Review: 2024 Norco Sight - For All the Mountains

Feb 28, 2024
by Mike Kazimer  
Norco aren't strangers to the world of high pivots – the Aurum HSP downhill bike kicked things off over six years ago, followed by the Shore and then the Range. The trickle-down continues for 2024 with the launch of the new Sight, along with its shorter travel sibling, the Optic.

The Sight retains its 150mm of rear travel and 160mm fork, but that rear suspension now comes courtesy of a high-pivot Horst link layout, with an idler pulley mounted on the chainstay. Norco's goal with the revised Sight was to use the lessons learned form the burlier Range to create a more maneuverable, pedal friendly option.

Norco Sight C1 MX Details

• Wheel size: 29" or mixed (tested)
• Carbon frame (aluminum available)
• Travel: 150mm / 160mm fork
• 64º head angle
• 77.5º seat tube angle
• 428mm chainstays
• Weight: 35 lb / 15.9 kg kg (size 3)
• Price: $7,499 USD
norco.com

There are carbon and aluminum framed versions of the Sight, and riders can choose from 29” or mixed wheel configurations.

I tested the C1 MX model ($7,499), which has a Fox 36 Factory fork, a DHX2 Factory coil shock, SRAM GX Transmission, Code RSC brakes, and Race Face Vault hubs laced to Stan's Flow S2 rims.







bigquotesIt's very predictable, delivering a calm ride without ever feeling dull or lethargic. In addition, the way it mutes landings off larger drops or into a chopped up section of trail is extremely enjoyable. Mike Kazimer



photo

Frame Details

The elevated chainstays and the idler pulley are the most immediately eyecatching features of the Sight, but the frame design itself is fairly straighforward, and has most of the little details you'd expect to find on modern trail / enduro bike. There's internal cable routing through the headtube (not the headset), room for a water bottle, and a tube / tool mount underneath the top tube. There's also frame protection on the downtube to prevent damage from shuttling or scree surfing.

The shock is driven by a rocker link that's mounted on the seat tube and driven by the chainstays, with a bearing mount at the lower eyelet for reduced friction. That lower shock mount is swappable depending on the wheel size a rider wants to run. The geometry between the 29” and mixed wheel models is nearly identical, except for the chainstay length – the chainstays are a little longer in the 29” setting.

Getting back to the idler design, the idler is sandwiched inside the chainstay, and there's a small guide extension that helps ensure the chain doesn't get knocked off line. There's also a custom chainguide that hugs the bottom of the chainring.

One feature that's missing is internal frame storage. I'd call that more of a nicety rather than a necessity, but it is becoming more and more common – Specialized, Trek, Santa Cruz, Rocky Mountain, and others all include built-in snack storage on their frames. That feature does add a few extra grams, and considering that the Sight isn't the lightest thing out there that may be one of the reasons it wasn't included.


photo
Plenty of room for a water bottle, plus accessory bolts under the top tube.
photo
Riders who want to go with a different rear wheel size will need to purchase the $135 Missing Link kit, which includes the lower shock mounts and rocker link.


photo

Geometry

Norco has gone with numbered rather than t-shirt sizing for the Sight, and there are five sizes available. Reach numbers range from 422mm on a size 1 all the way up to 522 on a size 5. Other key numbers include a 64-degree head angle and a 77-78 degree seat tube angle that varies depending on the size – larger sizes get a steeper angle to keep taller riders from ending up too far over the rear wheel.

Norco was one of the early proponents of size specific chainstays, and that continues with the Sight. The chainstays on the mixed-wheel size 3 I tested measured 428mm, which is quite short, but that number does increase to 436mm at sag, and 445mm at the most rearward part of the axle path, which occurs around two-thirds of the way through the travel.

The seat tube lengths are also very short – even the largest size has a 445mm seat tube length, the same length you'd expect to find on a size large frame, providing plenty of room for riders to run the longest dropper post possible.

At 5'11” I fall right on the split between sizes, and in this case I chose to go with the 3 instead of a 4. I tend to prefer bikes with a reach number between 475 – 485mm, and a top tube length below 620mm, so going a little smaller seemed like the right move, and Norco's Ride Aligned robot agreed with my decision. I'll discuss how that played out later on in this review.


photo


Suspension Design

Compared to old Sight, Norco reduced the leverage ratio and increased the amount of progression for more support and bottom-out resistance, which is good, since that was one of my gripes about that version – achieving a balanced setup wasn't that easy to achieve on the previous version.

As I mentioned in the geometry section, the axle path moves the rear wheel 12mm rearward before it starts moving forward for the remainder of the travel. Norco says that the more moderately rearward axle patch, as opposed to entirely rearward, helps reduce wheel hang up and makes the handling feel more natural.

According to Norco engineer Colin Ryan, "The idler is mounted to the chainstay separate from the main pivot shaft, which allowed us to fine tune the anti-squat characteristics to suit each bike's personality. We spent a considerable amount of time muling different idler locations for both bikes using swappable idler carrier plates that mounted to the chainstay. This allowed us to go beyond just looking at anti-squat curves on a computer screen and actually feel how these adjustments translated into different pedaling feel.

"The Sight idler location reduces anti-squat slightly compared to the Optic to bias it more towards traction on technical climbs and reduced feedback through the feet in rough sections of trail. We have licensed a patent from I-Track to be able to locate the idler on the chainstay, non-concentric relative to the main pivot.

The high pivot Horst link layout that we’ve designed the Sight and Optic around allows us to reduce anti-rise compared with a single pivot layout of a similar axle path. Anti-rise with these bikes does sit a bit higher than the outgoing models but we think we’ve been able to strike a good balance between countering weight shift to the front wheel when hard on the brakes and allowing the suspension to recover back to ride height without packing down through rough sections."

Specifications
Release Date 2024
Price $7499
Travel 150mm
Rear Shock Fox Factory DHX2 Coil, 60x205mm trunnion, Sprindex spring
Fork Fox Factory FLOAT 36, 160mm
Headset FSA #57 E Sealed Bearing
Cassette SRAM Eagle T-Type 1275 10-52T
Crankarms SRAM GX Eagle T-Type, 32T, 170mm
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB BSA Threaded
Rear Derailleur SRAM GX Eagle AXS T-Type
Chain SRAM GX Eagle T-Type
Shifter Pods SRAM Pod Ultimate Controller
Handlebar Deity Ridgeline 35, 800mm, 25mm Rise
Stem Alloy CNC, 40mm Length. 35mm Clamp
Grips DMR DeathGrip
Brakes SRAM Code Silver Stealth
Hubs Race Face Vault
Rim Stan’s Flow S2
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF 2.5’,EXO+ / Minion DHR II 2.4” MaxxTerra / EXO+
Seat SDG Bel Air V3
Seatpost One Up adjustable dropper


photo







Test Bike Setup

Norco's Ride Aligned calculator continues to be one of the best around, and it's a welcome alternative to the companies who don't offer any sort of initial suspension settings, leaving it to the consumer to figure out how the get the most out of their fancy new rig.

Enter your weight and height into the calculator and it'll spit out the recommended frame size, fork and shock pressures, and it even covers bar with and tire pressures. Of course, those are all just places to start, and personal preference will affect the final numbers, but my final settings did end up being very close to what Norco recommends. That equated to 83 psi in the 36 with one volume spacer installed, and the Sprindex turned to 460 lb.

The Sight has a very short seat tube length, especially for riders like myself who sit on one end of the sizing spectrum. At my preferred seat height there was a serious amount of fixed post showing, even with the stock 210mm OneUp post. I was still above the minimum insertion amount, but just barely, which seemed like good motivation to try OneUp's 240mm options. It turns out 240mm of drop is more than I prefer (I swear, I'm not Goldilocks), so I shimmed it down to 220mm and all was right with the world.
2022 Trail Bike Field Test photo by Satchel Cronk.
Mike Kazimer
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Height: 5'11" / 180cm
Inseam: 33" / 84cm
Weight: 160 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @mikekazimer



Testing Info

Testing took place over the last three months in Bellingham, Washington, and Vancouver, BC. Trail conditions ranged from perfectly tacky to frozen solid and everything in between. The Sight is capable of handling a huge variety of terrain, but this Trailforks loop is typical of the terrain ridden during testing – some techy climbing followed by a classic Shore descent.


photo

Climbing

It’s easy to pigeonhole a high pivot bike as being optimized for downhill performance – there's something about that idler pulley that screams “downhill machine” no matter how much travel a bike has, but that rearward axle path (and the coil shock) also pay dividends on technical climbs. The Sight does a great job of smoothing out chunky, steplike sections of trail, free from the micro wheel bounces or tire spin-outs that can put a halt to upward progress.

I occasionally used the climb switch to calm things down a little on logging road spins or other times when the terrain was fairly smooth, but otherwise, the slight amount of extra movement never bothered me.

Other than the super short seat tube leaving a lot of post extending skyward, the rest of the Sight's dimensions felt great on the climbs – the seat tube angle is steep enough that I didn't need to slam my seat forward on the rails, and the seated position was comfortably upright without putting too much weight on my hands.

The Sight's wheelbase is very manageable, making well suited to slow speed, tight, awkward moves. This could potentially be a technical climber’s dream machine, although maybe not in the traditional sense. Hardtail-like efficiency is often touted as the holy grail, but traction is really the key to solving uphill puzzles, especially if there’s sufficient support to keep the back end from sagging like a worn out mattress.

As with almost every idler-equipped bike, the extra pulley wheel does add some extra noise. Making sure the chain is well lubed helps, but there’s no getting around the fact that this design is louder than a non-idler equipped layout, a fact that's most noticeable on those longer grinds when you're trying to focus on something other than the sound of your own breathing.

The Sight also isn't the lightest thing around – 35 pounds is closer to what you'd expect for an aluminum bike, not a full carbon machine. I've been riding a bunch of kinda heavy bikes lately, so the weight never bothered me, but for the gram counters it's something to keep in mind. It'd be pretty easy to knock some weight off with an air shock and lighter wheels, although realistically I never felt that the weight was slowing me down.


photo

Descending

My first ride on the Sight took place on Vancouver's North Shore, a fitting location considering that it's where a good portion of the bike's development took place. The Shore isn't quite as awkward and janky as it once was, but there's still no shortage of rocky, slower speed testpieces, which is where the Sight really shines. I made sure to feed it a few skinnies too, for old time's sake, and it handled those cedar sculptures very well.

The Sight's axle path is well managed, and it never felt like it was too rearward, a trait that can make some high pivot bikes feel a little strange in corners or when trying to get airborne. It's very predictable, delivering a calm ride without ever feeling dull or lethargic. In addition, the way it mutes landings off larger drops or into a chopped up section of trail is extremely enjoyable.

I never found myself wishing for more travel either – the overall handling of the bike feels more 'all-mountainy' to me. That's the same category I'd put a bike like Specialized's Stumpjumper EVO, or the Canyon Spectral. Those are bikes that can handle just about any type of descent, but don't feel like too much bike on more rolling terrain. Norco has the Range in their lineup for riders looking for what's essentially a pedalable downhill bike.

photo

Its handling reminds me a lot of the Kavenz VHP16 I reviewed a few years ago, which isn't surprising when looking at their geometry figures. Both bikes have a surprising amount of quickness to their handling, and are ideal for navigating extra-awkward trails without getting stalled out in a tight corner.

The Sight's chainstay length starts at 428mm, grows to 436mm at sag, and maxes out at 445mm. Personally, I wouldn't have minded if those chainstays were a bit longer, if only to capitalize on the Sight's bump-erasing potential. I have a feeling that longer chainstays would add some stability and give it an even more locked-in feel while cornering. At times I felt like I was perched above the bike, rather than being centered and secure between the wheels. The bottom bracket height may have been a contributing factor here too - at 353mm it's on the taller side; for reference, that's 10mm or so higher than mixed-wheel bikes like the Transition Patrol or Santa Cruz Bronson.

Could the Sight work as an enduro race bike? It sure could, and running a longer stroke shock (65mm instead of the stock 60mm) and a 170mm fork would increase its bump-swallowing abilities even further. Going with the 29” wheel will give it a slightly bigger on-trail presence as well.


photo
photo

How Does It Compare?

The Specialized Stumpjumper EVO is another good example of a versatile all-mountain rig, a bike that's not quite a full-on enduro sled, but it's also not really a trail bike either. It was last updated in 2021, but the adjustability Specialized baked in has allowed it to remain very relevant. The fit of a S4 Stumpy EVO and a size 3 Sight is fairly similar - the reach numbers are in the low 470 range, and the head angle is around 64-degrees. I do prefer the taller stack and steeper seat angle of the Sight - that creates a more upright, comfortable climbing position.

As far as suspension performance, the Sight delivers more grip, and has better support for bigger hits - you can push hard without worry about using the travel too quickly, while the Stumpjumper EVO doesn't have the same almost-bottomless feel. For more rolling, less rugged terrain the Stumpjumper EVO is a good pick - it feels lighter and more efficient than the Sight. When it comes to chopped up terrain and really letting off the brakes, the Sight takes the win - that high pivot layout does a better job of smoothing out the chunky stuff.

Bonus points to to the Stumpy EVO for the SWAT box, and the higher level of geometry adjustments that are available.


photo

Which Model is the Best Value?

Going with aluminum is the best way to save money on the Sight, although it comes with a weight penalty of at least 2 pounds. For the carbon models, prices start at $4,999 USD for the C3, which has a full Shimano Deore drivetrain and brakes, RockShox Vivid Select+ shock, and a Lyrik Select fork. Other than the fork damper, that's a solid, workhorse parts kit, but the price is on the higher side, especially if you're looking for the most bang for your buck.

Given how many discounted parts are still available these days, going the frame-only route could be the way to go, although even then the $3,999 price tag is on the higher side of the scale; that makes the $2,399 aluminum frame a much more attractive option.


photo


Technical Report

Stan's Flow S2 rims / Race Face Vault hubs: The Sight's rear wheel had to take a couple of time outs in the truing stand to think about what it had done – I'm usually not that hard on wheels, but this one lost tension fairly early in the test period.

Code brakes: The SRAM Code Silver Stealth brakes are a great match for the Sight's all-mountain proclivities, although I'd recommend upgrading to the HS2 rotors for improved power – the extra thickness makes a difference.

Fox 36: The Fox 36 has been overshadowed by the 38, its burlier sibling, over the last couple of seasons, but for this travel bracket I'd argue that the 36 is the better choice for most riders. It's significantly lighter, and I had a grand total of zero instances where I thought it wasn't stiff enough. I've also had better luck with the out-of-the-box performance of the 36 compared to the RockShox Lyrik, and in this case the fork was smooth and consistent from day one.

Minion DHF / DHR II tire combo: I swore by the Minion DHF / DHR II combo for years, that is until the Assegai came out. Here in the Pacific Northwest I prefer the Assegai's handling to the DHF, especially during hard cornering or on looser trails, and that's the spec I would have preferred to see on the Sight.

photo



Pros

+ Great traction without feeling sluggish
+ Sprindex takes some of the hassle out of speccing a coil shock
+ Norco's setup guide is one of the best in the business

Cons

- No in-frame storage
- Idler noise is noticeable on longer rides
- Chainstays are fairly short, even with a rearward axle path.



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesCould 2024 be the year the 'all-mountain' category makes its triumphant return? If so, the Sight happily fits the bill. It's burlier than a typical trail bike, but not quite as gravity-oriented as some of the longer travel enduro machines, which makes it an intriguing option for riders hunting for that elusive do-it-all bike.  Mike Kazimer







Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,731 articles

278 Comments
  • 111 5
 The white and yellow colour works surprisingly well together.
  • 130 39
 ruined by the orange fork
  • 15 1
 Reminds me of those YTs with the yellow Öhlins forks...
  • 29 1
 I'm a fan of mustard and mayo
  • 10 0
 @MuddyFoxCourierComp: the customer version comes with a black fork…..
At least mine did
  • 4 1
 @MuddyFoxCourierComp: Normally I don't mind the orange lowers on most bikes but I have to agree with you on this one
  • 5 0
 Sunny side up
  • 2 1
 @MuddyFoxCourierComp: Agree, orange does not match yellow / white. The forks need to be black (red maybe?).
  • 5 0
 The white, yellow and orange remind me of candy corn during halloween.
  • 2 0
 great looking bike, on my list for next...
  • 3 0
 @MuddyFoxCourierComp: I work at a norco dealer shop and we got sent that same sight and it has black lowers
  • 1 0
 @Gristle: Who isn't? Baller on sandwiches. Baller on bikes. Spread that stuff everywhere.
  • 1 0
 @senatorcraig: it is my understanding that mayo can be highly controversial. The mustard haters are a rare, strange breed tho.
  • 96 19
 The best review Pinkbike has ever done. A strong contender for the best review done by anyone. Between the bike, pictures, riding at Owen and Hannah's, PYF interview and the soundtrack choice, I absolutely loved this. This review was the perfect blend of professional, fun and something everyone who works there and everyone who read it can be proud of as part of their progression into the next year. All of us who worked on it, thank you for everything you have done to bring this into the world ♥
  • 225 1
 I’m sorry sir but pink bike is for complaining about nothing. Please keep any praise and positivity to yourself.
  • 11 1
 I came here to say the same thing. Kaz's style has evolved over the years. Great reading, great content, and solid review.
  • 3 1
 there's a paragraph about the optic in the climbing section but agree it's a good review
  • 3 9
flag ceecee (Feb 28, 2024 at 7:40) (Below Threshold)
 This is the least exaggerated comment I've ever read. Hallelujah, Joey

@dmackyaheard: style? Kaz farts from the front
  • 110 1
 Wait, did the strangely positive YouTube bots make it over to Pinkbike now?
  • 3 0
 ChatGPT? Copilot? Which one was it?
  • 8 2
 This is for sure a bot account. Multiple comments that just don't make sense
  • 4 0
 Agreed! This is so well done! Really wished the review on the Madonna V3 was as in depth as this. @mikekazimer any word when the long term review for that one will be done? I just couldn't pull the trigger with so little ride impressions available. Sadly they are sold out in my sizing already, so looks like I got time...Thanks for the amazing write-ups, keep them coming!
  • 4 0
 @Mayzei: 50+ propbots loved it
  • 1 2
 AI review....
  • 5 1
 @Mayzei: the user account's activity is iffy, too. Zero comments between 2009 and 2011, zero activity for years, and now prolific commenting that does not always quite manage to cross the uncanny valley for readability.
  • 1 2
 @ceecee: You are great at making friends from what i'm guessing.
  • 5 1
 @toooldtodieyoung: not a bot, just had kids and disappeared for a few years. My humour is a bit left field sometimes...
  • 9 1
 @joeyjoejoe: exactly what a bot would say
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: you mentioned that maybe a longer chain stay would help stability. I wonder if the rear 29 version would add that?
  • 2 0
 @joeyjoejoe: that's actually good to know. For the life of me, I can't figure out the parts enclosed in asterisks from this sentence, "Between the bike, pictures, ***riding at Owen and Hannah's, PYF interview and the soundtrack choice***, I absolutely loved this." Who are Owen and Hannah? What is PYF? What soundtrack?
  • 3 0
 @toooldtodieyoung: It's a bot dude, don't try to interact with it. Red flags everywhere
  • 3 0
 @Mayzei: i'm curious to see where this goes …
  • 1 1
 I haven't read the review, but upvote for detailed feedback.
  • 1 0
 Best review of a review anyone has ever done.
  • 1 0
 @mbsharpe: You must work at PB
  • 61 3
 So it's (only) 2 lbs heavier than the Optic in the other review, but it comes with a coil shock and 150/160 travel? To me that seems like a much better proposition than an overweight short travel trail bike
  • 21 0
 The trail bikes I've ridden recently were not significantly lighter than my stumpy evo, but they had a very different ride feel. It's like always - you can't only compare bikes on paper
  • 1 0
 I thought the same thing. Only 2lbs heavier with a coil, 36, and aluminum rims? They do both look fun. I'd probably opt for the Sight though, the extra travel would come in handy for Moab and GJ.
  • 2 1
 It doesn't seem like there's any real reason for the Sight frame to be heavier than the Optic, right? So the difference would be down to parts spec. For how much fancier the Optic's parts spec is than this Sight (XO Transmission, carbon wheels) and the air shock + 34 instead of coil + 36, I am surprised the weight difference is still only 2 pounds.
  • 48 6
 Looks like a Slash now.
  • 9 1
 came to find 'Looks like a Trek' comments Big Grin
  • 6 5
 Shame on everyone here, this was supposed to be the top comment!
  • 36 3
 Looks like the perfect bike for most people in western US/Canada. Well done.
  • 8 0
 I guess one plus side of mtbs being so expensive that you can only afford one is brands starting to make bikes to do everything again. 160 front, 150 rear seems to be the sweet spot for all mountain. Hope to see more of this.
  • 3 0
 @dwbaillar: I have a 2020 Bronson - 27.5 wheels, 150/160 travel and cant imagine I need more for where/how I ride. I had a 2014 Bronson (150/160 also) flirted briefly with a 2016 5010 but it felt so much less capable so much of the time that I went back to the longer travel trail bike.
  • 1 0
 Agreed. It would make a sweet all-rounder for Western Washington. Right up there with the Stumpy Evo, Transition Sentinel, and a few others.
  • 36 5
 Short chainstays aren't a con, it's a different type of bike for a rider who likes a different feel. By making it a con youre discouraging companies making different types of bikes
  • 8 15
flag emptybe-er (Feb 28, 2024 at 11:29) (Below Threshold)
 Same with frame storage. I consider it a negative because storing stuff in your frame is silly.
  • 6 0
 Seriously, leave some bikes for me, I like short stays so this one seems right on the money for me.
  • 1 9
flag Jordmackay (Feb 28, 2024 at 14:56) (Below Threshold)
 You clearly are under 6ft tall.
  • 3 1
 @Jordmackay: their reach on the #4 size large size is kinda long for short CS. Would prob have to size down to a 3 and that's almost too small for most 6' riders
  • 5 1
 @Jordmackay: It's too bad the UDH has mostly killed adjustable chainstays on a lot of bikes. On the size 4 bike with 497 reach, the chainstay maxes out at 444mm at the longest point. If it was my bike, I'd want it closer to 454 to help balance the long front center.
  • 2 0
 @WalrusRider: privateer 161 is what you want then
  • 3 3
 @WalrusRider: Correct. 500 reach should have adjustable CS at 445-455/60. Bike companies seem to only employ small people.
  • 6 0
 @Jordmackay: That's a matter of opinion not fact. 435-445 chainstays are what I would like, and I'll ride bikes from 485 to 500mm reach at 6'1, Long torso, shorter legs proportionally. Adjustable is the way to go if you want to get the most people on your bikes, but we should also not try to force every bike company into following the same pattern, let people decide what they want and allow for options instead of trying to force homogeny.
  • 2 0
 @WalrusRider: Kavens does interchangeable dropouts that have UDH so you can customize your cs length.
  • 1 0
 @eae903: Yup, I own one and run it with 455mm at sag (460 max) chainstays and it's awesome Big Grin
  • 2 1
 @eae903: 435 on a 500 reach feels shocking. You must know this haha. I'm all for an egile bike but balance is king. Also a high stack is essential
  • 24 1
 In what universe does the frame only pricing make sense for the Optic and Sight? Like I'm not complaining about the alloy framesets, those are very well priced.

$2199 for an alloy frame or $5150 for carbon? A $3,000 increase for carbon?
  • 7 0
 If the price for the alloy frame is not an error, it's a freaking good deal considering it comes with a Rockshox Vivid Ultimate Air! And for the carbon, yeah as usual, not worth it.
  • 1 0
 @CaSentLeTabarnakMonHomme: apparently that's the real price, just jumped on the live chat and had it confirmed.
  • 2 0
 Isn't that a 1000% markup on the marginal cost difference?
  • 2 0
 Somehow $50 cheaper than a 2023 alloy Sight frame on sale with a SDLX...wild
  • 13 0
 Was going to comment that it #lookslikeaKavenz so I'm glad @mikekazimer mentioned that. I feel like it's time to put the Kavenz V7 up against a few of these bikes from the big boys (Norco and Trek) that are finally catching up with what they've been doing for years.
  • 12 0
 You may put the chainstay length as a con per the size but I welcome some diversity in the high pivot longer travel market.
  • 10 0
 Agreed. I like the colors and how it rides according to Kaz. And no stupid headset cable nonsense. A couple pounds lighter and it would be about perfect for me.
  • 3 1
 High pivot = DH-rig weights on trail bikes. Love the weight, or lose the pivot.
  • 6 0
 @powturn: But it's still a 4bar horstlink suspension. I have the previous sight and this one. this one is marginally heavier. but why?

Not much more material need here than the old Sight. I suspect the extra 2-3lbs here in the threaded BB inserts and cups, the bolt-on lower shock mount, and the coil shock is much heavier than the RS super deluxe air. Also the extra idler pulley and hardware.

This frame is really not that different from the old sight and VERY far removed from the Current V-HSP Range.
  • 11 0
 Complete build option is pricey, however the Aluminum frame only price is certainly a head turner.
  • 6 1
 Indeed. The bike he compared it to, the Stumpy Evo was $2K in alloy (before the crazy discounts happened) and that's where most other alloy frames were too. I spit my coffee out at $4K for carbon fameset lmao. You could get a Yeti frame or an entire carbon YT/Canyon/Propain for that price. Guess they're betting on the high pivot lifers? Do those exist?!
I don't think this hard time for the bike industry lets up until they realize the biggest "innovation" we want is lower prices. It's insane that this industry is just ok with price/value being universally bemoaned by it's consumers.
  • 5 0
 The alloy frame price includes a vivid ultimate, which is absolutely wild. Personally I'd be hard pressed to go carbon on this one, if I get a sight it's going to be an alloy frame-up. One thing to consider though is I've never seen a company brush their alloy welds as much as norco. They made the bikes look almost carbon! I hope there's no longevity penalty.
  • 3 0
 Poland has the best deals : www.pinkbike.com/photo/26289626
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: I loved my Norco, but it's the only bike I've ever broken. Alloy chainstay on a carbon bike too lol. Didn't break at the weld though.
  • 12 0
 Im a sucker for a yellow Norco.
  • 15 5
 Was so pumped for this rig to come out. Short chain stays and no in-frame storage are a reallll bummer
  • 6 2
 Glad Kazmer called out the lack of in-frame storage when comparing it to the Stumpy Evo and in his cons list. I sound like a nerd, but after daily driving a Stumpy Evo with in-frame storage for 2 years, I won't buy another trail bike without it.
  • 11 6
 never used inframe storage despite having many bikes with it. i have not missed out on anything by not using it.
  • 3 5
 @succulentsausage: what do you even put in it? A space blanket? Your phone?
  • 6 1
 @wburnes: Stumpy evo comes with a little bladder that fits in there that can fill a full water bottle, and you can also fit a little bag that can hold a tube, co2 and levers. Plus the bottle cage holds a little multi tool (a rather shit one but it's fine for non-epic rides).

It's super helpful, it's nice not having to carry a fanny pack if I don't want to, though I usually still do carry a fanny pack and just carry extra snacks. It also allows me to do longer rides that I previously would probably wear a backpack with just a fanny pack. And for longer rides where I have a backpack also, I can still carry an extra bottle's worth of water down low inside the bottom bracket rather than having that weight on my back.

For me it's a game changer, it's not a dealbreaker if a bike doesn't have it, but after getting used to having it it's a major factor in new purchases. Feels like something that doesn't seem like a big deal until you have it, and then the prospect of no longer having it on a new bike kind of blows.
  • 13 1
 @wburnes: All the stuff you normally put in a pack...and you ditch the pack. Its a game changer - hard to imagine not having a bike with it at this point.
  • 5 1
 @wburnes: first aid kit, in a Ziploc bag with a string attached, stuffed way up in the frame. Small pump, tire levers, tube. Snacks, car keys and small wallet with my ID and emergency contact info.

I basically never ride with a pack anymore unless im doing an extra long ride and need extra water
  • 3 2
 @wburnes: I'll add...its a dealbreaker at this point for me. The bike would have to be truly exceptional and unique for me to consider choosing it if it did not have frame storage.
  • 6 1
 @wburnes: That's where you put your weed.
  • 3 15
flag emptybe-er (Feb 28, 2024 at 11:26) (Below Threshold)
 @wolftwenty1: Are you serious? Frame storage? Why do people insist on storing shit in their bike now? It’s so strange. Definitely a sign of the (softening) times
  • 2 12
flag emptybe-er (Feb 28, 2024 at 11:27) (Below Threshold)
 @wolftwenty1: It’s a game changer if your tires never leave the ground/ass on the saddle kinda rider
  • 6 1
 @emptybe-er: thats why i like frame storage, i hate having a pack flapping around when im hitting jumps
  • 2 6
flag emptybe-er (Feb 28, 2024 at 12:05) (Below Threshold)
 @arrowheadrush: Get a smaller pack, you don’t need anything big enough to move around. I use a runners pack and don’t even know it’s there
  • 4 0
 @arrowheadrush: Also nice to have a little extra spinal coverage, imo. Has worked for me quite a few times
  • 4 0
 @wolftwenty1: and all of a sudden your bike weight 2 pounds more.
  • 2 4
 Get a framebag

Much better then in frame storage (lighter, more space , easy access, customisable)
  • 3 2
 @wolftwenty1: what if itcame e with a nice frame bag intead?
  • 5 1
 @emptybe-er: the guy rocking a runners pack is calling in frame storage whack. lol.
  • 6 3
 @inonyme: Or if you wear it on your back you weigh two pounds more and the weight is way higher off the ground. Facepalm
  • 8 3
 Amazing to see anyone arguing that in-frame storage is not extremely useful. Take your entire repair kit (spare tube, CO2 canisters/inflator, tire levers, patch kit, magic link, etc.) and just permanently stash it in your frame. That frees one up entirely to either use a minimalist hip pack or water bottles for your ride.

I tend to agree that, given all the amazing options for bikes on the market now, a bike would have to ride (objectively) 5-10% better than anything else on the market to out-compete a similar bike with in-frame storage. I don't want an ugly saddle bag or to go back to using a pack simply because a manufacturer did not take the time to engineer something as fundamental as in-frame storage.
  • 1 1
 @wolftwenty1: Or you move around more unsprung weight.
  • 4 2
 @emptybe-er: why would i get a smaller pack when i keep everything in my frame lol. You're so close to getting it
  • 2 0
 @wburnes: Spare tube and tire levers is the only thing I want storage for.
  • 1 3
 @KJP1230: same people also complain their bike is 2 pounds to heavy... go figure... lets add more weight!
  • 1 0
 @Thisguyinkimberley: That's what's in mine. With the built-in toolkit, I'm set pretty well for short rides.
  • 2 0
 @NWBasser: thats the dream! I'll have to keep the raceface storage strap for now. Maybe my next Sight will have a compartment.
  • 1 1
 @wburnes: I can store an extra liter of water that's at the lowest part of my bike instead of on my hip or back. Useful for long rides with the dog or packless rides. Has come in handy a few times I need to shed a layer too. I just see it as one of those "why not" features since that space is just wasted otherwise.
  • 5 3
 @KJP1230: Get a frame bag
-It can be bigger than in frame storage
-its lighter then in frame storage
-it does not weaken the frame/requiere strengtheneing the induced weak points
-it can be more easily accesible
-you can have it customized
-it can protect youre frame
-its silent

So lets face it, in frame storage is 100% a looks thing(it looks clean) as does through headset cable routing(which almost all in frame fans hate)
  • 3 2
 @succulentsausage: a extra liter of water unter the downtube(same or lower center of gravity than in frame storage) but also the best protection you can get youre frame(much better protecten thenn any downtube protector/shuttle guard provides

Framebags for the Future!


The space might be "wasted" but to access it comes at a high price (make a hole in the tube which weakens it so it has to be strengthened then you need a cover(some make noise some let in water) then you need bags from thick(heavy) material because otherwise youre multitool will convert youre down tube into a musical instrument...

In Frame storage looks clean and good but its not sensible
  • 3 1
 Doesn’t the gear mount serve the same function? I have a wolftooth pouch on my bike with all the shit I would store in a frame and still have a bottle cage mount separate.
  • 6 3
 @JasperTS: all that and my Stumpy is still way lighter than the new optic, and it has in frame storage. It also includes a tool that mounts to the bottle cage. Its the quietest bike I've ever ridden so in struggling to see a downside
  • 1 0
 @NWBasser: exactly
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: Yup. You wouldn’t know it if I didn’t tell you. Nathan makes some good stuff. Don’t even need a waist strap, 70oz. Could easily be 100+_
  • 2 2
 @arrowheadrush: Well, you’d get a smaller pack because you said it moved around when trying to jump. Then you don’t have to store stuff in your bike like an invalid.
  • 2 2
 @wolftwenty1: 2 more lbs on something (you) that already weighs 5x more ( than the object you’re trying to throw around) and remains mostly stationary. Please explain to me how you notice 2 lbs less on your bike than on your body. It’s simple physics.
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: How is frame storage fundamental? Same with water bottles.. You don’t even notice the extra weight on your body but adding noticeable weight to the bike is fine but those new brakes are 80g heavier, no way. Ok.
  • 2 2
 @emptybe-er: If I am adding weight, I would way rather add it to the downtube (water bottle mounts, in-frame storage) because of physics.
  • 3 1
 @arrowheadrush: it would be stronger without in frame storage
  • 3 3
 @JasperTS: Why would you want a trunk on your car, when you could have a Thule roof rack box?

Firstly, I don't need in-frame storage to be any larger. Frankly, my bike (2019 model, bought in 2020) has in-frame storage to fit everything I need from a trailside repair standpoing with room to add snacks and other things for bigger days or bike park visits. My in-frame stuff is wrapped in a cloth sleeve and is completely silent. It's as easy to access as open any lid found in your kitchen. It's completely hidden and does not degrade the aesthetics of my bike/build.

I'm sorry, but my entire point is that in-frame storage is very useful and should be a standard feature. It adds nominally to manufacturing complexity - but these frames are coming in fairly expensive anyway. Norco didn't neglect to include in-frame storage because they couldn't/shouldn't - they did it to drive down some of their manufacturing costs. Personally, as a consumer, I'd rather pay a few extra bucks for my bike to come with this very cool feature.
  • 2 1
 @KJP1230: Your physics are bad then
  • 2 1
 @KJP1230: It’s so simple, I cannot believe people can’t catch on to the difference between adding 2 lbs to your body (normal weight fluctuation) and adding a high % of weight to a bike that is specifically designed with light weight in mind for very good reason. You can lead a horse to water..
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: roof racks are the worst. Adds so much aerodynamic drag, and annoying to access as well
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: ppl just prefer to argue on comment threads rather than actually riding their bikes...
  • 2 1
 @emptybe-er: No. Adding mass lower in the system (rather than higher in the system) will lower the center of mass and make the system more stable in dynamic application. The physics checks out.
  • 2 1
 @wburnes: I agree. I was making a swipe at someones assertion that I wouldn't want in-frame storage (the equivalent of a car's trunk in our metaphor) when I could have a frame pack (equivalent to a Thule roof rack).
  • 46 36
 Bikes are too heavy now. End of story
  • 9 4
 Boooo
  • 41 11
 Nothing out of ordinary with this bike’s weight. If this is too heavy for you, Paul the Punter needs a partner for golf.
  • 2 0
 @PHX77: Yeah, sure.
  • 9 1
 That boils down to personal preference. My bikes are pretty heavy. I work a little harder on the climb, but they feel more planted on the descents and don't break.
  • 22 7
 + 1. My SB6 from 2019 with 150/160 mm weighs 28 lb. Even with heavy duty tires, it would be under 30 lb. What's going on with all those carbon bikes weighting (almost) as much as DH bikes? Unless you just shuttle all day long, you need to haul your steed up the hill too and heavy(er) is not the way...
  • 2 2
 @dmackyaheard: They also don't break the bank. People who say bikes are too heavy haven't discovered the joy of N+1.
  • 6 1
 The bikes I rode in the 1990's were right around 26 pounds. The Sniper Pro XC bike I have now is 25 pounds with pedals and a bottle cage-and is more capable than the trail bikes I rode a decade ago which weighed around 30 pounds. Heavy bikes have a place-it's nice not to worry about breaking a part on a high consequence ride. If you want to keep the weight lower for mellower riding there are still plenty of good options.
  • 4 0
 @cool3: this bike is physically a lot bigger, has a bigger front wheel/tire, probably heavier drivetrain than the 11 speed from 2019, and the idler. If you want a 30lb 150/160 bike there are things like the stumpy evo and ripmo.
  • 8 1
 @cool3: not a fair comparison - your SB6 is way shorter (an XL SB6 was shorter than S3 Sight), has air suspension and a smaller front wheel, and those things were way underbuilt and notorious for constantly cracking/failing. iirc, the SB6 that PB had for review had a hole punched through the swingarm because it was so frail...
  • 6 0
 Looks like a perfect rig for the typical US and Canada trails system: a sturdy bike that can handle gnarly stuff and still climb decently on very small elevation gain (4000 ft).
Though, it is clearly not made for a guy who climb regularly 10000+ ft of elevation in a day on technical terrain in the Alps.
  • 7 0
 I get it has a coil but kind of funny how a top end carbon build 150mm bike with EXO tires and a 36 weights this much now. The previous gen, alloy, low end build Sight I had weighted less than this. If this was alloy with a 38/Zeb and Doudle Downs it would weight like 40 lbs
  • 3 2
 @scotteh: I've been riding Yeti bikes and reading/chatting about them since 2015 and the craking thing is more gossip than anything. All carbon frames can and do fail, Yetis no more and no less than any other brands. BTW, if the SB6 was "underbuilt" (that's not my experience), tell me why Richie Rude won the EWS with it...
  • 6 0
 @xciscool: Tell me why a GX bike with average parts that weighs 35 lb should cost $7,500 US, then. I really support Norco as a Canadian and affordable no-nonsense brand, but the propositions from latter days (Norco is not alone) are pushing prices and weights up instead of down, IMO.
  • 3 1
 @cool3: that’s way more money than I’d ever spend on a bike so not arguing value but I’m also not worried about maximizing grams/dollar on an enduro bike. It’s the weight of some of these newer short travel bikes that gets me. A $10k sb120 weights 30 lbs according to pinkbike which is just silly.
  • 6 0
 Trail bikes used to lighter ten years ago, yes. But unlike ten years ago, now you can take your 150mm trail bike to the bike park and shred like there's no tomorrow without the bike snapping in half.
  • 1 1
 @PHX77: I don't care about the weight of my bike, but I do love a good game of golf
  • 2 2
 @cool3: I agree, I have a V1 Sentinel with Cascade link and a 38, I run DH tires at races and have another wheel set with Double Downs and it is right around 31 with OneUp pump. Seems like these bikes at 150mm should be around 33??
  • 7 0
 @Tormy: 31lbs with that setup seems pretty unbelievable TBO.
  • 2 0
 @cool3: Anecdotal I know, but I have only ever had two of my ridding buddies crack a frame, and bother of them were on yetis
  • 4 0
 @fuzzhead45: While I haven't cracked them, I'm on my 3rd warranty frame from Yeti due to issues with the switch infinity. They ride well, but don't last.
  • 1 0
 @cool3:
You should know that the first generation of SB 150 and SB 130 were prone to failure. I was going to buy a 150 but the shop I work at had four customers break their bikes that first season. When we got them on the phone Yeti refused to recognize that there was a problem.
Not going to say what shop but no other brand had the same failure rate at the time.
Now that we're a few years on Yeti has fully reengineered all their models so I'd buy one now but 2018/2019 was not a good time for them.
  • 1 0
 @cool3: Brands don't want warranty claims so they're making the walls of carbon frames thicker and heavier. Sucks. Also, this bike has high pivot, so obviously would be more than a 'normal' frame, given same construction method.
  • 1 0
 @Dman111: Well, two of my good riding buddies are/were on 2020 SB150s, one is now on an 2021 SB130LR and I had an SB66c back then and now ride a 2019 SB6. None of us ever had any frame failure (fingers crossed)...
  • 2 1
 Yes. 29” wheels have made bikes heavier. Learn how to ride people
  • 9 0
 Good news! Even with the new shock size you can over stroke it and bump that rear travel up.
  • 4 0
 This is an underrated comment.

The old Sight had a really short shock stroke shock for its travel. This was a problem mostly for heavier/more aggressive riders. In fact, in Kaz's review of the last model, there is a section about how he was struggling to get the rear suspension sorted correctly, eventually having to add another volume spacer over stock (and he's not a particularly heavy rider at 160lbs).

www.pinkbike.com/news/review-norco-sight-c1.html

I actually had a really interesting conversation with Cascade components about this on mtbr a year or so back about this topic. Moving to the 205x60mm at stock gives the bike more bottom out resistance due to the longer strong length (even if the leverage ratio was kept the same, which it wasn't in this case). So this version of the bike should be a lot better for heavier/sendier riders.

And even better, it seems like its approved to use a 205x65mm shock and get a bit more travel out of the frame, which is another win.
  • 3 0
 @ocnlogan: @ocnlogan: Totally agree. I had the previous Sight, and I liked a lot about it, but I couldn't get the rear shock to not blow through travel and send all of the energy to my ankles. I'm only 150 pounds. I attribute those issues with the stroke being too short. Anything over 140 mm should have more than a 185 x 55 shock, in my opinion.
  • 1 0
 Indeed. I've got a 2021 Sight that's an overstroked coil on the back and the Zeb Ultimate 170 up front. I don't bottom out anymore with the coil and and the 170 Zeb compensates in a huge way for my less than optimal landings.
  • 8 0
 @mikekazimer revisit the Kavenz platform and you'll be happy =) now with changable chainstay lengths and travel!
  • 6 0
 I saw that - I really like all the options that Kavenz now offers. It's been cool to see them grow.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer: Time for a High Pivot showdown with the VHP v7 in the line-up
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: time to see how the little guy stacks up against the big guys (who are a little late to the party)
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer:

It would be nice to have another look at the Kavenz.

From an outsiders perspective it appears that the new Trek Slash and this new Norco Sight share a lot of similarities of the Kavenz. They have all have rearward, but not entirely rearward axle paths, and can use 29/27.5in wheels out back, and have similar travel.

The Kavenz has the additional chainstay length options now (0, +10mm, +20mm), and can change travel through different shock mounts and shocks (although is a bit more spendy).

Anyway, they all look great, but a comparison would be fun Smile .
  • 3 0
 As a very happy owner of a 2021 Sight, I am giddy with excitement to try this thing out. Could very well be my forever bike, as my current Sight can do everything I've thrown at it including Whistler. Wish it had in-frame storage but oh well, love the colour scheme.
  • 4 0
 How is anyone complaining about too short of a seat tube? I wish more bikes would do this so I could finally get a 200+ dropper. Who cares if you have a little post sticking out, at least you have the choice.
  • 1 0
 IMO, there's no point in making the seat tube so short that the wheel will hit a typical saddle on slammed seat post at bottom out. The first gen Ripmos had this problem. Not sure if that would be an issue on this bike, but in general seat tubes can be shorter than what's actually practical.
  • 6 2
 Was hoping it could be compared to the Forbidden Druid V2. Any thoughts there? I’m trying to decide between those two bikes.
  • 4 6
 Wrong bike lol. This is a Dreadnaught
  • 13 0
 @bigmeatpete420: I would disagree. I belive the sight is a closer competitor to the druid. The dreadnought is far closer to the range. The dreadnought is raced on the world cup circuit.
  • 2 1
 @Thebikebeast07: how lol. It’s 4mm away from the travel. A few mm away from the chainstays. And half a degree on the head tube.
  • 2 0
 @Thebikebeast07: Rhys Verner piloted a druid to an Enduro World Cup win...
  • 3 0
 Also curious on the Druid V2 comparison. I have heard the capability of the V2 is way above what its numbers suggest.
  • 2 0
 @zanda23: yep many riders choose the druid over the dreadnought in the ews. I was talking about the dh world cup
  • 2 0
 @bikehard11: the druid is a very capable shorter travel bike, as mentioned above it has been raced and won on the ews circuit. Because the sight cane out today we don't have much info on it. My advice would be just test ride both or wait for some more reviews on the sight to come out
  • 6 0
 haven't ridden the Norco, but as a longtime Forbidden owner of a V1 Druid, Dreadnought, and now the V2 Druid I can say the Druid is hands down one of the most fun bikes I've ever ridden. Don't be scared away by the 130 rear travel number its so capable. I just recently bumped mine up to a 160 fork and ride it on everything.

Also the V2 Druid frames are $200 less than this new Sight and they aren't as portly in the weight department. Mine built up with a Lyrik, Super Deluxe, WA1 rims and X0 transmission came out to 32lbs

I'm a bit biased as a Forbidden owner but I can tell you if you do it you won't regret it.
  • 4 0
 @bikehard11: I haven't swung a leg over either of the new Norco models, so I can't compare. In the short time I had on the Druid, it was an impressive 130mm-travel bike.
  • 1 0
 @bigmeatpete420: You need to look at the chainstay growth numbers too, Druid V2 moves 22mm throughout its travel, while the Sight grows 12mm in comparable sizes, contributes to more stable rear end even though the vertical wheel travel for the druid is only 130.
  • 3 2
 I think PB played it cool by not comparing Forbiden to where they come from.
  • 1 0
 @inonyme: what do you mean?
  • 1 0
 @thefantasticfox: the owner of Forbiden come from Norco. The aurum hp was is last project there.
  • 3 0
 I've been riding a HP trail bike (Deviate Highlander 2) for the past 5 months, and I totally love it.

While it's not like I've tried the Norco to see how it feels, but I think HP trail bikes are totally awesome.
  • 4 0
 Norco didn't get the memo of pre-covid pricing and excess supply and lower demand. Or they need money to pay the GOAT.
  • 1 0
 I think the rumour was that the new Norco high pivot Ebikes we’re being planned to be released today but I think there’s an overstock old ones and they don’t want to announce the new one yet until they sell old supply- which are heavily discounted everywhere right now…
  • 4 0
 The old gen sight is the bike I recommend to a lot of friends when they get into biking. It’s still a thoroughly modern mountain bike snd will be for some time.
  • 5 0
 Lil Sprindex sounds like a local rapper name
  • 5 2
 WTF - they are presenting new bikes in 2024? Don't they still have stock to clear?
  • 2 0
 Not anymore.
  • 4 3
 Looks nice....... But I bet those 2 part lower shock mounts are going to creek like bitch after a while..... I remember a friend having a NS bike with a similar set up and you could hear him.... before saw him.
  • 3 0
 NS used a single piece shock mount that is very stiff and hard to "clamp". So if the tolerances are not spot on perfect, it might make some noise. A 2piece design is not as sensitive to tolerances and has a way better chance of being quiet!
  • 4 2
 @mattbeer Tell Kaz to test mixed wheels with the long chainstay setting. I think that's the secret setting, and the BB is high enough to make it work.
  • 2 0
 @fentoncrackshell, I might give it a try. The BB height with a 170mm fork would be doable, it's just that the reach will get even shorter, so it may potentially feel too small.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: You mean 345? Plus the extra stroke will allow you to run more sag/lower and the spring rate a bit which will lower the BB even more.
  • 1 0
 @TOOTRIKK, oops, yes, 345mm.
  • 5 0
 Looks like a Session.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Slash
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: I hear ya. the Lower shock mount does say Slash. But the Chainstay is way more Session then Slash.
  • 4 1
 @mikekazimer and versus a Bronson MX, which one would fit the best that all-mountain/doitall category?
  • 4 6
 Bronson. For sure
  • 1 0
 @bigmeatpete420: Preference. The Bronson is good. This would be very terrain dependent.
  • 2 2
 "The Shore isn't quite as awkward and janky as it once was, but there's still no shortage of rocky, slower speed testpieces"

Nice contradiction. Having more non-janky options does _not_ mean the existing stuff is magically less janky. Just like the existence of go-arounds (yes, unauthorized ones and numerous erosion-causing braids are still bad) doesn't make a feature any lesser.
  • 1 0
 He was referring to the trails themselves. For instance, CBC used to be a bit janky and has now been rebuilt to incorporate a lot more flow.
  • 2 2
 I've been waiting for the new Sight to drop but after reading this review have zero urge to do a frame upgrade from my '22 Sight A1. Anyone with a current 150/160 sight should look into the Vorsprung Tractive Tune before subsidizing Greg's new contract. In my opinion, having done the Tractive Tune and reading Kaz's review, you can get your current Sight riding like the new one for a fraction of the price.
  • 2 0
 I would like to know how this bike compares to the outgoing Sight. Is it that much better? Is it worth getting this vs. a 2023?
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer - what's the cable routing like? My Range is the noisiest bike I've ever owned and it's driving me insane, has Norco gone with internal routing or is it like the Range and annoying as hell?
  • 1 0
 Tube in tube cable routing all over, and the dropper has a small noise damping foam sleeve at the BB bend. Very easy install
  • 1 0
 @Maxhester: "tube in tube" meaning that they put the foam padding around the cable housing or there is actual dedicated internal cable routing?

The Range is a nightmare. Rattles around and makes bike feel like it's falling apart. And then when you do need to replace housing, you have to (well I had to) drop the fork to get my fingers inside the headtube to direct the housing out of ports. The rubber grommets that they supply dont do enough to stop cable rattle.

So the Sight has a significant improvement over the Range or just when it's new and nice?

Also seeking advice how to quiet down the Range!!
  • 1 0
 @exnvanlocal: No foam tubes. Rigid tubes inside of the carbon tubes. Much much much quieter than the Range.
  • 6 3
 Was excited for this bike but the chainstays are super short.
  • 4 3
 But it's a HP, so at sag it's probably a 440, and grows to about 450
  • 1 0
 For the size 4 anyways, looks like they rode the size 3
  • 1 0
 And the size 3 full 29 starts at 434 chain stays, which will grow. Longer.
  • 6 0
 @eae903, it’s 436mm at sag and 445mm at max extension.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: sorry, I was thinking it was the size 4, and I only skimmed the review. Classic PB thing right?
  • 5 1
 @eae903: chainstays only grow 12 mm throughout the travel.

I was hoping for the chainstay length to be sized proportionately with reach across sizes but it is not. Size S1’s cs to reach ratio is .99. S5 drops all the way to .84!!

I was expecting more from Norco.
  • 1 0
 @haen: I think the growth of the chainstay gets larger as size grows up too, so while the size 3 grows 12mm, the size 4 and the size 5 are likely to grow more than that, given that their rear center length uncompressed are both longer than 428. Might still be shorter than you would like, and there's no problem with that. but it is still more proportional. The rear center to front center ratio is probably more important to ride feel than rear center to reach.
  • 1 0
 @haen: That seems like splitting hairs.
  • 2 0
 @haen: unless I have missed something about the rear center growth being 12mm across all sizes.
  • 2 0
 @eae903: you may be right but I still think the chainstays are too short on the larger sizes. I would like them to be proportional to front center throughout the sizing, like Forbidden.

Norco does a lot of things right and the aluminum frame option is a deal. Might have to just give it a go.
  • 3 0
 @dmackyaheard: splitting hairs? Welcome to the pinkbike comment section Smile

But seriously, rear center to front center ratio matters. Increasing it 4mm while the front jumps 20+ with every size is not good enough. Bikes aren’t cheap, expect more.
  • 5 1
 Looks like a Slash.
  • 4 1
 Where are the kinematic charts?
  • 5 2
 So a size 5 with DD tires in Aluminum form and pedals would be what? 42lb?
  • 1 5
flag dmackyaheard FL (Feb 28, 2024 at 11:57) (Below Threshold)
 Doubt it. My L alloy Patrol with DH casing tires, coil, heavy wheels, heavy cranks, tire inserts is still 38.6lbs. I would imagine if you set it up like my Patrol it would be similar weight.
  • 4 3
 Good thing you added that whopping 10mm of dropper travel! Could have been disastrous if you could only drop it 8.25 inches instead of 8.65 inches. Whew!
  • 3 0
 Yea Kaz is especially over the top about the dropper length...10mm change and now all is right in the world...lol.
  • 4 0
 MUSTARDAYONNAISE
  • 1 1
 Looks great, but the short seat tube size is just not okay. I am running a 490mm with the longest OneUp post and I still have three inches of post showing....guess no Norco for me...lol.
  • 3 1
 Looks like a great freedowncountry light muscular e bike
  • 6 6
 Trek: you can copy my homework but don't make it too obvious
Rocky mountain: you can use our 2023 altitude color scheme for inspo but tweak it a little
Norco:
  • 5 1
 I suppose if you really squinted and are color blind.
  • 1 1
 Kazimer passed me climbing up good sir martin me last week doing the photos for this review and I thought he was on the altitude at first.
  • 1 0
 So if you could run a 65mm stroke shock on this, would you be able to run a 55mm stroke shock on the optic?
  • 1 0
 ........yes
  • 2 0
 another 27.5" bike bites the dust
  • 2 0
 But wagon wheels really smooth the bumps out, keeping my snacks intact
  • 1 0
 surprised to see so many color differences between the US and Canadian models on the respective Norco sites.
  • 2 0
 Why does Kaz want to turn every bike into an enduro lol
  • 1 0
 i was excited until i saw the canadian price tag.. 7k to 13k for carbon model.. is this a joke ahahah
  • 2 1
 Dropped BB reminiscent of Pole's new bikes... hmmmm, maybe Leo's on to something. [like he hasn't been for years:]
  • 1 0
 Hi great review! Just curious to know the trail you are riding in this review on the north shore?
Thanks
  • 1 0
 As I suspected would happen , another full 27.5 option disappears from the market
  • 2 3
 > Could 2024 be the year the 'all-mountain' category makes its triumphant return?

Now I am excited! Any rumors about that? Smile
  • 2 0
 Yes please.
  • 5 8
 I can't believe Norco thinks their going to sell these..bikes were so good 5 years ago..what were seeing is the industry struggling to produce new stuff ..just for sake of new stuff.. garbage.. going backwards..make bikes light again
  • 1 1
 Someone explained to me that there are VERY few exceptions to new products being better than the one they replace. On occasion there are problems with the first year of production due to unforeseen manufacturer's issues, but by the second or third year, the new product is almost always better than what it is replacing (new Coke notwithstanding Wink
  • 1 1
 Same frame as Optic, but with different links? Inquiring minds want to know.
  • 2 0
 No, just build by the same people. Very different and NOT interchangeable.
  • 3 0
 @TOOTRIKK: I live across the street from one of their engineers...
  • 2 1
 Did they take a mold of the new slash and mixed it with mondrakers colors?
  • 1 0
 what is the seat tube diameter?
  • 3 2
 2023 Rocky Mountain Altitude!
  • 1 0
 Not so fun fact - Mike Kazimer thinks the Tragically Hip are "overrated"
  • 6 5
 True. I'm not Canadian though, so I don't have any fond childhood memories or anything like that associated with them.
  • 1 0
 I'm bored of two tone paint jobs
  • 3 1
 Looks like a session
  • 1 0
 I'm glad elevated chainstays are making a comeback!
  • 1 0
 I must say that this one looks like a session too...
  • 1 0
 "It looks great although I wish the cables went through the headset."
  • 2 2
 Last year's colour palette from Rocky Mountain
  • 1 0
 Horst link with a pully
  • 1 0
 Like the eminnent
  • 1 0
 I WANT THIS NOW
  • 1 4
 I'm looking at trail orientated bike but Norco aren't on the list, not sold on HP. Trek Fuel EX is getting my attention at the moment.
  • 2 0
 cool story.
  • 1 0
 Have you seen the Fluid?
  • 1 2
 no in frame storage . lol who gives a fk
  • 2 3
 Looks like my Hope
  • 1 0
 @gregberry how do you like the Hope?
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.561855
Mobile Version of Website