Review: The New Marin Alpine Trail is More Adjustable & Capable Than Ever

May 15, 2024
by Jessie-May Morgan  

It's coming up on four years since Marin updated the Alpine Trail, their flagship long-travel bike. The 2021 iteration was a dedicated 29er, with 150mm of rear wheel travel serviced by a linkage-driven single-pivot. The 2025 model is no mere revision. It is now a mixed-wheel affair, with the capacity to go full 29", with 161mm rear wheel travel and a host of geometry adjustments, all of which stand to make it one of the more adaptable enduro bikes on the market.

The biggest update is seen at the suspension linkage. To satisfy their kinematic goals on a platform with more than 150mm travel, the designers were forced to say goodbye to the single-pivot.

Marin Alpine Trail Details

• Aluminum frame
• Wheel size: MX or 29"
• Fork Travel: 170mm
• Rear Travel: 161mm (MX), 156mm (29)
• 62.2-64º head angle
• 435mm-442mm chainstays
• Adjustments: Wheel size, BB height and chainstay length, head angle
• Sizes: S, M, L & XL
• Warranty: 5 Years
• Weight: 16.9 kg / 37 lb (S)
• Price: $5,399 USD (Alpine Trail XR AXS)
marinbikes.com


They switched to a four-bar linkage named MultiTrac 2 LT, with a Horst link design. That also allowed them to work in a flip-chip on the chainstay for the simultaneous adjustment of chainstay length and bottom bracket height.

The 2024 Alpine Trail is available in three builds, all with a 12-speed drivetrain, 4-piston brakes and custom-tuned rear shock. The top-of-the-line Alpine Trail XR AXS model is reviewed here, which goes for $5,399 USD.

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bigquotesThe Marin Alpine Trail compares favorably to some competitors' bikes, namely the YT Capra Core 3 MX, the Merida ONE-SIXTY 6000, and the Vitus Sommet 297 CRX. Though each of the aforementioned are very good bikes in their own right, the Alpine Trail XR AXS would be my preference.Jessie-May Morgan



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A 0.75° offset top cup (included) is used for slackening or steepening the head angle.

Construction & Features

All three models of the Alpine Trail run Marin's Series 4 hydroformed aluminum frame with internal cable routing, entering at the traditional spot just aft of the headtube. The ports have a rubber membrane that is punctured during initial assembly - they seal around the cable housing or hose once inserted.

New for 2024 is the UDH rear-end that brings SRAM Transmission compatibility, and the addition of downtube storage. Marin call it the Bear Box for obvious reasons. To open it, you unclip it at the side latch then hinge it open partially (hinging it fully would snap it), before pulling it outwards away from the hinge. It opens up a cavity into the downtube, where you'll find a small pencil case that is not waterproof, but does have little loops on each end to help you fish it out.

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The downtube hatch is partially sealed around its perimeter.
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An extra set of bosses on the underside of the top tube provides additional opportunity for mounting bits, though on the small clearance is tight, with only 40mm between the bosses and the shock's piggyback.

The door of the hatch is home to a set of bottle bosses - frustratingly, the small frame can't fit a water bottle here without use of a spacer and an aftermarket cage adaptor - not provided. That's a significant oversight for an enduro bike, and could be a deal breaker for some. That's true for the XR AXS and XR models that are home to a piggyback-equipped shock. The more affordable Alpine Trail 1 has an in-line shock, so that model should fit a bottle.

The hatch has the additional job of securing the brake hose and cable housing. It does the job, helping to keep the bike devoid of rattle.

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The Alpine Trail has a 73mm threaded bottom bracket and ISCG tabs for the mounting of a chain device and bash guard.
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Well-considered stay protection

The usual forms of frame protection are dotted about the bike. A hard plastic guard sits on the underside of the downtube, and the drive-side chainstay and seat stay get some rubber guards to fend off the ill-effects of chain slap. It's well thought-through, with the chainstay protection extending onto the inboard edge of the chainstay pivot where it runs closest to the cassette.

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Yep, really well-considered.
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This is bolted on, so no danger of peeling off.

At the other end, it extends up the stay toward the main pivot, a spot that is all too often overlooked. Again, the bike is reasonably quiet as a result. A bolt-on mud flap also sits between the back of the seat tube and the chainstay, in place to keep the worst away from the main pivot bearings.

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The six geometry charts for the Marin Alpine Trail in the stock MX configuration

Geometry & Sizing

The 2024 Marin Alpine Trail is available in four sizes, S-XL, with reach figures of 424mm, 454mm, 484mm and 514mm. Those numbers pertain to the configuration in which the bike is shipped - all four sizes are MX. As it comes, a size large has a 484mm reach, a 442mm chainstay, a 63° head angle, a 78.3° effective seat tube angle and a BB height of 345mm.

The frame offers up geometry adjustments at three locations:

• Wheel Size: The flip-chip at the seat stay corrects geometry when switching between a 27.5" and a 29" rear wheel
• Chainstay Length and BB Height: The flip-chip at the chainstay pivot raises/lowers the BB height by 7mm while simultaneously shortening/lengthening the chainstay by 7mm - it also concomitantly alters the head angle by 0.5°
• Head Tube Angle: The bike ships with a neutral headset cup, but a 0.75° offset top cup allows one to steepen or slacken the head angle

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That gives no fewer than twelve geometry charts to pore over. The idea is to give riders a solid enduro-worthy geometry, with scope to tweak things to suit the demands of different riding spots. Of course, everything is a compromise. Highlighting that is the inability to adjust chainstay length without affecting BB height - we are yet to see an independent chainstay length adjustment that is compatible with UDH from any of the mainstream brands - something I, and I'm sure many others, hope will change soon.

Above this section you will see the six geometry charts pertaining to an MX configuration. You can view the geometry figures for the 29" configuration here.

So, if your local tracks are obscenely steep, there's scope to run a 62.2° head tube angle. That could give you that extra confidence needed to commit to the fall line, at the expense of a front end that's more ungainly on the climbs, or feels more liable to washing out in flat corners. Alternatively, if your trails are less severe and warrant quicker handling, you might benefit from a steeper head tube angle. The point is, Marin are handing riders the opportunity to figure out exactly what works, or doesn't work, for them, and that is to be applauded.

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Marin's basic guide for matching geometry to the terrain

There are configurations that Marin specifically do not recommend. Off the table is running a 29" rear wheel with the seat stay flip-chip in the 27.5" position - there is insufficient clearance. They also do not recommend you run a a 27.5" rear wheel with the seat stay flip-chip in the 29" position, as it results in a BB that is very low, to the point where Marin consider it unsafe.


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Suspension Design

The Alpine Trail delivers 161mm of rear wheel travel in the stock MX configuration, dropping to 156mm with a 29" rear wheel. A 205mm x 65mm shock damps that displacement, giving an average leverage ratio of 2.47. The curve is consistently progressive throughout the stroke, becoming a little less so in the final quarter of the travel.

Arguably the biggest change for the Alpine Trail is the move away from a linkage-driven single pivot to a four-bar linkage. Mathew Cipes, the responsible product manager, tells us that this was necessary to satisfy their desired kinematic on the longer travel 160mm platform. In addition to giving the leverage curve more mid-stroke support, the Horst pivot gave the engineers more control over the suspension's anti-rise behavior (how it behaves under application of the rear brake). It allowed them to keep the anti-rise low (65% at sag) for better chassis control while braking.

Anti-squat is model dependent, in that Marin recommend 30% sag for for Alpine Trail 1 with the air shock, and 25% sag for the coil shock-equipped XR models. To that end, in for 32T-52T, anti-squat at 25% sag is 76%, decreasing to 70% at 30% sag. That's a little on the low side as compared to some competitors' enduro bikes, and it indicates the bike will have a tendency to sit down into its travel a little under pedal-induced acceleration.



Specifications
Release Date 2024
Price $5399
Rear Shock Rockshox Super Deluxe Ultimate Coil, 205mm x 65mm
Fork Rockshox Zeb Ultimate, 170mm w/ Charger 3 Damper
Cassette SRAM GX T-Type, 10-52T
Crankarms SRAM GX Eagle, 170mm Length
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX Eagle AXS T-Type
Shifter Pods SRAM AXS POD
Handlebar Marin Trail, Aluminum, 35mm Clamp, 20mm Rise
Stem Marin, 35mm Reach
Grips Marin Grizzly Lock-On
Brakes SRAM Code Bronze, HSC Rotors - 200mm Front, 180mm Rear
Wheelset Marin rims, 29mm internal width, alloy
Hubs Formula
Tires Maxxis Assegai, Maxx Grip. Front: EXO+, Rear: DD
Seatpost TranzX, YSP39, 34.9mm



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Test Bike Setup

I tested the Alpine Trail XR AXS model in a size small, with a 424mm reach in the stock setting and a 35mm stem. The bike comes with an 780mm aluminum bar from Marin with a 20mm rise. I cut it down to my preferred 740mm. For the steep step-littered high speed downhill tracks, I felt more confident with a higher bar height with 15mm of spacers under the stem, but for general enduro riding I felt a better connection with the front end with the bar slammed.

The small comes with a 350 lbs spring, which gives 19% sag for my 59kg. I immediately swapped that out for a 300 lbs spring, which gives a more appropriate 33-35% sag. The shock performed very well over the course of the test period. I stood to benefit from running four clicks of rebound damping on the shock, to get the rear-end feeling sufficiently calm and predictable.


Jessie-May Morgan
Jessie-May Morgan
Location: Tweed Valley, Scotland
Height: 5'4" / 163cm
Inseam: 30" / 77cm
Weight: 130 lbs / 59 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @jessiemaymorgan

On the RockShox Zeb Ultimate with the Charger 3 damper, I run a slightly higher pressure than is recommended for my weight, simply to get the rebound speed running a little faster. At the lighter end of the spectrum, there is a significant compromise to be made between sufficient rebound speed (aka traction), and general comfort. As the fork packs down at lower pressures, even with the rebound damping fully open, one can find oneself in some compromisingly pitched positions over the bike, especially when riding step-riddled sections at speed.


Testing Info

Testing took place over the last two months in the Tweed Valley, Scotland, at the enduro trails and downhill tracks around Innerleithen. Trail conditions were mostly wet, with some damp greasy days, finishing up with some dry and dusty days that gave rise to rougher, hard-pack conditions. This Trailforks route includes a bunch of trails that were ridden during the test period.


Climbing

As ever, the choice of tires feels to me to have the biggest influence on how efficient the bike feels to pedal. Yes, the Maxxis Assegai in a MaxxGrip compound feels very draggy, but on this 160mm travel enduro bike, they are absolutely the correct choice. On a bike that is intended to perform going downhill, grip and puncture resistance should come before rolling speed, so it's nice to see Marin committing to that with MaxxGrip, and a DoubleDown casing rear tire.

The bike feels very short in the seated pedaling position. The 78.7° seat tube angle gives a short effective top tube length, which did a good job of making me feel biased over the front. Slack head tube angles can sometimes be associated with a front-end that has a tendency to lift on steep climbs, but a short effective top tube length minimizes that, making it easier to keep weight over the front. As a result, the Alpine Trail is far easier to manage on steep technical climbs than its slack front-end might suggest.

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The downside to that is that a lot of weight is naturally pushed onto the hands, which can be uncomfortable if riding a long stretch on the flat. It makes a lot more sense when pointed uphill, and that pressure eases off. I actually found the seat tube angle a little too steep, and found it more comfortable with the saddle pushed back on the rails. Comparing the published effective seat tube angle with that of most other manufacturers' bikes should be avoided; while most brands measure the effective seat tube angle from the height of the headtube, Marin measure it at what they consider will be the average saddle height for each frame size. That's 684mm for S, 721mm for M, 763mm for L and 795mm for XL.

On steady fire road climbs, when the chain is in the larger cogs of the cassette, the rear-end does exhibit minimal bob under acceleration. However, I can't say it bothers me in the slightest. In my experience, the drag of the tires has a bigger influence on climbing efficiency than the suspension behavior or the bike's weight (17.6 kg w/pedals and saddle). The Super Deluxe shock does have a lock-out, but I don't find it useful. I set my saddle angle to account for sag, so if the suspension is locked-out near top-out, the angle biases my weight even further forwards to the point where its quite uncomfortable on the wrists. It's also a proper lock-out, so you lose all bump absorption and traction is negatively affected as a result.

When sprinting out of the saddle in harder gears the bike does noticeably sink into its travel, which does give the feeling that you're not getting quite so much forward propulsion for your watts compared to bikes that remain firmer under hard acceleration - bikes like the Liv Intrigue LT, for example.

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Descending

I spent the vast majority of my time testing the Alpine Trail in its stock geometry setting. That's with the chainstay pivot flip-chip in the Low (BB - 345mm) and Long (CS - 442mm) position, with a 27.5" rear wheel and the neutral headset cup, giving a head tube angle of 63°.

A 424mm reach is somewhat on the more compact side for my 163cm, especially when paired with a 35mm stem. With the back-sweep on the bar and the slack head tube angle, it gives the rider a feeling of being in the bike, braced in a commanding position behind the bar. Being more spread out in the cockpit could feel beneficial on extra fast, rough sections, but overall I think the reach on this one suits me and my local trails very well. They're are a little on the slower side by most standards, often with tight turns in rapid succession of one another.

With the chainstay pivot flip-chip in the High BB (352mm) - Short CS (435mm) setting, the rear end felt noticeably more supportive in compressive corners. With a shorter chainstay, the leverage ratio is a little lower, resulting in higher shaft speeds at the shock with more damping force generated. I really appreciated that extra support, and when I went back to the Low BB - Long CS setting, I added one click (of a possible 4) of low speed compression damping to try to replicate that additional support.

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On the whole, my preference was the Low BB - Long CS setting. The bike felt more prone to understeer in the higher BB setting, and I also felt that it accentuated that pitched feeling I got on steep, stepped sections of trail that was largely as a result of the slower than ideal fork rebound.

Being a relatively light rider, a common complaint of mine is over-damped suspension. However, I'm pleased to report that the tune on the RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate coil feels more than satisfactory. Riding flat pedals almost exclusively, I'm very sensitive to a shock that is packing down over successive hits, as I will have trouble maintaining a good shoe-pedal connection when things aren't quite right. With the Alpine Trail, I have no complaints in this department. I will often run rebound damping fully open, but with the custom-tune that Marin have settled on, I actually stood to benefit from not running the rebound as fast as possible. It's refreshing to have meaningful use of the external adjustment dials.

The rear-end of the bike tracks reasonably well. It's no magic carpet however, and doesn't have the buttery smooth feel of some of the mid-pivot enduro bikes I've ridden. It can feel as though it's getting hung up on square-edged hits sometimes, but my feet aren't getting blown off on those occasions. The bike generally feels composed when it goes deep into its stroke. It did have a tendency to feel little kicky sometimes - in scenarios where I'd unexpectedly come upon a chunky lone root at speed with the bike pitched downhill. Again, slowing the rebound with 4 clicks of damping settled things nicely.

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The small gets a 150mm travel dropper post, which for me is the minimum acceptable drop for an enduro bike. Clearance was largely fine on all but the steepest of trails, where I benefited from manually slamming the seatpost an extra 25mm. Happily, the small - and other frame sizes - offer plentiful insertion depth. At my saddle height of 627mm, I could run a 180mm OneUp V2 or V3 post in there.

A 63° head tube angle is slacker than what I'm accustomed to. It's manageable, but I did occasionally feel the fear of losing the front end on the steepest trails where the corners weren't so supportive. In light of that, I don't foresee a slacker head tube angle being of any benefit to me on my local trails, but it's cool that the option is there especially for those who want the stability that a longer wheelbase confers - those looking to use the Alpine Trail for fast laps in the bike park, perhaps.

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I eventually lost patience with the under-performing RockShox Zeb, as I felt it was holding the bike back from greater potential. So, I switched it out for a 160mm Ohlins RXF 38 m.2 fork that I had lying around. The axle-to-crown height is 13mm lower than that of the 170mm Zeb. That has the effect of lowering the bottom bracket a touch, and steepening the head tube angle by half a degree to around 63.5°. I felt most at ease in this configuration. If I were to race an enduro tomorrow, this is how I would set the bike up: MX with the Horst Flip-Chip in Long and Low, the Headset in Neutral, and with a 160mm fork. This is how it performs best for me.

To find out if there would be additional benefit to running an even steeper head tube angle, I made use of the offset headset cup to steepen it by a further 0.75°. While I didn't feel any less confident on the very steep descents, I did have a few unsettling moments where the bike felt too tall. No drama of course, just a fleeting sensation of feeling a little pitched. To be clear, all of my findings were made from back-to-back testing of different setups on the same set of tracks.



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Marin Alpine Trail XR AXS

How does it compare?

The Marin Alpine Trail compares favorably to some competitors' bikes that I've tested in recent years, namely the YT Capra Core 3 MX, the Merida ONE-SIXTY 6000, and the Vitus Sommet 297 CRX. Though each of the aforementioned are very good bikes in their own right, the Alpine Trail XR AXS would be my preference. It has the edge with the most composed, traction-delivering rear-end, and feels the safest to ride fast while handing its rider quick handling and a good sense of being the boss. While it is the heaviest of the lot (being aluminum, not carbon), it is also far more adjustable than most other enduro bikes, which will be of great appeal to the fettlers, or those who want something that can adapt to the varying terrain of different riding spots.

Marin will always struggle to compete with some of the direct-to-consumer offerings. The YT Capra Core 4 MX (carbon) with a comparably high-end spec is more affordable at £4,499, but again it lacks the adjustability of the Marin.

Also noteworthy here is that the Airdrop Edit MX Deluxe, another Horst-link aluminum enduro bike of comparable geometry, is a fair bit more affordable than the Marin Alpine Trail XR AXS tested here. With the same suspension components, and more adjustable brakes of equivalent power, but a mechanical SRAM GX groupset, it retails at £4,399, versus the £5,225 RRP of the Transmission-equipped Marin. For me, the benefits of the electronic drivetrain don't warrant parting with the additional £825 (granted, there are a few other spec differences, of course). The other side to that story is that while the Marin has heaps of adjustments, the Airdrop Edit MX has a fixed geometry. Also, the Marin is sold with a five year warranty, while the Airdrop gets a two year warranty. Oh, but the Airdrop can fit a water bottle on a size small.


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The Alpine Trail 1 goes for $3,199 USD / £3,095 / $4,299 CAD / 3,499 €
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The Alpine Trail XR goes for $4,599 (USD) / £4,445 / $6,159 CAD / 5,059 €

Which Model is the Best Value?

Always a difficult one to answer, given that it depends on exactly what you value and what your budget is. Personally, I wouldn't be compromising on quality of suspension components, but I would always be happy to forgo the expense of an electronic drivetrain to have some extra pennies in my pocket to upgrade more important things aftermarket, like tires or brakes.

To that end, I reckon the $4,599 Alpine Trail XR model offers the best value of the three available. It has the very same suspension components as the XR AXS (tested here), but forgoes the SRAM GX Transmission group for mechanical GX. The performance of the SRAM DB8 brakes is unknown to me - but I wouldn't let that put me off - especially in the knowledge that the $800 I saved could get me a set of entirely adequate 4-piston Shimano SLX brakes with plenty of change to spare.

The Alpine Trail 1 is the entry-level offering, priced at $3,199 USD. It gets a Fox Float Performance air shock, Fox 36 Rhythm fork with the Grip damper, a Shimano Deore 12 speed drivetrain, TRP Slate EVO 4-Piston brakes, and Vee Tire Flow Snap tires with the Top 40 compound.

Building it yourself? The frame kit with the Rockshox Super Deluxe Ultimate coil shock will set you back $1,849 USD / 1,899 € / £,1925 / $2,469 CAD.


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Technical Report

RockShox Zeb Ultimate w/ Charger 3 Damper: The fork is over-damped for lighter riders, and struggles to rebound fast enough at low pressure, resulting in poor traction and a pitched feeling on steep, chunky terrain

SRAM Code Bronze Brakes: Powerful enough, but I did miss the contact point adjustment that is present on the SRAM Code RSC levers

HA adjusting headset cups: Changing the head tube angle is straight forward, requiring only the switching out of the top headset cup. It requires no special tools. A massive plastic bush sits over the lower headset bearing to accommodate the change in steerer angle inside the headtube. Arguably, the offset cup is misleadingly labelled - orienting it with the -0.75° label at the front of the bike actually makes the head angle steeper, not slacker as it would suggest.

Flip-Chips: Adjusting the geometry using the flip-chips is very easy, requiring no special tools, but having a bike stand is of course tremendously useful. The chips are well greased, and were easy enough to pop in and out.

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Pros

+ Meaningfully adjustable geometry makes it adaptable
+ Very capable on its intended terrain
+ Steep seat tube angle feels great on steep climbs
+ Plenty of seat post insertion depth for long travel droppers

Cons

- Small cannot mount a water bottle
- On the heavier side
- Poor performance of the RockShox Zeb Ultimate (at low pressure) lets the XR AXS model down



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThere's no doubt in my mind the Marin Alpine Trail XR AXS is a very good example of an enduro bike. It offers a composed and supportive rear-end, and feels safe to ride fast whilst handing its rider heaps of self-determination that breeds good times - I really loved it. Though none of the geometry adjustments are without compromise, they do allow the bike to adapt to a wide range of tastes and terrain. The stock configuration is a great starting point (although the RockShox Zeb didn't work well for my weight), and will satisfy many riders, but fettlers will enjoy mixing it up to see what works best for them.Jessie-May Morgan





Author Info:
jessiemaymorgan avatar

Member since Oct 26, 2023
70 articles

198 Comments
  • 215 3
 5.4k for top suspension, wireless drivetrain, frame storage, and tons of frame adjustments seem like a good fricken deal.
  • 57 0
 Somehow they put in frame storage on an aluminum bike. Crazy concept to YT, Rocky Mountain, and I'm sure others who are locking in frame storage as a "premium" feature on the carbon frames only.
  • 37 0
 Agreed, the bike industry needs to give us more of this. Half-decent pricing, solid spec, meaningful adjustability and no stupid gimmicks (internal headset routing, you know I'm talking about you). A bike that won't fall to bits straight away, that riders can set up as they like, and that any competent home mechanic or bike shop can work on without costing the Earth.
  • 16 0
 Seriously! I was just kind of skimming this until I saw ‘top of the line’ and $5,399 and did a double take.

Marin really seems to know how to make a solid bike a good price point. I remember years ago being at an expo where I got to demo a bunch of high end carbon bikes and also this Marin bike whose name escapes me now. After riding the Marin I was sure it was the best one I had ridden all day and the guy was like yeah it’s sweet huh? Only $2600 too. Blew my mind.
  • 20 3
 @succulentsausage: Frame storage in Alu frames carries a serious weight penalty.
  • 11 4
 @Ttimer: so do tires that don't fall apart. everything that makes bikes more capable and versatile increases weight.
  • 25 66
flag p3riderforlife (May 15, 2024 at 8:11) (Below Threshold)
 Maybe it's time to find a reviewer who fits medium to large bikes?
Be nice to read about the new Marin and not" I'm a small and the zeb don't work for me comments".. maybe make a review about the zeb by itself?!
This is about a new frame design not your life long small problems.
  • 3 3
 @Ttimer: We need Dangerholm to do his sorcery on this bike.
  • 3 0
 Seriously, after seeing the Stumpjumper evo alloy with frame storage I thought it was going to become much more common
  • 12 4
 @p3riderforlife: Agreed. The Zeb is a very good fork for people who are more "average" in sized. Not really a con for this bike at all.
  • 39 4
 @p3riderforlife: listen to yourself bruv. The vast majority of PB reviewers are men riding larges. Women and shorter riders want to read reviews on bikes as well. It's a great thing that they have some staff with varied body sizes and types.
  • 40 9
 @adamweld: Cut him some slack, he's just waiting for the time when average sized straight white males can finally catch a break.
  • 3 0
 And the bike looks good!
  • 19 1
 @p3riderforlife: I’m 150lbs and ride a large and all the Charger 3s have too much rebound for me. It’s a thing.

I like reviews from different size people.
  • 13 1
 @p3riderforlife: no, there are more than enough already. This is the first time I can think of someone reviewing bikes in the size I fit
  • 8 1
 @p3riderforlife: Pretty helpful actually. The qualification is what makes it useful info for small riders who might be otherwise tempted to use that fork. I’m on the other side of things at 6’4” and always wondering about durability, chainstay length and other tall people problems. I really appreciate when XL frames get reviewed (and they don’t always hit the mark!). If you’re 5’10”, 175 lbs then don’t worry, literally every component works just fine for you.
  • 2 1
 @AppleJack76: he'd replace the frame with a Ransom
  • 7 0
 Marin gets it. Bravo Marin for continuing to deliver where your peers fall short.
  • 1 8
flag shencat (May 15, 2024 at 15:12) (Below Threshold)
 the color on it is just ugly mate
  • 2 1
 @shencat: I prefer attractive mates myself.
  • 1 0
 @dgwww: Yes sir, this is the way
  • 1 0
 @davesc: Jesse-May at 130 couldn't get the Zeb to rebound quick enough - doesn't really line up with you at 150 finding it too fast does it? Sounds like 140 is the sweet spot
  • 2 0
 @Otago: "too much rebound" means too much rebound damping which means rebound too slow.
  • 2 0
 And a great color/paint job!
  • 1 0
 @succulentsausage: Been rocking alu frame storage on my 2021 trek, wish more companies did it. Haven't ridden with a pack in years, just grab a big bottle and stash the snacks + tools inside
  • 143 2
 Really well-written review. Jessie has been a rad addition to the Pinkbike staff!
  • 51 0
 Cheers, Ethan!
  • 10 0
 Fully! Best review in a while. Felt longer than other recent reviews and I loved the extra attention given to the changes in feel and pros/cons of various modular set-ups. Thank you!
  • 5 3
 Maybe replace Kazimer who’s been bought out by transition! ! !
  • 1 0
 @truehipster: The conspiracy goes much, much deeper than that.
  • 3 0
 @jessiemaymorgan: It feels good to have a reviewer whose measurements are close to mine, especially a thoughtful and well-spoken one. The suspension setup pains hit particularly close to home :')
  • 2 1
 @truehipster: I don't think they'd have to buy anybody out, transition is a top dawg when it comes to good bike design. Have been for decades
  • 68 0
 Marin seem to be really upping their game, excellent spec for an amazing price in this market is rare! Would be good to see a back to back on a large size bike to see if those suspension performance issues with a lighter rider become less apparent?
  • 7 0
 Looks like it might be sensible to budget for a set of good wheels
  • 7 0
 @boozed: yeah for sure, destroy the old ones first though
  • 3 0
 @darkstar66: I have the previous gen of this bike and I wouldn't waste any time with the stock rear wheel it is made out of canned tuna however the front has held up fine and has been much much more reliable than the i9 wheel I replaced the rear with
  • 52 0
 The pink/blue color is awesome
  • 13 0
 best paint job on any bike in 2024
  • 12 1
 Marin marketing team meeting:

" Hey guys how about we make a pink frame this year and finally get a pink bike reviewed on Pinkbike"

" Shut up intern and go get a fresh pot of coffee"
  • 4 0
 Totally agree, this is one fine looking bicycle.
  • 1 0
 @trellis-opportunity-red: frame only option you just get silver Frown
  • 27 0
 Looks like the privateer v2 that didn’t hit a wall , happy to see this kind of bikes release ! Good to see also they didn’t cheat on the tires despite the heavy weight.
  • 4 0
 Priced better than the privateer as well
  • 25 1
 I might be wrong but I don't think many other brands have a storage hatch on an aluminium frame?

It looks like a really sorted frame to me and I've not thought that about a Marin for a loooooong time.
  • 25 0
 Trek's alloy bikes (Slash & Fuel EX) have in-frame storage as well - this looks to be a much bigger hatch though.
  • 15 0
 @dariodigiulio: Would be interesting to get some info on how much the downtubes need beefing up so they can have a big hole in the middle, especially on aluminium bikes.
  • 14 0
 Stumpjumper Evo Alloy does have in-frame storage as well
  • 1 0
 @scruff0372: I think it is a lot. Comparing the regular Stumpjumper Alloy or the Status to the Evo Alloy you'll see a massive increase in downtube thickness.
  • 7 0
 Other than, you know, Specialized, which started the whole trend.
  • 3 0
 Orbea has it, even on their entry level Laufey alu hardtail.
  • 5 0
 the last two generations of Marin's have been very solid, well thought out specs delivering a good value, and very reasonable geo. Ive got a 2022 rift zone, and the 2023 update fixed the few little things that could be better with my bike. Marin is doing really good work these days.
  • 5 1
 @scruff0372: Expect around a 300-500g weight penalty for alloy frames and around a 150-300g weight penalty for carbon. The stronger the frame needs to be, the bigger the weight penalty. From a structural perspective, it's a terrible idea to have a hole in the downtube.
  • 25 0
 A Marin I would consider buying... It has finally happened
  • 17 0
 I’m proud I got to be involved in the testing process for this frame over the last 18 months. The bike feels so good, I rode it almost everyday last year! My other bikes have been neglected
  • 2 0
 I built my stumpy Evo to be very similar to this (put longer cs on my bike, bumped travel to 160/170.) I was really impressed to see Marin come out with something so rad (I’ve only seen Raaw and Airdrop doing bikes like this) and it’s rad to see that it’s clicking with a ride like yourself! My only gripe with my stumpy is that it doesn’t quite feel right with a coil… are you running your bike air or coil?
  • 4 0
 Mark, my 12 yr old rider/trail builder and I are big fans of your videos. He bought a new previous generation Alpine trail in part because of you. Keep the videos coming!
  • 12 0
 @jessiemaymorgan Great review! Thanx!
As you mentioned it in the compare column ... when can we expect the review of the Airdrop Edit MX that Craig dropped of at your place?
Soooo looking forward to this one!
  • 11 0
 My pleasure! That's next on the agenda Smile
  • 3 2
 @jessiemaymorgan: any chance of a review of the new carbon Bird as well?
  • 14 4
 37lb in small… so over 40lb then for a Large or XL.
Looks great geo, design and value.

and looks nice too - Privateer, take note of how a big enduro bike should look at your price point!
  • 32 1
 A large frame doesn't weigh 1.5 kg more than a small frame...
  • 2 0
 17.6kg is already near 39lbs, so an L or XL could be over 40.
  • 12 0
 Nearly 17kg on size small is just crazy heavy. Nothing if you do not have a lift next to your home.
  • 5 6
 Glad I'm no the only one put off by the weight. Add the lack of a water bottle cage mount, etc, and realistically how far, how often, and where would this rig be anyone's first choice and how often will it be ridden? Not singling out Marin, 5k+ for bikes with such a limited appeal and range application is one of the reasons the cycling industry is in the toilet.
  • 6 0
 @juansolo57: Its got a water bottle cage mount right on the door of the downtube hatch. The size small has issues with space for it but other than that it has internal storage and room for a water bottle. The weight is definitely a bit much though
  • 8 1
 @juansolo57: for those of us that are lucky enough to ride mountain bikes in the mountains and do have access to lifts, I love these overbuilt, big travel bikes. You can ride the crap out of them at the park, on your local shuttle trails and pedal to trails and not worry about having an absolutely clapped bike at the end of one season.
  • 5 0
 @bbachmei: I also didnt see too many complaints about weight on the Atherton alloy or the frameworks posts. Just on this one. The internal storage is a nice touch. And you can beat on any of these bikes. Im on a stumpy evo alloy and its kinda nice having a bike you dont have to worry about much. Mine is quite a bit overbuilt and almost 40lbs already
  • 6 0
 @bbachmei: agreed. Marin makes stout bikes that are able to take a pounding and keep delivering ride after ride!
  • 2 0
 @juansolo57: @juansolo57: Are there lighter bikes for the same or less money (MSRP not discounted) with similar heavy duty spec out there? A burly alloy enduro bike with a coil, DD tires, ZEB, etc is going to be heavy! Obviously lighter bikes exist, but with this capability at this price point?
Trek Slash alloy is similar spec but is $400 more and is about the same weight with an air shock. It has an idler though, so that adds weight , but the air shock subtracts weight, so I'd put them on par with each other.
  • 11 0
 Great review, lots of real world testing and meaningful comparisons with similar bikes.
  • 8 0
 Marin have put out some really solid offerings over the last few years, this looks like a good follow on. Extra props to them for using the headtube for something useful & sensible, like offset cups, rather than a place to shove cables - other brands should take note
  • 11 0
 so basically what slash should have been?
  • 7 0
 The only change the Gen5 Slash needed was a steeper seat tube
  • 6 0
 Happy to see a review Thay finally mention the over damp rebond on the Rockshox fork. For Rider under 160-150lbs, it simply do not work (in addition to the overly rampy air spring).

To be fair, Fox are not that much better, but still, se would benefit to see lighter rebond since I don't ever see rider using the last quarter of adjustment .
  • 1 0
 Hard to have proper damping across a wide weight range.
  • 16 11
 With current sales for 3.5k you can buy Stumpjumper EVO Alloy Pro with top suspension, all the adjustments and 1.5kg lighter. Despite I like design and specs, but I’m becoming a weight weenie with modern alloy bikes weighing a ton compared to 2-3 year old models.
  • 26 9
 but you get a bike with clevis mount, even 3.5k is too much for that crap
  • 12 3
 @nicoenduro: it's more of a gimmick in lots of modern bikes imho
I know lots of riders with nobody having any issues with this shock mount. new float X and dpx2 shocks have a steel shaft, so they are robust AF
also - this one seems to have a trunnion mount shock which is also a shock killer Smile
I've met people with broken shocks by trunnion mounts much more often then because of the clevis.
My '18 and '19 Remedies have stripped down 2 different shock shafts without having clevises and trunnion mounts - so go figure
  • 2 2
 @nicoenduro: ha? plz, elaborate.
  • 19 6
 But the Marin has 10mm more travel, has proper mixed wheel adjustment and isn’t an overstroked trail bike.
  • 45 0
 Comparing full retail price with temporary sales doesn’t make sense.
  • 9 1
 @Ttimer: True, but it makes sense if you want to buy/need a bike right now.
  • 14 4
 @dooganmcdoogan: Yeah, you're right. I'm writing to Charlie Murray to say he's not allowed to win on his overstroked trail bike.
  • 5 11
flag dooganmcdoogan FL (May 15, 2024 at 4:00) (Below Threshold)
 @nice-guy: go on then. I’m sure he’d be super keen to reply to some random PB kook.
  • 4 2
 @dooganmcdoogan: I will include a link to your message — maybe you will get lucky Wink
  • 6 0
 I'm just glad a company actually competing with the common sense features on the Stumpy Evo. (frame storage, headset cup) Hell some companies are saying no to a headset cup and saying yes to headset cable routing. Those 2 features are the reason you can pry my Stumpy Evo from my cold dead hands. I want things that actually make a difference on the trail, not a lighter stiffer frame, wider hub spacing, or a new linkage (I can do that on my own with Cascade)
  • 9 0
 Sure, the only difference is that bike is on sale, only available in the smallest sizes, and has 1.6 spokes on an enduro wheelset. So go ahead and get that good deal but prepare for some down time when you go to true the wheels every few rides :/ Oh and how's that seatpost insertion? I couldn't even slam a OneUp 180 in my S4. Oh and make sure the coil you're running doesn't void the warranty! You'll need it for those wheels later
  • 3 0
 @nicoenduro: spoken like a man who has never seen the Trunnion-mount alignment on an Alpine Trail.
  • 4 0
 That was a very informative review that I appreciate even more as I'm the same height as the tester. The bike's weight is a bummer, but it seems all current alu enduro offerings end up around 16.5-17kg with pedals and fit for use tyres. Which is not unexpected, as frames and components are getting bigger and burlier with each iteration. I'd skip the storage solution if I was Marin as the execution is way too bulky IMHO, nevermind the unnecessary clearance issues in the smallest size. Otherwise the bike looks like a solid choice.
  • 4 2
 Even my carbon enduro bike weighs more than 17 kg...
  • 4 0
 Water bottle mount still being an issue is bit frustrating. I have a 2022 Alpine Trail XR and the piggyback shock punches the lockout lever through the bottom of the water bottle on compressions. My first ever laps with a water bottle, I was wondering for a moment why my legs were getting so wet. Otherwise, looks great!
  • 1 0
 Yep - I molded the bottom of all my bottles to overcome this problem Big Grin
  • 5 0
 thanks for pointing out the problem with the zeb. I really dont like that nothing is really suitable for lighter riders. Still sticking to my pike 160mm, no need for anything burlier..
  • 4 0
 Minor note: motorcycles list headangle from vertical instead of from horizontal like mtbs... referencing from horizontal is weird in itself since a bike with a horizontal headtube wouldn't turn. But the minus makes sense from a motorcycling perspective.
  • 7 0
 Seriously, what an amazing bike.
  • 6 0
 Yoooo Marin this is awesome..4500 for a full spec is pretty legit. Might have to look at these
  • 3 0
 @jessiemaymorgan good review, it's nice to hear shortcomings for shorter/lighter which are too often overlooked.
Also that seat tube angle info is crucial, especially considering I didn't even find it on Marin's website! The biggest difference is with the XL, having a 78,6°HA either at 647mm or 795mm saffle height is going to make a huge difference. Brands should really be clear about this.
  • 2 0
 I was always interested to buy Marin bikes, Alpine trail to be precise. But unfortunately they are extremely rare in eastern Europe.

This new generation looks like a lot of bike for normal price.

Can anyone who have experience with Marin as a brand, tell me something about quality of their alu frames?
  • 2 0
 In Poland we have a lot of Marin's bikes (especially gravel- the biggest market for Four Corners model), try to hit the Polish distribution, they usually have full stock.
  • 1 0
 I had a Marin Rift Zone 29er for three years. It was a nice bike. I put a coilover on it and rode it pretty hard. Lots of XC and some downhill shuttle days. I never had an issue with my bike. I'd definitely consider another Marin in the future if I can find one locally. But I think the shop that I bought mine from ended up carrying different brands now.
  • 5 0
 So with the Charger 3 it's back to Charger 1 RC days, factory tuned for riders over 80kg?
  • 1 0
 It's actually not better or worse than the previous one
  • 6 0
 If i was mark matthews, i‘d be stoked right now
  • 2 0
 I like your username
  • 2 0
 Great review! I rode those trails on my vacation last year, and stayed in Innerleithen, what a gem of a town and riding you have! Also, I imagine a great place to test those big slack bikes! Do you think your issues with the ZEB were isolated to a one off fork, or do you think the fork in general is an issue? Thank you.
  • 6 0
 Thank you! I'm pleased to hear you like the riding here too Smile This is a consistent issue with the Zeb, simply a flaw of the Charger 3 damper tune.
  • 3 0
 You said the word vacation and all I heard is 'holiday rooooooooooooooooooooad, holiday rooooooooooooooood'
  • 2 0
 @jessiemaymorgan: Jessie hi! How would you compare the bike to Merida One-Sixty in two words in terms of their all-round abilities? The frames (alloy) are priced very similarly here.
  • 7 0
 @Beskyd: I rode the Merida One-Sixty 6000, which has a carbon frame. It's a well-balanced bike that can be ridden comfortably at speed on a good variety of terrain, and is totally fit for purpose. I just prefer to Marin for its plusher suspension feel. It's more fun to ride - I find the Alpine Trail in S a little more playful and maneuverable than the the One-Sixty in size Short.
  • 3 0
 @jessiemaymorgan: Thank you so much for the detailed reply!
  • 2 0
 It is an amazing place. We were there last week enjoying the drying trails
  • 1 0
 @jessiemaymorgan: sram always does this, release a shit damper only to replace it with a good one two years later
  • 1 0
 @jessiemaymorgan: Do you attribute this to the compression tune? Thank you for the feedback.
  • 1 0
 @h8terbike999: I have both a 2023 Lyrik and ZEB, and had the previous versions. I don't find the damper harsh, but it is not quite as plush as the previous versions. However, not having a bladder is awesome, as I always had issues with those in the past.
  • 2 0
 I'm far more interested in the Marin DH frame that Matt Jones has been testing for the past 16 months...hurry up and launch that! This looks awesome though, and the colours are on point. If I was in the market for an enduro it would be on the shortlist.
  • 4 0
 Really good review but no mention of awesome paint job! Also at the other end of the sizing scale chainstay too short for XL
  • 4 0
 Marin has been killing it for decades at this point. Incredible paint job too.
  • 1 0
 Anyone have a suggestion for how to address the slow rebound of the Charger 3 ZEB as mentioned in the review? At ~75kg, I have my rebound completely open. At this setting, the fork works quite well for my weight, but I wouldn't be opposed to a bit more useable range of adjustment.

Curious if others have had this problem and found a way to address it. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Custom tune is probably the only way to address this. Im on the opposite end of the spectrum of weight and have to go the custom route to get something useful for compression (oddly enough rebound always has enough range to be useful for us heavy folks)
  • 1 0
 Lighter oil. Although you’ll lose some compression too, and it doesn’t have that much to begin with.
  • 3 0
 Matt and Marin, good effing work, peeps! This bike looks amazing numbers/geo wise. Such a progressive, radical iteration. Really really impressed!
  • 1 0
 I definitely want to try this bike. It seems to remedy my issues with patrols, which is that actual seat tube angle is too slack on the 2020 version and the current MX version has chainstays that are too long (for me). Thanks to all the b1tching and moaning about size-specific chainstays, I cannot get a frame with 500mm reach, sub-440 chainstays, and a steep enough seat tube. So from my own personal perspective this frame seems pretty damned ideal.
  • 1 0
 A size 4 Ibis HD6 fits those requirements. Seat tube angle 77°. Chainstay 435mm. Reach 508mm.
  • 4 0
 Came for the Marin Alpine Trail, stayed for the Jessie-May Morgan write-up. Both excellent.
  • 1 0
 This looks like a great update on the previous model, except in one aspect: seat tube length. All models have a longer seat tube, 5mm in the larger sizes, 10 mm in size small and 20 mm in size medium. @jessiemaymorgan did Marin give any reason for this? It is a sizing challenge on bikes for ppl with short legs.
  • 1 0
 "At the lighter end of the spectrum, there is a significant compromise to be made between sufficient rebound speed (aka traction), and general comfort. As the fork packs down at lower pressures, even with the rebound damping fully open, one can find oneself in some compromisingly pitched positions over the bike, especially when riding step-riddled sections at speed."

I have the opposite problem.
  • 4 0
 Since the demise of Vitus this is one I've been hanging out for.
  • 4 0
 More reviews of size small bikes please!
  • 2 0
 Yes it's good that brands are being called on you overdamped suspension, lack of water bottle clearance, often unnecessarily long cranks etc. For example here the 425 minimum reach makes it a boat for people under 160cm, same as most models out there currently
  • 4 1
 Question : How is Marin pronounced ? Like "the few, the proud, the marines" ? Muh-rin' ?
  • 1 0
 Muh - rinse (but without the se of the word rinse)
  • 3 0
 It's muh-rin. (Not reen). In with a r in front of it.
  • 2 0
 muh-RIN Emphasis on the 2nd syllable. This only goes for Marin County in Cali.
  • 2 0
 Thanks guys, I ask cuz' in french marin is a word as well (and a first name), but the "a" is pronouced like the "a" from cat, and "in" has no equivalent sound in english (like "on", "en", "an", "un", "in", "ain", etc).
It also has a female form, marine, which means navy (and is also the female form of the aformentioned first name) and sounds more like the english marin, but with a cat "a".
  • 4 0
 Oh boy, this would look like an absolute dream in brushed/raw!
  • 2 0
 The XR (not AXS) build and frame only options come in brushed...there are some crap pictures on the Marin website: www.marinbikes.com/bikes/2024-alpine-trail-xr & www.marinbikes.com/bikes/2024-alpine-trail-xr-axs-frame-kit
  • 2 2
 I recommend fitting a TruTune to the Zeb, especially at your weight. You will need more air in the shock which will help with low speed sensitivity, it makes the shock more linear through the travel and then I recommend cranking up the high speed compression to slow down the shock as it reaches the end of the stroke.

m.pinkbike.com/news/review-trutune-suspension-inserts-unlock-more-travel.html
  • 5 0
 It will not help with the too slow rebond, that's a another problem that the Zeb has with light weight rider.
  • 2 0
 @dagen123: if you have to run higher air pressure, that would increase rebound speed, no?
  • 4 0
 Change the damper fluid weight to be lighter. Any suspension shop can do it. I'm not even light weight (79kg) and it's really improved rebound.
  • 1 0
 @twonsarelli: Yeah, but the spring rate would be too high (cause vibration). The question is not only getting full travel, but having the right level of compliance and support.
  • 2 0
 @SkyeSnow: Changing to lighter-weight oil is often not enough, when tuning them we need to reduce the spring rate of the shim stack to get where it needs to be (there's actually science behind the optimal rebond speed for a given terrain).
  • 2 0
 I own the previous version in Carbon. Stellar bike. Keep doing what you're doing, Marin. The price point is about as good as it gets.
  • 1 0
 Love my Alpine Trail Carbon, was looking forward to these but 1290 wheelbase in a large seems absolutely insane for the tight and twisty trails I normally ride. A bit disappointed but I'm sure it works for some people.
  • 4 0
 This is what the privateer 161 should have been
  • 2 0
 Definitely one of the best bike reviews I’ve read in a long time. It’s really helpful to read reviews of smaller size bicycles.
  • 1 0
 I’m interested in how riders at your weight range manage your front suspension. Enough support to smash from below and still stay supple up top?
  • 2 0
 Curious if their other models will be switching to horst link? Or if not, why not?
  • 2 0
 @jessiemaymorgan Excellent, well written review! I look forward to reading more from you!
  • 1 0
 @jessiemaymorgan Hello Jessie! If you don't mind me asking, what were your settings on the ZEB? Any tokens?
...Great review, Cheers!
  • 2 0
 Sure! I ran the rebound fully open, with HSC also fully open, and 4 clicks of LSC. There was one token in it, but I had no issue using the full travel. Curious, as I have struggled to use the full stroke of this model on previous test bikes.
  • 1 0
 @jessiemaymorgan: Thanks for the reply, happy trails!
  • 2 0
 That purple Merida looks absolutely amazing! I want one of those.
  • 2 1
 Borrowing quite a few technologies and ideas from the Specialized Stumpjumper it seems!
  • 1 0
 Looks like they sorted the rear derailleur routing so its not under the BB, its the only thing I don't like about my C2.
  • 3 0
 would rag in mini mullet
  • 3 0
 Pink bikes ftw!
  • 2 0
 I'd rather have it a bit lighter and no adjustment stuff.
  • 2 1
 Ticks so many boxes. I totally understand the packaging reason for Trunnion mount but that doesn't mean I like it
  • 3 0
 Yes.... 4 bar!
  • 1 0
 Another banger from Marin. It's surprising that you don't see more on the trails.
  • 2 0
 Now this is how you do a review. Much better than the Rascal one.
  • 1 0
 Release I was waiting, looks like they did a good job! Frame kit under 2k euros is amazing!!
  • 1 0
 Matt Cipes and Marin are killing it. Beautiful bike. I have last years Alpine Trail Carbon and it's incredibly fun to ride.
  • 1 0
 looking at the headset cups and some other frame details it suspiciously looks a lot like my Stumpjumper EVO...
  • 1 0
 Looks like a great bike and I love the colour.
Maxxgrip Assegai on the rear though?
What did we do to upset you @marinbikes?
  • 2 0
 Replace the rear with your choice of tyre, keep it as a spare for when the front gets worn. I'd rather have this than replace two flimsy, hard rubber tyres at once.
  • 1 0
 (Correcting myself) Only you can't swap f & r tyres with the mullet setup!
  • 1 0
 I have the ebike version and it’s great.
I’d buy one of these if I hadn’t just bought a stumpy evo
  • 1 0
 Beatifully vibrant colors on that bike!
  • 3 3
 Finnaly this bike is officially launched. The frame set has been sold in China for nearly a month!
  • 1 0
 Flip-chips are soo hot this year!
  • 1 0
 That silver shock bolt triggers my OCD.
  • 1 0
 Water bottle is stupid, it's the bottle who should be adapted to the frame
  • 1 0
 A tester the same size and weight as me. Awesome.
  • 1 0
 Hope these updates come to the e-bike version! Looks sick!
  • 3 5
 beautiful bike with superb specs. incredible pricing with AXS. unfortunately 17kg is a no-go for me but for ppl shuttling, i guess, this won´t be an issue! well done Marin.
  • 3 5
 I agree. It’s ridiculously heavy. I don’t understand why the media are not calling manufacturers out for how overweight bikes are getting
  • 6 0
 @chrismac70: the problem is though, that its all the little things adding up. Tires make a huge difference, but then no one wants an enduro bike with paper thin tires, do they? A rider could save a couple hundred grams using a lyric instead of the zeb, but everyone wants that super beefy fork. This bike could probably be quite a bit lighter if it were built with lighter parts all around, but then whats the point of a 170mm bike if it's parts arnt sturdy enough to back up the travel? People expecting a long travel bike to be light are really trying to have their cake and eat it too. Obviously it would be nice to have a lighter bike, but building it lighter will be a compromise, too. I guess its easier to yell on the internet than it is to consider how things actually work in the real world.
  • 2 2
 @Torbo24: @Torbo24: Just an example—the 2020 Stumpjumper EVO had a Fox Rhythm fork (2.2+kg), an NX drivetrain, heavy wheels, and tires between exo+/dd weights. And it still managed to be 15kg in the biggest size.
  • 4 0
 @nice-guy: that’s lighter than the measured weight most places have for the top spec alloy evo build, so somebody’s scale is off
  • 1 0
 @xciscool: I'm talking about the previous gen StEVO - www.pinkbike.com/news/review-specialized-stumpjumper-evo-29.html

The 2020 model had heavier grid trail tires.
  • 2 1
 @Torbo24: That maybe true for those riding at World Cup level. In the real world do people really need zen stiffness v lyric? Do you really need big heavy tyres. I rode the same tracks as Jess last week on exo with no problems but I’m no wc racer.
  • 2 0
 @chrismac70: absolutely, i totally agree with you. Alot of people are running much heavier components than they need to be. People like to think theyre the hardest shredders ever though, you know? Anyway, my point was more that each component choice, which by itself adds just a little bit of weight, they all add up and thats how you end up with a heavy bike. Its like death by 1000 papercuts. Theres a little more nuance to it than just saying one bike is heavy and another is not. The frame weight is really the only thing you can directly compare, the rest of the weight is determined by component choices.
  • 2 0
 @nice-guy: this bike has a zeb and a coil shock. it appears that the zeb is 230 grams heavier than the rhythm 36, and the coil shock is roughly 500 grams heavier than the air version. so thats half the difference right there. not sure where the rest comes from, but its really not that big a difference once you account for the suspension
  • 2 0
 @chrismac70: Problem is the Lyrik doesn't come in a 170 anymore. Also switching from coil to air shock will shed over a pound along with a lighter wheelset.
  • 1 0
 @Torbo24:
zeb ultimate - 2.32 (enduro-mtb.com/en/best-mountain-bike-suspension-fork-2021-review)
fox rhythm 36/marzocchi z1 - 2.22 (enduro-mtb.com/en/best-160-mm-mtb-fork-can-buy).

I agree on the coil shock weight difference, but there's still a 1.5kg difference left.
  • 1 0
 its pretty heavy.
  • 1 0
 Take my money!!
  • 1 4
 Reach is too long
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