First Ride: TRP's New 12-Speed Mechanical Drivetrain

Mar 21, 2023
by Mike Levy  
TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador


I'm willing to bet my last donut that your mountain bike is running a derailleur from one of two brands, both starting with the letter S and both sharing the high-end mountain bike drivetrain market between themselves with essentially no one else in the picture. But if you take one more step along the alphabet you'll find TRP, the Taiwanese brand that's had its toes in the water since 2020 with their first-generation DH7 and TR12 systems. While both worked well enough, they didn't make much of an impact beyond the odd person saying, "Huh, what kind of derailleur is that?"

TRP is hoping to change that with their new EVO12 and EVO7 complete drivetrains that, aside from using a KMC chain, are manufactured entirely in-house. That includes the two new derailleurs, two shifters, their first carbon and aluminum cranks, and two cassettes, all of which are intended to compete against the best mechanical options from Shimano and SRAM.

Their three-letter acronym is short for Tektro Racing Products, the high-end division of the Taiwanese brand that was founded back in 1986 and has since grown to be the second-largest brake manufacturer in the world. How many brakes, you ask? There are 6.5 million bikes made each year that use Tektro stoppers, which adds up to a whopping 13 million brakes and roughly three zillion brake pads, all of which are also made in-house. While the majority of those aren't used on high-performance mountain bikes, their DHR brakes impressed a lot of riders when it was released, including us, and their EVO range has proven to be just as good.

Now they're aiming to do the same thing with their new 12 and 7-speed drivetrains, and we got an early look at both during a visit to their Taichung factory, as well as a quick ride for some initial impressions. Stay tuned for an upcoming photo tour of their factory, and learn more about their drivetrains below.


TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador

The EVO12 and EVO7 Derailleurs

The derailleur is probably the most eye-catching piece of the new EVO series components, especially in the gold color option everyone should choose. There are two versions, both with carbon outer cages; one is a 12-speed unit and another is for TRP's 7-speed downhill drivetrain and uses a stubby cage. Both can be had in gold or silver.

Have you experienced floppy derailleur syndrome? FDS is caused by a tired clutch or one that wasn't strong enough to begin with, and the result is usually too much noise and maybe a few dropped chains. TRP said that they put a big focus on putting a stop to that, and their solution is the Hall Lock, which is basically a lever-operated cam that applies pressure onto the B-knuckle pivot. This isn't a new feature – they used it back in 2019 – but it is an effective one. The name comes from John Hall, Aaron Gwin's mechanic, who came up with his own way to lock the B-knuckle in place on Gwin's race bikes, and we've also heard rumors that other mechanics were doing similar things to different brands' derailleurs as well.

The cam is a wear item so TRP has also employed a small set screw that lets you adjust the Hall Lock tension, although they also say it shouldn't ever need to be replaced. You'll need to unlock it to make wheel removal easier and definitely remember to do the same if you're installing or removing it.


TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador


There's also a clutch, of course, with TRP saying that it weighs less than the previous version while still being serviceable. With a lever and a button to push, it's a bit more finicky to release than SRAM's single push-button design, but I had it down with one hand after a few tries.

The other thing TRP did in their search for a quiet drivetrain was to rotate the parallelogram by a few degrees so that it moves more side to side than on an angle to follow the cassette, which makes plenty of sense when you think about what's going on back there while you're taking terrible lines through rock gardens.

The 12-speed EVO derailleur weighs 301 grams and costs $239.99 USD in gold and $229.99 in silver, while the DH version goes for $229.99 and $219.99 USD.


TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador


EVO12 and EVO7 Shifters

The matching 12 and 7-speed shifters feature relatively light action, a thumb paddle that's easily adjustable, and "MatchMaker compatible mounting," but it's the nearly hidden switch on the underside that's most interesting to me. This little guy allows you to choose between being able to make five upshifts with one full sweep of the thumb paddle, or you can limit the movement to just a single shift with each push. It's basically just an internal stop that you're moving, and a small magnet holds it in place.

This makes a lot of sense for e-bikes where, if you're not being careful, you can damage your drivetrain by shifting through a bunch of gears while the motor is also putting the power down, but TRP says that it was actually a feature requested by their non-motorized downhill and enduro racers.


TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador


Picture yourself ten minutes into a rowdy enduro stage and, if you're anything like me, breathing through your eyeballs while just trying to hold your shit together when you come up to a short, punchy climb near the end of the stage. This is precisely the kind of situation where I'd grab too many gears, lose all my speed, and probably fall over right in front of spectators. With the Shift Mode Switch, you can make your gear selection much more deliberate in those situations by locking it to just a single click. There have been single-click shifters before, but none that can change between that and a multi-shift mode.

Other things to note include improved routing that sees the cable sit more in line with the handlebar rather than looping out, gold or silver color options to match the derailleur, and a cable-pull ratio that's unique to TRP. Actual weights are 139 grams with the clamp or 125 grams without.

Both the 12 and 7-speed shifters retail for $99.99 USD in silver or $109.99 if you prefer gold highlights.


TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador


Carbon and Aluminum Cranks, Wave Chainrings

It's not a drivetrain without a set of cranks, of course, which meant that TRP had to design and manufacture their own. First up are the new carbon arms that TRP said, "Aren't the lightest but are definitely the strongest," a bold claim in a time when more and more riders seem to be questioning where they use carbon on their bikes. While ISO load testing requires 50,000 cycles, TRP tested to 100,000 cycles without any issues and even went as far as 500,000 cycles before seeing a failure. Their exact words were, “It's stronger than any other crankset on the market.”

They come in at 504 grams without the chainring or about 82 grams more than XX1 arms and 52 grams more than XTR, but TRP is obviously quite confident in the carbon layup and happy with the minor weight tradeoff. They come in 165mm or 170mm lengths and use a 30mm diameter aluminum axle that's compatible with many bottom brackets. Speaking of that, there are threaded, PF92, and PF30 options from TRP as well. The forged aluminum crank also uses a 30mm spindle, and they can be had in 165, 170, and 175mm lengths.


TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador


For chain retention, TRP licensed MRP's Wave technology that uses an alternating left-to-right pattern when viewed from above. The Wave design has certainly had some mixed reviews over the years, but TRP says that they've optimized the design to play nice with KMC's chains for the tightest tolerances and maximum retention, with slightly thicker teeth than other brands have been using. That means that if you're buying an entire EVO12 or EVO7 drivetrain, it'll come with a KMC chain for, "The best performance possible." That said, they also stressed that there's nothing proprietary going on and that other brands' chains will work as well but you won't get quite the same retention abilities. Also worth mentioning is that the DH chainring employs a thicker spider for added strength.

The carbon arms cost $349.99 USD while the chainrings go for either $74.99 or $79.99 USD depending on the finish you want. If you prefer aluminum, they'll cost you $149.99 USD, and the bottom bracket goes for $41.99 USD.


TRP EVO12 drivetrain photo by Ajax Salvador


EVO12 and 7-Speed Cassettes

Just like everything else except the chain, TRP's new cassette is manufactured entirely in-house at their Taichung factory, and they were happy to admit that it was the most challenging aspect of designing the new drivetrains. Cassettes are crazy complicated, with the shape of the gates, ramps, and teeth having a massive effect on shifting performance, and TRP says that it took a lot of time and effort to get theirs to perform to the level they were looking for.

It's a two-piece design, with the first ten cogs being machined from a single piece of forged steel and the two largest cogs getting the same treatment but in aluminum. Steel torx bolts hold the two pieces together, and the result is an impressively light 10-52 tooth cassette that comes in at 372 grams. That's right in the same ballpark as high-end cassettes from SRAM and Shimano. The spread runs from 10-11-13-15-18-21-24-28-32-36-44-52 teeth. The 7-speed downhill version is all steel aside from the aluminum spoke protector, and gets an 11-13-15-17-19-21-24 spread.

Both cassettes will fit onto Microspline freehubs only – they're not compatible with XD drivers due to patents.



Photo by Mike Levy


First Ride Impressions

I spent a grand total of about one hour riding the new EVO12 drivetrain, which is at least a few months short of what I'd need to call this a review but enough time to gather some early impressions of how the group performs. It was all bolted onto a new Commencal Tempo (side note: holy crap, what an impressive bike) and the ride consisted of a short climb with a few steep walls before a flowing descent that had a few rough spots for good measure.

I found the shift lever action to be light-ish, and the chain moves from one cog to another with a very positive 'ka-chung' feel in both directions. I made sure to shift like a meathead under while working hard up those steep pitches and had zero issues. I also tinkered with the Shift Mode Switch and have to admit that I'm surprised that I found myself preferring the single-click mode far more than being able to run through a bunch of gears at once.

So, what does all this add up to? I'm not sure quite yet – I'll need much more time before I make that call – but initial impressions are positive. My main takeaway was how quiet the drivetrain seemed; there was little to no chain noise and zero derailleur clunking or banging happening while I was pinballing through the rocks and trees. While a new electronic drivetrain has just been released and more are on the horizon, TRP's chosen a more conservative approach for their first group that makes a lot of sense. This was only intended to be a brief look at the EVO12 and EVO7 systems, with a proper release – and much more saddle time – to come in about a month. Stay tuned for more riding impressions and all the tech info, as well as a tour of their factory.




If the EVO12 system proves to be as consistent as their brakes, would you consider it over a mechanical drivetrain from one of the two major players? Or are you more likely to stick to what you know?

Author Info:
mikelevy avatar

Member since Oct 18, 2005
2,032 articles

199 Comments
  • 401 12
 I’m gonna go ahead and say that releasing this on the same day as the New SRAM stuff was definitely not the play.
  • 176 0
 Bold move cotton, let’s see if that pays off
  • 3 0
 wanted to say the same.
  • 29 1
 Everyone wanted to release on 321 I guess
  • 14 21
flag Compositepro (Mar 21, 2023 at 9:17) (Below Threshold)
 It’s not even UDH ffs
  • 183 7
 I disagree because I don't give a damn about electric drivetrains and a new cable-actuated option is much more exciting to me. If this TRP drivetrain is good, I would absolutely consider it over a new XT drivetrain if the price was better. That's really the thing though, the price or performance has to be better than XT for me to bother.

It's really too bad that PB(and this may not be their fault due to times they were supplied parts) put in a big chunk of testing and effort to talk about how great the direct mount SRAM stuff is, but put in the absolute bare minimum on this.
  • 6 2
 MRP wave tooth profile. It's soo good at chain retention that it actually "sucks". Like it pulls the chain too much. Used the Oval 30T and boy I almost wrecked my derailleur.

Not a good design
  • 113 4
 I for one am thrilled that TRP gave us a cable-actuated alternative on the same day SRAM proclaims that everything is going electric. I ride bikes to get away from electric things. TRP gets my business from here on out.
  • 18 17
 @Explodo: a choice was definitely made. in the end, after much nail biting and tough deliberation, Pinkbike eventually came to the painful conclusion that the victor was gonna be money and they were willing to do whatever it takes to get the most they can.
  • 22 2
 @Explodo: currently you can buy both an XT shifter and derailleur for a total of $170, which is $60 less than just this new TRP derailleur. and remember, it's at least another $100 for that TRP shifter!
  • 8 0
 @Explodo: The price of the derailleur is $230-240, the shifter is $100. Your hopes of better prices are sadly misplaced.
  • 3 0
 and position price point same as SRAM GX does not make it more desirable
  • 6 0
 @cfox109: But no Project 321 hub announcement yet...
  • 5 1
 rather get trp tbh
  • 5 1
 Team TRP
  • 27 0
 One thing competitors realize is that if you want people to talk about your product, you put it where your competitor's product is.

Posting the TRP products on the same day as a highly clicked on SRAM product is double/triple the # of eyes on any other news day. Well played by TRP.
  • 3 2
 @Explodo: Ssme. I have been running shimano electric on the road for a decade and SRAM AXS on my gravel bike for 4 years. My XX1 Cable stuff on the mtb works so good, and is light and cheap, don't see the point on the mtb.
  • 1 0
 Attempt to boost trp product sales
  • 1 2
 TRP Jumped the shark!
  • 4 2
 *Professor snape voice*
" a cable-actuated drivetrain? You cannot be serious."
  • 9 2
 Respectable move. Bringing the fight to the big dogs. Looks great too, well designed and well manufactured. No cheap stamped metal or rattly plastic. It’s about time sram had some competition.
  • 5 0
 21.3.?
  • 5 0
 @Explodo: 100% yes. I'm happy with my Shimano drivetrains that are typically a mix of deore/slx, but throw on an xt shifter, and you have some sweet performance for a great value!
  • 7 2
 @eicca: Don't forget about Shimano. They make non electronic drivetrains as well. Oh, and they are vastly superior to these patent avoiding designs.
  • 2 0
 @cfox109: or 213 as the rest of the world calls it?
  • 2 0
 @Henrygoesfastsometimes I completely disagree. TRP knew exactly what they were doing today and I for one love the shit out of it.
  • 1 0
 But it wasn't released with a novel to accompany it. Thank you @mikelevy
Its always good to have some competition for the big S's
  • 8 0
 Priced over the top of X01, and double the cost of XT? Perhaps TRP can move units on OEM market, but I can't see consumers paying a premium for this unproven tech unless there is significant performance, durability, or weight advantage.
  • 4 1
 @Explodo: nothing is better than XT.
Sram has an embargo for 4/1. If they pre-released then that’s garbage for retailers.
  • 6 11
flag honestjerry26 (Mar 21, 2023 at 20:01) (Below Threshold)
 @Explodo: Sounds like you haven't ran AXS. Biggest regret on my xc bike is that I put XTR on it and not AXS like my enduro. New shimano stuff is garbage and wears out so fast, already burned thru so many warranty XTR products. My XO1 AXS running 3 years strong on my other bike with over 5000miles on it.
  • 5 11
flag garrisond5 (Mar 21, 2023 at 20:03) (Below Threshold)
 @BarneyStinson: we don't give a f*ck what the rest of the world calls it. We're f*cking mericans and make our own f*cking rules.
  • 6 0
 @Pmrmusic26: My opinion has always been that as you go up the shimano price scale, performance tops out at XT and the only thing XTR gets you is weight savings and the associated drop in durability.
  • 1 0
 It's very possible that TRP developed and was going to launch their drivetrain earlier than SRAM, and then SRAM decided to cuck them and launch it the same day - or vice versa. But usually the bigger company has more in the tank. Firsthand knowledge, bike companies absolutely do this kind of stuff if their products are close to launch already.
  • 18 0
 I'm pretty sure both SRAM and TRP chose this timing because they were focused on showing it at the Taipei Show (which we're currently attending). Probably not part of some grand plan on TRP's part IMO, although that would be fun.
  • 2 0
 iunno, im kinda happy to see it as an alternative, same day.
  • 1 0
 Maybe they figured after seeing SRAM's pricing this new drivetrain would look very enticing Wink
  • 3 0
 @skyroach: my thoughts as well. I have yet to find any qualm about my XT drivetrain. It works perfectly, it's set and forget, it's sturdy but still light. As an average joe, there is really no reason for anything more fancy than that
  • 4 0
 @nickmalysh: I would figure not having it engineered by SRAM would make it more desirable...
  • 1 0
 Paid off for me, as I am considering it.
  • 5 0
 @hardtailpunter: True for everything but the cassette & chain: XT cassette is a boat anchor, & Shimano cassettes & chains wear significantly faster than X01 and XX1 counterparts (each of my last four SRAM 11 & 12 speed drivetrains have lasted 5-7k miles: XT & XTR have burned out in less than 3k). That said, the performance per dollar of XT is unrivaled: the reason most Pinkers complain about 12 speed reliability is they are riding GX garbage. XT is *the* cost effective answer to that problem, if you don't mind buying new cassettes every 2500 miles.
  • 2 0
 @powturn: i love the durability of my eagle drivetrain. when i saw the TRP drivetrain that's the first thing i wondered about. if its nearly as durable as eagle that's the ticket IMO.
  • 2 0
 @powturn: Sram cassettes and chains last insanely long, it is worth paying extra for it
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: Sarcasm is misunderstood on here !!!
  • 1 0
 @n8dawg82: HaHa! Not here in the U.K. where it was 21323
  • 104 1
 Not over $1000? Pass.
  • 45 0
 Peasant-train for sure.
  • 10 1
 Considering it's $100+230+$350+$80+$42 for everything listed other than the chain and cassette, this is definitely be over $1,000 for the full set if you get the carbon cranks. And likely just a tickle under $1,000 with the aluminum cranks
  • 6 0
 @nickfranko: thats cheaper than the NX Transmission drivetrains will ever be
  • 81 0
 @mikelevy: I run Microshift - where is my donut?
  • 28 0
 Touche
  • 36 1
 @mikelevy: And there there's us SS idiots who just ditched the derailleur all together cause shifting is too hard for our simple brains.
  • 4 0
 Same here!
  • 5 0
 Same.
  • 7 5
 @terrylikesbikes: Nope, all those idiots are lined up waiting for knee replacements
  • 3 0
 Just checked, it says ‚Ingrid‘ on my derailleur…
  • 12 0
 @terrylikesbikes: you aren't a true ss rider. You didn't tell us your ratio unsolicited.
  • 2 1
 Box Components foo gimme my donut. Couldn't be happier on the sidelines for sram vs deore pissing and moaning whenever a new bike comed out.
  • 3 1
 @terrylikesbikes: humble brag has entered the chat.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: how do you like it? What have you had that’s comparable?
  • 4 0
 I recently took the plunge and ordered the 8sp kids' Microshift set to replace my Zee drivetrain. Zee is fine, just hoping that it is eventually going to pay off as these 8sp chains are so much cheaper than the fancy 10sp chains I need now. I did already put the (adult, big range) 8sp Microshift drivetrain on the mtb I built for my daughter and it is working super nicely.
  • 1 0
 @b1k35c13nt15t: To be honest, it’s mainly a little different without being better at anything, my reason for using it was that I wanted to build a bike out of as many European made components as possible. Before that I was mainly a Shimano guy, and shift quality of a common XT drive train is superior.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: 'old' trp 12 on my bike, but luckly for you guys I'm not into donuts at all...Where's my beer?
New setup looks solid, but I really hope trp changed the ergonomics of the shifter, cause the old ones are crap whatever way you turn them even with rather big hands/fingers glove size XXL.
Shifters are like formed the wrong way around and bend away from your thumb. Angle adjust also of no real use.
Would need some 3d print pice to refit, but used a sliced old road tire and tape instead :-
On this here testbike they're not even mounted with matchmaker to the evo levers? For me with odi rouge grips it was impossible to even reach the upper shifter like this, too little space between grip/bar and shifter. Hm...
Besides this, even the old trp is a solid groupset, a bit harsh, but reliable.
  • 1 0
 Where do you ride and how’s your clutch? You know what I mean Here, in the U.K. winter, they’re a floppy useless mess in no time due to the specialist wet grinding powder on the trails
  • 1 0
 @Coolcmsc: Hi there! Never had issues with the clutch, but in the area around Basel, we've got brown soil / clay which turns into concrete when wet. So the clutch is less of a problem than ripping off the derailleur in a mudhole. Had different ground conditions last autumn in Czech Republic riding in the piss, but also no issues. Seems like UK winter is the problem ;/ BUT I once had a similar problem years ago riding an old gravel pit. Brakepads got sintered by the sandy water. All brakepower gone in a second and made the way home braking with feet down. Maybe try something like moto chain lube or finish line wetlube to seal off the clutch.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: That would be similar to my reason of just not wanting any plain Jane shit on my bike. Everything works pretty well, so as long as it's average- I'm happy. I learned to time my shifts when I was like 12.
  • 43 1
 I'm gonna go ahead and say that this is exponentially more interesting than the new not-a-drivetrain, drivetrain.
  • 62 23
 God, I wish this site would run a poll as to who actually wants a 12-speed drivetrain. Sure, most of us have one because we wanted the wide 500+% range but I would be so much happier with a similar range, fewer speeds, less weight, and some f*cking reliability.
The new Shimano linkglide drivetrains seem like my savior. One day gearboxes will hopefully be standard. Hopefully, I never have to buy a 12-gear cassette ever again. Just the two cents of a guy who is sick of his stuff breaking.
  • 21 3
 There are more then enough gearbox bikes now that what youre saying is just a coppout. If you praused gearboxs as much as you say youd already have one...
  • 15 17
 @mhoshal: I've owned a single, roughly $3k bike for the last six years you tell me how to afford a gearbox bike and I'd have one by now. Some of us want reliability in our bikes because we can't afford a new one every couple years, I've got six digits of student debt to pay off and medical bills like crazy - not all of us live in Canada.
  • 8 0
 I had the E*13 10 speed, 9-42 tooth cassette for a while and it was perfect. 466% range, allowed for a small 28 tooth chainring, and perfect jumps between gears with only 10 speeds. It was also super light. Unfortunately it shifted like crap, wore out quickly, and had to be replaced after just a season.

most frames are built for that 50+ dinner plate out back, and so the anti-squat is optimized for a 32 tooth chainring. A 28 tooth on modern frames would not perform the best.
  • 10 0
 @mhoshal: Not to mention some of them are super nice with pretty progressive geo and generally high build quality. Gone are the days of the only available gearbox bikes being shitty bodge jobs with mediocre geometry and suspension performance. There's some high quality shit out there at this point.

Donno. I broke considerably more derailleurs back when I had my old 9-10 speed stuff than I do now, and the shifting and range is better now by far. I go through a chain once every 1500-1800 miles, which is about what I did back then, and replace the cassette every third chain. Stuffs gone up in price, but so has performance and baseline inflation.

The bike industry does some pretty stupid shit sometimes, but its time to acknowledge that the current 12 speed setups are fairly decent for their intended enduro/trail/XC purposes. And SRAM and Shimano both make a DH dedicated group with tighter setups. This TRP drivetrain looks really good, and they've been around for long enough that I expect them to have the data to make sure they have the small details taken care of and actually put together something really good.

Another competitor making high performance stuff is only a good thing. Especially since Shimano still out here convinced everybody wants 2x setup in the front after losing that battle 12-15 years ago.
  • 10 2
 @William42: I have had a very different experience with 12-speed drivetrains. I may as well have bought two GX Eagle groupsets back when I bought one because literally everything besides the cranks and chainring has failed in only 3k miles.

The 2014-2017 11-speed era was peak reliability IMO, those drivetrains cost me the least to fix, parts were abundant, and sram was putting those derailleurs together like ak-47's apparently cause I haven't had one fail yet.
  • 6 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: This is the experience I've had as well. I'm about to throw all this gx eagle crap out. 2016 Chainreation prices on Shimano 11 speed was peak drivetrain.
  • 6 0
 Deore 11 speed, CS M5100 is 11-51. 39-45-51 are the largest cogs, so the shifting is way smoother than the old 11-46 shimano. It's been super reliable, and after I did the ole 'install the B screw backwards trick' it shifts pretty nice. I don't think it's weight weenie approved though.
  • 2 0
 @ryanandrewrogers:
I'm with you on the 11 speed Sram stuff though. I have X1 on a different bike, but that one only clears a 42 tooth from what I understand. Works for my trail bike, but not my enduro sled unfortunately.
  • 3 0
 @Glory831Guy: The Sram 11 speed will clear a 46t cassette from my experience
  • 2 0
 @Glory831Guy: The derailleurs of that era seemed to be literally tougher alongside the mechanical reliability. Rather than exploding into a million bits at the sight of a rock, my 11 speed shrugs off hits like prime mike tyson.
  • 2 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: just replaced my 11sp GX derailleur after 16.000km. It self destructed, but over the years it's had so many encounters with rocks that the finish had changed to "rough brushed silver". It's nickname was indeed Kalashnikov. Of course I bought another 11sp GX in it's place. The cassette is also a tough bit of kit that's almost impossible to kill.
  • 2 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: Yup, 11 speed Sram was the best for me too. Went through several bent hangers and managed to grind off half the aluminum on the derailleur and it still shifted like new.

12 speed is great out of the box, just don’t crash or hit it on a rock…
  • 6 0
 For real—give me a good 10 or 11 speed with the same range as 12. I have SRAM eagle on my bike and honestly can’t even tell sometimes if I changed gears. I don’t need a CVT on my bike. What ever happened to the BOX drivetrain??? There’s very little info out there other than a handful of first impressions from when it launched.
  • 3 0
 @Glory831Guy: interested in this "'install the B screw backwards trick". what does this do?
  • 5 0
 So, If your B screw is fully inserted and the adjustment still isn't right, remove it completely from the derailleur. Next, insert the b screw in the same threaded hole, but from the opposite side, and adjust to correct tension. This effectively lengthens the B screw because you have the added length of the allen-end. Before I did this on the Deore 11, the derailleur would rub the cassette when shifting to the largest cog. My brother had suggested it, and said he learned the trick while working in bike shops. FWIW, overall I'm pretty useless at setting up derailleurs. I had the Deore installed at a local shop
  • 1 0
 ^ But the mechanic was stumped as to why the adjustment wasn't right. I told him about the trick,, he tried it and the rubbing went away. I've since played with the B tension a bit, as I can see the cable tension is right and the upshifts are even smoother.
  • 1 0
 I could probably find a more ideal hangar for this setup, but it works fine with this little bandaid fix.
  • 3 0
 I run a customised 11-39 cassette - 10 sp, after machining off the top two dinner plate cogs. Uses 12sp shift spacing so I use XTR mid cage derailleur and a tight chainline. No more silly dinner plate cogs. No floppy massive hanging junk on back of bike. Super light too.
  • 1 0
 @Uberbox: I've ridden box 9 and 11 speed
The 11 speed I got an insane deal on. It performed just fine on my 275+ hardtail.
Missed a couple shifts under power. But never damaged.
  • 4 2
 What are you possibly doing that is breaking current 12 speed stuff? I ride hundreds of miles on my bike each season. I ride tons of park laps every summer. I shuttle big rides. I put together grueling 60+ mile off road rides. I have broken zero shit in years. All kinds of different 12 speed drive trains from high to low. Sram to Shimano. Literally nothing broken. Maybe it's you.
  • 2 0
 @Glory831Guy: Isn't it more convenient to just install a longer screw instead? Seems like a hassle to adjust the screw when the head is on the opposite end.
  • 3 0
 I have a 12s Shimano setup on my XC. I must say it's ideal. The gear ratios are where they should be, not too big not too small. So far it's super reliable and the chain lasts long. The only slight downside to 12s is that it's marginally more sensitive to grit and dirt that sometimes get caught up in the cassette. For trail-enduro use I think we can all get away with 11s...the jumps in the middle bottom part of the cassette can be slightly larger as these bikes are not ridden on flat terrain so much. Linkglide seems like a great idea to me.
  • 4 0
 If you don't want to wait for Linkglide or CUES stuff to be available there are Deore 11 speed groupsets for $175 brand new on eBay. 11-51T, so the exact same range as 12 speed without all the headaches.
  • 2 0
 I'm perfectly happy with 10-42 11 speed XX1. It's about 150g lighter than 12 speed.
  • 1 0
 @Linc: Which cassette did you mod and how light did it end up?
  • 2 0
 4k miles on SLX 12 speed. Upgraded to XT shifter. Just put on my 4th chain. Not a thing has broken. It would be frustrating if everything had, but my experience has been great.
  • 2 0
 @garrisond5: Racing it. Pedaling hard and breaking teeth off the cassette. Hitting the derailleur against all kinds of shit. Crashing a lot. I mean sure maybe it's me, but tons of people on this site agree with my opinion that 12 speeds these days are weak and costly to replace, so maybe it's you bud. I put my bikes through the wringer and the Eagle drivetrain is always the first thing to fail me

Also good to note: I run a 27.5 rear wheel and my friends who run a 29 have significantly fewer issues with 12-speed drivetrains.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: it would be if I HAD a longer screw, haha. I usually just twist the end of the screw to adjust it now, I don't even bother using the allen side.
  • 1 0
 @Glory831Guy: Yeah, I just thought that if it is a metric bolt, you can always get a longer one from the hardware store. Now looking at your flag, maybe if it is a metric bolt it could actually be harder for you to find one at the hardware store. Is it?
  • 36 0
 wtf...you guys are seriously trying to get us all fired today. how are we supposed to afford all these products if we don't have jobs?
  • 39 2
 It's absolutely insane at the moment, the team has been going hard.
  • 33 0
 Is that a cord coming out of the shifter?
  • 23 5
 For those of us who ride bikes to get away from electronic things, and are sickened by SRAM's direction, TRP are the heroes we need. My next drivetrain WILL be TRP, guaranteed.
  • 2 1
 Same! As many others have been saying, the Microshift Advent X is a fantastic, mechanical, not overly complicated drivetrain for an insanely affordable price and it'll be hard for me to buy anything else. But I'm definitely buying one of these TRP drivetrains if only to support any company countering Sram's bullshit.
  • 2 2
 did I miss something? Are new SRAM options only wireless? I don't think so
  • 3 0
 @valrock: You definitely missed something cuz SRAM’s new offerings are only wireless.
  • 3 2
 @eicca: f*ck me, f*ck SRAM, what the f*ck? Who's f*cking idea that was? f*cking stupid
  • 13 0
 More competition is welcome in the drivetrain realm, especially with SRAM abandoning high end cable operated shifting.
  • 7 0
 1) I'm more keen on an upcoming TEMPO review (fingers crossed)

2) After seeing the latest SRAM release... when the zombie apocolypse/pandemic or EMP blast destroys are power generators and solid state circuitry, those of us who had embraced the analog nature to biking will breath a sigh of relief lol Perhaps Levy's mini will become a prized item too lol

3) Currently in Japan, and I'm continually impressed that almost everyone that isn't on the subway, is on a simple bike. The only ebikes ive seen are commuter bikes with child seats or food delivery racks attached to the back. Tha analog bike ain't going nowhere and it's becoming more and more evident that the electrification of the geartrain is for western recreational riders.
Just my 2yens
  • 2 0
 Kaz has a Tempo review in the works. Spoiler alert: he likes it too.
  • 9 0
 When's the Tempo review dropping?
  • 6 0
 very soon, the pics are in Kazimers profile already
  • 3 0
 I was only on it for an hour but wow, I can see myself really liking that thing.
  • 6 0
 Not enough batteries in this drivetrain. I love extra things that I have to worry about charging, dying, etc, so for me, these need 3 batteries if they're gonna beat sram axs!
  • 7 0
 I still don't get why marketing departments think Gold = I'm Rich and into Hedge Funds.

Last I checked, hip-hop mountain bike components isn't a thing.
  • 1 0
 Bike Rumor has some nice pictures of the black and silver carbon cranks group.
  • 8 0
 Levy always gets the good stuff
  • 4 0
 work very well, I have over 1500 miles on mine over the last year, shifter ergonomics are ok. Im running the 12 speed on a sram xo1 casette and it has been flawless. the only thing I dislike is there is no cage lock like sram stuff.
  • 4 0
 I like the idea of the Hall lock. I've had a lot of issues with my Advent X derailleur flopping and struggling to keep the chain taught, even with a well adjusted clutch. To be fair, it has 3 seasons of hard riding and abuse and still works.
  • 4 0
 Someone is gonna have to explain to me why this makes plenty of sense:

"The other thing TRP did in their search for a quiet drivetrain was to rotate the parallelogram by a few degrees so that it moves more side to side than on an angle to follow the cassette, which makes plenty of sense when you think about what's going on back there while you're taking terrible lines through rock gardens."
  • 5 0
 makes perfect sense if you don't think about it
  • 4 0
 Vectors and shit. If the parallelogram angle is adjusted to be a bit more horizontal, then a lower percentage of the force from bumps is translated to vertical derailleur movement/chainslap. Think about pushing straight down on a block resting on a 30 degree ramp instead of 45. All else being equal this would move the guide pulley further from the cassette in the 10t; I'd assume this could cause a bit slower shifting in the highest gears if it's not dealt with by some other design element, though likely not by much.
  • 2 0
 @kevinjordans:
That is probably the best possible explanation. Nice. I think it is probably just marketing BS, though. They went through the trial-and-error process of tweaking 17 things in the development cycle to make it shift well, and ended up with something a few degrees different from Shimano, and then claim it as a fundamental improvement.

If the parallelogram moving down when the wheel hits a bump is actually a problem, the solution is to go back to Shimano Rapid Rise. Then the cable prevents that. But everyone hated it.
  • 1 0
 @SJP: Oh it's absolutely not some game-changing technology improvement. But the derailleur is a pretty refined product at this point and the marketing team can't just say "yeah it's pretty much like xt/x0 except it has a trp logo so we make money instead".
  • 1 0
 I would appreciate "Works the same, but we make a lower profit margin, so you spend less."
  • 6 0
 I am still recovering from my Box Prime 9 experiment, not sure I can handle this...looks amazing though.
  • 2 0
 Not a success I take it?
  • 1 0
 @agmin: Yep, never got it to work great. Finicky to adjust.
  • 3 0
 I had the original TR12
I used it with a SRAM XO1 10-50t cassette,
and OneUp oval ring, and GX chain (only one available!)
I also used it with the Archer wireless shifting system,
which worked great.
I liked the pull ratio, made Eagle gear entry smoother,
though the clutch could have been tighter for rough stuff
(never bad enough for me to bother adjusting tho)

Had the Slate EVO 2.3mm brakes, and they were beasts.
I hope some product managers will take a risk on TRP stuff, to give riders a different experience,
though I know SRAM has got most pretty well under their thumb.
  • 7 0
 Transition is already speccing TRP on some of their builds.
  • 4 0
 Fuji is speccing TRP on their builds!
  • 2 0
 @thustlewhumber: Only Brakes though.
  • 1 0
 Fezzari and Transition Spec TRP on some models of bikes out of the box. It's really good to see their brakes getting that level of recognition.
  • 2 0
 I'll buy, if they make a gold-free version. Been running Tektro Orion brakes for 4 years, could be stronger but they've been bomb-proof reliable.

In a previous life, I used to do rebuilds and tune-ups on magneto-powered Harley Sportsters. Batteries on a bike?!?!? Psshaw!
  • 2 0
 Nice to see some more options other than the two S brands. I took a chance with the TRP dhr evo brakes and have been blown away. If their drivetrains have the same performance and reliability as their brakes I would definitely consider! Drivetrain looks dang good too!
  • 1 0
 When it's time to replace the derailleur on my non-UDH frame I will consider any and all 12-speed cable-pull derailleurs (that fit). I just replaced a GX Eagle after 3000 miles with a GX lunar I've been hoarding. Standard GX was a little floppy the last 500 miles or so and I replaced a jockey wheel along the way too.
  • 2 0
 Stoked to see another drivetrain manufacturer enter the market with what looks like a quality product. Can only be a good thing to have more competition for us as riders.

Also an omission should it be *under power*?
  • 3 0
 I'm actually really interested to try this once it hits the market. It's about time there was another player at the table and they definitely deserve to be given a chance.
  • 4 0
 TRP is now on my short list for upgrades! Love the look. I’m always down to try something new. Great for competition.
  • 2 0
 I wish them luck. I hope the durability is higher than the brakes I had (slate T4), which started out decently but ended up with cables pulling out of levers during rides and lever pull screws moving on their own.
  • 1 0
 Drivetrain manufacturers know that the money is made by selling as OEM not through retailers to Joe Public.

At the Taipei show I promise you TRP are sitting down with bike brands telling them they can spec bikes with $340 of mech & shifter than for less than they currently pay for GX or XT. The SRP is deliberately inflated as a sales tool. Give it 12-18 months and you'll see these in shops for the same price as GX and XT.
  • 1 0
 More quality micro spline cassette choices is great for riders. Like TRP Evo, my Shimano group shifts great under load, and I’m looking forward to a personal comparison. Cassette progression is spot on, no surprising jump to the 51 cog means more usable gearing.
  • 1 0
 "Both cassettes will fit onto Microspline freehubs only – they're not compatible with XD drivers due to patents." That's a really weird thing to say, considering that multiple companies use XD technology to make cassettes (E.13, Garbaruk), and SRAM basically designed the XD patent as open so that any hub manufacturer could produce a compatible product.
  • 1 1
 I was a life-long Sram fan until buying into the mid range of Eagle and getting a groupset that won't shift and zero customer service to back it up. I would happily give another brand a try to see if they can make a product that delivers gears and actually shifts.
  • 7 3
 Pfft! Cables? Thats sooo march 20, 2023. Get with the times trp.
  • 3 1
 When ANY of the shimano drivetrains are set up well, they shift so dang good. I'd be surprised if this could even match the performance of deore.
  • 2 0
 So does this play well with a shimano 12 speed cassette and chain? What's the shift spacing I wonder would like to see someone try it.
  • 4 0
 This and the Tempo have me interested, keen for a proper test on both.
  • 4 0
 Incoming review from Kazimer soon.
  • 2 0
 Count me in. As a lifelong Pittsburgh Penguins fan.....how can I not buy this?
And then I'll pick up some gold brakes too from them.
  • 1 0
 I somehow don´t get it how this should attack the market, XT 12s derailleur is probably the same weight while it costs 75-100 USD, shifter 50 USD. Does the TRP works twice as better?
  • 3 0
 Henry got Eagle XX, Kaz got Eagle X0 and Levy got acoustic TRP. Forgot to fill out your TPS report for Outside @mikelevy?
  • 1 0
 Still seems pricey. Microshift adventx seems hard to beat. Everything on my newer bikes is xd as well. Not sure how many brands make xd cassettes but this says they cannot BC "patents".
  • 1 0
 Is there a cage lock button on this new one like SRAM have? I have a TR12 derailleur and I actually 3D printed a little tool to hold it open when I take the wheel off. I went from GX to TRP and missed that feature a lot!
  • 3 0
 In the more detailed review try and look at cross compatibility
  • 5 2
 Infinitely more interested in this than anything that requires a battery.
  • 4 1
 Another cassette brand that can be used on microspline....YES!
  • 7 3
 Except I've seen more than a few stripped out microspline cassette bodies. Most likely user error but the XD system is almost foolproof and more common.
  • 10 1
 @Joecx: I've seen stripped out XD cassettes/cassette bodies. Anything that has users is going to have user errors.
  • 2 0
 @blcpdx: Stripped XD is more user error than stripped Microspline/HG, which is more due to legacy design error.
  • 1 0
 Another carbon crank with the shoe rub protector in the wrong place and / or too small. Same thing with the new RF carbon cranks. Check the rub marks in the photo.
  • 3 0
 Never knew TRP was Tektro.
  • 1 0
 Too much innovation for my brain to handle,

I’m going to ignore all this and ride my 2013 Truax with 2X and 26s and love every minute of it.
  • 1 0
 We now have 5 12 speed rear mtn der's to play with...Shimano, Sram, Sensah, Sunrace, and TRP. Anyone wanna do a compatibility chart?
  • 4 0
 Yeah also quite keen to see this. Although Shimano is the only company making a mid-cage 12sp, so that continues to reign supreme in my books.
  • 2 0
 If the Cassette is compatible with Shimano I’d pony up. That’sa great weight
  • 3 0
 XT just keeps looking like a bigger bargain every day
  • 2 0
 Full XT kit at Jenson for under $800: der, cranks, chain ring, bb, cassette, 4 piston brakes, shifter, chain… can’t beat the value.
  • 1 0
 It's all roses....except the WaveRing. It's a crap design. It's never been reliable. Narrow/wide rings work better. But seriously-I'd love to try the rest of the drivetrain.
  • 4 1
 Uses a Hanger... lol Wink
  • 1 0
 Not sure I’m ready to give up my current set ups but this is intriguing… and the gold is cool!
  • 2 0
 Pair this with a shimano cassette and chain and it might be a sick combo
  • 4 2
 I'm way more excited about this than the Srammy Tranny
  • 2 0
 Ok, but this just made me want to hear more about the tempo.
  • 3 0
 Kaz's review incoming.
  • 2 0
 TBH this is a lot more interesting than the new SRAM stuff.
  • 1 0
 and with that massive headset top cup you could always retro fit an Acros headset and go for an even cleaner look.
  • 2 0
 Yes!
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy do you happen to know cassette cost?
  • 1 0
 now this is what I wanna see, beautiful
  • 1 0
 What chainring spider standard are they using?
  • 1 0
 New Giant bikes with full TRP please.
  • 1 0
 Are the top aluminium cogs available separately for the cassette?
  • 2 1
 I'll take it based on looks alone
  • 1 0
 This looks great. I'd hit that for sure.
  • 2 1
 Can't be worse than Sram! Interested how it performs compared to Shimano!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a rapper's drivetrain
  • 1 0
 Turp might be the new jam
  • 1 0
 So sick of tacky gold finishes on everything.
  • 1 0
 I like it, but won't go for the gold.
  • 1 0
 I'm able to read this with @levy 's voice in my head
  • 1 1
 The derailleur is clearly infringing SRAM's patents.
  • 1 1
 WHERE CAN I GET THAT CASSETTE AND CHAINRING
  • 1 0
 Probably anywhere you can buy bike parts?
  • 1 1
 wuh.... what was the point of this? Why not wait for the full review?
  • 1 2
 Lost me at KMC chain
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