Quarq ShockWiz - First Impressions

Feb 15, 2017
by Mike Kazimer  
ShockWiz


The ShockWiz suspension data acquisition device first appeared back in 2015, the creation of Nigel Wade and his tuning company, Dusty Dynamics. Initially, the unit could be purchased only via a Kickstarter campaign, but the device caught SRAM's attention, and they decided to acquire ShockWiz, and to bring Nigel onboard to continue the development process. Now called the Quarq ShockWiz, the device is currently available to anyone with $399 USD in their bank account.
ShockWiz Details• Automated shock and fork tuning recommendations
• Works with air sprung forks and shocks with a single volume positive chamber
• Includes two air hoses for mounting
• Smartphone app for Apple and Android
• Waterproof and dustproof
• Price: $399 USD
www.quarq.com

I've spent the last couple of weeks experimenting with the ShockWiz, enough to get used to the app interface, setup, and performance. There are still a few scenarios I'm planning on putting it through in order to suss out exactly how accurate its recommendations are; look for a more in-depth examination once I have some more time with it.

Before we go any further, though, let's start with the basics: what exactly is the ShockWiz, and how does it work? ShockWiz is a tuning tool, a way to monitor your suspension's behavior over the course of a ride. It does this by constantly measuring a fork or shock's air pressure as it extends and compresses, and then using that information to calculate things like sag, number of deep compressions, rebound speed, etc... The device itself is waterproof and dustproof, powered by a CR2032 battery, and in addition to monitoring the changing air pressure, it has an accelerometer that can be used to calculate the average time spent in the air per jump.


Installation

Installation only takes a matter of minutes and a couple of zip ties – one side of the air hose is threaded to the ShockWiz unit, and the other is threaded onto a compatible fork or shock. Once it's hooked up, it can be paired to a smartphone via Bluetooth, and then calibrated following the steps laid out by the app.

Calibration involves letting the air out of the shock, cycling it a few times, pushing it to the end of its travel, and then pulling it to full extension. This gives the app the baseline numbers required to accurately measure how the shock is behaving.
ShockWiz

After the calibration is complete, the next step is to go for a ride. If you'd rather leave the electronic leash at home, it's not necessary to bring a smartphone along – the ShockWiz will still record the data, and then it can be reviewed at a later time, once you're reunited with your phone.


ShockWiz
The app contains a series of screens that display overall shock health, recommendations, and detections.


First Impressions
For my first few rides with the ShockWiz I installed it on a Fox Float X2 mounted to a Trek Slash. In the weeks prior I'd dedicated more time than usual to getting this particular shock set up to my liking, so I was curious what the ShockWiz would have to say about my settings.

One nice feature of the ShockWiz is that you can check sag before heading out on a ride without needing to get out a shock pump. Just sit on the bike, cycle it a few times, then open up the app to confirm your settings.

Out on the trail, I did a couple laps of a two-minute downhill, one with a mix of rough sections, jumps, and drops. The ShockWiz will even tell you if it needs more information in order to provide accurate recommendations, such as riding a rougher section of trail.

After those two laps, I checked in with the ShockWiz. My score was 96/100, but on the suggestions page it recommended letting out some air pressure and speeding up the rebound. I gave that a try, and after starting a new session (a necessary step after any changes are made), I took another two laps, and took another look. I'd felt like the changes were beneficial – decreasing the air pressure improved the small bump compliance, and as it turned out, the device was happy with those changes as well, bumping my score up to a 98.
ShockWiz
You can even find out how much air time you racked up during the course of a ride.

It's worth mentioning that there are four different tuning settings – Efficient, Balanced, Playful, and Aggressive. You can switch between them at any time, and the recommended settings will change accordingly, although there's sometimes a slight delay as the new recommendations are calculated. What goes into each of those modes is detailed on the ShockWiz website, but the names are fairly self-explanatory – Efficient creates the firmest tune, and Playful is similar to the Balanced mode, but with the goal of achieving a livelier feel.


Suggestions
To me, the 'Aggressive' name is a little misleading – following the suggestions in that mode will create the softest tune, ensuring that all the travel is regularly used. It's aimed more at DH riders, but even then, I feel like the Aggressive tune should be firmer, rather than softer – more like what a racer would run and less like the settings preferred by someone wants their suspension as soft and squishy as possible.

The other feature that's missing in the app is a way to record the data gathered in each session. As it is, when you tap on 'Start A New Session,' that previous data is erased. I'd like to have a way to easily record the pertinent data, or at the very least have a section to record notes in the app itself. I'm sure we'll see the app continue to progress as more and more users give ShockWiz a try – it'll be interesting to see how it evolves.


Do You Need It?
As it is, ShockWiz is sort of like a game for bike nerds, with the end goal of achieving a perfect score, that elusive 100%. Is it an absolute necessity? Of course not – the ShockWiz is simply one tool that can help take some of the mystery out of suspension setup. In particular, I can see it as being useful for bike shops working with customers to dial in their ride; the customer can go out with the device attached, come back, and the shop employee can take a look at the data gathered and see what steps might be worth taking. The same goes for coaches, or avid consumers keen to keep a close eye on their suspension's behavior. Or what about integrating the technology into the shock itself, eliminating the need to buy an aftermarket device? Now that would be something to see.




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250 Comments

  • + 190
 Sorry can't wiz away $400 right now
  • + 24
 Really surprised with the pricetag. Will probably just wait for this to go on clearance.

Is there a better (and cheaper) alternative available?
  • + 15
 @Verbl-Kint: Check out: www.sussmybike.com

Would be interesting to see a comparative review of the two systems when they are both available.
  • + 6
 @Verbl-Kint: Technically it is more expensive, but Cane Creek has a tuning app for their shocks... But you kinda do need to buy the shock I guess
  • + 19
 @Verbl-Kint: Better alternative might be spending that money getting a custom tune/ chatting to some local suspension tuners/ dropping by with a $400 crate of biscuits and beer and seeing how much you can learn
  • + 34
 I don't know. As far as the price, I'm not too shocked. Still, I'm not ready to fork out that much cash. That is, unless there's something like a race where I would be under more pressure to get my setup dialed in.
  • + 73
 That's not the entrepreneurial spirit...Buy it and rent it out to you buds in exchange for after ride beers. It's will pay for itself in no time!!
  • + 2
 @Verbl-Kint: Yes, experiment with your setup until it feels dialed..... crazy concept.
  • + 24
 Toss in with a few pals on one. It's not like it's a tool you need every day
  • + 6
 "available to anyone with $399 USD in their bank account." Well that's about what's in there so....
  • + 6
 $400usd for two would be more reasonable.
  • + 0
 @Verbl-Kint: Yes. Go ride the sh*t out of your suss, learn how it works, and adjust to suit YOUR needs.
  • + 6
 Honestly what I see happening is one of your bike geeky/techy friends buys it, uses it, and from there it just gets passed around all your mates until everyone finds their ideal and the "ShockWiz" finds a dusty corner of the basement. I can see this being very useful in races though especially when you have limited practice runs to get your ideal set up in.
  • + 18
 Get the device, set your bike up perfect, rent it to all your friends for $30-40 each, the. Sell it for half the price, sounds like a perfect deal to me.
  • + 11
 @jazzawil: not to forget, at that price, Craig at avalanche downhill racing does an amazing job and not only fine tunes, but upgrades ur suspension: custom to rider and bike. Just throwin another option out there...
  • + 6
 @browner: I'm thinking spend the $400 for therapy. You really don't need to be this anal
  • + 18
 This should be mandatory at all bike shops. Free to use when you buy a bike from them. Rent to everyone else.
  • + 5
 I think it is an awesome idea and I would live to rent one for a weekend. I would be happy to pay £30. Hopefully some bike shops will get in on the act. They can rent it out ten times to cover their costs.

A lot of blokes like me don't have enough free time or access to shuttle assisted riding to really get to know their suspension.

This would be gold for me to use once or twice.

Not on the back though, because I've got a DHX2 and it's f*cking unreal!
  • + 2
 @dingus: im waiting for sussmybikes product so i can buy 2, have recorded data and be used for air and coil.
  • + 1
 @jrocksdh: 100% score for air is still only equivalent of 10% for coilz Razz
I do think this is great though, if we all must suffer air shocks because of their infinite spring rate tuning then we may as well make damned sure they're working as well as they possibly can do.
@jaame: hiring them out would be a great idea, fingers crossed the crusty dude in my lbs see it that way ;-)
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: It just makes sense!
  • + 1
 @Verbl-Kint: Not sure if better, but there's software out there that records a video of your shock or forks and analyses the footage to show a position and velocity graph. You have to do the algoritghms to improve your settings yourself though. www.kinovea.org See video for explanation www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BRbtkiW2tg
  • + 1
 Does no one here have friends ? just all chip in and buy one together making it cheaper and its only an aid so after you have all used it write your settings down and you'll not have to use it again until you buy a different fork or shock.
  • + 3
 @heavyp: Not exactly true. Shock setup depends on (among others) the type of terrain you're riding. So yes, if you always ride the same loop you can set your suspension once using this tool and sell it. But if you do more types of riding this thing could be used more often.
  • + 3
 Plus, everyone knows that after they have used it, that one guy is going to keep it and pretend he's forgotten where he put it... (ebay)...
  • + 4
 @diggerandrider: Yep Craig does an amazing job! Re-valved my shock and have an Avy Custom Cartridge in my fork from Avalanche. One of the best investments I've done for my bike and riding.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: please elaborate. Will the sussmybike not work for coil, or not as accuratebas it does for air?
  • + 1
 @jrocksdh: sorry dude I was just making a general comment but as I hit reply to you it tagged you ;-) I know nothing of susmybike, only that coil>air can. Which we all know, I was just making a poor attempt at humour.
  • + 73
 Yeah, thanks a lot SRAM. Before he was acquired, his intended retail price was $239. But with that Quarq name its almost double.
  • + 18
 They'll claim the price increase is due to fitting the dyno data to the air pressure data and optimizing the assessment output. Looks way to basic to really get a sense..I would like to see it save all your rides between date X,Y and provide a all around setting that will be best for ALL of the trails you've ridden in the past month.
  • + 7
 @Loamhuck: just take a screenshot of the data and save it on your smartphone problem solved
  • + 2
 @Loamhuck: absolutely. Most riders ride such a variety of trails that we rarely set up a bike to be ideal for one single trail.
  • + 2
 @Loamhuck: i like the idea of comparing rides over a month or so
  • + 5
 @properp: screenshots are rather inelegant if you ever wanted to work with that data
  • + 10
 This wouldn't be the first Kickstarter product to severely underestimate how much their product would need to sell for and actually make money to stay in business
  • + 3
 @properp: 75 screenshots followed by manual entry of data (75 x #entries x time per entry x lunch break x beer) = not so much. Here is what else they can do...have you enter your frame type and pull in the compression ratio, anti-squat etc. and further improve rear shock setups...
  • + 100
 The intended retail price was never as low as that. During the initial crowdfunding via Kickstarter the product was sold at a lower price to attract customers to a brand new technology that had no precedent, where backers would need to pay their money up front and wait months to be sent there device. The Kickstarter campaign ran at a loss where the expected production costs exceeded income. Kickstarter was deliberately cash negative so that the product had a chance to get off the ground, if it was priced sustainably at that time, I doubt the product would exist today. Today the product is priced at a point where it can be produced, distributed and supported as it needs to be. Believe it or not, the BoM cost is relatively high for this product. It is not trivial to find a small reliable pressure sensor that can handle 1200 psi and isn't damaged by oil in the air. Nigel Wade ShockWiz inventor
  • + 5
 @NigelW:

Your a badass. As all Nigel's are! Cool product

goo.gl/images/Hv5waZ
  • + 2
 @NigelW: You have a great product by the look of it. Good on you.

You could consider a rental service? I'm never going to buy one, but I would love to rent one.
  • + 3
 And when you compare this to the data acquisition stuff the big teams and factories use, what Nigel packed into this at this price is pretty damn impressive... Just ordered one for a customer today...
  • + 1
 Thank you for the response Nigel, I'm pumped to get my pair.
  • + 1
 I believe the original Kickstarter deal was right at $250. aimed at being a lower than the intended retail price. If you've followed this project from the beginning you would've noticed how much the device has improved since it's first iterations.

You act like Nigel was held at gunpoint to sell his product design. It looks like the added product development expertise, manufacturing and distribution support have helped deliver a top shelf product. If you like having gadgets like this, you'll understand why it's worth so much. If you can't afford it or don't want it, don't complain, just don't buy it ya dingus.
  • + 3
 @NigelW: Thanks Nigel!

I've had mine for a few months and I love it! It's helped me out a ton. Not just with refining the setup on my regular bike, but it helps when borrowing a friends bike too. I can get to the perfect settings for my weight and style in half a ride.
  • - 8
flag intensemack10 (Feb 15, 2017 at 22:08) (Below Threshold)
 @dgm10: I actually acted nothing like that, good job reading something that was never there into my statement. I LOVE gadgets like this, and have no doubt it would provide some useful feedback, and I also credit Nigel with a super clever idea and design. But in no way would this EVER be worth anywhere near $400 to me. Even if I wiped my ass with hundred dollar bills, I would not pay $400 for it.
  • + 3
 @NigelW: maybe i'm just cynical coming from a motorsport racing background, but my only other experience with suspension potentiometers and tuning is dealing with Motec/Magnetti/2D ECUs and data acquisition. granted the recording/sensitivity/playback functionality of those probably vastly exceeds the ShockWiz, and also has a fancy shmancy dash and controls the engine and blah blah blah... the price tag of $20k also does as well...

so in that way, for $400, this seems kinda neat and beneficial to play with. when a floor pump and pedals regularly cost $100+ each, and tires are often $70+ each, this isn't the end of the world. with the ability to have "run" playbacks or save multiple settings and "runs" so you can compare and keep notes on various trails/tracks, this would probably fit the bill real nicely for a lot of people. i like that this tech is trickling down.
  • + 4
 @NigelW: are you still involved with this company or it solely ran by SRAM now?

I only ask as LoamHuck brought up some valid points that would be extremely useful for the consumer.

Is it possible to run two units(f/r) simultaneously? A package would be nice to see if that's the case.
  • + 2
 @dgm10: Thanks for the kind words! A lot of work has gone into this product, it's truly well worth it when we see comments like this. Continue spreading the good word sir!
  • + 3
 @gonecoastal and @Loamhuck The ability to record settings within the app is probably our most frequent request from users. It is important to remember that outside of the Compression Ratio and Baseline Air Pressure (which you set during calibration), ShockWiz doesn't know how many clicks any adjustment is at or how many tokens you have installed. The ability to record current settings will always require the user to manually count compression and rebound clicks prior to enter the data. Currently the best way to go about recording such information is within your phone's 'Notes' app or, dare I say it, on an actually piece of paper with a pen or pencil! Just know the exceptional minds behind this product are fully aware of this need and that the future is AWESOME!

As for the product selector, that is a great idea that has been considered. There is however a lot of variables involved with that, not to mention the internal upkeep of such tables. At the end of the day ShockWiz works best when the Compression Ratio is accurately measured using the Calibration Wizard within the ShockWiz App. The process may take up to 5 minutes your first time through. Once familiar you can cut that down to 2-3 minutes max. Also, once you have the CR measured, this value can be recorded and simply re-entered later if needed. The only caveat here is that making a change to Air Spring Ramp (Bottomless Tokens and Bands) will change your springs Compression Ratio which means such a change requires re-measuring.
  • + 1
 @AlexQuarq: that was gonna be my next question...

how are you accounting for "optimal" when somebody could have too many or too little tokens in their fork/shock? assuming that these things boil down to personal preference? and so just trying to isolate psi, compression, rebound settings only for a person?

what if somebody is not utilizing enough of their stroke, so the program suggests compression setting changes, but really they should be using less tokens for the given terrain that they're using for testing? how does the program distinguish the difference?

if you're only riding 1 ShockWiz at a time, how do you account for changes on one end of the bike affecting changes, OR BEING affected by changes on the other end? are you assuming its negligible for the sake of it being a mountain bike compared to a motorcycle?

anyways... beyond that... setting savings in the app or ability to record the dynamics of a run in conjunction with one of those apps that gives you speed/distance/elevation of the run so you can map certain shock actions to exact areas of a course, and the ability to run 2 ShockWiz at the same time, would be awesome.
  • + 3
 @Sweatypants: Lots of good questions here. ShockWiz does exactly what you're suggesting.

ShockWiz offers tuning suggestions for 6 adjustments; Baseline Air Pressure, Air Spring Ramp (Bottemless tokens and bands), Rebound (LSR), HSC, LSC, and Bottom Out Resistance.

When suggesting changes to these adjustments, ShockWiz takes a holistic approach. It considers the combination of all the tuning parameters available to us and tries to keep everything in balance so that no force is dominating over another, across all obstacles we encounter in a typical ride.

If your spring is too linear, ShockWiz will suggest that you "Add Spacers" to increase Air Spring Ramp.

If you aren't using enough of your travel, ShockWiz may suggest a number of things. The most obvious being to "Remove Air" to lower your Baseline Air Pressure. It may also suggest that you "Remove Spacers" to decrease your Air Spring Ramp. Creating a more linear spring curve allowing you to more easily use all your travel. The important thing is that it considers every aspect.

The Suspension Tuning Order article is very helpful to determine the correct order adjustments should be made, link below.

shockwiz.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/229083967-Suspension-Tuning-Order

It is important to remember that there is no such thing as a "perfect" tune – unfortunately it does not exist and suspension tuning is always a balance of compromise. A tune that works well on one part of your ride will not necessarily be optimal on a different portion. However, it is possible to get to a point that is a very good compromise between all the aspects we are considering. ShockWiz directs you to the point at which a good compromise is achieved, which we call the ‘Window of Happiness’.

As the name suggest, the 'Window of Happiness' is an acceptable range we want to be in. It may consist of 1-2 damping clicks wide and maybe +/-5% Baseline Air Pressure, for any given Tuning Style. It is important to understand that the Window of Happiness is not as simple as focusing on one aspect, such as having your sag at a particular percentage.

ShockWiz devices cannot communicate with one another, and you can only connect a single device to the app a time (to view the data). This does not pose a problem when using multiple devices, as all the user calibration vales and ride data is stored on ShockWiz, not within the app. The ShockWiz App is only a means to view the ride data and to interact with the device; such as to calibrate or Start a New Session.

Using one ShockWiz, and swapping it between the front and rear suspension, is no less effective than using two simultaneously. The only disadvantage of using one device is the added time in tuning the fork and shock individually. When you are satisfied with the Shock Tuning Score and feel of one suspension component, you would simply move it over to the other.

For more information see the 'Using ShockWiz' section of our ShockWiz Online Help, link below.

shockwiz.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/categories/203983928-USING-SHOCKWIZ
  • + 2
 @AlexQuarq: Good to hear you all are working on updating input parameters specific to field applications. I think the uptake and input data required to streamline it for your clients (in general) will be tough. Can this be automated via the manufacturer? I know that data related to rear geometry is hard to come by, but I'd be willing to bet you have most of the major manufacturers (that you have OEM setups) onsite. Five minutes is a good investment for most folks who can't bracket their suspension in a day or two worth of riding. Is there a CR vs. Force database? Can't you pull Fox and Rockshox shock data for each model and # of spacers? It's a simple polynomial equation that can be fit and used. I still have one big question that I that I haven't sorted out in my head...how do you deal with tire pressure? It's a mostly un-dampened spring that impacts your pressure due to unsprung mass and small bump sensitivity...or is tire pressure a setup parameter already? LASTLY, a race setting should be firm, supportive and aggressive not mushy for bikes with 170mm travel. Can I help you guys refine this thing !!! Seems like a interesting product
  • + 1
 @Loamhuck: In regards to tire pressure, or any other aspect of bike set-up (geometry, mass, etc), ShockWiz doesn't know what it is, but it doesn't need to know. It is always analyzing the response of the suspension, looking for undesirable traits and trying to fix them. It doesn't care what induced the undesirable trait (most often caused by the trail, but influenced by the bike and the rider), it just wants to adjust the suspension to get the rider, bike and trail working as well as they can.

That doesn't mean that changing tire pressure doesn't have a significant effect on the riding experience - it often does, but these are typically to do with lateral grip and how the bike 'feels' and inspires confidence on the trail - not things that relate directly to suspension performance.

Because of tire pressure, the rider may have a different amount of grip / confidence and therefore be faster / slower through certain obstacles resulting in different suspension movements, but ShockWiz will just continue to analyse this and suggest any suspension adjustments it thinks will lead to an improvement.
  • + 2
 @gonecoastal: I've been involved the whole time since the acquisition, and continue to be so. Mainly focused on the engineering as that is my background, but I work on other aspects of the project too.

I think Alex already covered most of LoamHuck's points. As he alluded too, one of the nice things about a product like this is it has the ability to evolve after purchase, via updates, as new features are developed and implemented. Something which we don't normally think of when buying an bike component. Since the devices have been sent out to the original Kickstarter backers, we have deployed a couple of app and firmware updates to add in the 'Statistics' page, improve the tuning algorithms and add in multi-language support.

As for two devices for a dually, it is nice to run two units simultaneously, but is not a necessity, the ShockWiz 101 article covers it here: www.quarq.com/2017/02/07/shockwiz-101/#more-682
  • + 0
 duplicate - my fail!
  • + 0
 duplicate
  • + 0
 duplicate
  • + 1
 @AlexQuarq:
Thanks for the feedback. I'm developing a bit of a techno crush on your product.
The Early Adopter and Responsible Dad in me is having a bit if a fist fight about what to do with the savings earmarked for my daughter's school fund.
  • + 1
 @Phlippie: I'm thinking your daughter would be stoked to find out her dad "had the most dialed suspension in his crew" or that you "almost went pro". Hahahaaha
  • + 0
 This is an awesome product. Unless our shocks / forks are doing something weird like diving in corners etc how well are you seriously aware of how your shocks are working when your flying downhills? Be great for getting them from 80% to 100% even more so if you own more than one bike like most of us do. Well worth the money in my opinion. Looking forward to them becoming more integrated maybe fitted to where your volume spacers currently go so you can just leave it there or something similar.
  • + 1
 @AlexQuarq and @NigelW
I am wondering about one thing: the SAG measurement. Thanks to the calibration and the initial pressure, the device will know the starting point and the end point of the spring curve (which is proportional to the pressure curve since the size of the piston is constant), but how does the device know how these to points are linked? The size of both the negative and positive chambers will greatly influence the shape of the spring curve. Is Shockwiz assuming a "standard" spring curve?
  • + 44
 I will rent mine for $75 for 3 days.

Shipping included.

Just DM and I can send you the details.
  • + 15
 Seriously, right?! I mean, you only need to use the thing a handful of times. Buying a few then building an App to rent them out would be a pretty solid little biz model...
  • - 10
flag me2menow (Feb 15, 2017 at 14:06) (Below Threshold)
 make it 35 and you've got a deal
  • + 7
 My first thought as well...Shops and/or Shuttle services should rent these out
  • + 2
 As long as you can convince the renter to pay full retail price, with a full refund on return, minus the 75$ for your fee...
  • + 7
 @seismicninja: nah you just gotta have their card info so you can charge the full amount if they don't return or break it.
  • + 6
 @DirtbagMatt: a handful of time if you if you ride a specific bike/terrain but if you have a trail/enduro bike that you like to do anything from pure XC to WC DH with then it is probably kinda cool to tune your setup depending on what you're riding that day.

That being said, I would probably have bought one if it was 200-300$ CAN but 400$ US? No way. If you've been messing with suspension for a while, your setup is probably pretty dialed by now anyway.
  • - 3
 Yall suckers downvoting me are too keen to pay retail
  • + 0
 @me2menow: (for the record, I didn't neg ya) but what are you talking about anyways? You're suggesting $11.66 a day would be a fair charge for the hassle of renting this, or anything, out? $25 a day would be very reasonable...and only if you're picking it up and dropping it off.
  • - 1
 @loopie: Given that the incremental cost associated with renting it out only involves shipping, a "fair" price would really just be whatever the renter and rentee mutually agree upon above that incremental cost (ie market value). Economics, ya feel? Doesnt hurt to ask.
  • - 6
flag me2menow (Feb 15, 2017 at 16:32) (Below Threshold)
 haters gonna hate, lovers gonna love
  • + 0
 @me2menow: and idiots are going to keep commenting.
So, please do us a favor and shut up.
  • - 4
flag me2menow (Feb 15, 2017 at 18:50) (Below Threshold)
 @thedriftisreal: get off my quarq
  • + 2
 @me2menow: good luck trying to talk economics in a thread where half the posters are complaining about price. Somehow I think SRAM has a lot more experience charging what the market will bear than shockwiz alone
  • + 6
 @laxman2001: wouldn't be the first time a company mispriced something but again this is the mtb world, where people would pay 500$ for dog shit as long as it is carbon, or anodized in the right color.
  • + 9
 @PLC07: purple anodised carbon dog shit?! Take my money!
  • + 3
 @Kickmehard: Does it have 50T though?
  • + 1
 @Endurahbrah: Im looking for a purple anodised carbon dog turd with a gearbox, 50t dog turd with a derailleur? Gross!
  • + 31
 I hope a LBS near me will buy and rent, I don't need my own but would love to perfect my suspension setup.
  • + 10
 Seems like a no-brainer for a service-oriented shop. Sell a full-service package - deluxe suspension tune or something like this. Send you out with this thing for a session on your favorite trails, analyze data, tune, rinse, repeat, then give you the settings to use on a cheat sheet, along with a bit of advice on how to modify them if you're road tripping somewhere (for bike park use, do x; for flowy XC trails, do y).

The bit about it not saving data? That seems pretty minor, can be fixed in the app rather than requiring a hardware change. The unit gets reset - but your app could save the session data, then allow you to compare it to past sessions. Could even tie that into a website so you could buy a membership and always keep that data around to compare over time.
  • + 0
 @g-42: that sounds awesome! Return the bike to bike shop already have ridden the trails and they give you a nerdy spec sheet with graphs and data telling you which settings are best for different trails. Knd of like how canecreek sends a data sheet in the box with the eleven six shock
  • + 15
 @ibishreddin: tell me more about this cane creek eleven six shock.. I hear it's almost as good as the push double barrel air.
  • + 0
 @mattbrown9: It's expensive. That is all
  • + 1
 @ibishreddin: You guys are talking sense. Rentals for this kind of tech is definitely the way forward.
  • + 2
 @ibishreddin: I figured it was a typo, but I couldn't resist the chance to be a sarcastic jerk. #forums.
  • + 2
 @g-42: implement the data with Strava possibly. Could work well with the "milage" tracker they have.
  • + 1
 @gonecoastal: THIS. At some point I imagine this becomes an integrated telemetry setup, where you can overlay GPS/Garmin data, ShockWiz and POV video onto a single screen and have tons of data points for tuning. Sort of like high-level motorsports data coming onto the MTB side.
  • + 1
 Buying one, and having 4 or 5 riding buddies pitch $50 to have access to it wouldn't be a bad way to go either.
  • + 28
 This is something I would like to rent
  • + 4
 Definitely. A bit for me but more for the wife who weighs less than me and has no interest in adjusting her suspension. I got the sag right for her but the rebound is purely a guess based on how much travel she ends up getting.
  • + 2
 @jasdo: I feel your pain.
  • + 15
 That's funny how people bitch about a product that could significantly improve how we use your 1 or 2K suspension and impact your riding experience when nobody says anything about crazy price tag of weight weenies products (carbon handlebar or wheelset) that really have a negligible impact on your bike performance. I'm pretty sure, perfectly tuned suspension would benefit me better than riding xtr instead of SLX or having my bike 2% stiffer and .5% lighter
  • + 5
 THIS.
2.5k for an Enve wheelset? Hell yeah bro! 400 for a bit of equipment that can actually improve how you ride? Nahhh bro too expensive!
  • + 13
 I kickstarted it and like it. You get to a pretty good tune in less time than the usual incremental adjustments you would do otherwise. I don't have the time or discipline for bracketing settings so with this i got very quiclky a way better tune out of my new pike coming from another fork.
  • + 3
 Same here, it made me think how I set up my bikes too which was the biggest surprise for me and the element I got the most benefit out of.
  • + 2
 Me too, you can get a very quick set up, Ive ended up just leaving it on the fork and having a look occasionally. Suggestions change with the terrain and as mentioned a screen shot of the data. They actually suggest one for the front AND one for the back, I did swap it over after some changes to see if it one affected the other, wasn't sure if it was the shock adjustments or my riding that made the thing recommend some alterations, kinda hard to do the exact same lap with the exact same effort. I found I spend more time thinking about the response to the changes and becoming more familiar with how the adjustments affect the performance. All in all I'm glad to have it.
  • + 1
 @skiwenric: Well hello skiwenric...I'll have to give you a shout when riding season starts and take you out for a burgerWink . Would love the give this gadget a go!!!
  • + 1
 @robnow: shoot me a msg when you are coming out.
  • + 15
 Not much use if you are running coils.
  • + 8
 Though your comment was probably not really useful, it made me laugh! thank you for that.
  • + 5
 @Aprilfisheye: No worries. Sometime you just have to state the obvious.
  • + 1
 Yeah my DH bike has the old 40 coil on it. :/
  • + 12
 I'm a buyer. It's going to be fun stuff!!
  • + 6
 I've had one for a while now. Has been attached to a couple of bikes, works pretty well. Price is steep, but if you're a raging nerd it's a justifiable purchase.
  • + 7
 Lots of armchair CEOs on Pinkbike. The price seems reasonable to me for what it does.
  • + 3
 X = Y / Z, where Y is the level of stoke, Z is the price (that has doubled since the kickstarter), equating to X as the probability that I will buy this. Level of stoke is pretty dang high, but the price tag divisor is killing X.
  • + 7
 Sorry for starting this off, however the price is..............Shocking!
  • + 1
 i think you are showing high sensitivity to this issue.
  • + 7
 Well that's the baseline pun out of the way, let's see what everyone else is packing.
  • + 5
 Haven't seen many but puns are on the rebound
  • + 3
 I think everyone felt lots of pressure to think of a good pun, and their confidence sagged so they decided no to
  • + 3
 i think this would be a good product for bike shops to rent out, (with a hefty deposit i imagine) as its something i imagine you use only a few times to get your suspension dialed in, so would make sence to rent it to riders before they hit the trails to dial in there suspsension
  • + 4
 I don't just learn about bikes at pinkbike. I also learn grammar. I had to go to the dictionary to understand what "to suss out something" means. Thanks for improving my education Pinkbike :-)
  • + 2
 I'm a roadie without a mountain bike and I think it's cool. Price seems fair~ish... if you are buying carbon parts or racing your bike might as well set up your suspension correctly (how correct is the app... i wouldn't know)
  • + 2
 Question - Wouldn't you need to capture data from the front and rear at the same time?

I feel like as soon as you have your shock "dialed" and throw the Unit onto your fork/make adjustments up front.....you'd potentially change how the rear reacts rendering your shock adjustments now obsolete. (and vice versa)

Suspension gurus?
  • + 3
 Hey JC9won4, Tuning a full suspension mountain bike does not require 2 devices. Using one ShockWiz, and swapping it between the front and rear suspension, is no less effective than using two simultaneously. The only disadvantage of using one device is the added time in tuning the fork and shock individually. You are correct about the getting one end of your bike dialed and then moving to the other, and that affecting what you just did. All that means though is moving ShockWiz back to what you tuned first, to see if there are any changes. I wouldn't expect you'd have to tune your fork and shock more than 2 times each before they are very well balance. I would also expect the amount of change on that second pass to be very minimal.
  • + 1
 @AlexQuarq: Thanks for the response. Yeah, I figured you would need to go back and forth between the front and rear, a couple of times before getting it "nailed", which is of no real concern. My mind was more geared towards two units being optimal.

Are you guys still working in a support capacity? Or is that all in the hands of Sram now?

BTW Congrats!
  • + 6
 LBS should rent them out.....
  • + 2
 Personally, as much as I like data acquisition, and being scientific about things, I usually just tune my suspension by feel. You can't put a number on how you feel, and what if you don't like the settings, but apparently they're correct for you, are you going to let a little computer ruin your bike ride?
  • + 5
 I said the same until I tried it. It told me to change everything. I thought it was stupid but followed it anyways, I can always change back right? The result blew me away, it's way better than what I had before and has changed the way I set up my bikes
  • + 5
 Liberal!
  • + 2
 I feel like this is one thing I have no idea how to do, set up suspension. Somehow I feel like the bike works good anyway. Still I want one and then want to lend it to anyone who wants to try it. I do wish it was $399 a pair. Better get back to work.
  • + 5
 I'll go halfers with someone
  • + 1
 damn, at $399 that's definitely in the realm of rent from a bike store for a weekend to set your bike up, or rent from someone like mojo, charge $50 for a weekend, ship/get it on a friday, sat/sun ride and tune, monday ship/give it back, even with shipping could make your money back after 10 rentals, as for the UK at least 2 way shipping is like $7.
  • + 1
 I would love this, as I am genuinely terrified of messing up my suspension settings as I don't have enough knowledge to know exactly what I am doing. At ~350 Euro it's just too expensive to buy for the few times I'd use it.

Hoping that price drops over time.
  • + 2
 $400 is a lot of money but if you can get together with a good group and split the cost.
its not the kind of tool that you'll need on a day to day basis you can pass it around the group and all reap the benefits
  • + 1
 I wonder why it does not work with Rockshox dual position air (DPA) forks. It seems like it should as long as you leave the travel setting in one position (most likely the full travel position) while you are using it.

Edit to answer own question: It's because at 0 sag both positive and negative air chambers are connected.
  • + 3
 Hmm. Another mag said that dual position fork where fine as long as you left them in one position. I've got a Fox Talas 36 and would be interested in trying one of these.
  • + 3
 @NickBit: It will work with a TALAS - the RockShox DPA has a different internal setup that makes it incompatible.
  • + 2
 Welp, that just saved me $400.
  • + 4
 @mikekazimer: lol@ it working with competitors fork but not their own.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: will it work with 2017 fox 36 and 40? i think the air chambers are combined when attaching a shock pump.
  • + 1
 @frampo: yes, it should work for both of those models - they each only have one positive chamber.
  • + 1
 @frampo: Mike is correct, Fox air springs do not function this way.

The Dorado Air system from Manitou is the only air spring that I am aware of that works this way. Basically the air inflation valves on these springs feature a poppet valve that, when a shock pump is installed, opens the positive and negative chambers to one another allowing them to equalize. Once the pump is removed, the valve closes and the chambers become separate again. The ShockWiz hose functions no differently than a pump when installed, which is why it is not compatible.

ShockWiz compatibility articles can be found at Quarq.com > Support > ShockWiz Online Help. I also always recommend contacting your suspension's manufacturer or visiting your local bike shop for technical questions such as these.
  • + 1
 @AlexQuarq: Beers are flowing at the shop!! You swinging by??
  • + 1
 I will make sure the shop I work in has one! Really I just want to play with it too. Will rent it out to customers and offer setup advice. It's in the same ballpark as the Andreani piston kits around and whole forks are fairly expensive. Moto X guys spend this much to get a base setup.
  • + 1
 gutted it wont work for a new CC coil inline... I think I've just dialled in the best AM / trail bike shock ever built ( yes... it's new tech and I'm worried about it not blowing up) that I can afford - not the Push - and I would love to compare this to my old Fox Evolv and CC air inline..
  • + 1
 I’ve been mountain biking for years and years and through all that time I have owned various suspension products and also for all that time like most mountain bikers I have set up my suspension with the manufactures prescribed air pressures and sag and then twiddled the rebound and compression dials to where I thought felt best, mainly using intuition. As a mere hack/weekend warrior I, like 99.99% of riders, do not have access to Telemetry systems like some World Cup riders do so intuition and experience would have to do, until now
With the advent of the ShockWiz tuning system I now have my suspension dialled to perfection and learnt a few things about the characteristics of my suspension during the process.

I used Adrenaline Cycles as they unlike other bike shops have a unique way of delivering tuning to their customers. Most bike shops who are currently able to hire out the ShockWiz are doing just that hiring out the gadget and leaving you to your own devices where you have to figure the whole thing out, download the app, go through a learning curve and then start tuning your bike. Although the gadget and respective app are very intuitive you still have to invest time to get a handle on the way it works which could take days even weeks until you are completely proficient with it .

The USP Adrenaline Cycles offer is your own tech geek who goes by the name of Kev. Kev has already done all the learning on your behalf and for a comparable cost to just hiring the ShockWiz Kev will come with the ShockWiz. Having an expert come with the gadget means that you don’t have to do any of the learning and you can reduce the time it takes to tune your bike down to a mere 2 hour session with Kev. Kev is a bike mechanic and a self-confessed geek on all things bike and he is likely going to school you downhill as well, pretty handy to have around.

Kev and his pair of ShockWiz’s will go to where you want to ride or your local, within reason (based in Derbyshire with access to the Peak district and various gnarly local Downhills), calibrate the ShockWiz front or rear or both depending on what your needs are, calibration takes 5 minutes. Kev will then send you off to ride your bike in your current settings and then once the system has enough data reconvene, for me this was 3 runs down my local downhill play area . Once the data acquisition was complete you can both geek out on the results and Kev will then start suggesting what is required to hit the sweet spot. In my case at £1 a piece Kev whipped my rear shock off and added 2 volume spacers, this task would have taken me 30 minutes in a work shop, Kev did it in 4-5 minutes out on the trail, impressive stuff.

My session with Kev lasted 2 hours from meeting and shaking hands to riding away with a smile on my face. The session was fun, informative and successful. I chose the playful tuning option and I could genuinely feel this through my bike. Other tuning options are Efficient for the XC crowd, Balanced for a neutral feel, Playful for those who value the downhill side of riding but still want to ride some miles and finally Aggressive for the Downhill only set. So there really is something for everyone.

So if all you want is to have your suspension tuned properly and you do not want to go through the pain of learning how to best use your intuition or go through the learning curve of using a ShockWiz then I highly recommend contacting Kev at Adrenaline Cycles, he’ll have you set up in no time, and you get the bonus of living out your fantasy as a Pro doing preseason testing, or is that just me.
@adrenalinecycleservicesuk
  • + 5
 Getting it for the shop! It will pay for itself with just 3 customers!
  • + 3
 would this work for all diff types of suspension? i.e. fox, magura, bos ect?
  • + 4
 For the most part, as long as it has a positive chamber with a single volume. This illustration explains it a little further: www.pinkbike.com/photo/14415820, and Quark has a compatibility chart here: shockwiz.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/categories/204347088-COMPATIBILITY.
  • + 2
 wow that incompatibility list is pretty long! cuts out a ton forks
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: remember it's just a pressure transducer that records and the software makes the info useful!
  • + 1
 @MX298: That is more or less correct. ShockWiz consists of a highly accurate pressure sensor and micro processor. The device records the air pressure inside your suspension's positive air chamber while you ride at 100Hz (100x/second). By knowing the Compression Ratio and Baseline Air Pressure of your suspension, the raw pressure values can then be converted to travel percentage. It is the ability to determine displacement that allows ShockWiz to see how your suspension is behaving; how much travel you're using, shaft speeds, etc.

It is important to remember that the data gathered is very real. There are really 2 important pieces here; the devices ability to measure and record pressure data at the very high rate that it does, and then the algorithm which takes in the very complex information and outputs very easy to understand tuning Suggestions. The raw data on it's own is of very little use to most.
  • + 1
 @AlexQuarq: this has been used on MX bikes air forks for some time. How do you deal with the negative air port also. We see changes in pressure with temp changes because of the 21% non inert gas when we don't run nitrogen too. I bet you spent some time making all that info (algorithm) useful too. . . I like it. Great idea.
  • + 1
 I think that must show a graphs, impact velocity and travel, I dont know if this indirect method using air pressure is precise for this, but that is very important information
  • + 3
 this keeps your mates bits off your saddle when they offer to help you set up the susp..
  • + 2
 I'll sell mine for 300USD shipped (gotta send it from Australia) if anyone wants one, doesn't work on my new forks and went coil shock. It's a good paperweight currently.
  • + 1
 What price for shipped in Australia? PM me.
  • + 3
 I used my pair for the first time tonight. Very simple to setup, and the suggested adjustments worked. Very pleased.
  • + 2
 It would be cool if bike shops bought a bunch of these and allowed you to rent them for a few days to dial in your suspension. I think that's where the real market is.
  • + 3
 how does it compare to those little rubber circles on the stanchion? i forget how much those cost
  • + 7
 Bruhh does your O-ring on your fork speak to you, and tell you if you need to increase/decrease rebound? If so, tell us your dealers number!!
  • + 2
 Please don't integrate the technology directly into the shock, at this rate the last thing we need is even more batteries on bikes, especially on the shock.
  • + 4
 probably cost $50 to make, slaps a "SRAM" badge and voila !
  • - 2
 only for the 1%
  • + 1
 A pressure transducer, a couple of chips to record pressure and to interface info and voila!
  • + 3
 @jaydawg69: idk. There are a lot of folks with with high paying jobs that have money to spend on 2.5k wheelsets, and this probably makes close to the same difference in dropping times as those expensive wheels, so I'm not surprised it is this much.
  • + 4
 @jaydawg69: I am the 1%, it'll be in next week
  • - 2
 "If you own a house in a developed country, you are probably in the 1%"

...or so I read...
  • + 1
 @jaame: I think you guys missed my joke... remember when SRAM only marketed a product for the 1%. It was in a video.
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69: what was that? The vivid or something? Yeh I missed it.
  • + 1
 It would be frustrating to spend the $400 only to find out your suspension is set up correctly anyway. It might be a rude shock for the kids that pump their suspension up extra hard because they think they're Gwin.
  • + 1
 Thing is though if you race, whether that be downhill or enduro, ideally your suspension setup should be different for each track. So having this device enables you to make the most out of your suspension every time you race and/or ride.

I personally would really like this, but it definitely isn't for everyone - probably only for people who compete often I'd say.
  • + 3
 All my bikes have coil shocks And forks...sooo I'm out.
  • + 2
 This should be mandatory at all bike shops. Free to use when you buy a bike from them. Rent to everyone else.
  • + 0
 I was very excited about this product because it would allow me to set-up my wife and kids bikes. However, they priced me out at $400. At $250 they would sell twice as many. Shame.
  • + 1
 Hey @mikekazimer and Vernon Felton, any thoughts on getting one for Pinkbike staff? It would be useful as a tool to baseline suspension set up for product reviews?
  • + 1
 @AlexQuarq Could this work with a coil shock going off of IFP pressure? I know it would increase the chamber volume a little bit.
  • + 1
 I seem to remember this on Yoann Barelli's bike at Crankworkx last year. They put a very badly set up shock on his bike and it failed massively on live TV. Hurray.
  • + 3
 @beeboo this sounds so nice except for the price!!
  • + 1
 It's outrageously priced! I could buy a whole new shock for this much Eek
  • + 1
 @beeboo: this is a data acquisition/ tuning tool. Bet that new shock would still not be tuned correctly too!
  • + 1
 I actually think this is great, I am a Strava but so actually getting the data back in a way you could reference to speed and feel sounds awesome.
  • + 3
 I'm fine with the price tag, split and share it with a few friends.
  • + 1
 Great idea, especially for uplift days but the price is going to have to drop a couple hundred quid before I consider buying one
  • + 0
 I really don't need anything like this anymore since I switched to Manitou forks and shocks. Although I sometimes miss the disappointment of buying $1000 Fox forks only to have it do nothing more than go boING.
  • + 5
 so buying manitou suddenly makes it so you don't have to tune forks/shocks? lol most manitou shocks have more adjustments than RS meaning you actually probably need this more that people on RS. Im running both RS and manitou currently and I've spent waaayy more time dialling in my manitou stuff.
  • + 4
 i think he just doesn't know how to tune forks and his manitou one came in the right set up luckily. that or the rebound was just wound all the way slow instead of fast and he cant tell that his fork is set up awfully
  • + 2
 Would love to try it...but the price!? Surely in a few years a cheap alternative will come out!
  • - 1
 Really, really, really expensive if you consider the BOM. Like the actual cost of an iPhone. Looks like it costs less than $50 to make. We need to go back to when companies amortized their R&D costs over a longer projected product life. I'll wait for the knock off. Would be a great tool for big mountain rentals. Get more people in the sport if all it took was one or two hot laps on a short controlled course and the bike could be tuned to the rider.
  • + 1
 Although the BOM may be low for the actual device, you are also paying for the software development and analysis of the curve ratios for whatever type of specified riding you select. Yes we can argue software development has very little overhead but this is a niche product. Not everyone is going to buy it, and if a lot of people do then maybe price will be driven down. The market will dictate whether 400 bucks is to steep(although as bikers we have accepted high prices for rather cheaply made things)
  • + 1
 Last summer Apple sold its billionth iPhone. how does this data acquisition/tuning tool compare to an iPhone?
  • + 3
 I was about to pull the trigger when I thought it was $399 for a pair...
  • + 2
 This is going to be the same as power meter for road amateurs. Lots of info to show how much you suck.
  • + 4
 Haha! I probably shouldn't comment of this but couldn't resist, and you're only half right here. Power meters measure the rider's performance, ShockWiz measures your suspension's performance. So based on that, ShockWiz measures how poorly the user has set up their suspension, which in the end is a very easy fix and inherently makes you faster. A few rides, a shock pump and some dial turning and will get your suspension right where it needs to be. Improving your fitness however requires a lot more work and doesn't happen nearly as fast! Smile
  • + 2
 150 bucks i am pretty sure this would sellout
  • + 2
 Replace the parking-lot bounce test?
  • + 1
 I'll wait for the Chinese knock off version on eBay. It might not work the same, but it will be cheaper for sure.
  • + 5
 and take between 6 weeks and never to arrive
  • + 2
 @sk133872: But it is Free Shipping
  • + 1
 No kidding. Chinese POV cameras are killing gopro, don't see how this could be different in a few years time.
  • + 1
 For customer service call 1-800-AMF-YOYO
  • + 1
 A good way for a local shop to add value. Buy a bike and we will lend this out to you a couple times a year.
  • + 1
 Anyone remember what the other suspension data acquisition device out there is? The other one worked with coil shocks too.
  • + 2
 Fit bit but for bikes. Sorry no use for it.
  • + 0
 WOAH! Wait here. You want $399 for just the unit alone and I have to buy a mounting kit for another $35 and a hose kit for another $50? What the holy f*ck Batman?
  • + 2
 No, that $399 includes the device, mounting hardware, and two hoses.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Thanks Mike, That is not how it is listed on Jenson's site. They make it seem like device only.

www.jensonusa.com/Quarq-Shockwiz/Quarq-Shockwiz-Shock-Tuning-Device
  • + 1
 I love the idea but 400 bucks! Really!? The price probably drop in a few years.
  • + 1
 I know bike nerds that don't ride for shit and then ... it's the wrong fork setup
  • + 2
 this would be a great way to tune the shock on a Salsa Deadwood
  • + 2
 A Salsa Spearfish might be a bit more appropriate. Smile
  • + 1
 $399 for this.....yeah right! Thanks a lot SRAM for jacking it up Facepalm
  • + 1
 thia device should be for rent at lbs who care about their customers. that way you coukd set your bike and forget.
  • + 1
 i mean, technically each different trail needs a slightly different suspension tune. its probably more a race mechanics toy but im pretty sure they already know how to interpret the riders feedback and tune suspension accordingly
  • + 1
 The app looks clean & direct but £359.... ?
  • + 1
 Just get to making a proper gear set already!
  • + 4
 You know SRAMs current groups are some of the best shifting and gear ranges out right? You can rag on their brakes all you want but the 1x systems are prime
  • + 0
 @allenfstar: if you consider having a dinner plate on the hub a good idea
  • + 2
 @allenfstar: It is good, it sure help when they acquired Sachs.
  • + 3
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: beats the hell out of a front derailleur.
  • - 1
 @DrPete: that depends
  • + 0
 Hmmm....
SRAM smell the money spinner in this....
Recon the Q stands for quids in!
(I know it really means quark)
  • + 2
 that's not a Q it's a partial picture of a shocker... albeit a very big butthole....
  • + 1
 Average jump 510 meters??? $400 for something that doesn't even work????
  • + 1
 That's a time measurement.
  • + 2
 Think it is 510ms (milliseconds), which is 0,51s (seconds), which is a half second.
  • + 1
 It's called garmin and starva if you into that !
  • + 2
 Thanks for stating how uneducated you are.. Its nothing like Garmin or Strava......
  • + 6
 Starva is how I lose weight in the off season.
  • + 1
 Coming soon to Mud Dock Cycleworks - Bristol, England! www.mud-dock.co.uk
  • + 1
 im all over this like a tramp on chips,cant wait to get one !!
  • + 1
 will it work on 2016/2017 36 and 40 RC2 fox forks?
  • + 1
 If they are both air sprung, then yes! Check out the ShockWiz compatibility within our Online Help, link below.

shockwiz.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/categories/204347088-COMPATIBILITY;
  • + 0
 @AlexQuarq: I have looked at the compatibility chart but am still unsure after watching this view about the fox air spring. If you could confirm if this will work or not I would be grateful before I purchase one.

youtu.be/03pdywBkuNQ
  • + 2
 @frampo: That style of spring is compatible.
  • + 1
 @NigelW: thank you, cant wait to try the product!!
  • + 1
 Is there a 10 for the price of 1 deal? I'm in....
  • + 1
 Fitness tracker for your suspension? Thx, no!
  • + 1
 Waw new shox new price) so good ))
  • + 1
 Fork and shock with shockwiz built in. That would be cool...
  • - 1
 I'm not a google employee, so I'll just ride my bike and figure it out thanks.
  • + 0
 "QUARQ" - the sound you make as you pull the cash out of your pocket
  • + 0
 wonder how much this would have been if SRAM hadn't bought it
  • - 3
 okay... so you can buy an entire computer for $400 and not a crappy one at that. so are they saying that this little box has as much computational power than that? holy f*cking cash grab...
  • + 7
 Can you plug a Dell into your shock and have it tell you how to tune it? It's not about computing power.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: with a pressure transducer, algorithm and a generator yep!
  • + 0
 @MX298: can't wait to see your superior design.
  • - 3
 $399 is a lot of money for a product you didn't even create. Original creators had a much better pricing plan...
  • + 23
 You don't know much about business, do you?
  • + 0
 I dont care about price, just a useless info that provide this sh... .
  • + 4
 What happens when Shockwiz becomes self aware and sabotages your suspension setting?
  • + 1
 is this the thread where we are supposed to write angry things about Donny T in?
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