suspension bike has 417mm chainstays too across all sizes.
  • 1 0
 @aaronka970: never road a riot/toir, but I have a Honzo ESD at 417 right now. It's fun in some scenarios, sketchy in others! perfect for my goofing around hardtail.
  • 27 1
 Whatever your perception of the aesthetics (I actually like it, apparently more than most of you), it's damned impressive that they can make a carbon frame in HCOL Colorado, and be price-competitive with everyone else doing it overseas.

Even if you add the same shock, their frameset is is $160 cheaper than the new Smuggler, and $559 cheaper than the Hightower 3 framset. And the build kits feel like a pretty good balance between (inflated 2023) costs and performance.

Does seem like you pay a bit of a weight penalty for GG carbon vs the way other manufacturers are doing it. Aka, GG lists this bike's frameset + shock at 8.0 lbs, and Transition (generally known for chonky frames) puts the 150mm Sentinel at 7.0 lbs for a framset + shock.
  • 9 1
 Well said, although I word argue for that extra pound you're getting a vastly superior carbon material. I'm honestly surprised none of the overseas companies aren't trying to copy the GG thermoplastic, for the massive savings in labor if not for the QA/QC improvements, strength benefits, etc...although, apparently making a legit thermoplastic frame is way easier said than done.
  • 3 2
 @jackalope: "We do this not because it is easy. But because we thought it would be easy." -- (guess) a decent number of companies exploring thermoplastics, but defaulting back to Taiwanese expertise in traditional carbon.

From what I've read about GG, the founders had previous aerospace experience with the Thermoplastic manufacturing, so a lot of their R&D was figuring out how to build bikes cost effectively. Kind of like silicon chip manufacturing, all of the secret sauce is in the manufacturing efficiencies.
  • 10 0
 Ive had no issues with the cable routing on my V1 revved smash/gnarvana. The trick is to cut the cables pretty short and tighten the cable cover from the bottom, up, once the cables are pulled tight. I started off with a coil shock on mine and it was great for parks and steep chunky terrain, but made it a pig to climb with. Just put on a float X2 and it already feels more lively.
  • 25 4
 Until the X2 froths up its oil like a cappuccino.
  • 9 1
 Gorgeous bike, haven't ridden one yet... but that head tube is HIDEOUSLY disproportionate to the forks.
  • 3 0
 @diggerandrider: Looks better with a bigger fork for sure, but it's still massive. I went from a Lyrik on my Smash to a Mezzer when I updated to the Gnarvana, the larger stancions definitely look, and feel, nicer.
  • 4 0
 @Flavaine: f*ck these X2's... I have a new bike arriving this week with an X2 on it (first time I've run an air X2). I'm so worried about it I bought a RS Super Deluxe Ultimate to have as a spare. Maybe I'll bolt it to the frame to have as part of my trailside fix kit, haha.

Questions... how quickly are these things blowing? And when they get rebuilt by Fox, are they updating the internals to fix the issue or do they just keep blowing?
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: I ran an X2 on my Pivot Mach 5.5 for little over 2 years, only once did it "need" a rebuild. I did regular maintenance, but no real issues. That said, I do see numerous reports noting the newer versions "blowing up" on the regular
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: it seems really hit or miss. I know people who have had no issues with their X2s and really like them. Personally I've had 2 start slurping like crazy after only a couple months of riding. In my case they were both trunnion shocks, i've read comments saying that is an issue for the X2s. I've also known people with X2 trunnions with no issues. So who the heck knows.

I just know that personally, I wouldn't run one again simply because I got burned. I don't feel the performance is much better than other shocks that i've had zero issues with.
  • 1 0
 @sudochuckwalla: Thanks, will have to see how it goes I guess. At least I was able to pick up a brand new RS Super Deluxe Ultimate for $400.
  • 1 0
 @Flavaine: X2 loves making frothy cappuccinos more than Riches Rude
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: my ‘22 blew up after four rides
  • 1 0
 What do people expect from cables these days? It looks more than neat to me and for the fans of internal routing, it all quickly tucks into the frame. Is it only the exposed front part that bothers people? It is only a matter of time before one brand releases a bike with a chain guard and people start complaining about bikes where they can see the non-designur-approved chain.
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife:
What am I missing here? Years ago I figured out if you want a durable, great performing rear shock go coil. Unlike an air fork, which for me feel good and are durable, an air spring on a rear shock is always going to be a weak link. The pressures it has to deal with seem to overwhelm available tech. When we are dealing with 33 plus # bikes does it really matter if an extra pound is added due to a coil?
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: My 2020 X2 was solid for 2 seasons with an annual rebuild.

My first 2022 was busted out of the box and second lasted about 5 rides. I also thought about buying a sale super deluxe from knolly as a backup haha.

What is your new frame?
  • 2 0
 @scotteh: Haha yes, these are the stories that convinced me to get in the box! Thinking I might just swap it out right away and sell it as a brand new take-off. Even if it does survive, or if I have to get it rebuilt a couple times... since I sell my bikes every year, I think it would only make my bike more difficult to sell with it on there.

They still have stock of them, including the coil version for a great deal, you should grab one.

New bike is the Chilcotin 151 in Teal Cosmos... arrives on Thursday!
  • 1 0
 @MikerJ: Ya, my last 3 bikes I ran coil. I re-up every year so I thought I'd go air this time around... we'll see how it goes, may go back to coil next year... or who knows... in a month, haha.
  • 2 0
 @scotteh: UPDATE: Build up the bike... sat on it... "Squelch, squelch, sqelch", with almost no rebound. Back to fox it goes! Good thing I bought that back-up!!
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: classic, lucky you thought ahead haha. Apparently fox is rolling out an update to improve x2 reliability in ~May, but no idea if it will be backwards compatible.

Enjoy the Chilcotin, it’s a sweet bike! That teal is a stunner
  • 2 0
 @scotteh: No kidding! Huh, maybe I'll hang on to the X2 for a month or so before I send it back... maybe I'll call my guy at Knolly first, their office/warehouse is a couple doors down from the fox office/Canada HQ... see if I can get some inside info before I send it off.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: good call, please let me know if you hear anything useful as I’m considering a new shock soon.
  • 2 0
 @scotteh: UPDATE: Straight from the Canada Fox HQ rep:

"... We do have updated parts and I'm confident to say that you are not going to experience any problem after this warranty claim."
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: thanks! Heard that before, but fingers crossed haha
  • 8 0
 Feels like the front triangle they've been milking for years is getting long in the tooth... I want a longer bike than the S3, but I don't want a 480mm seat tube. The molds for those seem to be a major cost/long lead item for GG...

I've also noticed the Trail Pistol seems to be gone... I wonder if there is an upgrade coming.
  • 1 0
 Been some chatter on the Pistol in the GG forum. Expect new colors to be released soon.
  • 5 1
 @BenLow2019: exciting new colors. I guess I'm old enough to remember when GG used to make fun of the brands that announced new colors like they were something exciting.
  • 3 0
 Yeah they need 4 sizes. there is a huge gap in sizes with their bikes.
  • 2 0
 @jwdenver: You might know this but if not... They had plans for 4 sizes, however, they scrapped the smallest size before it launched, but after sizes 2,3 and I think 4 were available to buy. They launched size 3, and a few months later 2. They made it sound like after real-world testing, size 2 in the short was small enough and they didn't need to make the size 1. Kinda sucks cause they could've planned sizes to be more efficient, still a fun bike though.
  • 8 0
 I own a GG Smash. Got it on a Black Friday sale last year w/ I9 305 V3 wheels, I9 stem, Push ElevenSix, Lyric Ultimate, Code RSC brakes, X01 drivetrain, bike yoke dropper…. for $6800 (including tax) and the bike rides like a dream. Show me a bike that is as well spec’d for the money. There isn’t one. Even at current non sale prices they are better equipped than any of their competitors. I’ve had my bike on day long epics, massive jump lines, gnarly east coast tech, smooth flow trails, tight rooty windy trails, and it handles everything I’ve thrown at it. It also climbs well. Couldn’t be happier. They let you customize your build, it’s made in the states, GG works with manufacturers making stuff in the states, and the customer support is fantastic. No they aren’t the most attractive bikes out there but just like the partner you choose looks aren’t everything and the more you get to know them and love them you start to enjoy the their unique looks. I f*cking love my bike.
Stepping off my soap box now
  • 2 0
 Agree. I picked up my Pistola last spring. It was very competitively priced and specced really well. I could have gone cheaper by a bit with a YT or Canyon, but GG is local to me and their support has been wonderful. The only weak spot on my mid-tier build was the CB rear hub as I blew one of those up near the end of the season, but it got warrantied and I built up a spare set with Hope V4s and DT Swiss EX471s. The only thing I could find comparable was a Pivot Trail 429 Enduro and it was about $850 more for no real improvement in spec.
  • 10 3
 The article immediately says that the front triangle of the bike is unchanged - and yet it is an entirely different silhouette to the existing lineup (which all share the same front triangle). So....I think they changed it.

The first picture shows a frame with a different looking top tube and top tube-to-seat tube junction. In fact, the frame in the first picture looks different than the frames on the current website. What's up?
  • 5 1
 @KJP1230, @DarioD:

Yes, was going to say something similar.. I have an aluminum Megatrail and follow GG . . . Got their press release on this bike yesterday, and there’s mention of front triangle changes, including location of main pivot. Dario, get us the rest of the scoop!
  • 4 1
 @Stumpclumper: Whats strange is that the frame in the first photo is different than the green frame the reviewer is pictured riding, and different than the look of the frame on the current GG website.
  • 5 0
 @KJP1230: If you look at the photo of the rider on the green bike it's a photo by Yoann of his buddy Nate, not the reviewer.
That front triangle looks like the existing size 4 to me. The "main pivot moving" is the pivot on the seat stay not where the yoke attaches to the frame. It looks like they're re-using a similar piece to the Gnarvana vs what the V1 Smash has, which would account for the removal of the flip chip. I've got V1 Smash stays hanging on the wall and a Gnarvana build in my garage.
I think I'd take the Gnarvana over this updated Smash honestly, and I actually kinda wonder if this is just the Gnarvana with different dropouts to create a 1cm shorter wheelbase, so you could probably bump the shock stroke on this version of the Smash to 65mm and get a "Gnarvana with shorter stays". I was running a 230x65 DVO Jade on my V1 Smash and it cleared the seat tube at full compression w/ a 2.4 rear tire.
  • 7 0
 I think it could also come down to it being a size 4 here and a smaller size on their website.
  • 6 0
 Straight from the horses mouth, GG states that the front triangle is unchanged.
  • 8 0
 Bike looks like a really good choice, however that reach adjust in the shortest makes it look kinda dumb.
  • 10 1
 just can't get over that overbite on the headtube
  • 15 2
 I own two and never noticed until your comment. Thanks I hate it.
  • 5 1
 They have it setup in the “short” position, aka the ugly position. I have no idea why they’d do that for product launch photos.
  • 2 0
 @stevemokan: Yeah good point, also the cable management looks amateur. Poor GG they make great bikes but need help on marketing.
  • 1 0
 @stevemokan: Yup, and they're also reviewing an XL (size 4) which is slightly longer at the headtube junction and seat tube. The large frame as shown in the stock photos is a little more balanced looking, IMO.
  • 4 0
 Yeah a beautie it's not. My 18 yr old son bought the V1 just before COVID hit. Sweet deal and he upgraded the fork to 160. He races local enduros with it and beats the snot out of the bike. Its easy to maintain and durable as hell. He loves it.
  • 3 0
 Have a Gnarvana (previously a Smash). Love it. But they gotta knock down the price to upgrade to v2 (currently $1k+) carbon chainstays and v2 alloy seatstays.

Would also make my Smash seatstays irrelevant since they wouldn't work with the carbon chainstays.

A "update program" to connect people exchanging chainstays would be sweet. Closest to that is the Guerilla Gravity facebook group, that's where I snagged my Gnarvana says for cheap.
  • 2 0
 I have to agree here. There's still nothing wrong with the older V1 designs using the aluminum triangle. They work so well already and you can find SS kits for CHEAP. The weight savings going to carbon CS's is so tiny that it's hard to justify spending $1000 for a kit. Take in mind that the V2 Smash is still not 100% carbon like the V2 Trail Pistol. The upcoming Trail Pistol V3 is likely going to be even more money since it's a full carbon triangle. The only thing that has me lusting over the new Smash is the extra 5mm of travel and the new colors.
  • 2 0
 @dirtdiggler: increase stroke to 62.5mm and get 151mm travel. Just double-check rear tire clearance.
Those colors though, esp the green are verynaice.
  • 1 0
 @chrod: Nice! I've always wondered if that was possible since there is a good bit of clearance between the tire and the ST at 145mm.
  • 2 0
 @dirtdiggler: Yeah most folks say there's enough clearance to run 62.5 and have a couple mm clearance left over, even with 2.4 or 2.5 tires.
I'm cheating and running a 65mm X2, scraped once. But I think a 62.5 would be the right move, actually set the progression correctly.
  • 4 0
 @chrod did a bunch of research on this before I found cheap Gnarvana stays. Was going to downstroke the Ohlins TTX air 2 from 65 to 62.5 and try them on Smash stays.

But...ended up grabbing the gnarvana stays and decided to try them. Absolutely love the longer chainstays, suits my riding style really well. Bike feels much more balanced than the Smash. I like the "inside the bike" feel, and really don't feel like I lost a lot in climbing (at least for steep PNW road climbs). The longer stays actually feel really planted and centered on technical climbs.


I'd be more curious about carbon stay ride quality than weight. But again, maybe for...$600 or something, not $1200+ haha. That's more than I spent on the used Smash + Gnarvana I have lol.

Amazing how GG was so ahead of the game in 2019 that these frames are still relevant. These things used are one of the best values out there for a modern GEO bike.
  • 2 0
 @robotdave: I did the same thing! lol
But I didn't get along with the long stays, preferred the shorter rear end. Old habits.
I think in the Smash V2 GG has found a great compromise in the 440mm stays.
I was blown away by how the Gnar climbed though, absolutely great for a big 170/160 29er. Long stays probably helped.

Agree - GG geo was years ahead. Designed in 2019, still relevant now. And if you raise the front end of a Smash, Trail Pistol, or Mullet the Megatrail you are right in line with modern ~63-64 HA bikes with a seat tube steeper than 76 degrees.
  • 1 0
 @chrod: I'm really curious about the relationship between chainstay length and BB height, particularly BB drop. I thought I hated long stays.

Had a Specialized Stumpy Evo, always rode that in short mode. The long/low mode was just too low. And that was just 443ish mm with a slammed BB of 331mm. I almost felt like the back end hung up too much over drops, like it felt way too long. Wonder if I was feeling the BB too far below the axle. Whopping BB drop of 44mm, I think that was the actual issue I was feeling vs. CS length.

Sold that (broke the evo chainstay and could never trust the frame again), got an alloy patrol. 440mm CS, 340 bb height. 27.5" rear wheel definitely influences the overall feel and reduces the "BB DROP" compared to a 29er with the same CS + BB height #s (only 15mm of drop). LOVE IT. Keeping that build with a boxxer as a park bike.

Now onto the Gnarvana, 450mm CS, 347mm BB height. Not sure the BB drop, guessing around 25-ish mm. LOVE IT.
  • 2 0
 @robotdave: Hadn't thought about the interaction between rear center length and BB drop
I think you're right in that the "in the bike" feeling can come from both, more "down" in the bike with a low BB and "centered" in the bike with long chainstay.

The best back-to-back I've done has been switching between v1 Smash / Megasmash / Gnarvana.
Smash at 347mm BB (160 fork) 435mm stays, Megasmash at 337 low BB, 343 high, and Gnar at 347mm BB 450mm stays

337mm BB is about as low as I can ever go with ~160mm travel. Below about 340mm BB has the "in the bike" feeling to me but the short stays keep me from feeling centered fore/aft. (which I like, I prefer to pivot on the rear wheel a bit). While the Gnar felt "too far forward" for my liking, it definitely was easy to control on chunk and did not require any thoughtful forward shift to weight the front tire, it just worked. I've been faster in the high-BB configurations over rough chunk, and maybe the rear end is getting hung up less because of the extra height. Dammit now I want to go ride...
  • 3 0
 @robotdave: Personally, I love the shorter 434mm stays on the Smash V1. I didn't even realize they were that short! On shuttle runs I never once felt like the bike was unstable or anything close to that. Goes to show how perception can be biased by the numbers. On single track the Smash is super fun and responsive and I'm a little worried that the longer stays on the V2 will give too much of that 'stable' planted feel. However, 440mm is probably better for most people across a range of sizes.
  • 1 0
 @dirtdiggler: I think the website geo charts on the V1 Smash were actually wrong for some time until they released the V2
  • 2 0
 @chrod: I haven't tried the megasmash yet, VERY appealing if I can find the stays for cheap! This is why GG is awesome.

@dirtdiggler agreed, riding style and body type probably play a lot into it too. I felt like Smash V1 was way too unstable on steep chunk and shuttling. 160mm fork would have probably helped a bit, but something was just off for my style. I do like to keep weight pretty centered and pump hard on everything. Short legs and long torso might contribute to that. But either way, my Patrol alloy 440 CS length, not super far off of Smash v1 at 435mm and it feels just fine haha. Maybe it's the combo of +5mm CS and lower BB on the Patrol vs. Smash that makes the difference for me.

All this thread tells me is more brands need to step it up with adjustable GEO. But they won't do that, because they have to justify having a SB115, SB140, and SB165, or Santa Cruz's ridiculous line parsing out mullet vs. 29er (5010/tallboy, hightower/bronson, megatower/nomad).

Even being a Transition fanboy...would be pretty sweet if I could turn my Patrol into a Spire easily. Which you could do because I'm 90% positive the front triangles and linkage are the same, rear triangles are different (not sure if it's seatstays or chainstays or both).

Kona kind of nailed this with Kona Process X (change chainstay length and wheel size with flip chips). But more expensive, I don't want 490mm reach on a large, and not built in US vs. GG.
  • 2 0
 @robotdave: The Megasmash is rad. High mode is very close to the Smash, with a slight climbing and XC disadvantage. Whippy backend, but stable in gravity mode, 155mm travel in high, 165mm low, can be run in 170 or 160 front. I run the Megasmash for park, and when the Smash would be outclassed by chunk or drops. I'd run the Megasmash full time if the Smash wasn't a better everyday rig due to better 29er rollover.

+100 for brands stepping up with adjustable geo. Someday GG should figure out how to accomplish all their adjustments with chips and dropouts instead of stays, would make swaps even easier.
I'd take adjustable geo over internal frame storage or a 1lb weight savings anyday.
  • 8 3
 I can’t believe all these comments about the looks. This bike is absolutely gorgeous in person. Maybe it’s the look of the size 4? Idk my size 2 looks amazing
  • 5 5
 I’ll explain: looks are subjective or relative, however you want to say it. Just like with colors, some hate red some love red. You happen to love ugly bikes.
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: Of course, style is subjective. You may not remember the last time a GG was posted here, but go look at the comments. What I find most interesting is how opinions about lines and style choices vary so much. Transition Spur, straight line from the top tube to stays: gorgeous. GG straight line from top tube to stays: hideous. GG starts the recessed, sharp faceted angles along the inner curve of the front triangle: hideous. We are one arrival copies the design: gorgeous.
  • 2 0
 Seriously, this is the type of cable routing I can get behind. Outside, but covered. Even if it's not perfectly executed. Canyon has/had something similar didn't they? People shit on headset routing all the time but for me, internally hydraulic lines are bad if they don't go through the headset too.
  • 4 2
 I like GG but this seems expensive. Before they had quality US made bikes for a good price but now they are with everyone else. With all the sales going on- there are much cheaper options.
  • 4 0
 Yeah they raised their frame only prices by nearly $1000 from when I bought my Gnarvana a year or two ago
  • 9 1
 @Bobtheguy: Cost of living and paying decent wages in Denver is much higher as well.
  • 7 4
 @bman33: what mages you think the extra money finds its way into employees pay packet
  • 6 1
 @chrismac70: because until recently I actually lived in Denver a few miles from GG & semi-connected to 'the industry'. I know what going wages are in that area and what job postings' salaries are being promoted in that area. GG takes care of it's staff. Anything else?
  • 2 3
 @bman33: I mean, they were still in Denver back when I bought my frame so I don't really think that's the cause of the price hike. They did move their HQ to a different building but I would hope that simply moving buildings wouldn't put them in enough financial trouble to require a nearly 50% price increase per frame.
  • 6 2
 Still have the water bottle in the wrong spot?
  • 2 0
 can you not fit one (little one) below the shock as well? some washers on the front bolt could kink it up enough to avoid the bend in the down tube
  • 2 0
 @SATN-XC: I've not ridden one, but I do wonder if a fiddlelock water bottle mount would actually be easier to access under the top tube, rather than down low at the typical down tube junction? Certainly less far to reach while riding...
  • 3 0
 @SATN-XC: you definitely can. The Abloc bottles are a great solution in that spot too, since they're more tapered on the ends.
  • 3 0
 @SATN-XC: there is a forum post if you Google it on someone using a 3d printed shim to angle the bottle mount. I believe they used one of the small, fat YT thirstmasters. I think some washers or other hardware would work as well.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: top tube certainly works but it would be nice to shift some of that weight lower on the bike
  • 2 0
 It's easier to reach, I like the bottle location.
  • 2 0
 No, it’s the right spot. It’s so much easier to grab while riding than a low mount, especially as a tall person. If you stop to drink it doesn’t make a difference, but GG’s location is superior if you drink while pedaling.
  • 2 0
 @jdejace: Yup, much easier to grab when you're riding. It actually make much more sense to have it there.
  • 3 0
 When you say increases by 5%, do you mean 25% + 5% = 30%? Or going from 25% * 105% = 26.25%? Smile
  • 1 0
 I suspect it’s the latter
  • 6 2
 Same old shoebox headtube...
  • 4 0
 You had me at All-Mountain
  • 3 0
 Wtf is this hot or not? Dudes crying about ugly bikes... like their all 10's. Austin Powers looking mofo's.... Yeah baby!
  • 1 1
 Not a fan of the cable routing. I mean at least it isn't thru the headset but to me it looks cheap and ugly. I would love to see the full pic of the other side with the cable routing. It would be a good poll to see how many like it to those that don't.
  • 1 0
 As an owner...I LOVE IT. So good. Looks fine to me.
  • 1 0
 The Smash rides immensely better than looks. Put a bag over it or get your beer goggles adjusted and rip. I bought v1 and wanted to hate it, but she kept being so sweet to me that I am keeping her around a while.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely LOVED my AL megatrail V2… when it came time to renew, i just couldnt do the aesthetics of the carbon one. Too heavy, too chunky in the wrong places, bad paint jobs. Great geo is the only area i can grant merit.
  • 13 11
 It definitely hit the ugly tree on the way down. That cable routing looks a right mess
  • 6 1
 Yeah, but it makes changing out the seat stay kits much easier vs internal cable routing through the head tube. Once you use it a few times you realize it's well thought out.
  • 4 2
 @dirtdiggler: Sure, but why couldn't they have also thought about making it look nicer...
  • 5 0
 @bunjiman82: Well sure. Having owned one the cable system looks good to me compare to everything else I’ve seen. They designed it in 2019 so it’s aged a bit but I’m sure they could improve the overall look if they redesigned the entire triangle. My only complaint about it is that tucking in the cables and tightening the bolts is a little tricky, but it beats rebleeding your brakes each time.
  • 3 0
 No shit, I really wish they would have it routed through the headset like a reasonable bike company.
  • 4 0
 @dirtdiggler: Exactly! I would take GG's approach or an approach like GT's recessed downtube approach over bleeding the brakes and/or headtube routing every single time.
  • 2 3
 @dirtdiggler: I would rather have headset routing than that mess
  • 7 0
 @chrismac70: Tell me you don't work on your own bike or never change components without telling me you don't work on your bike or never change components....
  • 5 0
 @chrismac70: Seriously, how is this considered a mess? Everything is nicely tucked away on one side under a cover. The rear CS also has internal routing to the derailleur. The way it's shown on the reviewers bike he has a zip tie where all the cables come out so it looks like everything is crowded together up high. Usually the cables don't need that zip tie and cables fall onto the head tube naturally. If you're changing out seat stay kits every 3-4 months you definitely don't want to re-bleed every time unless you enjoy wasting time.
  • 3 0
 Love my two GGs: a Pistola and Gnarvana.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. They are super ugly bikes and because of this, I wouldn’t buy one.
  • 2 1
 i don't give a rats ass what anyone thinks but 35 pounds is a friggin TANK to try and ride trails with after all 150mm is a trail bike.
  • 1 0
 Key takeaway: People who worry about their bike being the best looking probably aren't their target market anyway. People that want a tough fast bike are.
  • 1 0
 Mine started as a Trail Pistol. Then I converted it to a Smash. It's a way better bike as a Smash. I put 2,000 miles on a Smash v1 Revved. Really good bike for Pisgah.
  • 2 0
 That green looks so good.
  • 2 0
 Very well done first ride article - let’s get more Dario!
  • 7 5
 Uglier that beating your father with a sweaty sock at 03:00
  • 2 0
 Love the bike but man i just hate the heat tube look.
  • 2 0
 Does it come in alu-min-ium?
  • 1 0
 Great bikes, wonky hydration solution. But it wouldn’t be a deal breaker for me.
  • 2 0
 Very surprised that people find this ugly. I think it's beautiful.
  • 2 0
 Ugly head tube but I'd still Smash. Am I 25, in a bar, at 1am right now?
  • 1 0
 Still no small size. still another company not on the short list. GG hates short people. ╭∩╮(Ο_Ο)╭∩╮
  • 2 0
 I will smash that.
  • 1 0
 Looks fun. Demo tour please!
  • 3 1
 Pass.
  • 7 10
 Kind of ridiculous to talk about a weight reduction of 90 grams when this "trail bike" weights close to 35 pounds. There are e-bikes that weight close to that number! A perfectly capable trail bike used to be 25-28 pounds!!!! What are these things made of? Loaded carbon?
  • 7 0
 'What are these things made of? Loaded carbon?'

They are loaded with things that don't break.
  • 2 0
 It's probably mayonnaise or something.
  • 3 2
 This. What’s the point of having a trail bike made from carbon that’s heavier than an ebike
  • 1 1
 @henryquinney would like to know your location
  • 1 0
 The aesthetic is in the eyes on the beer holder.
  • 1 0
 Holy 5 shades of Kashima.
  • 1 0
 Where is effective seat angle measured from?
  • 1 0
 The design of Fox forks starting to look really old.
  • 1 0
 When you are spending thousands on a bike
  • 1 0
 What the heck happened to the Trail Pistol? Not on their website no more.
  • 1 0
 The bikes aren't ugly at all. Pinkbikers are just toxic.
  • 1 0
 Smash
  • 2 5
 float x, descendant cranks and crankbrothers wheels for pushing 34lb with exo rubber and no inserts, on a trailbike for $7k??

Buyers getting smashed

Maybe it was supposed to be an april fools post?
  • 1 3
 I like the revved carbon but this bike is pretty ugly and that’s my personal taste and if the bike don’t look good it won’t sell
  • 2 2
 Ugliest headtube ever made.
  • 1 1
 about those engineers....
  • 1 1
 ╭∩╮( ͡° ل͟ ͡° )╭∩╮
  • 1 1
 Rank
  • 4 6
 Looks like a Spot.
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