Pinkbike Poll: How Easy (or Hard) Is It to Work On Your Bike?

Sep 9, 2022 at 12:17
by Matt Beer  
The GT prototype showing its underbelly.

Autumn is fast approaching and it's time for one of two things; overhaul your bike after a summer of neglect, or cut your loses and sell what's left of it. Ok, maybe you stay on top of your wrenching or are an honest person and throw some new bits on the bike before you sell it. At some point, you'll have to sink some money into the bike that's pulled you through a season of sending. That poses questions like, can you do the wrenching at home, how much do you spend on replacement parts, and are those bits buried deep in a brand's support website?

There are some components on your bike that simply wear out, like chains and tires, but others will last a whole lot longer when you keep them in tip top shape, such as wheels and suspension. A few of those items on the maintenance schedule require unique tools and skills. Even basic kitting out a basic workshop isn't free and although there are plenty of YouTube tutorial videos, home mechanic work can be limited by specific tools. So, how much love do you give your bike, and is it a daunting task?

What do you define as a "tune-up"?



Every now and then these repairs take longer than expected when you run into hurdles. For example, just this week, I attempted to replace the shift cable and housing that ran internally through the frame. Now, that should be a short task - under twenty minutes, but problems arose when the housing guide became kinked somewhere inside the frame near the BB. This escalated to the point where I had to disassemble the linkage of the rear triangle to free up the housing. My frustration grew when I found that the pivots contained two sets of washers on either side of the bearings, which meant I needed another set of hands to reassemble everything. Long story short, bike repairs aren't always as straightforward as you envision them.

How much maintenance can you do yourself?



When it does come time to replace frame components, like pivot bearings, or order up a fancy new shock for your steed, it can be challenging and sometimes overwhelming to know how to locate the correct parts with all of the "standards" out there. Brands have made the user experience drastically better in recent years by providing tech documents and drawings online, but that's not always the case. Each company varies with how much information they divulge. Not all of them list the suggested shock tunes, bearing sizes, spoke lengths, or unique frame protectors.

How easy it is to find the parts you are looking for?

Do frame, suspension, and other component manufacturers provide easy access to source replacement part numbers or compatibility info?


Do you think frame and hub bearing kits are overpriced or wear out too quicky?

Often, you'll find expensive, proprietary bearings in your bike that can be impossible to find besides purchasing them from the frame/component manufacturer.



Exploded view of a Commencal Supreme.
It's just like putting together a LEGO set, right?

When it is time to shell out for fresh replacement parts, there is the argument for spending less on components that are more likely to break, such as a derailleur. Why would you spend hundreds of dollars on a finicky device that hangs dreadfully low off of you bike, destine to be smashed to pieces at any moment, when you could spend less than $60 on the Shimano Deore 12-speed option? Will that last longer or break less frequently than the top of the line XTR version? If you could avoid damaging either in back to back tests, I'd wager that the higher quality pivots and stronger materials in the XTR would win that battle.

Whether your bike comes with basic or premium parts, what do you replace those components with when they break or wear out ?

Buy nice, pay once, stay the same, or buy twice and pay the price?



Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
353 articles

224 Comments
  • 141 3
 Of course the majority of the PB readers chose the "I'm confident in disassembling anything on my bike and will make or buy any tools I need." option. I would not expect anything less Wink
  • 19 13
 Riding a hardtail, this is the answer. I think rear suspension is more complex with a pressurized expansion chamber (or whatever it is called that pushes the oil back) and all those pivots everywhere. Brake bleeds, front suspension, wheel building etc is fairly doable with affordable tools. I just never installed a headset or reamed a headtube as I'd do this so rarely that it wouldn't be worth the investment of tools. But the other maintenance, it has to be done regularly so it is easily pays to learn and do it yourself. Have to add, I also consciously buy components that are easy to service and have readily available and affordable parts. I probably wouldn't invest in a suspension fork that'd requires a lot of proprietary expensive tools to perform a service.

Maybe us hardtail riders are also more likely to assemble a full bike from parts so the last question is kinda odd.
  • 92 1
 As an engineer…
  • 29 5
 It's should have mentioned full suspension rebuilds including damper services. I do this, it takes a number of specialised tools and decent mechanical skills. My guess is most of the folk who answered yes to this probably don't do it.
  • 8 0
 @vinay: I agree with your perspective. Most maintenance tasks on a bike are easy to learn via youtube and the tools are not too pricey. Its just hard for me to believe that most riders can service almost everything on their bikes. I would say that 10-20% of my biking friends know how to service everything on their bikes (in comparison to what the PB polls say). Cheers!
  • 21 1
 Hey, if I can change a timing belt on my car or adjust valves on my Ducati then I can do a pretty good half-assed job of adjusting my rear derailleur.
  • 1 4
 @IMeasureStuff: I do actually have a full suspension bike (Cannondale Prophet) and I have a Magura MX shock in there. The shock is easier to "work" on than my fork Wink . And the single pivot design isn't too hard either.

But I absolutely get your point! That said, I don't know honestly whether most of the people on here actually ride full suspension or hardtails. Wouldn't be surprised if at least most of what people on here ride could be ridden on a hardtail. If we'd go full spectrum of the two wheeled stuff, we can't ignore those riding with pedal assist. I've yet to come across someone who can actually do a full service on one of these motors. I for one would never dare!

@mateosan100: I built my first wheel using the instructions from Sheldon Brown. I was given the tip to just take it easy and it will work out. And it did indeed. I built a rear wheel and took it to the Megavalanche Alpe d'Huez (and it survived the full week). My wheels may not be one of those you'd sell with warranty that they'd never need service and all that but that doesn't matter. If you can build your own wheels, you can also keep them in check. Brake service, Magura just gives you a workshop manual with your brakes. They're supposed to be serviced by the customer! My current forks may be a cheat. They're Magura TS8 forks. Grease lubed lowers, just a positive air chamber, easiest forks out there Smile .
  • 14 0
 While its easy to be intimidated at first, most stuff is actually pretty easy, if you're handy with a wrench, and have some sort of mechanical sympathy. Just take your time, buy the tools you need, and don't panic.

My personal issue so far is damper servicing though. I don't have Nitrogen laying around to charge a fork/shock. I've done air can services, and lower leg services, but still haven't bled a damper, or tuned a shim stack.

Someday maybe.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: Long time hardtail rider here (singlespeed even. talk about low maintenance) and there certainly is more maintenance on a full-suspension, but I don't think it's beyond the capabilities of most home mechanics. I had a bit of a learning curve upgrading to a geared fully, but it hasn't been that difficult. I'll pay a shop for a full rebuild of my shock, but if you can do a brake bleed you can do a basic seals/aircan service easily enough, and when I am paying for service I'm perfectly capable of removing/installing the shock myself, which saves a bit on labor costs. I haven't yet had to replace linkage bearings, so unless I buy a bearing press (I've seen some cheaper ones geared toward the home mechanic) I might have to have that done in a shop.

Certainly, you do have a point about expensive tools that rarely get used. Could I install a headset if I had the tools? Sure. But between the bearing cup presses, facing tools, etc, you've got several hundred dollars worth of tools for doing *one* specific job that's *rarely* done outside the context of a bike shop/race team, etc. I'd have to pay my LBS to install a *lot* of headsets before those specific tools would ever pay for themselves, so I'll happily bring my bike to a shop for those sorts of jobs.
  • 5 0
 @IMeasureStuff: I used to strip and rebuild all my forks and rear shocks but i got tired of buying seal kits that always had a seal missing or the wrong size so i now just do lower leg and air can service my dampers go to a suspension shop so i can have them back within a week .
  • 1 0
 I at present have drawn the line and a service on my Ohlins suspension. Otherwise, I buy all the tools I need to do whatever repair.
  • 2 0
 @SoCalTrev: Last time I bought a fork (online) and called my lbs whether I could bring it to have the steerer cut, he was too busy to do it but just invited me to it myself in his workshop with his tools. Yes a cutting guide isn't particularly expensive but still not something I'd regularly need. He didn't want money (for me using his tools) but even if he did it would still not be something I'd buy. But a truing stand, you're going to spend hours behind one. I'll happily spend two days building a full wheel (spread over two days or so). They're not going to let you do that in their workshop Wink . Get your own truing stand!

And yes, removing and installing a shock isn't too hard. Just have some common sense and think about how the suspension wants to move and how to fixate it. On the Cannondale Prophet it is easy. I just leave it standing on the ground and wrap a strap around the swingarm and seattube. That will keep it in place when you remove the shock. If you can't imagine what happens with your own bike, at least have someone (knowledgeable) help you think that out before you start removing bolts.
  • 5 0
 @ocnlogan: this is why all my bikes run Rockshox as even their most high end products only need a few specialised tools and a readily available 600psi shock pump.

Damper services in Fox gear can involve Nitrogen and a vacuum pump!
  • 7 2
 Can confirm this to not be the case for most of the people I know that ride. Hell, most shop employees can't even lace a wheel anymore.
  • 9 1
 @wobblegoblin: "My brand new crankarm stripped out and my pedal fell out while riding, the crankset is clearly defective!!!"

"Did you install the pedal on the wrong crankarm?"


"I'M AN ENGINEER! I KNOW WHAT I'M DOING!!! ITS DEFECTIVE!!!"
  • 6 2
 @mateosan100: its hard for me to believe that people find bikes so incredibly complicated.
  • 2 3
 @scott-townes: Installing a pedal on the wrong crankarm is a clear sign of special skills.

@kevman : Is it? I feel that the skill of building a wheel has gotten some mythical image as if it is something only a few people can learn. Whereas if you just follow the instructions, you'll get there. Just give it time. A bit like riding a unicycle. It is not a special skill. Practice half an hour a day and in two weeks you'll be riding unassisted. Either way, building a wheel does take a bit of time which is free for the enthusiast who likes to chill and have something in his or her hands whilst chatting with friends and family. But for a mechanic, time is money. And if selling a new factory made wheel is cheaper then they'll do that. I live in The Netherlands and I've got the impression most wheels sold in bike shops are for commuting, typically Nexus geared rear hubs and dynamo front hubs. When a rim breaks, it is cheaper to replace the wheel than just the rim. They do keep the wheel for parts, because they can swap out the geared rear hub cartridge in case someone comes in with broken gearing. So I'm lucky in that respect as new these hubs are fairly expensive but I can get them for cheap, buy rim, spokes etc and lace up new wheels for family and friends. I don't claim my wheels are better than machine built wheels. But I don't need to count those hours as money. Just chill, have a tea and a chat. It can be self-time or it can be social. A bit like knitting really. Give it a few hours and there will be a wheel. You can't go wrong really.

So yeah, the point I'm trying to make is that wheelbuilding may actually be one of those things where it may actually be more worthwhile to do as an amateur than as a professional. A bit like patching a tube.
  • 3 2
 @vinay: just because you CAN ride something on a hard tail doesn’t mean you have to. Sometimes it’s fun to not bruise your tail bone too lol
  • 3 0
 @IMeasureStuff: Same here. Rockshox forks and rear shocks are fairly simple and straight forward. That's the only component I would keep buying from SRAM. Keep things simple and easy to maintain is always the best thing.
  • 6 0
 @scott-townes: My favorite is:
“$15 for a derailleur hanger!? I can engineer one in my garage in half an hour.”

“Ok, then why are you here?”

Shockingly, he bought the hanger.
  • 4 0
 @wobblegoblin:

Is the next part of your sentence: “as an engineer, with a BMX background,….” ?
  • 1 1
 @wobblegoblin: with a BMX background of course
  • 3 3
 @TannerValhouli: As an armchair anatomist I'd say if you're bruising your tail bone, you're doing it wrong. Actually, when you stand up, you won't hurt anything at all. That said, it is not the way to do epic rides indeed, hence why I don't do epic rides.

As for the BMX thing, they can be a bitch to work on. Try to get the pump head on the Schrader valve of a 20" wheel with 48 spokes. I haven't yet tried to lace one of these. U-brakes and a cable detangler (headset rotor). Hydraulic disc brakes are a breeze in comparison.
  • 9 0
 Everybody in pinkbike has nitrogen charging setups for shock dampers in their basements.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: Just like everyone has a nitrogen tank for their tires Wink
  • 6 1
 Well I did go to bike mechanic school, worked in shops, and owned my own specialty wheel building business. But I had to select "I can tension spokes, perform a fork lower service, and bleed my own brakes." because I don't have specialized suspension tools lol.
  • 3 0
 @shagolagal: $15 for a hanger? more like $30 to $45 (looking at you wheels manufacturing LOL)
  • 3 0
 @shagolagal: Engineer idiot savants.
  • 2 0
 Buncha liars.
  • 14 5
 Is riding a hardtail the MTB equivalent of veganism? Gotta make sure everyone knows you're using an inferior machine
  • 4 0
 Disassembling is the easiest part. Now for assembling correctly...
  • 1 0
 @jonbrady85: yeah, but a damper is far more complex than either of those jobs.
  • 2 0
 @IMeasureStuff: I agree, it should have split this category up. I do everything except damper services that require vacuum bleeders/nitrogen charging. And I’ll confess that I sometimes take my fork/shock to the suspension shop just to save myself time, though if I’m not busy I like to do it myself
  • 1 0
 @IMeasureStuff: Not only do I measure stuff too for a living (Metrologist GE Aviation), I also do all my service work, unless I'm pressed for time.
  • 2 0
 Haha, I see these types as customers all the time. Lots of people think they are better at working on their bike than they really are or at least they say.
  • 2 0
 Where was I start confident but quickly realize that the part I am working on is operated by dark magic and I need to take the partially “fixed” bike to a local bike shop wizard.
  • 1 0
 @ihertzler: too many bearings are never enough.
  • 1 0
 @dirtmcleod: awesome, what sort of metrology work? My little company does 3D Laser Tracking, Industrial Photogrammetry and a bit of precision total work.
  • 2 0
 @IMeasureStuff: I own all the non-contact inspection processes which includes 4 GOM Structured Light Systems and 8 Hexagon Optivs which we use for cooling hole inspection utilizing the touch probe for alignment, camera for initial hole location and a Chromatic Confocal Sensor for hole scanning, holes are ~.030". Prior to GE Aviation I was at a GE Power R&D facilitzy and we had pretty much one of everything. Prior to GE I worked for a Third Party dimensional inspection lab we had a couple of scan arms, CMM's and Laser trackers. I've done at least a little of everything really but my focus is Point Cloud inspection, Polyworks and GOM though I can program a number of other inspection softwares.
  • 1 0
 Facility*
  • 1 0
 @vinay: A Lifeline cutting guide is around £11 at CRC and I use it pretty regularly as you can also use them to trim down handlebars.
  • 2 0
 @scott-townes: Downvoted by the engineer, who is currently wondering why his left pedal feels loose
  • 1 0
 " Is riding a hardtail the MTB equivalent of veganism? Gotta make sure everyone knows you're using an inferior machine"

@ihertzler: That's what I've been thinking during my Triathalon.
  • 3 0
 @ihertzler: yes but no, hardtail are cheaper to own and maintain, veganism is a whole 'nother story
  • 2 0
 @IMeasureStuff: The pressurized IFP Chambers of, for example, Fox Shocks is the only thing I don't do myself. Too much of an investment in tools for me. But I clicked "I do anything" anyway, because it is true enough.
I have done damper rebuilds in forks. I have a Formula MOD shock that has a pressurized bladder instead of IFP and it comes with shock pump for that purpose. That design has the home mechanic in mind, it is really easy to do anything yourself.
I think it is fair to say that if there are maybe one or two things that you don't do yourself, even though you could, you still fall into the category of "do everything myself".
  • 2 0
 @IMeasureStuff: can I rebuild my fork? Yes.

even though I'll service everything if I have to, I will Gladly pay someone if suspension service or frame bearings are involved.
  • 2 0
 Even if I don't understand it, I will still take it apart Smile
  • 1 0
 I can do everything on my bike including building wheels, except full internals service on suspension so I chose that option, but I haven't had a bike long enough so far (probably stretching intervals) to do that so my bike has never had work at a bike shop
  • 3 0
 @j-t-g: Everyone knows that PBers are either engineers or dentists. One has nitrogen available at work, and the other has nitrous at work.
  • 2 0
 full suspension rebuild is the big black box that most people cannot touch due to the invabailability of tools (vacuum bleeding, special clamps) so I was quite surprised who many people chose that option.
  • 1 0
 @Helmchentuned: the question is "what do you define as a tune up" not "what are your capabilities".
  • 1 0
 the amount of those people that came into the shop asking us to finish their build because they couldnt do it or didint have the tools, or knowhow, was insane. if you dont know how to do it, bring it in the shop. its going to cost you the less in the end because you do it yourself and fuck it up and now we gotta fix your messup and charge more
  • 1 0
 @TylerG96: I've never worked in a shop, and never been one of the people you describe, but I think the risk of having to pay a shop more money to fix their screw up is a known risk, and if its the solution they have to settle for in the end, at least they learned something. The better advice is "if you don't know how to do it, ask someone to teach you (or look it up on the internet), then if you still can't fix it, bring it to the shop." The shop's market is "paying customers who can't fix their own bikes," so I don't see a problem with a customer attempting something on their own and knowing when to cut their losses/seek professional assistance.
  • 1 0
 @scott-townes: Who are you calling a savant? LOL
  • 1 0
 @bb8: quite right - it's the only way to truly understand anything!
  • 31 1
 Related to the bearings question: I strip my bearings out take them to the local bearing shop they do their magic with their vernier callipers and bring me out a fresh set for a fraction of the price of a kit. They even have a list up of common bike bearings.
  • 45 0
 How about the I can do it all but I'm to lazy option.
  • 2 0
 Would you be able to share the name of said shop?
  • 9 12
 Be careful with that though... getting the correct size is one thing but most bike linkages use Enduro bearings that have more balls in them than typical bearings. This is so they will better deal with the limited rotation compared to a wheel or bottom bracket bearing.
  • 7 1
 @millsr4: You can get the "all balls" or "cageless" specification from most brands.
  • 18 1
 @millsr4: They're called full complement, it's not something that Enduro came up with. Less common but not bike specific or anything like that, you can get them in most good bearing shops.
  • 4 1
 I have a place local to me that sells nothing but bearings. If they can't get it...it probably does not exist.
  • 4 2
 Before I take out all the bearings on my bike, I refer to the exploded diagrams for my bike to see what they are. Then, if I need to, I can source out the bearings I need. Usually, the bearing need to be washed or cleaned and then regreased before putting them back in. Unless the bearings don't spin freely or has scratchy feel as you spin them on your fingers, replace them as necessary. I wouldn't bother going to the LBS to get them measured if you know what the specs are ahead of time. I'm sure the LBS would gladly sell you a whole set of bearing for over $100 (or quid) even if your bearing are still ok. The ones they'll like sell you are the Enduro bearing. These aren't anything special and they're not the highest grade bearings but they're definitely way overpriced!
  • 10 0
 what the hells a bearing shop?
  • 2 1
 @ridelife6: machining shops that make different grades and applications of bearings for automotive, industrial, and other industries that require bearings.
  • 7 0
 @hubertje-ryu: correct. It's amazing how many people think enduro "max" bearings are exclusive to mtb.
  • 6 1
 bearing shop??????
  • 17 1
 @HollyBoni: please for the love of all that is good in this world don't buy enduro bearings. they are overpriced, poorly manufactured, and are simply pure marketing BS.

NSK, SKF are cheaper and much higher quality.
  • 3 0
 @Garlic-Breead: yes they exist and where I live every decent size town has one. Bring in your bearings and they will either have them in stock or can get them in. You will often get a choice of brands and price points.
  • 3 0
 @IMeasureStuff: just looked it up, i have 2 really close to me! never knew they existed. will go there the next time i need a bearing refresh
  • 3 1
 @millsr4: Enduro bearings do have pretty big balls, but Rampage bearings on the other hand.....
  • 1 0
 Do they give you MAX bearings though?
  • 2 0
 @the-burd: "MAX" bearings are also known as "full complement" bearings. Most bearing manufacturers make them.
  • 1 0
 My experience with the local bearing shop was that they weren't much better priced than the local bike shops. They did have all the bearings I was looking for though.
  • 1 0
 @leftypumpkin: It depends on the grade of the ball bearings or the press bearings you want. For linkage bearings, I don't think you need highly polished bearings. Probably average grade will do. For wheels, you'll need very high grade bearings and that's where the cost will be.
  • 1 0
 @HollyBoni: TIL, thanks!
  • 23 1
 Fox suspension is my main gripe and the only thing I can’t service. Deliberately overpriced tooling and requirement for nitrogen in the IFP forces you to go to official service centres and it’s not cheap. The service intervals are also too short. Thinking of replacing fork and shock with a different brand.
  • 12 1
 Rockshox is your best friend here periow. They even publish all their rear shock tunes and sell shim kits to allow you to tune it yourself.
  • 10 3
 DVO beats RockShox in serviceability by far.
  • 7 0
 My problem with Fox, other than the expensive proprietary, is the fact that when they update designs replacement parts are nowhere to be found.

I've shared my experiences with a local suspension shop on not being able to find parts for my fork 2 years after it was made & he agreed on having the same issues. Fox's response is oh well, whereas other brands like Cane Creek have gone out of the way to make a custom part on something that can no longer be found.
  • 1 0
 Nope. 60% of a service is completely left out. @eicca:
  • 6 0
 You can use air. Don’t need nitrogen. Says I’m the service manual
  • 2 1
 @eicca: Please explain how they beat rockshox BY FAR.
  • 3 0
 @Freddye: I was curious and just downloaded the DVO Topaz full service manual. Honestly it was really straightforward and the only extra tools needed was a bleed syringe and a 10mm shaft clamps. I would definitely simpler to do than a Rockshox Super deluxe ultimate. If their other shocks are like this then it's hats off to DVO
  • 3 0
 @eicca: That's what I thought, until I tried to service my Diamond's damper and discovered they don't sell rebuild kits? There are good instructions for how to bleed the damper, but you're just expected to replace huge chunks of it when the o-rings wear out, I don't consider that to be "serviceable" at all.
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: But how do you get it in there? It's not a normal valve is it, can't use a shock pump.
  • 1 2
 @motdrawde: yes you can, it’s a simple schrader valve.
  • 1 0
 @MaartenR: On a DPX2?
  • 3 1
 @freeridejerk888: You're a service manual?
  • 1 0
 @motdrawde: oh wait no sorry I thought you meant the topaz
  • 1 0
 @MitchSwanson: I recently sent my 2013 Fox fork to the Wanaka Fox agent for a service and their assessment was the damper had "collapsed" and they could not source a replacement damper and the fork should be replaced.

Since then I have disassembled the damper, located and replaced the 2x damaged o-rings, filled with the damper with oil and the fork is now working again.

While i have always supported Fox servicing, the parts availability and knowledge in this case was limited for forks 9 years +.

If youre gonna own bikes with older forks, despite the agents diagnosis, it is possible the fork or shock my be economical to fix.
  • 3 0
 @Ritgut: I agree. We should have parts for 15yr otherwise we are trashing the planet. Especially rebuild kits and be happy to fit them for you.
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: In a lot of cases, you can use air, but it has to be really dry air. With air having any moisture in the chambers supposedly can cause corrosion and/or oxidation (from H20 and O2). If you're using pure N2 gas, there's nothing else in the gas except pure nitrogen. So, likelihood of corrosion and oxidation is removed. The experts also say that N2 gas is more stable than air as air, which is composed of nitrogen, O2, CO2, and H2O. N2 is not inert either. Some say that Argon is a better gas to use as it is totally inert, but the cost is probably way higher. You can watch on Youtube on guys with big trucks and air shocks. They use a small nitrogen tank to fill their shocks. It's another several hundred dollars of investment to make if your shocks require N2 rather than normal air.

For one thing, normal air is cheap and if you regularly maintain the shock, I don't think normal really dry air would do much damage unless if water gets inside.
  • 1 0
 Literally leaves out 70% of the rebuild on the onyx and diamond. There’s a bladder to change. Zero mention you buy a “rebuild line kit they send you 10 parts with no mention of how to remove it. That’s kinda wack. The tops also missed a few steps but I can rmeber when. Hats off to them right! @IMeasureStuff:
  • 22 0
 I don’t know about you, but my LBS is unfortunately pretty subpar, and I simply don’t trust them to work on my bike. Plus, the cost of the tools are still less than half the price of the service.
  • 12 1
 This. Also the 3wk lead time for the privilege of having their apprentice work on my bike.
  • 22 4
 I can't even begin to explain how critically important it is for a MTB'er to tear down their own bike and rebuild at least twice. Why?

You better know how to tinker/fix/troubleshoot an issue when you're at mile marker 7 on that 16 mile ride.
  • 18 0
 True! I do my best brake bleeds at mile 7
  • 10 0
 I mean you could walk….if your not great at trail side bearing replacements, or shock rebuilds.
  • 3 1
 @dwbaillar: I know you're being facetious and /s, but true story...buddy and I were riding Tamarancho in July. Went down into the canyon where we shouldn't have and it was so hot his DOT brakes swelled/seized up, locked on the rotor and his rear wheel wouldn't rotate. We were miles from anywhere. I had my tools and equipment and we were able to pry the pads apart along with some sticks, and took the pads out entirely so just so we could keep riding. This wasn't about getting a brake bleed done, it was having the requisite understanding how all the bike components work so you can troubleshoot and get creative when the LBS isn't 12' away.
  • 19 0
 but the bike needs a software update...
  • 6 1
 but you bought an e-bike...
  • 2 0
 Only if you have a SRAM AXS groupo out in the boonies with no cell coverage Wink Or, if you have a Garmin device and it wants to do an upgrade in the middle of the ride and the whole device freezes up!
  • 17 5
 People really unseal a sealed bearing and re grease it? That’s wild when they cost 1-4 bucks each. Also local shop charged me 14.99 per enduro bearing when I wasn’t really paying attention. Got 8 ceriamic ones for 21 online wnd they last 3-5 times as long. f*ck ENDRUO and there over pieces Chinese crap
  • 5 1
 You need a bearing puller though.
  • 14 0
 Why deal with hammering out old bearings and possibly wallowing a soft alu bore when you can just pop the seal off, clean and regrease (with better/longer lasting grease) in the same amount of time? Agree on the overpriced branded bearing thing though...
  • 3 2
 You need a bearing puller though.
  • 20 0
 @Eatsdirt: Because bearings wear down, they develop play, and the races get battered (especially on pivot bearings). A clean and regrease won't solve that, but it can help to extend their life in certain situations.
  • 6 0
 I don't throw stuff out if I can fix it. We can't complain about how bad carbon-composite materials are for the environment when we chuck parts in the bin that could have easily been given a longer life.
  • 4 6
 @Eatsdirt: once you break the seal, the seal is compromised. You may buy yourself some time on the bearing, but it isnt going to last as long as a replacement.

Every grease is "better and longer lasting" than its competitors.
  • 5 0
 Why throw out perfectly fine bearings when you can just as easily pull them out, clean them, and then regrease them? Yeah, I agree about those Enduro bearings - it's like all LBS carry them and mark up the prices on these by several hundred times. That was the first time I got ripped off. The second time is when I didn't have time to service my own Rockshox Monarch rear shock. The LBS sent it away to Northshore to get it fully serviced and I had to pay over $200! This is the reason why I do my own stuff. It's not hard when you can find stuff on the net and watch videos on how to service everything that's mainstream.

It's better to pop out all the bearings and their backings away from the frame. It's easier to get all the grit out, blow dry and then regrease before pressing them back into the frame. If you get the right tools, it's a pretty easy job. Yes, tools are expensive but you can look around and get quality tools for way less than the brand names such as ParkTool, Wheels Mfg, etc...A lot of times, you can easily get the correct concrete bolt expanders at home depot or MEC for like a few dollars for knocking the bearings out, especially if you have bearing that are placed back to back with a spacer in the middle in the rear linkage. A blind hammer kit is also not that expensive from the automotive departments. Plus, these tools can be used over and over. So, it's an investment for the long haul, not just for a single use, just like most parts that can be cleaned up and re-used for a longer period of time rather than keep buying new parts and throwing away still good usable parts.
  • 5 4
 @RonSauce: that's funny, given the first thing I do to a new frame/wheelset is over pack them with "better and longer lasting" grease that is actually intended for a completely different application... and somehow I don't ever need to replace them. No slop, no corrosion, no gritty feeling. From desert riding to PWN downpours. But if you're telling me I'm doing all wrong...
  • 1 0
 Wow you know they wear it out. @Eatsdirt:
  • 1 0
 @Eatsdirt: well what is your magic grease brand?
  • 1 4
 @dwbaillar: A magician never reveals his tricks... to snarks. Every afternoon I can give you 600 reasons why the DOD would chose to use this grease liberally.
  • 2 0
 @dwbaillar: Bel Ray Waterproof grease is nothing short of amazing. It's very thick, sticky and extremely water and corrosive proof over time. If you need to repack a bearing or need to apply grease to a thread, headset etc.. It's the business. Also well priced and a tub will last a life time. The only place I don't use it is in between two smooth surfaces, like seat posts or a through axle.
www.belray.com/product/waterproof-grease
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888 : why not, as long as it works? Easier than changing the bearings, nothing to buy/order/wait for. I tried that and the pivots now move smoothly, without play. In the meantime I ordered the bearings... But won't bother with a replacement while the original ones do the job.

This is on a Radon swoop that has seen 5 seasons of bike park under 95kg, without any bearing service. So I am tempted to believe that good quality bearings have a near infinite life span.

And there's no risk of catastrophic failure like a chain, is there?
  • 12 2
 I've seen that some mfr's are intentionally designing products to nearly force me to a shop or ship the product back to THEM for service. Fox stands out in my mind on this one. And they provide vague information on their website until they receive the product, then they have me over a barrel and clearly know they can charge whatever the dart hits on the board. MTB service has entered the realm of car service, once they have you in the shop, they have you where they want you. I do almost all my own service and usually in far less time than any shop or Mfr expects me to wait, and for a lot less since I'm only paying for parts in that case. However, I upgraded my suspension this year and didn't think to look into service costs. It doubled from what my previous suspension parts cost to service AND they now require special tools. This is how Mfr's raise their GP (gross profit - and it IS gross!) or force many of us to their authorized service shops. I've read many comments here from guys bitching about eBikes. One guy told me it was because they don't want MTB to turn into what the ski business has turned into. Yeah, because turning it into the car repair business is so much better. Insert eye roll here.
  • 8 0
 Interesting coincidence that the abbreviation for "manufacturer" is "mfr".
  • 12 0
 usually i fix one thing, but another thing breaks in the process
  • 2 0
 one time i was replacing my brake pads on my shimano brakes and my dog come up and scares the crap out of me, i was resetting the porcelain brake pistons and i chipped one of them. because of that little mistake i had to buy a whole new caliper!
  • 1 0
 @Garlic-Breead: Seriously! f*ck Shimano for not selling a small parts kit or replacement parts for their calipers. I did the same thing when trying to push back pistons on a set of Zee brakes.
  • 7 0
 It's amazing how long you can prolong the life of things with good maintenance. I recently heard of a Giant Reign with an old Monarch that only recently gave up the ghost after going strong for decades.
  • 1 0
 During and after the pandemic, I learning that it's good to have a stockpile of redundant components.
  • 3 2
 @CSharp: As far as I know this one was still running all her original parts, although she may have had some stuff swapped out. RIP Liz.
  • 8 0
 Someone buys factory bearing kits ? You can get a set of SKF, *ag or NSK for about 40 to 50 percent cheaper. And those are really the best bearings you can get.
  • 15 0
 People who literally can't be fucked to read the writing on the side of the bearings, that's who buys kits.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, what's that third company? I couldn't make it out.
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: not sure if sarcasm or actually curious. Anyway * = F
  • 1 0
 Source? I haven't spent a lot of time looking, but can't seem to find brand name 6900's any cheaper than OEM... $36 CAD for a set of 8
  • 3 0
 Some bikes use Enduro Max-E bearings now which have an extended inner race. There is no other option unfortunately.
  • 4 0
 @AndrewHornor: I would try physically going into a couple of the industrial/power transmission outfits in your town/city and ask. And sometimes they won't be cheaper because they've already got an NTN or SKF bearing in there. SKF does several aftermarket bicycle bearing and seal applications and is definitely a higher tier product.

Related to @GBeard 's mention of the E (extended race bearing), there may be other options but I don't think they're common here and the same bearing outfit could tell you if they can access one or not.
  • 2 0
 @GBeard: But equally, if you shop around, the very same Max-E bearing can be bought for 50% less in some places
  • 7 1
 option for....

I know how to fix/adjust it all but would rather pay someone to do it.

why because I'm a mechanic (car) and I spend all day on the tools and the thought of working with tools and metal after hours gives me the shivers/suicidal thoughts.....
  • 4 0
 I'm the opposite. I sit in front of a computer all day and look forward to pulling shit apart. I've noticed my Lyrics are topping out and I've got everything I need to overhaul Charger dampers. Woo hoo!
  • 7 0
 I always give it a go and usually end up cocking it up royally and have to sheepishly bring it to my shop. It's a source of shame for me that my riding skills far outweigh my wrenching skills.
  • 2 0
 me too buddy me too
  • 2 0
 sounds too true! :-D youtube videos don't show you what to do when something goes wrong
  • 4 0
 Just to add about the part availability thing.
I can figure out what I need and most times the regional supplier (Brazil in that regard) has most of it, but they put way too much margin on it. Because there is only one distributor they pretty much put the price they want. Most people are relegated to pat for it since they have no other option. However, since I know what I’m doing and out of the lbs environment (not their fault imo) it is cheaper to source it online outside of Brazil (even with tariffs and shipping). So usually I can find it locally but I prefer to wait for it to arrive since the prices are abusive.
  • 4 0
 I replace my shit when it breaks or adjust/rebuild/bleed it if it stops working well. Otherwise I just ride and lube the chain every so often. I've gone years without bleeding brakes or droppers because they still worked well enough. Ironically, the most attention my bikes get is when it comes time to sell them in which case I actually break them down and go over everything thoroughly.
  • 4 0
 My strategy is to do it all except suspension dampers and anything press fit. Pressing bearings is easy. Have done it before, but honestly don't want to deal with it. Bearings and dampers are a once every 2-3 year job, and its easier to plan to do them in the off season and pay someone else to do it. Amortized cost makes buying the tools less attractive.
  • 5 0
 Tires, brakes, modern frame: will pay for top quality
Suspension: adequate is fine.
Everything else: enjoy it while it lasts.
  • 4 3
 Saw a video of a WC DH run the other day. You might want to consider upgrading the handlebar to "adequate".
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Haha, fair Wink . Though the "while it lasts" part of a basic bar is often somewhere between forever and infinity. It's when people try to push beyond adequate is when they get in trouble!
  • 1 0
 @vinay: saw that too, ive heard of carbon handle bar cracks but not full shattering!
  • 4 1
 Qualified bike mechanic here(I know that guy!) and I carry out most things at home but frame bearings I take to my local shop as I don't have them tools at home. I like to give back to the shop that paid for my qualifications too.

Lower leg and can service no problem. Anything deeper and it's off to the brands (in my case Sram uk) main service centre.
  • 3 0
 Props to companies/products that are reasonably priced, easy to service, and supported by the manufacturer. OneUp droppers, DVO rear shocks, Lyrik forks are all on my preferred list.

Companies that provide all the spare bits also get a shout-out. Yeti and Ibis sell all the stuff you need to rebuild a rear end. That's how EVERY bike company should do business!!
  • 3 1
 Bicycles, especially mountain bikes, have become exponentially more complicated over the past 20+ years. Some of the complexity is reasonable given the added performance benefits we now enjoy with high-travel, full suspension frames. However, the reduced level of user serviceability is making an already expensive pastime even more out of reach for many people. Privateer racing was realistic for many riders 20 years ago. Today, even youth racing requires sponsorship on some level. (I speak from experience on both.)

Manufacturers need to agree on better standardization or simply accept existing standards rather than changing thing for no other reason than to change. Compatibility of parts within the same major brands is now the exception rather than the rule. Making the buying and maintenance of bikes more difficult is not the way to draw or retain customers.
  • 3 1
 Clearly not many people answering this poll work on all kinds of bikes. The breadth of knowledge required to work on all bikes and components is absurd and anyone who says all of the parts are well documented hasn't worked on a bike more than 5 years old. Flip the poll question around on the part availability and documentation question: Most brands make it challenging, but there are a few who make sourcing part numbers and compatibility somewhat reasonable.

Also, anyone who defines a "tune-up" as the all-out option is wacko and if you're valuing a high-quality drivetrain as being a long-lasting money saver you're insane.

The answers to these questions explain a lot about why maintaining your own equipment in the bike industry is so expensive and time-consuming. "Yeah, I don't purchase new bearings, I get them custom-made for my mountain bike and it's cheaper." Hey Pinkbike, can you please try to do something about why everything is absolutely outrageous in the bicycle world? Maybe talk to some production or product people.
  • 2 0
 I'll buy a tool even if it's one I wont use much if it makes it cheaper than getting my lbs to do it,lower legs,wheel truing, assembling the bike,bleeds etc are all good.I've built a few wheels but tbh I'm not as good as our local builders so they can do that.One of the most frustrating things is getting hold of service kits in a timely manner at a reasonable cost-NZ is often really expensive for bits so it means I have to plan ahead.
  • 3 1
 Maintenance is NOT something you do at the end of the season. It is an ongoing process that comes from inspecting your bike before and after rides.

Anyone who just works on their bike at the end of the season doesn’t ride much.
  • 1 0
 No clue what yr weathers like there but is winter riding not an option there (NV)? Western NC here so - year round. I guess Ive never thot pf end of season much…
  • 2 0
 Seal kits are a rip off, straight up, looking at you sram.

Also, why do I need thousands of different sized/shaped allen keys and a ton of tools to service my bike?! Back in the early 2000s I could strip a bike down and replace the frame with only a handful of tools.
  • 2 0
 I’d love to install a better BB than the crappy SRAM Dub PF92 but having tried a quality Hope one now on three separate Yeti frames (100, 115 and a 130) once the quality bearings are pressed in they bind as the BB tolerances that Yeti manufacture to just aren’t good enough. Fed up with it to be honest as with the UK weather I’m having to replace my SRAM BB 2-3 times a year. That and the SRAM crank that needs 54nM or torque! Wtf is that about.
  • 2 0
 Looking at the answer distribution on the 2nd question- i gotta call Bullsh!t!!! No way in hell that nearly a third of riders can service everything including brakes and suspension. I'm possibly the most tinkering rider of all my riding buddies, which I've met thousands over 20 years of cycling, and i can count on one hand the number of riders who would do a full teardown themselves. One out of a hundred riders is still exaggerated, let alone one out of 3 or 4.
  • 2 0
 Completely true, I’m the mechanic in my riding group, each can do a little, one other can build his own bike.

People don’t know how to care for shite these days.
  • 1 0
 Agreed - ive been riding 30 yrs and only recently began doing almost everything but trueing wheels but - at least w/ RS & Manitou forks lowers & full service (even dampers) is so easy & fast vs paying $200 a pop for those I don't why more riders dont learn. Still, the groupings in the categories are way off - trueing is an advanced skill to do right. These shoulda just been basic / intermediate / advanced / expert as even tho I do 99% of my work now, Id still say Im only intermediate level.
  • 2 0
 @Mtn-Goat-13: 90% of shop mechanics dont normay do a lowers service, let alone a damper. So unless 25%of people answering this survey expert mechanics, the results don't make any sense.
Totally agree with you about basic lowers service (oil/dust wipers). It's so simple that even driving to the shop and decommissioning my bike for a week seems like a waste of time compared to doing it at home- so paying that much is just ridiculous to me. Why hardly none of my friends even attempts it is beyond me..
  • 1 0
 @foxinsocks: Agreed my man, there only a couple shops Id drop my fork with and one for shock but - its really not bad. These questions are just not grouped right at all… dunno who would group them up this way (?)
  • 1 0
 For the most part bike building and maintenance isn't too hard. Some aspects are frustrating like bleeding Shimano rear brakes with internal routing and getting the rear derailleur set up perfectly. But for the most part things are straight forward. I don't do much with wheels or dampers, however. Ill drop the lowers and refresh some seals and such but if I dink with the damper it never comes out right. With carbon rims they rarely need any truing or fiddling so thats cut down on work. Learning how to do your own work is the best. Its cheaper in the long run and its fulfilling generally. It is a drag to buy a $40 tool that will only be used rarely. That sucks
I learned because in 2011 l had a bike shop shame me about chain. It was a ego buster for sure but the joke is on them. Never went back and learned to do it all myself
  • 2 0
 he said dink
  • 2 2
 I have no experience with carbon rims but them being straight seems no good indication per se. Make sure spoke tension is even. You can go by tone (when you pluck them) or you can use a spoke tension meter. Left and right can be different, but all spokes left should have more or less equal tension.
  • 1 0
 I'm closest to the one that says there are tradeoffs. But the tradeoffs listed don't really make sense to me. It seems that most people think wheels are higher in the list for money than drivetrain? Maybe thats just me and my buddies though.

This one I agree with.

"I see certain trade offs in different areas. Quality frame, suspension, wheels and tires are worth spending money on. Save money where you can."
  • 4 0
 I'd love to see all the tools that others are making. That's my most favorite aspect of working on dampers so far
  • 3 0
 I have a full set of spade bits to make wooden clamps for the vice.
  • 7 0
 My fork broke the other day ... so I quickly manufactured a new one. That is, according to this poll.
  • 1 0
 Also getting a bit more adventurous. Managed to shorten a Fox 36 airspring the other day to 130mm (required geometry of a new frame) as I baulked at paying over £1000 for the new Fox 34. No doubt I have voided all warranties and my frame will now crack etc., etc.,
  • 1 0
 I do all of the things above on a daily basis for people that have no time and lack 99% of tools and knowlegde to go for a small / full service / rebuild. Usually the ones that tried to do it themselves bring back the bike in a worse condition to start with.

If you are somewhat serious about your bike, at least keep some ridelog somewhere to have an idea what kind of service you are looking for and type of spending that goes along with it. It makes communicating with your mechanic also a lot easier. Like being able to reproduce noises or sensations. And if you get certain parts serviced, like a fork, ask if they can keep an eye out for the condition of the headset etc. Ah.. and ask them to ride your bike a second after they done their job.
  • 2 0
 It might be easy to get tools ... if you know what you're looking for ... but you can't buy experience! I go to my LBS for a full service, because I can afford it and it's supporting local business :-) nerves put me off trying anything more than changing a tyre or cleaning the chain - because if I got it wrong I'd have to go to the LBS anyway
  • 1 0
 I don't mind taking my bike into the shop if necessary, but I'd say 95% of the work doesn't require special tools or knowledge. Sure, you have to put in the time to learn something that first time around, but after that it'll only take half the time or less. To me, it's just not worth the $50/hr and multiple days off the bike for something I can get done in an evening.
  • 1 0
 The beauty of bike is that they are pretty dang simple aside from Damper/suspension tuning and nearly everything has a youtube video. Oh...and DTSwiss lockring removal, the worst thing to service ever perhaps? Other than that, its mostly high quality stuff that's literally just bolted on or pressed in with basic tools.

The hard part is working on cheap bikes tho.
  • 3 0
 pb keeps saying stuff to make it seem like high quality mtbs only last a season? Keep your bike well taken care of and it will last.
  • 3 0
 reading my fox DHX2 manual......
"wash with hot soapy water after EVERY RIDE"
me: only washes bike when its caked in mud
  • 2 0
 @Garlic-Breead: me: washes the bike twice a year just before it goes to the shop for a suspension service.
  • 1 0
 Questions leave a bit to be desired. Just because I can figure out and buy any tools I need to do any job doesn't mean I want to or will if gainfully employed. I can and have done all the maintenance when I was younger, but now I prefer to just bleed brakes, do lowers service and tension spokes. My bike does not always get "the best" either, but I'll take strong carbon rims over a fancy drivetrain any day, especially for the bike park.
  • 1 0
 I love working on my bikes, truth be told. But. I've been trying to check my fatbike's frame alignment as something feels/looks off with it, and I'm not loving it. Got so much string flying around it's like Catherine Zeta-Jones in the entrapment. Might be the one time I call for professional help.
  • 2 0
 I want to be better at bike mechanics but frankly many failed attempts at doing basic stuff has taught me to shift that task to someone who won’t balls up tightening bolts….
  • 1 0
 You'll never regret a torque wrench. And these days the torque is printed on bolts or in manufacturers maintenance guides.
  • 1 0
 I say this not from a place of condescension at all (b/c there is a bit of that with die-hard shop people), but if you're youngish and have the opportunity to work at a bike shop for even a year, the entire rest of your cycling life will benefit SO MUCH. I feel so lucky to have spent a year in a bike shop, and building a bike up from a frame for the first time after mountain biking for 10+ years, and doing it confidently, was so gd gratifying and gave a deeper understanding of my personal bike as a cohesive machine. Also, riding a tuned bike almost all the time is pretty freaking awesome.
  • 1 0
 For Marzo Bomber CR riders: service/rebuild manual here - www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=1030

Id been looking for this for a while, couldn't seem to find it on the Fox/Marzo site & finally got a link from tech support there after a long email thread of them not getting my question. Shock-servicing riders, enjoy! Does take some specialty tools tho - and a damn blowtorch…
  • 1 0
 My take is, Some jobs need doing so infrequently like pressing headsets facing etc, I'm not investing in the tools. Otherwise dampers are serviced by pros and wheels are only built and rebuilt by wheel builders. Everything else I'll do myself, it's part of the hobby.
  • 1 0
 One item in the poll should have been broken into two choices:

--- "I don't have access to the necessary tools to build wheels or pressurize suspension components" ---

There's a big difference between wheel building tools and nitrogen recharging systems. In my own garage, as well as those of several other experienced mechanics I know, there is a full gamut of wheel building tools. No home mechanic I know owns their own nitrogen charging system.

Heck, I only know of one local shop that has a charging system and they only do suspension service. They couldn't even fix your derailleur if you asked. If you need a full bike overhaul (which to me includes suspension damper rebuilds), around here you can't get it done at one place. You have to remove your own fork and shock and take those to the suspension shop separately. After that service is done and you reinstall your own fork and shock, then you can take the whole bike to another "shop" for their version of an overhaul which varies dramatically in scope and cost from place to place.

All the bike retail shops around here that offer suspension service are actually just sending the components out to dirtlabs or another suspension only shop. Hence the reason the wait times are weeks long at shops. They aren't even doing to work in house.
  • 2 2
 You do not need any special tools to pressurize suspension, you can make DYI needles for fox and just need a 600psi pump from RockShox. But certain dampers require vacuum to be bled properly and this is the only real obstacle, other then this, you can do everything at home.
  • 3 0
 The tune-up question makes little sense to me, because those are all tune-ups, and I do every one depending on the need.
  • 3 0
 i also think the barke bleeding should be on the easyer side, before a full wheel ture
  • 1 0
 Dry baked on bearing grease - an SKF secret that they purposely flaw so that it doesnt last forever but can. Once one finds out the secret it makes bearings ten times better. Thats what they use on rocket hardware.
  • 1 0
 Rockets fly on wheels?
  • 4 0
 I manufacture my own gas.
  • 2 0
 Too many chickpeas?
  • 3 0
 Pinkbike must be an invaluable source of market research for the bike industry.
  • 3 0
 Make my own tools... Does bashing headset cups in with a hammer count. Yes, yes it does.
  • 2 0
 Where is the cartoon with a kid spending just barely basics in grocery, wearing 20 years old clothes and spending a fortune in a bike shop? That's us.
  • 2 0
 Be cautious of ebikes, some manufacturers design them to brick if you attempt to self-service.
  • 4 2
 Not to worry, according to this poll every PB reader can code their own ebike OS.
  • 2 1
 @singletrackslayer: and service there own motor
  • 1 0
 Working on my bikes, and my friends bikes, has become a nice side hobby to riding. That being said, I've easily spent enough on tools to buy another bike altogether.
  • 3 0
 First question: suspension yes, but wheels no. What now?
  • 1 0
 I can true a wheel, but haven't built a wheel. About the only thing I haven't done.
  • 2 0
 I thot the same thing - trueing a wheel (for me) is next level work but full fork / shock teardowns + damper service - doesnt seem hard at all. The questions are not grouped very well
  • 3 0
 Agree, suspension is a straight forward, wheel tuning - it is like ‘multidimensional chess’
  • 1 0
 My bike is running smooth...except for my rear deore brake squalling on my Marin full sus..so far replaced rotors/pads,driving me crazy...
  • 3 1
 I looked at my bikes suspension pivots. But, being a hardtail I just smiled and went for a ride instead.
  • 1 0
 This year, I sent my Fox fork and damper out for full rebuild. It was the first time since 2011 I had someone else fix something on my bike.
  • 3 0
 These poll options are stupid and don't capture a dher's reality
  • 1 0
 I find working in my bike a relaxing way to get away from the wife with one exception - internal cable routing is the shops problem
  • 1 0
 When u need service 5+ bikes, better to know how to do it yourself, also buying bikes with similar components helps a lot ( all brakes on mineral oil, forks on same oil etc)
  • 3 1
 Hands up everyone on here with their own CNC machine...
  • 1 0
 "Most brands do, but there are still a few that make it challenging."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tsk3zAZyLaQ
  • 1 0
 LOL SRAM!
  • 1 0
 My bikes I work on. My lads GT, I give to the bloke in the pic above, he's ace!
  • 3 0
 My favorite color is ham
  • 1 0
 Carbon rim hater, I don’t care to much about the drivetrain to be honest.
  • 3 3
 Informal sub-poll: upvote this comment if you use a hammer to install headsets and pf BB's, downvote if you use a press (homemade or bought)
  • 1 0
 Funny enough, always user hummer on dj bike and bmx, however switched to press on MTB
  • 1 0
 If only I could never contaminate my brakes whenever I work on them.. my nemesis.
  • 2 0
 A quick tune up on my epic is not the same as a quick tune up on my sender
  • 1 0
 I can do any maintenance on any bike with a hammer and a screwdriver... You don t need loctite if you crossthread it..
  • 2 0
 Since I come from a BMX background... does that make me a hardtail rider?
  • 2 0
 I have never, and will never call it a "tune up"
  • 2 1
 This seems like a great data mining poll
  • 2 1
 Just ask Tech Tina. Apparently she knows……
  • 1 1
 Srams website fking blows they should be ashamdd of themselves.
  • 1 1
 I only ride park







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