This Tool Takes The Guesswork Out Of Cockpit Setup (With Lasers)

Sep 2, 2022
by Seb Stott  
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While bikes have become ever more advanced (and expensive) over the years, it seems increasingly strange that something as fundamental as getting your bars aligned is still done by eye. Even for an experienced mechanic, bringing the bar precisely parallel to the fork crown can take several rounds of trial-and-error. Personally, I'm often left with a nagging doubt that it might be a few degrees off.

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Dead Naught Tool Co. hopes to change this with their handlebar laser tool. Laser-based tools for aligning handlebars have existed before, but they tend to rely on the front tire as a reference point. This tool straps onto the handlebar and shines two calibrated lasers to project the plane of your handlebar onto the fork. These can be lined up with the fork's crown, arch or axle in order to ensure the bar is straight, before tightening the stem bolts.

The tool is the brainchild of pro mechanic, Derek Corbett. "I believe the front tire is a poor thing to use to align the handlebar as tires are rarely straight or in dish," Derek explains.

It sits on the handlebar with two machined acetal vee-blocks (which apparently won't scratch the bars). It's powered by two AAA batteries, which should last for 40+ hours of continuous use (over a year of regular bike shop use). Custom electronics mean the laser intensity won't fade over that time.

Dead Naught Tool Co. is launching on Kickstarter with a campaign that ends on September 11th. The handlebar alignment tool may just be the first product from the company. "I've got a new tool in the works that will allow for a wide range of adjustments, with one laser-based system," Derek tells me.

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Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
288 articles

238 Comments
  • 773 6
 Nothing wrong with the old school way of doing it:

Step 1; loosen stem bolts
Step 2; loosen bolts more because they are not loose enough
Step 3; realize bolts are too loose so tighten them up
Step 4; straddle bike with one eye closed and twist bars, bar don't move easily because bolts are too tight now
Step 5; twist bars only to over-compensate cause bolts are too tight
Step 6; twist bars back the other way only to over-compensate
Step 7; get off bike and go around to front and straddle front wheel
Step 8; bars look square WTF
Step 9; re-straddle bike, nope bars are not square
Step 10; go back to straddle front wheel and over compensate twisting another 3-4 times
Step 11; get back on bike in your 'attack' position to make sure it feels good while wiggling your bars back and forth a bit to make sure they are square
Step 12; bars slip and get mis-aligned whilst doing this
Step 13; &$(# it, get it close and tighten up your stem bolts
Step 14; realize you are hyper aware of bars being .0001 degree off and it's screwing with your head for the first 1/2 mile
Step 15; ride it like this for 6 months and never think about it again

But maybe it's just me?
  • 27 0
 went through steps 1-14 last night, glad i am not alone
  • 8 0
 Accurate
  • 230 0
 Wait - You don't use a precision "side of the foot kick on tire" while closing one eye straddling the top tube? Then switch eyes back and forth 6 times to make sure they're not playing tricks on you. Then, not trusting your own eyes....kick the tire again to take it out of alignment and repeat the process over for good measure.
  • 6 6
 most underrated commented. Big Grin

vote this good man up!
  • 16 0
 @Nwilkes: I've tried that over the years but have moved on....if my feet are involved it's the pigeon toed double sided tire pinch
  • 5 0
 That's just the procedure I always tend to follow. But on the first ride I always hit the ground and have to re-adjust by holding the front wheel between the legs and twist the bar into the ´alinea's position.
  • 8 6
 #15, rinse and repeat.

This tool, that electric bike stand, and all these fancy trinkets that only a dentist would own …

Sometimes I wonder where we’re going with all this junk.
  • 29 0
 Step 16. Learn your arms are different lengths and cry
  • 18 3
 People are really looking at the front tire? Does no one
- snug the headset down to where the bar can still move a touch
- drop the saddle and straddle the bike
- lay a straight edge across the top of the stanchions (I have a yellow level)
- align the bar to the straight edge by sighting on either side of the stem
- tighten down the headset
- carefully swap hex keys and torque down a stem bolt to make sure nothing moves while you get off
- tighten everything up
-
  • 14 2
 One of the most enjoyable comments I've read in a long time. For what it's worth: I close one eye, lean back and try to visually align the bottom edge of my handlebar on both sides with the front edge of each side of my fork crown. in my head, since the the fork is square, if the bar is lined up with the fork then it's square too. Of course I have serious doubts that my one-eyed, cocked-head vision is square. Wink
  • 35 4
 Way easier to just line the edge of the bars with the edge of the fork crown using your eye balls
  • 7 4
 @camcoz69: this is the easiest way that know one ever talks about
  • 4 2
 @dancingwithmyself: I just eyeball the bar with the top of the stanchions, with one of the tightening bolts barely gripping already;
  • 32 3
 Instructions too vague, ended up in hospital with a bearing puller stuck in my willy
  • 4 3
 This comment was soon long i shipped reading it and went right to the comments about the comment.
  • 1 0
 Alinea's was supposed to be ´alligned'
  • 2 0
 Works every time too.
  • 3 0
 Just don't forget the rest breaks for beer when the &$(# moment happens!
  • 5 0
 After years of struggling, I've eventually found the perfect solution to the problem:
Step 1: Try to align bars
Step 2: Give up and let my wife do it
Step 3: Profit
  • 8 1
 @camcoz69: Ah, except it works for shit in practice. Fork crown is 4" long and curved. It's not even a good ballpark method.

Laying a straight edge (or anything long and straight) against the stanchions like mentioned above is the trick. Big long edge to sight the bars against. Minutely accurate, fool proof, cheap and simple.
  • 1 0
 @dancingwithmyself: what? Too complicated.
  • 3 0
 @mobiller:this can be done as trail side adjustment after a crash , use a branch or a rock whatever is handy as a straight edge.
  • 3 0
 This has to be in the running for comment of the year
  • 4 0
 @kingbike2: I'm already using a rock for most trail side adjustments, so that's perfect.
  • 2 0
 Step 16. Over tighten snap a bolt, try and drill the broken bit out. Fail.. ruin the stem. Pop up to the lbs and buy a new one.. rinse and repeat
  • 4 0
 Have the stem kinad loose on the steerer, sit on saddle, roll backwards 2 metres and they'll straighten perfectly themselves with the wheel. Tightening them now is the issue. I just use patience and luck! Dont fall also! Wear a helmet. Peace
  • 2 0
 @jdemeritt: this is hilarious! My arms are different lengths, which actually makes it easier. Sit on the bike, close your eyes and twist until it feels right. You never have to worry about it looking straight again because it isn’t.
  • 13 0
 Hang on, doesn't anybody crouch onto the top tube and pinch the front wheel with your knees anymore? The trick to making everything work is to have one ball dangle on each side of the top tube and your dong laying flat on it. I don't know how it helps but it's the OG alignment 'tool'. Not sure what the ladies do.
  • 1 0
 @number44: works better for me on bikes these days with longer reaches....
  • 2 2
 Four people (downvotes) are robots.
  • 2 0
 Comment of the year candidate here
  • 4 0
 you deserve an award for this manual. Made me laugh out loud at steps 4, 8, and 12
  • 1 0
 @dancingwithmyself: I just use the bars and the back edge of the Fork Arch and have never had a problem...
From there straight to Step #15.
  • 7 0
 One eye closed isn't enough, you have to scrunch up half your face to get a proper plumb line.
  • 1 0
 This is the way brudda.
  • 2 0
 It’s a universal truth
  • 2 0
 I think this tool needs to go into mass production
  • 2 0
 Step 16; take it to shop for service, mechanic tells you your bars are bent
  • 3 0
 @number44: my balls aren´t balanced anymore.
  • 1 0
 @freerideglory: same here. No doofus warning to not attempt alignment with wicked hot front rotor. Burn unit gave me a sticker - told me it makes bike go faster. Said I could always get a rotor tattoo to soften the look of the scar. ; )
  • 1 0
 lol facts
  • 1 0
 If anything is even slightly bent it throws everything off and there's no making it look right.
  • 2 1
 i only have one issue here , FUCKING COCKPIT ,i certainly will not be buying one to set up my F35
  • 1 0
 @camcoz69: this. If you can't do this with your naked eye, can you see well enough to be bombing down single track?
  • 2 0
 Belongs on love island
  • 1 0
 Laser line up the bar rise with the HA/fork and now we're talkin
  • 1 1
 Comment of the year seems all sewn up.
  • 1 1
 Step 1. Buy a double crown Step 2. Buy a direct mount stem
  • 1 0
 So I received my tool today and it works exactly as the video shows. I always align the back of my bars to the front of my crown and I always had the nagging feeling I was off, and this tool confirmed I was - not much, but still off and in the direction I thought it was. It fits perfectly on my 1Up 35mm rise bars and you can use the front or back of the crown arch, or take out the front wheel, insert the axle and use that. I did all 3 and got the same results, so another plus is knowing my Pike is well made. I'm not a dentist and have never owned an XTR or XX1 component in my life, much less a carbon frame, but I do love tools and you will not find me wondering down the isles of a Harbor Freight anytime soon... Buy once, cry once. I'm sure I'll get down voted or made fun of, but there is not a single rider here that if given the opportunity to use this tool for free, they wouldn't hesitate... and to anyone who says they wouldn't, I'll save myself some time by saying bullsh!t right now.
  • 2 0
 @DBone95: nothing beats a good tool - 100% agree.

How far off do you think you were?
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: About 3mm. Enough to be obvious as soon as I turned it on! I'm right handed but always use my left eye whenever I do 1 eyed alignment stuff and the bars were too far right.
  • 120 0
 Attach it to sharks already
  • 97 0
 Misaligned sharks are the worst.
  • 17 0
 @toast2266: hate it when the pectoral fin is NOT lined up with the head
  • 3 0
 Everyone deserves a warm meal
  • 19 0
 "We have mutated sea bass."

"Really? Are they ill-tempered?'

"Absolutely."

"Oh well, it's a start."
  • 5 0
 Such a good excuse to get laser sharks.
  • 53 0
 “Pew pew!”
  • 111 1
 Lasers and accuracy, held in place by bungie cords....
  • 5 0
 @mininhi: lol - my thoughts exactly
  • 10 1
 @mininhi: Bike reviews on PB… with suspension setup based on manufacturer recommended sag...
  • 10 0
 @Chuckolicious: don't do it by eye, use this laser, line it up by eye, and boom. more precise than eyes.
  • 14 1
 @mininhi: I work construction and a guy was running conduit on the ceiling while using a laser line to keep it straight. I walk by after lunch and tell him it's crooked. "No way! I followed the laser exactly." Well your 1 foot off the hallway wall at the start but 2 feet off the wall at the end......he still didn't believe he was crooked. He thought maybe the hallway was crooked.
  • 7 0
 @Kevindhansen: A line can be straight and pointed in the wrong direction! To be fair, as someone who has laid a lot of tile, there are plenty of crooked hallways out there. But hopefully not off by whole feet!
  • 8 0
 @Kevindhansen: lasers are only as accurate as the guy setting them up
  • 9 0
 @mxmtb: even laser light can be bent by black holes.
  • 52 0
 Pros: cats love it

Cons: cant use by airports
  • 45 0
 Or you can use your eyecrometer.
  • 34 2
 This again? Every couple years someone tries to make one of these. The last one was insanely expensive. I slot these in the same category as magnetic clip less pedals. The innovation no one asked for or needs. Its like something Kramer would invent if he rode mountain bikes.

Heres the last one
bikerumor.com/review-perfectly-aligned-handlebars-tune-spurtreu
  • 6 5
 To be fair, I am actually very intrigued by magnetic pedals. I rode clipless for 12 years before a new riding buddy was on flats so I decided "What the hell?" and opted to join him. I came to find that I absolutely loved the feeling of full platform flat pedals (Deity TMacs FTW!). The only thing I don't like is the occasional pedal slip (which only seems to occur at the gnarliest moment) and the diminished wattage on extended climbs.

It feels as if magnetic pedals are getting closer to solving these problems. I'm not saying they are there yet - but each iteration seems to get better/closer.
  • 6 0
 Ahem... I have been riding for 30 years and have long wished for an easy way to align my handlebar, and for an option that sits somewhere between clipless and flat pedals. I don't think either of these problems have been properly solved yet, but I submit that if they were, (meaning effective enough, affordable enough, durable enough, all of that...) the MTB community would happily accept them as innovations. No?
  • 7 0
 Interesting. I know a guy that built one of these laser alignment tools. He has magnetic pedals....
  • 2 0
 Ahhh…Kramerica Industries
  • 2 0
 @jonchaney:

But can it align a Johnson rod?
  • 2 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: "MTB community would happily accept them as innovations. No?"

Hilarious. You're a funny guy.
  • 27 0
 I said I wanted sharks with fricken laser beams attached to their heads!!!! - Dr. EVIL
  • 1 0
 We could put one on Mark Wallace if you insist.
  • 1 0
 I want a dropout alignment tool with Lasers... Sharks would still be cool though eh
  • 2 0
 @Hyakian: I'll see your Laser Shark and raise you a Laser Orca!
  • 22 0
 it looks like it was made in 1970 and takes four D batteries...
  • 21 1
 Easier to align the bar to the crown than it is to the tire.
  • 5 0
 Especially with something long and straight laying across the crown.
  • 1 2
 We just need a basic keyway standard between the stem and steerer tube. Use a plastic keyway that can sheer to save the bars and controls. Most stems already have a slot on the back, just need a shallow grove on the steerer.
  • 4 0
 @MikeGruhler: I wouldn't trust the manufacturers to put the keyways in more precisely than I can align things by hand. Also there will inherently be some amount of slop in the keyways, which would make their utility (even if cut accurately) questionable.
  • 1 1
 @barp: The keyway can easily be the length of the steerer allowing it to key in to the crown making it aligned as a single unit. I would also imagine the fitment of the stanchons are more precisely aligned the a simple keyway would be, they're able to keep both bores aligned in all directions necessary to make a fork so why would a single keyway be more difficult? As well keyways are made to not have slop, that's the point of a keyway and there tolances (avg .018-.02 ±) They precisely align 2 parts, like the main crankshaft pulley on a engine that measures the timing of an engine... Zero slop. I can't even recall a single keyway that's been cared for that has any slop after seating the 2 parts together. Think about what you just said, you think your inaccurate eyeballs and sausage fingers can better align something that's been cnc machined to tolerances that you can barely see with brand new eyes. I'd agree with you but your argument goes against machining standards and practices that are probably older then both of us combined and have a better track record at aligning things better then any human could.
  • 1 0
 @barp: ...but for what its worth I wouldn't put it past a stem manufacturer to screw up the process. But what we don't need is lasers, that do know. I always set up by eye, check with a tape then make reference marks on bars and controls for quick setting later.
  • 1 1
 @MikeGruhler: If there's no slop in the keyways, then they'll be too tight to actually put the stem on without using another tool. Positive tolerance is a slip fit, and zero or negative tolerance is a press fit.

And I appreciate your concern about my fingers, but I can safely assure you that they in no way are akin to sausages.

I have no idea what you're trying to say about stanchions. They're cylindrical and so are the fork lowers that they go into, so there is no alignment required for a fork stanchion that I'm aware of.
  • 1 1
 @barp: I was referring to the manufacturing involved in making the crowns to hold the stanchion in alignment. I would believe that's more difficult then a keyway. But I get your point on the tightness of a keyway, with the right tolerance it would work fine. It may be the simplest solution (minus a manufacturing standard) to a problem that's not a problem as much as its a PIA sometimes...glad your fingers are doing well.
  • 4 0
 @MikeGruhler: Look up the bottom of a fox38 steerer tube. They are ovalized internally at the bottom, and are generally anything up to about 20 degrees out of alignment with the crown. I too think a keyway is a great solution, but agree with others that this would rely on bicycle manufacturers being able to make straight things. Unfortunately bike manufacturer tolerances arent a patch on real engineering Frown
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Damn! If Fox has stuff that far out of alignment then that's a serious problem. I find 20 degrees a bit unbelievable, a few degrees maybe but 20 degrees over the length of a steerer would put it a few inches out of alignment and completely change the trail/rake numbers but I get what saying. Yes, it would be a chore for manufacturers to get it right but seeing how automotive and heavy industries rely on keyways and have endless 3rd party companies creating parts for said keyways and they seem to get it right. Maybe the bicycle industry is just 3rd rate compared to others...
  • 1 0
 @barp: Picture the assembly process: #1 install stem on steerer
#2 insert key into keyway
#3 install top cap and tighten fastener
#4 tighten stem pinch bolts.
The keyway just needs a slip fit on the steerer to center up the key and the stem would be a slightly looser fit then tighten up to a interface fit when tightening up the stem bolts. It would definitely be a balancing act of tolerances but I do believe that's part of engineering and really isn't as hard as everyone thinks.
  • 2 0
 @MikeGruhler: I mean 20deg out as in the internal ovalising generally isnt aligned with the crown properly. Nothing that would effect the geo of the fork, but less than ideal seeing as the ovalisation is supposed to add wall thickness at the front and rear.
  • 2 0
 @gabriel-mission9: Damn! I got ya..that's crazy. Insane how all fork manufacturers have had some really shady forks over the years. That would be a fun article to read, not to mention the comments. Lol
  • 16 0
 I have one simple request. And that is to have bikes with frickin' laser beams attached to their headsets!
  • 13 0
 The person that needs this is going to have more serious bike setup obstacles than a slightly misaligned handlebar. I hope it comes with a free pair of L and R marked socks to save the user another major hassle before a ride.
  • 2 0
 Interestingly, my Fox socks are marked R and L, though they otherwise appear identical.
  • 1 0
 @Neechy: plenty of socks have the labels but the only socks I've seen that aren't symmetrical are those weird separated toe socks.
  • 10 0
 On a hiking trip to NZ my wife and I bought expensive hiking socks. I wore them infrequently and I'd unroll them, grab one, see it had 'L' on the heel, put it on my left foot and then put the other sock on my right foot.

One morning in the tent I was handing her one of her socks and said "Why does your sock have an 'S' on it instead of an 'L' or 'R'?"
  • 5 0
 @iamamodel: I do the same thing with my IXS knee pads, the big “L” tag is always the first thing I see rather than the tiny “left” and “right” text hidden under a flap
  • 1 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: That would be annoying. Doubly so for you because my socks weren't made for left and right, whereas your kneepads are.
  • 3 0
 @Neechy: My RS fork has R and L on the same side, I'm lost, HELP!
  • 10 0
 if wolf tooth made something like this they could call it the Laser Wolf. and as you use it, it could play music from Fiddler on the Roof. i know, i know, no one is going to get the joke. hell, i don't even think it's funny...
  • 2 0
 If I were a rich man, I'd definitely have one of these!
  • 3 0
 i'm hoping they come out with an electronic doodad that measures your air time, called Air Wolf
  • 14 0
 "Lasers"
  • 10 0
 what if....suspension manufacturers scored/marked a small line at the 6 oclock position on the steerer tube so that you could align it with the gap in the stem clamp? nah, lazers and batteries and extra tools please.
  • 5 0
 Only works on stems with straight slots in the back?
  • 4 0
 Stems, headsets, forks, and headtubes should all have center marks (top and bottom, front and back). Line them up and done.
  • 1 0
 They would make that and the just sue each other over the idea.
  • 3 0
 Just align them up properly once and then scratch your own mark. Obviously only works with those lightweight stems that leave part of the steerer exposed. Otherwise you can't see it anyway (and it doesn't make sense to line things up before you've put on the top can and preloaded the headset, only after which you tighten the stem bolts).
  • 10 0
 Best way to do it is to wait for the equinox, line your front wheel up with the rising sun in the east and then line your bars up with the setting sun on the western horizon. And sacrafice a gravel rider.
  • 9 0
 How about a level or straight piece of wood horizontally acrosss the top of the sliders and align with the bar ends. Measuring at the bar ends is a lot more precise than measuring at the fork crown.
  • 6 0
 I've done this for years and it's dead simple and works very well. But for some reason the MTB community doesn't want to accept it and stupid products like this still get made.
  • 2 0
 Never thought of this but it sounds like it would work well. Definitely trying it next time.
  • 2 0
 @sino428: But the laser alignment industry!
  • 3 0
 Just don't use home depot lumber.
  • 10 1
 If you’re dim enough to not be able to line up your bars, you are probably dim enough to want this. It’s a mad, mad world
  • 14 5
 Innovation is always awesome but this feels like a solution looking for a problem
  • 16 13
 What problems do you anticipate? It looks pretty simple to me. Just don't shine the laser directly in your eyes.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: I think its just hard to justify a spend on something my eyes have been doing! I don't think lasers and I would mix well for the reason stated, either.
  • 17 2
 @mikekazimer: he means it is a solution for a problem that doesn't really exist. Not that it is a solution that will cause a problem.
  • 8 2
 @mikekazimer: Problems: Wasted money. Fails at it's one job of accurate bar alignment due to...bungie cords. More E-waste and plastic to end up being rendered down to micro particles, taken up in the food chain, and ending up in your blood (yea, a real thing). Probably could come up with a few more if you're willing to pay me. Big Grin
  • 6 0
 A long spirit level across the stanchions works for me.
  • 2 0
 @fartymarty: ^This 10,000% save your money!
  • 3 3
 No, the problem is there. Aligning handlebars is an imperfect and slightly annoying task. Not a huge problem, but a problem still. We just haven't seen a truly innovative solution yet that is better than what we are currently using. If we found a way for steer tubes to slot into stems in a way that aligned them perfectly without any extra cost, effort, or time, then the problem would be effectively solved, no?
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: but it has lasers!
  • 3 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: what makes it a problem that's worth talking about? Does even optimizing the 0.1% of precision here translate to a tangible performance benefit worthy of +$100-150+ gadget? Even in a shop?

We've been doing this for hundreds of years without anyone I'm aware of complaining that "I wish I could align my bars even better because X bad thing happens or Y performance is left on the table". There's probably enough variance in manufacturing tolerances of the components involved in this device and bars+stem interface themselves that you won't be realizing anything over using your eyes. I don't understand the value proposition at all.
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: The problem this solution will find is that the supports of the tool rest near where the bar tapers and sweeps. A slight shift of the tool left or right with respect to the center of the bar might cause it to tilt considerably. The laser dots are relatively close together and are projecting on a curved surface (the fork arch), which may also make it hard to be accurate. Especially on Manitou forks. The tool is designed to point down but the supports are actually designed to rest on when the tool is horizontal. If you point it down as intended, it also relies on the bungees to hold it snug to the bars. Which it will when the bungees are new. As they age, the user may not be aware that there may be a little bit of play on one side causing the tool to tilt.

Have you compared the convenience and accuracy of this product to the method of aligning the handlebar to a straight bar held against the stanchions, as suggested in this comment section?
  • 4 0
 @vinay: Honestly, there is no way this laser tool is as accurate as sighting down from the bars to a straight edge against the stanchions.
  • 8 3
 If you need this tool, you have no business working on a bike. Or doing carpentry. Or plumbing. Or working on a car, motorcycle, or lawnmower. You might consider velcro shoes so your mommy or daddy doesn't have to tie yours.
  • 3 0
 Velcro might be pushing it. Slip on shoes shoes might fit the same developmentally challenged target market.
  • 1 0
 Or someone needing this tool would appreciate the greater efficiency a tool like this could bring to their workflow.
  • 5 0
 Broom handle layed across between stanchions and tire. Sight down from bar. Lickety split fast, bang on perfect alignment. For free. I'm going to make broom handle instruction sheets in fancy gift box packaging with an infinite marketing budget to give this laser box some competition.
  • 5 1
 I would 100% buy one of these if it was affordable. But because "bike industry" and bike industry sales channels, it will probably cost too much. Just like the Wera "bike allen key set" you have the privilege of buying for $80 through the bike shop sales channel, or only $40 at the local tool shop that stocks all the Wera. Just happens to be missing the torx keys, but you get every nice allen.
  • 3 0
 Wera set is worth every penny, but I get your point.
  • 2 0
 That's essentially driven by consumers who get into bike mechanics without previous general tool knowledge and experience.
Park Tool and the like then sell some "bike specific" premium tool that said consumer buys, oblivious to the fact that there is a cheaper, better tool from Bahco or equivalent being sold at the local hardware store. You see the same with stuff like lubricants or bearings
  • 7 0
 Or just use a dual crown, and you don’t need to warranty your csu every six months.
  • 6 0
 this is stupid lol, just line up your bars with the fork or some other obvious thing. If this was actually needed then no one would have straight bars, yet everyone has them
  • 2 0
 There is always that one friend where you hop on their bike and the bars are like 5 degrees off, so you ask and they think you are the crazy one.
  • 3 0
 Laser levels that builders use are cheap. Combine with a 3D printed cradle that hooks on to your bars, not bungees, and possibly a better result. Cheaper, more accurate and you can still use the leveller for tiling, hanging pictures etc.
  • 1 0
 Good idea. You can get ones for a little more that shoot a line.

www.homedepot.ca/en/home/categories/tools/hand-tools/measuring-and-layout-tools/levels/laser-levels.html

Ive used this one at work
  • 1 0
 @taskmgr: I'm probably on the Home Depot black list as I'm apparently not allowed to view that page. Either way, I doubt the laser leveler I have at home is going to work well as it is designed to auto level. That is, it won't point straight when pointed down. But yeah, they usually project a cross instead of just dots. If one must use a laser for alignment, a cross line laser is indeed more usable than just two dots. But lasers aren't necessarily the best solution in the first place, especially if you're projecting on a curved surface like a fork arch.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: you could go over head and hit your frame and tire with it. Some self leveling lasers can actually do 2 axis so you could get your bars in there too. Lots of options. The 2 dots is a non starter for me as well
  • 3 0
 I love lasers, but here's a better way:

Get a straight stick or pipe (think broom stick) and a bungee cord. Lash the stick horizontally across the shock lowers or stanchions, tighten with bungee. Look from side to see how stick lines up with handlebars. If they aren't parallel, tweak.

Easiest to look "through" the handlebars to the stick to see if they are lined up. Trick is making stick level.
  • 4 0
 Customer states -Bars misaligned. Uses lasers to make bars perfectly aligned. Customer picks up bike, pauses, stares at bars, closes one eye. -Are you suuure these are straight, doesn't it look a little off to you?
  • 1 0
 When I get a custy like that, I loosen the stem, hand them the bike and tell them to put the bars straight themselves. Then I tighten the stem and bid them adieu.
  • 6 0
 Spend more time reading comments than cumulative time aligning bars over the course of my life
  • 2 0
 Looks like the laser dots are still using the tire as a reference for centering and you're still eyeballing with respect to the tire. I wish someone would come up with a totally simple solution that is like dirt cheap. How hard is it to develop a 2-rod approach to triangulate the bars and stem for centering?
  • 4 0
 Like one rod across the stanchions, lined up against the handlebars?

Could just lay a rod across the stanchions and sight down.
  • 1 0
 @50percentsure: 2 equal length rods. Therefore, no sightings needed. You can do it blindfolded. Think of an equilateral triangle. Anything requiring eyeballing a reference point means it can have parallax issue.
  • 2 0
 Just a day too late… I had to re-align my bars today and after a day at the park I’m convinced I’ve stumbled upon the holy grail of stem alignment, it’s completely perfect, absolutely zero doubt in my mind. Now I just gotta tighten the stem bolts to the moon so it never turns again
  • 4 0
 Can I leave it mounted to my bike while I ride, so it can detect an upcoming bump in the trail?
  • 5 0
 I was thinking $40, but $140? Why leave the price out of the article?
  • 3 0
 So people actually click the link.
  • 2 0
 At least this guy actually manufactured it, and it's not just 3d printed crap made in their living room. However, the DNR one make the most sense, if you wanted to waste your money on a stem aligner.
  • 1 0
 Www.dnrdesignsllp.com true alignment
  • 2 0
 Too bad Tune doesn‘t offer the original Spurtreu anymore so blokes have to start a Kickstarter campain for an even more expensive copy ;-)
bikerumor.com/review-perfectly-aligned-handlebars-tune-spurtreu
  • 1 0
 This!
  • 1 0
 "I believe the front tire is a poor thing to use to align the handlebar as tires are rarely straight or in dish," Derek explains.

Obviously he's never seen me bungie a plastic box onto my handlebars if this is a better alternative.


Also, it $139 USD (plus shipping) for the Kickstarter if you want this over a couple of laser pointers and a roll of duct tape.
  • 4 0
 I think the PB editors review this kind of stuff so they can sit back with a beer and watch us all flip out in the comments.
  • 3 0
 I feel like I can get by handlebars straight. My saddle on the other hand...
  • 3 0
 So according to the video I have to use my eyes to align the tool to the bars and stem?
More lazers!
  • 3 1
 I will never understand the need for this. Literally just close one eye and just line up the back of the bars with the front of the crown.
  • 2 0
 Tough but brutally fair crowd. Thank you Dead Naught for this comment section gold mine. I bet the bars still don't look quite straight after this thing is used.
  • 3 0
 But wait. Didn't we just trade "eyeballing" the bars to the fork crown for "eyeballing" the tool to the bars???
  • 1 0
 Drink 2beer/eye so they’re both calibrated, then align using top comments method. if that hasn’t sorted it, set up a matrix of plumb lines and take a century to do it right
  • 1 1
 Hey Derrick, wanted to reach out to you
about this project-while we really like the
design, we have one question-Not sure if you
have got a patent lawyer…….?this process is
patented at this time both domestic for
20years- and international for 5, hate to be
the one to break this news to you…..we will
be contacting our lawyers Tuesday - again
sorry for the bad news Www.dnrdesignsllp.com
  • 3 0
 Set your phazers to stunned...
  • 1 0
 @Bomadics I prefer disrupters.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: I prefer blasters
  • 4 0
 I prefer the BFG 9000.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Plasma Gun was way better in multiplayer though.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: I just like the name.
  • 3 0
 Just an early APRIL FOOL.
  • 1 0
 Do the lasers adjust for my longer right arm resulting from separated shoulder? My bars feel crooked when they are straight Razz
  • 2 0
 My roadie friends will love this! They are always using T-squares and other contraptions to set their bars straight.
  • 1 0
 I just got 2 metal skewers, bent the ends 90 degrees to hang over the bar and rest them on the fork crown. Easy, cheap and works.
  • 2 0
 Screw AXS or whatever, lasers are the electronic tech I want on a bike, just for more exciting things than bar alignment.
  • 3 0
 JFC, we’ve become feeble as a species.
  • 1 0
 Open a bottle of whisky or a few beers then close your left eye and stand over the bike. Easy. But laser beams are coolZ like fembots.
  • 1 0
 i jerry rigged something like this together a few years ago.
Then a buddy pointed out the "sight the back of the handlebars onto the front of the fork dropouts" method.
  • 3 1
 i need this. also, i don´t need this.
  • 2 0
 Laser tag on the trail? - yeah, wanted
  • 1 0
 That sounds good except don’t most people have one arm slightly longer than the other?
  • 1 0
 Hasn’t @bencathro got laser eyes? Seem to remember it on one episode of “how to bike”
  • 2 2
 Or we could just find a way to have the fork manufacture groove the steering tube and have a notch in the stem that keys into the groove
  • 1 0
 I've thought about this before too. That must be a lot harder than it sounds or it seems like it would have happened already. Extra manufacturing costs? Too hard to hit the tolerance requirements? Widespread adoption of new standards?
  • 1 0
 The industry needs to promote a new standard to solve this problem, make your current rig obsolete, and drive more sales. Instead of a "stem" it would be called a "yoke" (pronounced yo-KAY). It can only be installed one way so it would be idiot proof in the long standing Japanese tradition of Poka-Yoke.
  • 5 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I suspect it's a durability thing. Ever crash so hard your bars end up misaligned? Now imagine all those forces that twisted your bars out of alignment on a steerer tube/stem combo with a keyway. I suspect it'd end up 'causing a whole lot more problems than it would solve.
  • 1 0
 Solution: oval steerer tubes. Then oval stem clamps. Then oval head tubes to match with oval crown races, spacers, and of course oval headset bearings. Then everything will be perfectly aligned forever.
  • 3 0
 Lol level = one million.
  • 1 0
 Does this work on bikes that don't have a suspension fork, like road bikes?
  • 1 0
 When you aren't aligning your bars, it doubles as entertainment for your cat
  • 2 0
 At that price I'd rather buy the Abbey Tools version.
  • 1 0
 Over complicated,maybe? Crazy idea: what if fork manufactures started Lazer etching the middle of steered tube?
  • 2 0
 $140 for a tool that nobody needs... innovative.
  • 2 0
 I'll wait for the E-bike specific version to be released.
  • 1 0
 Im only interested if it links up to my tirewiz, shockwiz, axs, flight attendant app on my phone
  • 1 0
 If you don't want to deal with Lasers or batteries...
www.dnrdesignsllp.com/shop
  • 1 0
 s r I h T A g T is really cRoOkEd Just leave them cRoOkEd,
  • 1 0
 Incase anybody was wondering Stun guns war is, raw snug nuts. Spelled backwards
  • 1 0
 Why doesn’t the industry just agree a method to index the stem to the steerer tube like cassettes have?
  • 1 0
 Those ultra high precision rubber bands will bring it all together!
I’ll save my money for another set of tires
  • 1 0
 The bars shouldnt be perfectly straight anyway. We’re all asymmetrical, so its better if bars are a but off
  • 1 0
 why can't there just be oval steerer tubes and matching stems that are always straight?
  • 1 0
 Just keep your bars just slightly crocked all the time and never worry about it
  • 1 0
 my arms aren't the same length. are yours?
  • 3 1
 Ah, just eyeball it
  • 1 0
 This tool takes the guesswork out of bear encounters (with lasers)
  • 1 0
 Looks like a good 3D printing / arduino project Big Grin
  • 4 0
 i cant help but think all that is needed is a couple of lazer pens a 3d printing case and some tie-wraps to acheive the same result
  • 2 0
 @McMeta666: 3d printed, or scrap wood and a tape measure?
  • 1 0
 @oroszsteven: what ever you have access to Big Grin
  • 3 2
 Fork manufacturers should put marks on the steer tube.
  • 1 0
 This is the way. If they can put cut-marks on bars, why not alignment marks on stems and steerer tubes?
  • 2 0
 @SoCalTrev: Check the marks on you handlebars. A lot of them are not aligned anyway.
  • 2 0
 REALLY????????
  • 1 0
 But, but, what about the Lefty users?
  • 1 0
 so like what have we been doing all our lives?
  • 1 0
 6 beers is my preferred tool for this job. Most bike jobs actually.
  • 1 0
 How does this work /south/ of the equator?
  • 1 0
 Wouldnt buy it. But maybe shops can rent them out.
  • 2 1
 Well you're screwed if your tire is warped.
  • 2 1
 I'm in. I got #27 of 30 and was happy to pay $139. Love shit like this.
  • 1 0
 ....
  • 1 0
 JFC, we’ve become feeble as a species.
  • 1 0
 An industrial designer would have helped here.
  • 1 0
 All these lasers (cool, cool!) held in place by 2 elastic bands?
  • 1 0
 Is this really one of the most pressing issues in mountain biking today??
  • 1 0
 I put dual crown forks on all my bikes to avoid this problem.
  • 1 0
 freakin lasers!
  • 1 0
 WTF XDDD
  • 1 0
 1st world tool
  • 1 2
 YES
  • 1 0
 opps







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