Field Test: 2022 We Are One Arrival - Efficient & Effective

Sep 10, 2021 at 14:04
by Matt Beer  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

We Are One Arrival SP2



Words by Matt Beer, photography by Tom Richards


When We Are One teased us with sneak peeks of what looked to be a frame mold, we knew we had to get our hands on one. It's hard to talk about anything that We Are One builds without mentioning their devotion to sourcing materials as locally as possible. Their new bike, aimed at the enduro market, the Arrival, sings the same tune. Everything from the hardware and paint to the carbon sheets is sourced from within a five hundred mile radius.

Their first foray into frame building encompasses a wide array riding styles. It's ready to smash or dash. The 152mm of rear wheel travel and 160mm fork are aggressive enough to take on Enduro World Series races, but won't shy away from backcountry sufferfests.

Arrival Details

• Travel: 160 mm front / 152 mm rear
• Wheel size: 29”
• Hub spacing: 157 mm
• Head angle: 64°
• Seat tube angle: 77°
• Reach: 475 mm (SZ2)
• Chainstay length: 437 mm
• Sizes: SZ1, SZ2, SZ3
• Weight: 32.04 lb / 14.53 kg (w/ control tires)
• Price: $8,899 USD
weareonecomposites.com
This dual link, full carbon frame is purpose built around 29" wheels only, without any geometry or kinematic adjustments. In other words, there are no compromises between a steep seat angle or a slack head tube and the suspension has been tirelessly tested and tuned.

We Are One have also jumped on the size naming bandwagon. Since the field test took place, the naming has been changed from M/L to SZ2, but the reach remains the same at 475 mm. They also paused the start button on what would be a SZ4 frame, which we mentioned in the bike introduction. Currently, there are three sizes fitting riders from 5’3” to 6’4”, which seems like a bit of a stretch for those on opposite ends of the height spectrum. Reach numbers are traditional though, starting at 450 mm for a SZ1 and growing 25 mm per size to 500 mm for the SZ3.

For the SZ2 and SZ3, there are two options for dropper post length. Our SZ2 bike was equipped with a 170 mm dropper, which left 25 mm between the top of the seat clamp and the bottom of the post collar when fully inserted. I never experienced any clearance issues, but that middle rocker link pivot interrupts the seat post insertion depth, which could pose an issue for riders with a shorter inseam or different descending position.

Up front, there was a 100 mm head tube and 37 mm BB drop, creating a short stack height and aggressive, forward riding position. Henry and I both found ourselves using all 20 mm of spacers under the stem and swapping the 25 mm rise bar out for a 35 mm.

The smaller 185 mm x 55 mm trunnion mount rear shock is advised to set at 23% sag, so you won't be kicking rocks and that keeps the anti-squat in the zone for transmitting maximum watts. For my 73 kg weight, I did have to run 240 PSI in the Float X2, which might leave heavier riders maxing out the 350 PSI pressure limit.

Geometry such as a 64º head tube and a 77º effective seat tube angle are fairly standard these days, but the Arrival is versatile and doesn’t hold back in rowdy terrain. The chainstays do grow proportionately from 437 mm on the SZ1 and SZ2 frames, to 441 mm on the SZ3.


We Are One Arrival

Other attributes of the frame are double row bearings on all pivots, which are housed in the links, not the carbon, a threaded BB, and… gasp, Superboost rear hub spacing. I'm not sure why this is such a heated topic, because the bike comes with its own premium wheels. This spec reduces wear on the larger cogs by keeping the chain straighter on that wide hub and pairs with a narrower 52 mm chainline.

Inside the beautifully finished raw to Cerakote matte finish frame are foam insulating tubes for the housings. This method superseded guided internal routing for one reason: quality carbon compaction. Internal guides can prohibit compaction when molding the carbon and leave voids, which can pose as stress rise areas.

On the topic of workmanship, all of the fixtures and threaded axles feed into replaceable, keyed alloy nuts, not the carbon, with the exception of the BB shell and proprietary brake mount. This bracket bolts straight up to a 180 mm rotor for the strongest and longest wearing design. At no surprise, the frame is backed by a manufacturing defect lifetime warranty.

What is really interesting though is their crash repair program. We Are One offer to fix the frame without financially profiting from the service. It’s actually more expensive to fix the frame member than replacing it, which shows they are conscious of their environmental impact. They also assemble the Arrival in Kamloops without any plastic wrapping or ties and practice reusing other component manufacturers’ packaging.

For $8,899 USD, the Arrival comes with the mechanical SRAM XO1 groupset, Fox Factory suspension, Magura MT5 brakes, a Chris King headset, an SDG dropper post, and Vittoria Mazza tires. Of course, you’ll find their renowned carbon Union rims laced to Industry 9 1/1 hubs and Da Package carbon bar and alloy stem combo too.

The no holds barred build checks out at $10,999 with a full SRAM XX1 AXS wireless drivetrain and dropper post, Magura MT7 brakes, I9 Hydra hubs, and is finished with the same We Are One parts mentioned in the other build. Now that is a high entry level build price, but we are talking about premium components on a carbon frame that is made in North America.

At this time, complete bikes are the only option, but there are production plans to offer rolling chassis and Push 11/6 shock options.




Climbing

Surprise - the lightest bike of the lot was also an effective climber, both on trail and in the efficiency test. Yes, there is a climb switch, but it’s really not necessary. The bike simply went forward when you stepped on the pedals, not up and down, due to that linkage configuration. Don’t let this undermine the descending capabilities of the Arrival, as we’ll discuss those shortly. When pointed in either direction on the hill, rear wheel traction was plentiful and maintained excellent small bump performance.

You might think that the large BB drop would lead to crank strikes and clumsy navigation through tech uphill routes, but this is where the 23-25% sag suggest makes sense. I like to preach about bikes that retain their geometry, or at least front to rear balance, and the Arrival is one of them. This makes it predictable to time pedal strokes when you put the power down or lunge up stepped trail features.

I found the steep seat angle and lower bar height a benefit while climbing, and was surprised in several instances by the Arrival's ability to scale some ridiculously steep pitches. The shorter rear center made the traction limit somewhat easier to find, and I could shift my weight accordingly, all while keeping the front wheel from wandering.

We Are One Arrival

We Are One Arrival
We Are One Composites Arrival

Descending

Immediately, when I jumped on the Arrival, I felt like both my contact points; hands and feet, were close to the ground, as if I was on a snappy, slalom bike. At slower warm up speeds it was noticeably lighter and more agile, like the YT, compared to the bigger bruisers in the fleet. I was anxious to throw this thing into some high speed berms, but also had some initial reservations of how the lesser travel and low body position would pan out on the steeper, rougher runs. Did we mention how fast the trails are at Sun Peaks?

I have to say, I was blown away with the Arrival’s capability on serious downhill tracks. Of course, the limit was a finer balance at race pace than on the longer travel and lengthy wheelbase of the Range and Force Carbon, but that suspension really gave the Arrival some muscle. There was no shortage of stability through heavy compressions and brake bumps, which contributed to confidence levels.

Timed Testing

Previously featured in a Canadian National Enduro round, our timed section of trail was primarily made up of tight, fast corners with square edges rocks and roots. This offered the longer and heavier bikes a chance to show how their brute stacked up against the more spritely ones in the bunch.

Going fast isn't everyone's number one goal when choosing a bike, but it is one more metric we can use to differentiate the bikes in test.


Matt Beer: "The Arrival laid down consistent hot laps and narrowly missed the win by less than half a second. The bike snapped out of corners and the suspension carried speed through rough sections while delivering predictable levels of traction. Its shorter wheelbase and low, aggressive position attacked our test track, but required higher levels of focus."
In those heavy braking zones, the bike remained active and the dual-link suspension didn’t squat or firm up the suspension. I was genuinely impressed with how that smaller rear shock did everything so well, including those sections of rumble-stripped singletrack. The Float X2 aided the right amount of kinematic progression. No, it’s not a high pivot, but the axle path seemed to move the wheel out of the way without using much travel. The drivetrain feedback was minimal, both in terms of pedal kickback and noise.

The only place I noticed a bit of feedback was at slower speeds on technical single track over roots, but I think this was more about my level of engagement and body positioning. The Arrival definitely rewards a rider that charges.

While it can chase the welterweight enduro bikes down raw downhill tracks, there is a limit. It still has elements that keep it hunkered down on your line, but you’re asking a lot from 152 mm of travel to bomb full-on downhill tracks. It is more demanding to ride at those speeds over longer sections of physical trail, but it can be done with a bit more focus and skill.

When Mike Levy posed the question, “What bike would you chose for an EWS season?”, I was torn between the Arrival and the Specialized Enduro. The main differentiator would be the fatigue factor. With the Arrival’s shorter travel and speed-hungry, attack character it might be more physical on longer race stages. The 170mm front and rear travel Enduro does slightly give up the ability to duck and weave in tighter corners, which the Arrival loves and our timed testing proved. Otherwise, both bikes possess contemporary geometry and respectable weights, making them top candidates for enduro racing.

If you had to give me one bike to go ride anywhere on the planet, I’d pack my bags and box up an Arrival. There would be very little terrain that I would shy away from onboard this bike. Its all-encompassing suspension attributes and geometry tackle every type of trail well. It has that rally car responsiveness that would suit riding destinations with ripping, technical single track, topped with plenty of corners and jumps to slay; Bellingham, WA, Bromont, QC, and of course Kamloops, BC are a few regions that come to mind. The Arrival is a do-it-all enduro bike that left us impressed with its eagerness to keep up with some longer travel bikes.


Pros

+ Very capable 152 mm of travel
+ Generates speed incredibly quickly
+ Overall appearance: shapes, finish, cable routing, and subtle branding

Cons

- Rear shock pressures may limit max rider weight
- Limited sizes squeeze riders at either end the of height spectrum





The 2021 Summer Field Test was made possible with support from Dainese apparel and protection, and Sun Peaks Resort. Shout out also to Maxxis, Garmin, Freelap, and Toyota Pacific.







271 Comments

  • 123 4
 Can we take a moment to recognize whomever inserted Levy's eyebrow raising grin into ALL the introductions of the Field Test videos?

Please do not allow Levy to ever make that expression on camera again.
  • 16 1
 So true, genuinely disturbing
  • 38 1
 I’ve taken 4 showers on account of that look.
  • 16 1
 @scvkurt03: I hope they were cold showers
  • 1 0
 What about the jingle? It’s always changing! I never know what to expect anymore.
  • 1 0
 @sdaly: so true. Hope no one was wearing crocs in the shower after that. Each to their own, but..
  • 5 1
 Is anyone else weirdly and disturbingly reminded of Reece Witherspoon in the car scene from Cruel Intentions when Levy pulls that expression? No? Just me?
youtu.be/_4lDASeWsFg?t=60s
  • 84 0
 I'm going to ask the video editors to gradually extend that clip throughout the rest of the series.
  • 33 0
 @brianpark: on it!
  • 5 12
flag Three6ty (Sep 11, 2021 at 19:14) (Below Threshold)
 Bring back Kaz! And is it just me, or has Outside muted Levy’s personality. These reviews are just not the same…
  • 5 0
 @brianpark: good thing there’s only e-bikes left Wink
  • 2 0
 @Three6ty: have you seen those Levy eyebrows?

I think it’s safe to say he is not muted
  • 1 1
 @Three6ty: but the pederastic nimbility goes to 111
  • 10 1
 @Three6ty: I definitely could use some muting every now and then tbh
  • 1 4
 @mikelevy: Some distance between you guys sitting at that table, not because of the virus but because the awkwardness of the two others on either side. It was to formal for a test where others have opinions other than "Mighty Might Mikes."

Next time have some beers like they do on Beta bike test (AKA- Bible bike test) sit or stand some distance apart so its more genuine and less fickle with some attitude.

Jus sayn
  • 1 0
 @jasonlucas: just schlowmow it
  • 2 0
 @likeittacky: Some chest-high beers and red flannel and filming in a brewery haha
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: You got it, except needs to be a flannel Kilt; it be more appropriate.
  • 63 7
 Honest question: do you guys think this bike looks good esthetically? I want to like the way it looks but somehow the rear end just looks cluttered to me. The Transition is probably the cleanest looking bike of the bunch.
  • 22 2
 Aesthetically speaking the shock tunnel kink is the worst part of the bike. That said, they’ve still done a great job.
  • 3 0
 It does look stuffy in the back and it remotely reminds me of the old Demo but I honestly love the big picture.
  • 23 5
 I also can't see all the beauty most people are seeing in this bike.
  • 10 5
 Not attractive IMO
  • 2 0
 I hated the rear end look at first but its really grown on me
  • 7 0
 It's "weird" but it works and personally I'm loving the look of this bike. But very understandable that many probably wouldn't.
  • 17 0
 IMO it's just the right combination of edges and angled planes to give it the stealth bomber looks.
  • 9 4
 You have to see it in person to truly appreciate what’s gone into this thing. It’s a no expense spares work of art. Only the highest end carbon throughout the whole frame. All the machining in house right down to Tyler’s famous seat collar. Not to mention the titanium hardware. It’s like the Ferrari of mountain bikes. Hopefully I own one someday soon. I really appreciate that the frame is all made from North American materials. It’s a special bike.
  • 5 0
 @theedon: That stuff is all legit. it looks awesome from that perspective and I would love to have this bike. But we're talking the overall shape. And I agree, the space between the bottom bracket and seat doesn't look great to me.
  • 4 1
 Agree. Sure the tubes and carbon are gorgeous, but overall not very good looking.
  • 9 0
 I don't love the looks (why does it look like a Morpheus?) but for whatever reason it does look way better in person than in photos/video.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: do you think if we want lighter big bikes (and of course we also still want them stiff and durable) and designers to utilize the full potential of carbon towards that end, then we should all shut up about the busy linkage, strange kink at the shock, and the weird triangle at the toptube-seattube junction? Is that the price of what we want? To what extent are Transitions evidence against this hypothesis?
  • 1 1
 @jclnv: yeah I can't work out the reason for the kink in the bottom of the seat tube?
  • 7 0
 This bike looks like Ms. Universe compared to that GT.
  • 1 0
 I think the way the seatstays and top tube line up gives it a questionable banana shape.
  • 2 0
 @KennyWatson: it’s so the rear triangle doesn’t hit the seat tube
  • 1 1
 At first glance, it’s attractive. Looks mean in the raw carbon and very angular in shape. However, after looking at it a bit, I think I would be a little self conscious riding it around my local trails. It has a bit of a bat-mobile thing going on… like it was designed for a movie or tv show set in the future… a Star Trek bike!

I love that it’s designed and built in North America… and that by itself may be enough for me to get over the appearance.
  • 3 0
 Looks like a French bike, like a Lapierre or something.
  • 3 0
 @Thirty3: I was going to say it looks like a slimmer Devinci...
  • 1 0
 @dancingwithmyself: The kink in the seat tube, sharp creases and flat planes on the carbon surfaces all ADD weight. If we wanted light frames we would end up with something that has smooth transitions from tube to tube and (generally) straight lines. Look at the Specialized Aethos road bike to get a sense for what super light carbon frame design looks like. That design philosophy could be extended to a FS MTB pretty successfully.
  • 51 4
 I do not think that it can be overstated how awesome it is that this bike is designed and manufactured locally. I would think more of my Transition and my Ibis if they were made in Bellingham and Santa Cruz respectively. In my opinion - the made in Canada approach makes this bike far more special and worth the money.

I bought berries today - I chose the local ones over the ones from Mexico. They were more expensive. I bought salmon and halibut too - chose the fresh caught in BC stuff over the frozen imported option. More expensive.

I have a We Are One Arrival - SZ2 / SP1 / Push 11.6 on order - I could not be more excited for a bike. I am stoked to support all the individuals in Kamloops that make this possible. Please keep doing what you are doing.

ps... My Ibis is for sale Wink
  • 6 0
 Sold my Firebird for this bike, I was excited ever since it was announced. Being small business owner definitely contributed to supporting smaller business. It’s a special bike! Got the SP2 SZ2 on order as well November block.
  • 2 0
 My ripmo may also find its way to the classifieds section
  • 8 6
 It's all local to someone. This bike is no more local to me, in Europe, than an Asian one. If we're transitioning to a local economy there will still have to be Asian bikes for the Asian market.
  • 3 0
 I'd love to buy one of these, but at 6'5", 225lbs and a riding "style" best described as "ready, fire, aim" it just doesn't seem to be a good match. I absolutely HATE the fact that the Specialized is such a good looking bike and probably a better fit/function for me. That said without the big S and others pushing up prices so aggressively there probably wouldn't be room for WRO to launch a boutique bike, so happy days.
  • 1 0
 Good job to you....
  • 7 1
 I've told it before, and I assume they've grown since then, but my favorite WAO story is from when I ordered my first wheelset from them in 2019.

I was able to place the order through my local bike shop, and after a few weeks they called to check on on the status.

My LBS owner just called WAO's number, and someone picked up the phone on the 2nd ring. When the bike shop owner asked when they thought my wheels would ship, it was clear that the WAO employee just set the phone down, and shouted over his shoulder: "How, how are those Insiders headed to Moscow coming along? ... No, Moscow Idaho ... Ok, great." Then picked up the phone and said, "They're almost done. Should have them out next week."

No, "We'll check with the factory and get back to you." No, "Oh, on a boat somewhere." Just, "We're working on them, right over there."

The Arrival isn't the right bike for me, but something would have to change drastically if I ever bought another wheelset from a different manufacturer.
  • 29 7
 - Pink bike reviews new $10000 yeti.

-Comment section : yeti expensive shit fu&k rich daddy dentist a*sholes ….

-Pink bike reviews Canadian made we are one made just down the street BUT COST $10000…

-comment section : great bike . Way to go , so pretty , here are 10 reasons why who ever dared saying it’s expensive is an ignorant a*shole …
  • 15 3
 You are being rational among zealots. I wish you luck.
  • 18 4
 Yeti buys frame from Asia, adds 100% margin and the money goes to CEO and a few employees, wao makes frame in house, pay local citizens and gets much less margin on it.
  • 6 1
 I like this bike, but you are 100 percent right. Certain manufacturers get the bro bump here on Pinkbike. We Are One is one of them. I’d say they earned it. They make carbon wheels at a much more reasonable price than notable competitors. I bought a set this summer, and they have great customer service based on my interactions with them.

The value-to-cost ratio of their wheels is one of the reasons I’m surprised at the price of this bike. They built a reputation on a solid product for a reasonable price, and then they come out with a really expensive bike. To be clear, I don’t begrudge them the price, but I’ll likely never own one. It’s just too expensive for me. Maybe it’s the cost of North American manufacturing, but they’ve been doing a great job of competitive pricing for their wheels. Why does the complete bike cost so much in comparison?

Also, I think you gotta mention Guerilla Gravity is doing their manufacturing in Colorado, and their top-of-the-line Enduro bike is much more cost effective.
  • 7 2
 @lkubica: Man, That is way too much of an oversimplification. It doesn’t really work like that.
  • 21 1
 Congrats Dustin and the rest of you guys.

I want to bring up one other thing…service. Memphis and crew have taken care of me like I am one of their own. My Insiders are currently being rebuilt by WAO, and I am riding my old Agents in the meantime. The level of service from these guys, even through COVID, has been exceptional. I would be an idiot to ever stray from something this good.

My Druid has a story behind it too. It was Dustin’s frame. He gave it up so I could buy it, and he bought a gloss moss instead. First production run. Third huge season on it.

That said, I am thinking hard about this one. I may have to beg and grovel to see if a large might turn up somewhere…Dustin? I may have to bribe my banker too…
  • 9 0
 We Are One are definitely at the head of the pack as far as customer service and support goes. They definitely look after their customers.
  • 7 0
 @privateer-wheels: I am 100% confident they will never let any of their customers down. They are always accessible and as into biking as any one of us. Probably much more than most of us. They patiently and respectfully answer all questions asked of them and they really do appreciate the support of their customers. Their products are all of a gold standard quality, fit and finish, but just as importantly, they are always there to help. Before AND AFTER the sale. These guys totally get it. I have no reason to believe any of this will be different with respect to the Arrival. No BS post-purchase delays if anything goes sideways with any of their products. Compare that to other manufacturers. Not many/any are in this same class.
  • 2 0
 Thank you for the kind words Mike, much appreciated! Nothing better than enjoying a cup of joe while reading such positive comments from our beloved customers! We strive for nonother than exceptional customer service and proof of, only boosts our morale! Chat soon, Memphis
  • 23 7
 Feels like this bike got both the "beginner's bonus" and the "local brand bonus" in this review.

Is it pretty good? Probably yes. But it's also is it $ 3.000 more expensive than the Capra, Force and Spire. Consequently, one would have to ask if it is also $ 3.000 better than those. And most likely, it is not.
  • 25 6
 They made it themselves
They did not pay a manufacturer in Asian to build their design.
They make some of the best rims on the planet
They are not "beginners"...
  • 15 3
 It's not a cheap bike because they don't use cheap labor. You don't have to buy it.
  • 33 1
 OK so this has been bugging me the entire time with these reviews!!! They are not comparing apples to apples. Every manufactures x01 build with carbon rims is equal or more expensive than this bike. Check for yourselves, compare xo1 build with carbon rims on Spesh, Ibis, Santa Cruz, Transition, Evil, Pivot etc..... they are all the similarly priced. You can't review different build specs and then claim its short fall is its expensive!!! You can complain they don't have lower end GX or XT builds but not that its more than its direct counterparts!!!!
  • 5 0
 Well… first off it has a set of $1800 wheels and $300 bar and stem combo. Thats 2/3 of that price difference from the others. The rest of the money can be found in the all North American build, quality, warranty, and service WAO is already known for.

A TR Sentinel XO1 (which is a direct comparable) is $7200 without carbon wheels.
  • 8 0
 @Baller7756: So your saying a Sentinel that is $7200 with a set of 1800$ Carbon hoops is $9000!?!?! ok thanks..............Point Made!! My point directly is WA1 was able too make an equal if not better frame with an equal or better warranty with all materials sourced in North America with Labor in North America for the same price!!
WA1 to all other bike brands in North America...Hold our collective beer!!!!
  • 3 0
 A valid point.

The real apples-to-apples comparison will be when Guerilla Gravity releases their "Fully Revved" (all-carbon including the rear triangle) Gnarvana. Somehow those damned Coloradans have so-far managed to keep their pricing for hand-made-in-the-USA carbon bikes in-line with the lower-end of overseas frames. E.g., their full-Carbon 120/130mm Trail Pistol is $6,100 for an X01 build, and $5,200 for a GX build.

I don't begrudge anyone who is willing to pay more for a WAO made-in-Canada bike, in fact, I can think of lots of worse ways to use your money. But you are definitely paying a premium.
  • 3 0
 @atourgates: I’ve done the math, paying retail for all parts on bike has you paying around $3700 for the frame. Which means when Frame-Only options come about I’d expect it to be 4200-4500. So in line with Yeti, SC, and Pivot.
  • 15 1
 I'm sure there was a "survey" on the topic at some point previously, but to me the geometry adjust options a lot of bikes come with are usually silly. Who out there routinely changes to "steep" settings one weekend to blast a fire road then back again for the next ride for the park, and then somewhere in between for a moderate trail?...At the same time I'm sure it is still attractive in people's mind to have all the capability options. We like the "tow/haul" mode on our truck, even though we don't own a trailer, and I like that my overdrive pedal can make my guitar blow my windows out, even though in reality I never turn the volume past 4, and I have 400 lbs of Olympic plates in my garage, just in case I get really strong and will need to use them all at once to get a proper workout in (will never happen). Sorry, bit of a rant, but god there are so many things we think we'll probably need and don't ever really use and are of no real importance.
  • 13 1
 Well, maybe I'm doing geo-adjustment wrong, but I used them on my current bike (RM Altitude) to dial in the fit to my preferences. Once I got them there they've stayed. To me, geo-adjustments are for taking a great bike and tuning it into the best bike for the rider and what they want to accomplish with the bike.
  • 4 0
 @taldfind: I am in the same boat with my RM Altitude. It took a while to find my ideal setting for the ride 9. But now that I have, the bike does everything I want it to do. I think it is more about allowing the bike to be tailored to the individual rider than to the terrain.
  • 1 0
 I think it’s usually included as an easy option. If you can offer it without much trouble, why not? It just allows people to customize a bit more. I agree none of it is all that special.
  • 37 1
 @taldfind: Agreed. I'm not a fan of geo adjustment but your take 100% makes all the sense in the world. I don't think anyone is changing their geometry from ride to ride, but some are definitely getting the bike to their liking and leaving it there. I like Rocky's bikes but Ride-9 is crazy overdone IMO; the Ride-4 system with bigger changes makes sense to me. I also like the idea of headtube inserts to adjust reach like Specialized uses, but it's not something I look for in a bike.

But a 0.3 degree change? 3mm of bottom bracket height change? Get lost with that junk.
  • 1 0
 I actually do keep my Evil Calling in the steeper "Low" position most of the time. I've switched to X-Low a few times for bike park days and it is definitely fun, but the bottom bracket ends up low enough that I'm constantly pedal striking, even with 170mm cranks, so I keep it in the higher position for pedaly local trails. Also I don't really take my Calling to the park that often, only if my long travel bike is broken.
  • 5 0
 I do on my 2021 Stupy Evo. Trails, park, races. I change geo at least once a week! But I like to tinker and drink beer in the garage so….
  • 13 0
 Some guy commented recently that flip chips weren't to give two bikes to one rider, but to make one bike appeal to two different riders. Thought that was pretty astute.
  • 1 1
 I Love my 2022 Stumpy evo adjustments. At first I didn’t think I would change them , once I found my favourite setting. But…. We have some very different terrain on our local mountains. I will literally change it before the ride depending which mountain we are heading to. Chainstay lower/higher adjustment takes 2 minutes.,
Headtube adjustment takes 5 minutes.
Also note that the stumpy evo S4 has identical geometry as their test bike . I don’t think the Stumpy suspension is as dialed as WAO. But much cheaper.
  • 4 0
 Canyon's Click/Clack & EWS results this year disagree
  • 4 1
 @HankHank: And one more talking point on the sales floor, of course.
  • 3 0
 The steep setting is often perfect to switch for a 650b wheel at the rear with zero or little changes in the geometry.
  • 6 0
 @mikelevy:I think people miss the point of the Ride-9 system.

It's not to change just geometry, but frame progressivity to suit a wider variety of rider's styles and/or terrain. Especially with coils, a way to fine tune frame progressivity (and for air, less reliance on tokens which has positives) is a great free tool. It's 0 additional work/maintenance, you change it to where you want it acts like any pivot bolt. Not a must have for your next bike but an odd thing to bemoan.

It would be like complaining Fox/Rockshox have too many token sizes. There's a reason Cascade Components don't make an aftermarket link for Rocky Mountain: "they're already done it [with the Ride-9]", though Rocky's is adjustable both ways (more or less progressive) and with finer steps. youtu.be/LX0nZjHKvcM?t=245
  • 3 0
 I'm into bikes with the geo change. I think the Stumpy Evo 21 does it best. Depending on events in the calendar, I'll switch from enduro style to XC style, change the stem, change the tyres and in no time I've got something ready for an XC or endurance event. geo change appeals to me.
  • 8 2
 @lennskii: You're right, it can definitely be used to fine-tune the suspension feel on some of the Ride-9 bikes. I think my moaning has more to do with the fact that it adds weight, complication (it can be a PIA to work on), and I'd guess that the large majority of riders might tinker with it once, maybe twice, and then leave it alone. If that change gets them to like their bike more, then it's probably worth it - I can't argue that it doesn't add adjustability!

Still, for me, the idea of a bunch of different settings and holes, some of which can definitely hurt the bike's performance more than help it, isn't what I want to see. I want a bike that's made to work well with whatever shock it comes with, and that shock should have more than enough scope for tuning progressivity via volume spacers. Obviously, if you're a really heavy person or a very light person, you're out of the ideal range, but I'll argue all day long that we don't need that sort of adjustment and that at least 95% (pulled that straight out of my ass haha) never touch it more than once, if at all.
  • 1 0
 I’ve used the geo adjust on my Troy when I moved from Bc to Ontario, then back again. I think some value in a bike that has a hugely broad geographic sales base. Less so something purpose built like this.
  • 1 1
 @mikelevy: Agreed- what had to be compromised to allow some geo adjust to happen? Everyone wants to be an expert, so we give them knobs and extra holes and flippy-things, and sometimes entire seatstays. I bought a GG and chugged the kool-aid , havent touched the innumerable adjusties all year, wheels are still round, can confirm. I'm still waiting for them to make an unadjustable frame, based around the trail pistol, probably would save a 1/2 lb. in the headtube alone.
  • 1 2
 Geometry adjustments or flip chips is just a cheap marketing option for the industry. 5 years ago, just before the reach wars started, they were called offset bushings because the industry were too slow to bring out bikes with slacker head angles. The new SJ Evo is the only way geo adjustments should be offered. A flipchip is just a compromise that rotates all the fixed angles around a point.
  • 1 0
 @Planetx888: Added it to the list to talk about in next week's podcast.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: I've used the Ride-9 (new and old iteration) and it literally takes 1min of extra work to put the bike back together for a shock service or to change positions. Extra weight? Maybe a maximum 10grams?

The argument that that 95% (out of ass estimate haha) of riders never touch it could be said for most suspension settings and even tokens. To quote the great Henry Quinney "This idea that we should be at the whims of the most mechanically inept is bizarre.".
  • 2 1
 @lennskii: "This idea that we should be at the whims of the most mechanically inept is bizarre." Sure, but that doesn't mean things have to be more complicated than they need to be. And my 2c is that the chip-in-a-chip design is too complicated and most riders don't take advantage of it. It works, but it just isn't my thing.
  • 14 0
 Pretty gushy review , looks like a well done bike for sure . Is this the new “ it “ bike for shredding B.C ? I’ll bet price and availability are going to be the limiting factor . Nicely done We Are One !
  • 8 0
 For a shred and pedal bike, it’s been real hard to find much that can beat the Ripmo. But maybe this does. If money was no object I’d buy one of these quick.
  • 8 1
 Agreed on the gush. I’m sure it’s a great bike, and I love We Are One as a company… but I wasn’t honestly expecting an objective opinion on this bike from the PB staff. Hell, I’d get caught up in the hype, too. That being said, I hope that We Are One is successfully making bikes for years to come and would love to own one some day.
  • 37 15
 Ripmo and Ibis in general make the ugliest bikes on the market @Svinyard:
  • 13 5
 @tarik28: but that's just like your opinion, man. One I agree with.
  • 5 0
 The SP2? Come on guys, you missed the chance to call your first bike the VR1!!!!!
  • 3 0
 @tarik28: as a ripmo owner, I agree
  • 2 0
 Appreciate your honesty sir @canned-slammin:
  • 4 2
 @Hogfly: Agree. Love WR1 rims and ethos, but this reads like a transcript of Fox News interviewing a trump surrogate.

Excellent first bike, but I’ll be eagerly awaiting V2 or 3 and some more travel options. I really, really hope they grow this into a portfolio of frame-only options and get away from using the same front triangle for various models. Would love for my money to go a company like WR1.
  • 8 1
 @tarik28: I love my Ripmo, but I agree*. I bought the gray one, which helps hide the lines a bit Wink

*I would like to submit the following bikes for consideration as ‘uglier’ - Marin Wolf Ridge (finally discontinued after 2020) - - Eminent Cycles ‘MT 29’ - Niner Rip 9 (current) - Esker FS Bikes - and last but NOT least, the structure cycles SCW1

I would also like to hear a direct comparison between the WAO and the Ripmo. (And maybe throw in last year’s PB bike of the year, the Stumpy Evo)
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne: Ha, clearly no Germans in their marketing dept.
  • 2 1
 @dancingwithmyself: wouldn’t it be cool if they just sold linkage kits so that you could buy one frame and then change it into a 180,150 or 120mm travel bike? Get the geometry right, but then have adjustable travel(with corresponding geo changes) for the same bike? Less waste and no need for more than one bike.
  • 2 0
 @Jvisscher: if they could accomplish this without the need of owning 3 different shocks that would be great.

But, I’m assuming doing this I’ll need the different linkages, different shocks, and I know different forks. It’s an awesome idea and when not in use those forks and shocks become decorative art in the house.
  • 3 0
 @basic-ti-hardtail: So listening to this review it's sounds like a updated Ripmo so year we need a comparison!
  • 1 0
 @basic-ti-hardtail: I think you are forgetting the ugliest bike of all time, Marin Mount Vision. EBike aesthetics without the pesky motor and price.

m.pinkbike.com/news/review-marin-mount-vision-9.html
  • 2 0
 @whitedlite: i know the fox 36 goes from 140-180mm travel. The only decorative piece is a $65 air shaft assembly.
  • 1 0
 @tarik28: Guess I disagree, I really like my Mojo 3 :-)
  • 13 1
 Heck of a bike BTW. I think it's beautiful and thumbs up for making it in Canada. Best of luck to the WeR1 folks.
  • 9 4
 Cheers to Canada man. You guys are great
  • 7 0
 I recently drooled over one in Fernie. To see it in photos is one thing but in person is a completely different. Stunningly gorgeous. It checked off all the boxes for what I love in a bike aesthetically and to see this review it obviously rides as good as it looks. If only I could afford it…
  • 8 1
 Travel bracket puts it more in line with transitions sentinel, and the Norco sight…I’d be interested in how it compares to these two? Seems to fit the “all mountain” category (which seems to have been dropped) more so than the “enduro” range of bikes. Can see why they included it in this test though! Amazing sounding bike, really stoked to see the bc manufacturing!
  • 8 0
 So are the top riders in the ews (rude, and moir) on all mountain bikes or enduro bikes? It’s interesting that bikes with 150mm rear travel really aren’t determined enduro anymore.
  • 7 0
 You know what is ironic? The fastest bikes uphill also appear to be the fastest downhill....and yet we are told lomg travel this, high pivot that is the way forwards....funny that, considering the 150mm travel SB150 is also one of the fastest bikes on the EWS circuit also.
  • 6 1
 So true. I find the divergence between what elite racers run and what is being marketed to the consumer is one of the more interesting story lines in the industry. The respective use cases are different, but if anything the elites need more travel because of way higher forces they generate, which is the opposite of the way it’s going. In terms of rear suspension travel, if 150mm is enough for Richie Rude to smash into things with, it’s sure as shit ought to be enough for me.
  • 5 2
 @trailanderror: that last line: your logic might just be completely backwards right there.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: maybe not. Ritchie is a big dude and a fast dude and a great rider, so all that combines to make the 150 just right. If you're not as large and/or not as fast, the 150 should be enough to also manage your not-as-great-ness and make everything just right.
  • 6 0
 no mention of the 36 on this one vs. the 38/Zeb on the others... seems like the "downsized" fork didn't slow it down much, if at all. Or to phrase it a different way, doesn't seem like the 38/Zeb provided much of an advantage in descending...
  • 2 0
 Interesting. How about a back to back run on the same bike with both forks?
  • 3 0
 If you haven’t figured it out, lighter bikes are always faster…
  • 2 0
 only bike in the test with 160mm up front, that's why there's a 36 specced. rest has 170mm and the 38 is the better option for this kinda travel IMO.
  • 7 2
 Take all my money! (Literally all of it). Man what a bike, I had a feeling. Look at Richie killing it on that outdated SB150….once you get into the 160+ rear it’s no longer a bike you want to pedal. Saving my pennies to buy one of these.
  • 11 0
 Wait how is that sb150 outdated? I think I’m missing the joke
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: I believe they are being sarcastic.
  • 7 0
 @Svinyard: sarcasm my man. The point is longer, lower slacker has a limit. Seems every other bike in this test has taken it too far.
  • 5 0
 @MikeyMT: all depends on what and how you're riding. For example, the Transition sentinel would be a much better direct comparison to this bike. PB already called the Spire effectively a downhill bike that pedals to the top. I don't think We Are One was aiming for that. Neither was Transition when they made the Sentinel. Now all that said, how often the average Joe really needs that bigger bike is another question, but there's certainly a place for it.
  • 2 0
 @MikeyMT: Agreed. Of the bikes reviewed here, this is the only one I’d consider. Maybe the Capra. The rest are just too much for what and how I ride. The “enduro” category has gone a step beyond what I’m looking for these days.
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Agreed! I know getting bikes is somewhat difficult, and PB has been drooling to review the WAO bike, but all too often their comparisons have bikes that are not in the same category, or the components are from different performance/price ranges.

Yes the TR Sentinel is an almost identical bike.
  • 1 0
 I thought that as well. Until I had to upsize, due to lack of availability. Surprised by how well it rides. 35mm longer reach than my previous bike.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I agree. The rest are single crown park bikes. We did this 10 years ago guys…remember the Giant Faith Sorge was riding and everyone drooled over? There is a reason we all went back to real DH bikes for the park.
  • 1 0
 @MikeyMT: It seems like there used to be XC, Trail, Enduro, Downhill. Now Enduro has gone far beyond what I need, and there’s some new category between Enduro and trail.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: yup. This bike. Sentinel, stumpy EVO (others?) are the bike most people need/want IMO
  • 1 0
 @TheR: All Mountain? Generally speaking a 150/160 bike.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: Road, Cyclocross, Gravel, XC, Downcountry, Trail, All-Mountain, Enduro, Downduro, Downhill.

Simple !
  • 10 1
 I really dont understand what's wrong with S,M,L,XL sizing..
  • 6 0
 Surprised to not see any comments about the Fox 36 vs. Fox 38. Seems like everybody thinks they need a 38 for an enduro bike but I imagine that 36 played into the overall feel that they discussed.
  • 6 0
 Shhhhhh. Don't let the audience know that they don't need a 38, they'll stop spending their money which in turn will stop funding for great reviews like this.

Martin Maes seems to prefer the 36...
m.pinkbike.com/news/bike-check-martin-maes-gt-force-is-not-ordinary.html
  • 6 0
 Man I love the 38, just means 2020 36s w/ Grip2 are popping up all over the buy/sell for $5-700
  • 3 2
 I’m getting a bike with a 38. I know I don’t necessarily need it. But I also don’t not need it. It’s got 2mm different stanchions. It’s mountain biking. It’s fun. We get hung up on the silliest little details around here!
  • 1 0
 Was convinced I needed the 38 because I’m 185lbs and ride aggressively. To be honest, I prefer the 36. And to be even more honest, the fit 4 feels just as good as the fit2 damper *gasp* to me.
  • 1 0
 @snowwcold55: ya, I'm actually nervous to see how it goes with the 38. But it comes on a bike that I was able to get my hands on at a decent price, so that's the fork I'll be riding!
  • 9 5
 I'm not a weight weenie, but... What will the next development be that will lead to lighter bikes? Are we at the point in time where bikes are pretty much as light as they get? This is the lightest bike in the test at 32 lbs. and before I looked at the weight I expected it to be closer to 30 or maybe even a smidge under. Of course you can build bikes lighter (thanks Dangerholm) but at an extreme cost and sometimes durability compromise.
  • 9 0
 I stopped caring what the non rotational parts of my bikes weigh the second I got the bill for a crunched down tube on a carbon frame.
  • 4 0
 Until Wakanda releases a vibranium-shod bike, we are stuck with good'ol carbon bud
  • 11 0
 Can't have it all, yet. We asked companies to make bikes that are longer, stronger, stiffer, and warrantied for life. They delivered, and heavier bikes are the result. I believe the listed weights include the control tires, which were dh and dd casing maxxgrip. Most riders looking for an allrounder like the WAO will probably run lighter tires
  • 3 1
 Technically the spire is lighter, bigger bike but same weight
  • 3 0
 I think we have indeed reached that point. If your main aim with a lighter bike is climbing efficiency, you can achieve those goals with careful adjustments of your seat, handlebars, stem etc. Well engineered bikes that weigh a smidge more can be just as efficient. Besides, as my friend always says, why always go for the lightest option when the weight you save is often the equivalent of a decent shit?
  • 1 0
 Performance is what matters not the weights. Obviously there is some correlation between the two but people need to focus on the right weight, the stuff that actually makes your bike perform better at things rather than just make your buddies go Wow when they load it on the rack.
  • 2 0
 its interesting how weight has kind of piled on over the years as im sure Remy Absalons comencal meta666 for the mega avalanche clocked in at around 30lb's and it was Alu in 2008
  • 1 0
 How light do bikes need to be? I’m sure tech will come along eventually that will allow bikes of this caliber to be lighter without sacrificing performance or cost. But at what point do you just say, “this is what is required of my legs and lungs to ride this bike”?

Actually, with the proliferation of ebikes, that tech may never come. That’s probably one of the reasons the industry loves ebikes so much. They don’t have to stress about weight.
  • 13 6
 I love this bike, I think they nailed it, but I really think if we're going to throw around the term "quiver killer" it should be a sub 30lbs bike. And this is NOT, I repeat, NOT only for better climbing performance (the "take a dump" crowd can stfu) - as we can see with these timed tests, lighter bikes can descend faster because they are much easier to hop and float. Your upper body doesn't work as hard wrestling it and you have more energy on longer descents. They brake better. Sprung weight (not what's in your colon) matters!

Look, I love my 33lbs Enduro - it RIPS, but the thing is a pig and I really do wish it was about 3 lbs lighter. I also get to experience the opposite end of the spectrum with a 23lbs Epic Evo and seriously - light bikes are so much fun up AND down.
  • 4 1
 Very uninformed opinion here, but IMO it's possible today to design a bike using cfrp or aluminum which can be considerably lighter, using topology optimization or some similar technique. But being able to manufacture it, and then manufacture it profitably is likely not possible with today's manufacturing tech. Also, even if you can make it, to sell bikes, you need consumers that think it looks good, which puts a constraint on the shape of the bike, limiting how you can make it more mass-efficient. I think if these challenges can be satisfied or overcome, we can see a reduction of 5lb maybe?
  • 4 0
 @Noeserd: All the bike in the test have heavier forks, Zeb's & 38's vs a 36 on the WAO.
  • 1 0
 @Joecx: yet Spire has the same weight as wao , i believe it's possible to achieve 30 lbs even 29 on that bike with some price
  • 3 0
 I think it's really difficult nowadays to have a durable bike (with durable tires) under 30lb. Slap some EXO's on that (not sure why you would) and you'd be in around 30lb...
  • 2 0
 @Lokirides: the Enduro can be sub 30. Just put a 150 dropper, inappropriate wheels and tires you should be close.

Either that or let manufacturers drop lifetime warranties so they can build less durable bikes which will also be lighter.

I think you get my point, there are trade offs to be made. We can't have everything and choices are being made now to make bikes more durable. In order to accomplish that things have gotten heavier. Add on the fact that a lot of riders are riding significantly steeper/rougher trails. Our local zone would not have been out of place as a WC DH stop ten years ago. It is that steep and rough, yet we are now pedaling to the top on bikes that are probably faster than what they used to race.
  • 5 1
 Bikes are heavier because...warranties. Because someone somewhere jumps loading docks. Because someone somewhere weighs 120kg and likes to hit jumps. Because someone somewhere rides bike parks all day everyday without servicing anything on the bike. So bikes are built for those people,and all the others who would like a light,nimble,fun on something more than DH tracks bike are SOL.
  • 1 0
 That’s the weight with control tires, which were DD Dhr2 front, and a DH casing Dissector in the rear.
With EXO/EXO+ tires, you’d be looking at under 31lbs for the WAO - and getting a lot of punctures if riding the bike up to its potential.

It is really hard to imagine shedding much weight on bikes in this category without making them less capable.
Trail bikes and ‘downcountry’ bikes… well that’s another story.
  • 4 0
 Want to lighten up your bike? Be honest with some questions:

Do you really need a Zeb 38, or will a 160mm Pike do just fine?

Do you really need double down casings on both (or any) tires, or can you get by with lighter casings?

Stuff like that. Maybe the answer is yes, you need it, but I think a lot of people are riding around on overbuilt bikes.

Also, do yourself a favor and buy yourself some nice wheels. They tend to be lighter and snappier in a place where it really counts.
  • 8 4
 “ I'm not sure why this is such a heated topic, because the bike comes with its own premium wheels. ” Not sure why this is hard to grasp but not everyone buys completes, they may already have bought a premium carbon wheelset in “normal” boost that was expensive and would like to carry over.
  • 5 0
 Well you can’t buy a frame set of this bike so either way it doesn’t matter lol.
  • 6 1
 Just get the Problem Solvers adaptor kit, spend 10 mins re-dishing your wheel, and get after it…
  • 6 0
 When @mikelevy asked: "what type of rider would this bike, do well for it?" I sincerely though Henry was going to say: "a dentist".
  • 5 0
 That would have been hilarious.
  • 3 0
 @mattbeer I'm curious on your thoughts on the sizing for this bike? the M/L has a 475 reach and the L/XL 500 reach. Did you feel like 475 is enough for someone who ride a traditional large or 480 reach bike?
  • 3 0
 Unless maybe, they don’t frame only. Makes carry over kind of a non issue. While I understand being annoyed by a different standard, I think the rational behind superboost was pretty well explained by WAO.
  • 2 0
 As Matt said the low stack will affect reach for some also. I'm surprised it wasn't an issue for Henry as he prefers his bars a bit higher..
  • 1 0
 Remember once you normalize for stack height, that reach shortens quite a bit. I think too when the we see the SZ4 the break from SZ3 to 4 change to around the 6'2" mark.
  • 1 0
 @Darkstar187 5 mm of reach isn't going to make or break the fit, but there are other numbers to consider, like wheelbase and stack.
  • 8 5
 I may get tarred and feathered for this, but I actually think this thing's kind of ugly. Particularly the rear triangle. That being said, I think it's a really cool bike in every other sense.
  • 4 0
 "pairs with a narrow 52 mm Q-factor"

I think you mean chain line. 52mm Q-factor is impossible, at least with a 73mm BB she'll...
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil Yes, you are correct. Thanks for the catch. 52 mm chainline, 168 mm Q-factor. So many numbers!
  • 3 1
 Lets be honest that for now, using their own cockpit and wheels is a no brainer, and pairing that with NX eagle and RS select suspension would be, uh...missing the point, so here we are at $9k. Fair point on the cost, but again, if you are hunting for $8-10k bikes, the components thrown on this are actually a better price point than many others for the same money. That's kind of like saying that you got a Bugatti at a 10% discount and is a deal, but you get the point.
  • 2 0
 Is this bike (SP2) more expensive outside of Canada? It was $10,000 CAD last time I checked therefore under $8,000 USD (for the past month). For $8000 USD this bike seems to be better value than most other bikes at that price.
  • 1 0
 The fact that WAO was able to squeeze this much value out of a bike while doing the manufacturing in Canada is a marvel. Truly a good example of how attention to detail and to production framework can make the process leaner than for industry giants. They most likely end up with barely any waste and there's less exposure to harmful carbon dust released as part of the finishing process.
  • 6 0
 What a sweet bike
  • 4 0
 So do we get to see how the control bike performed against the field test competition?
  • 1 0
 Definitely want to see this. How do they rate the Enduro against this latest crop of bikes?
  • 6 0
 @salespunk @derekbnorakim We talk about the Enduro a bunch in the upcoming roundtable video (might come out tomorrow) and compare the bikes to it. Soon!
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: great to hear!
  • 5 0
 I'd love one, but in a frame-only.
  • 4 0
 What is the “upper end” of rider weight? I’m pushing 220 with a fully loaded pack.
  • 2 0
 i was wondering the same thing, most over 6ft riders are generally closing in on the 200/95kg mark
  • 2 1
 I think that it's time for dyno and suspension testing. I think that at least 50% of bike feel is really the suspension feel. Lots of bikes are really over dampened and many of them have shocks in which the rebound setting affects low speed compression (looking at you rock shox) which compromises the ability to properly tune the suspension. I am not suprised that bike with top level Fox shock feels good and balanced...
  • 1 0
 Can somebody explain chain guides to me? I've only lost my chain one time in the last 8 years of pretty hard riding on 1x SRAM and that was after my XX1 derailleur clutch failed. Is it riding style, do some people backpedal while they are descending? Maybe when racing Enduro or DH where a chain coming means winning or losing but for general riding I don't really get it?
  • 5 0
 Certain bikes seem to have some chain retention issues, possibly because of how their suspension, chain line, equipment choice, rough trails, too long of chain, etc. The WR1 doesn't have those issues and would probably be fine without a guide. I never use one and never have an issue, but some people like the security, especially when the weight penalty is so low.
  • 7 0
 I think a bash guard is far more important than a chain guide. I’ve dropped a chain about 3 times in the 5 years on my current bike but man I’ve bashed that poor little guard to oblivion.
  • 3 1
 @mikelevy: Not to be argumentative but the weight penalty might seem low for the actual guide but to mount it to the frame quite a few concessions have to be made when adding bosses to a carbon frame, I'm betting total weight added is 100g or more. Seems like a weight gain for what appears to be a fashion accessory.
  • 1 0
 Good question. As someone already pointed out, the bash guard is probably the most important part. If you ride in rough, rocky areas like most deserts, it’s very easy to damage a chain or chainring on a step-up or high-center situation. It’s happened to me more than once.

As far as the chain guide, it’s just an insurance policy for a failed clutch (or forgot to turn it back on), or some other rare freakish event that can happen at very high speeds on rough terrain, think UPS in Moab. Also, weight penalty of the chain guide is tiny when adding to a bash guard.
  • 2 0
 @OnTheRivet: Ah, excellent point. The frame would no doubt need to be a little heavier as well. It all adds up!
  • 3 0
 Will there ever be demo-days again? Would love to hear comparisons to the SJ Evo & Sentinel.
  • 2 0
 Wow the size 1 (small) has a reach of 450 mm....that is huge. Hopefully they bring out something a bit smaller in the future.
  • 2 0
 Yeah pretty crazy. iirc that is the same as my size large RM Slayer from 2017.
  • 1 1
 Or take the clue... If you want small, better get a 650b bike...
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the great review.

Any chance there will be a comparison to the Spesh Enduro control bike? Will be interesting seeing how it was last years favourite.
  • 5 0
 Yup, we compare the bikes to the Enduro in tomorrow's roundtable video Smile
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Legend, thanks heaps. All your work is super appreciated. Have a good weekend Smile

And my first comment should of read:

"Any chance there will be a comparison to the Spesh Enduro control bike? Will be interesting seeing how last years favorite stacks up".
  • 2 0
 Anyone know how tall the test riders are? I'm 6' and trying to decide between the S2 and S3. Coming off a L 2015 Sight so geometry is totally different.
  • 2 0
 @HughP: Matt Beer is 5'10" and 160lb, while Henry is 6' and 183lb.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: thanks so much for the info!. @henryquinney: do you think you would have preferred the S3 for sizing?
  • 3 0
 Could the nice person who sent me a private message about sizing please re-send it? I accidentally deleted your message
  • 1 1
 '...The Arrival is a do-it-all enduro bike...', so it is an All Mountain - Enduro Race bike, ¿isn't it?
Could be a good thing to do an scale chart/s (as Hambini does ;-) ) to situate the bike and its competitors based in its his category (define by its brand and Pinkbike staff - XC, ¿back country?, Trail, All Mountain, DH, Freeride) and its capability (Enduro Race, Bike Park, etc...), or tag them to do a fast search...
  • 3 1
 "Everything from the hardware and paint to the carbon sheets is sourced from within a five hundred mile radius"
Guess where those suppliers get most of their stuff from..
  • 4 0
 North America.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: So they buy from a distributor who buys stuff from all over North America or even the world? Locally sourced is a joke in composites. We're not talking about salad greens grown at the farm down the road. Composites have a global supply chain, from the PAN fibers to the resins to the mold bladders, etc. Let's not pretend otherwise.
  • 1 0
 I'm curious on what length stem there using on these shorter reach bikes..40 or 50mm..maybe a 50 were normally a 40on longer reaches..
  • 2 0
 Beautifully done, WR1! So... when are going to put a linkage front end on it and take over the world?
  • 4 0
 never ever.
  • 3 0
 How does this compare to the Pivot Switchblade or Firebird?
  • 1 0
 so now, how will the avg rider do.. ? ie most of pinkbike commentors who change bike every 4-5 months looking for something that will make them not suck?.. ie me lol
  • 1 0
 Toyota had been sponsoring these field tests? And yet they have such ironic commercials...
  • 2 0
 Would give my left nut to try this in Sentiers du Moulin!
  • 12 12
 So 0.4 seconds Slower than the YT and a good $4K more expensive...

I am all for trying to buy USA/Canada made gear, but that is a fair bit of dental work to perform...
  • 13 1
 You’re right to ask “is this bike 4000 dollars more fun than the YT?” But I would never use their little speed test as a factor for buying one these bikes. It’s meaningless.
  • 4 2
 Of course an overseas bike is cheaper. They are paying $8/day in Asia for labor vs $300 plus all of the EPA costs associated with composites in North America. Pollution remediation is insanely expensive under NAFTA.
  • 3 3
 @BiNARYBiKE: Funny that I got downvoted so hard...was making a joke...

Sensitive snowflake dentists around here...lol
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Also, I totally agree with 0.4 seconds not being a factor in buying a bike.
  • 4 2
 @scitrainer: Downvotes are from people who dislike overused jokes, not salty dentists. Also surprised someone who calls people snowflakes would argue in favor of a bike from Asia Smile
  • 5 1
 OK so this has been bugging me the entire time with these reviews!!! They are not comparing apples to apples. Every manufactures x01 build with carbon rims is equal or more expensive than this bike. Check for yourselves, compare xo1 build with carbon rims on Spesh, Ibis, Santa Cruz, Transition, Evil, Pivot etc..... they are all the similarly priced. You can't review different build specs and then claim its short fall is its expensive!!! You can complain they don't have lower end GX or XT builds but not that its more than its direct counterparts!!!! @mikelevy why do you guys not mention this?
  • 1 1
 @lyzyrdskydr: sooo snowflakes ride bikes from Asia or they dont or there are no snowflakes in Asia or wtf...? You confused me on that reference.

I didnt actually think it was salty dentists downvoting me...
  • 2 0
 @thad75: We're not comparing the bike's spec and saying which one is the best deal, just talking about how the bike performs. Especially right now, it's just not feasible to get in bikes of similar spec.

All of the bikes use high-end suspension that's comparable, which is the most important thing. A bike's drivetrain has very little effect on the outcome or how it performs as a whole.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Makes sense, I guess what im saying is once WA1 has frame only options that they are offering an incredible value as all will still be true that you have pointed out about it having a "Story" but at an almost identical price point. Point is frames will be same same, not more expensive.
  • 1 0
 @thad75: my thoughts EXACTLY!!! Just compared this SP2 build to my Santa Cruz (GX build) and the 2021 pricing for SC is only $2k less... add the carbon wheels alone and you're over the price of this much higher spec WR1. I think its a decent price for what you get... that being said it definitely isn't cheap!
  • 1 0
 so whats the best affordable alternative to this frame? Asking for a friend.
  • 1 0
 Specialized Evo AL if you can find one from a few years ago
  • 2 0
 Suspension layout looks a lot like a Giant Maestro? Am I the only one?
  • 4 0
 Lots of co-rotating dual-link stuff out there for sure, but different pivot locations (and shock tunes) mean that many of them have unique characteristics. Having ridden a few Maestro bikes over the last year, I can say that WR1's suspension performs very differently.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: is it similar to the Pivot Firebird or Ripmo ?
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: ok but let's see the charts for antisquat and leverage.
  • 2 4
 So this has a low stack and a 475 mm reach, similar to the recently reviewed Knolly with similar travel. But the review here was gushing and the reviewer was 5" shorter. Did PB just kind of prove the point of most of the comment section under the Knolly article?

I have never owned a Knolly, not a fanboy, I just find it interesting...
  • 2 0
 No mention of the 157 superboost vs 148 boost from Levy
  • 2 0
 I'm indifferent about it tbh
  • 2 0
 I want a slowmo of levy's eyebrow raise in every vid
  • 1 0
 Looks amazing, hope I can try one soon.
  • 2 0
 Is this the one?
  • 5 3
 Looka like a transession
  • 2 2
 Looks like a ReignPatrol, or a PatrolSession
  • 1 1
 I was hoping someone would say it....hurtling towards 2030 where every bike has the same boring linkage and homogeneous characteristics. The important thing tho is that theyre cheap and profitable to produce. When this is all thats out there im dropping FR/DH and only riding slope on a hardtail. FTS.
  • 1 0
 @trailsmurf:
Yeah, we need more shock-destroying yokes. Innovation!!!
  • 2 1
 love the bike... but somehow the review made my stoke go down hill.
  • 1 0
 Such a beautiful bike! Well done WAO.
  • 1 1
 Thankfully, amazingly no-one has their knickers in a twist about superboost hubs.
  • 1 0
 Maybe a bike available nov 2022
  • 1 0
 You can have one this Nov build slots still available.
  • 1 0
 I'm too fat and tall for it?... Damn (I'm also too broke for it too).
  • 1 2
 I like everything about this bike, but if I break a frame I bought brand new I probably am going to want a new frame vs having it repaired.
  • 1 0
 Be still my beating wallet
  • 2 0
 I want one
  • 1 0
 Levy's computer is dirty. Clean it man!
  • 1 0
 and just in time for the new ABBA album
  • 1 0
 A new benchmark for boutique classification.
  • 1 0
 What??!! No one is complaining about the Super Boost?
  • 1 0
 I like this from their website;

Purpose
To be ridden wherever you want.
  • 1 0
 Why not a photo of the non-drive side so we can see the suspension layout?
  • 1 0
 "Who is this bike for"? People who like massive amounts of debt.
  • 1 0
 Imagine how light it would be with 2ft less front brake housing.
  • 1 0
 It’s time to do a head to head vs the switchblade.
  • 1 0
 Look to Banshee for the AL version.....
  • 3 4
 You missed the Bars/LOW FRONT END in the the cons - BUT Wow great start WAO - I would love to own this bike.
  • 1 0
 That just depends on rider preference. 25mm is an average rise. I would switch for something lower.
  • 2 0
 @DavidGuerra: it’s not the bars it’s the length of the head tube. As a tall guy, I actually have to watch out for this. It’s annoying. You end up with steer tubes that are too short and then your only option is bar rise. They both switched to a 35mm rise. That’s not common.
  • 1 0
 I agree. My only comment is directed at the fact that they are bringing it as an issue in the video yet do not mention it in the write up. @BiNARYBiKE:
  • 1 0
 @dldewar Our team discussed if this was actually a con or not. I never found it to be a problem, but mentioned that it does put you in a more aggressive riding position. You can also choose different bar heights in the Arrival built kits.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: At 1.85 and based on prior experience, I would probably be happy with a 15mm rise bar on this bike, with the stem all the way down. But yes, these are relatively short headtubes. This is actually something that at one point I would have liked, to push the grips even lower (I was running a flat bar already), but I'm slowly getting used to a slightly higher hand position, which ends up being less fatiguing.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: higher bar rise as part of the build is cool. Don’t know if I’ve ever seen that option. Makes sense when they’re using their own bar though.
  • 1 0
 Take. My. Money. Please.
  • 1 1
 Only wished it came with mullet option....
  • 1 3
 Bike had no place in an enduro test. It’s an all mountain/ big trail bike. Biased review, I am disappointed in pink bike.
  • 3 0
 Nah, you're 110% wrong on that. WR1 bills it as an enduro bike, knew the bikes it was going up against, and the WR1 actually went quicker than bikes with more travel in this test. The Arrival could be your trail bike, all-mountain bike, or enduro bike. Depending on what you want and where you live, those terms are kinda interchangeable. Also, they guys loved the bike.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: then why wasn’t it compared to the Transition Sentinel? The Sentinel has 150mm rear travel just like the arrival. Sentinel has the same travel and it’s a all mountain/ big trail bike. A couple of years ago the Sentinel was an enduro bike, now it’s not. Sorry mike, you need to keep up with the times.
  • 3 0
 We are one - “hey check out our enduro bike, our riders have been placing well in EWS races on it” @mustclime: ThAtz nOt EnDuro

Thank you for your insight into the world of all mountain and big trail bikes. A pleasure to read before my morning coffee.
  • 2 0
 @mustclime: Because we have the Spire here instead. Sorry @mustclime but you're getting stuck on terms Wink
  • 1 2
 It's arrived!
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