Schwalbe Evo Aerothan Innertube - Review

Mar 22, 2016
by Richard Cunningham  

Schwalbe Aerothan EVO tube 2016


Schwalbe worked with BASF to develop what is by far, the lightest-weight full-sized inner-tube for mountain bike tires - and it is not made of rubber. The Evo tube is made from a thermoplastic called Aerothan and its Presta valve stem is molded from high-strength polycarbonate material. Evo tubes are not puncture proof, but are claimed to be the equal of a conventional inner-tubes in that respect. The use of alternative materials renders some unheard of weights: 68 grams for 26-inch, 72 grams for 27.5-inch, and 76 grams for 29-inch tires. And, we're not talking about wimpy 1.9-inch XC rubber. Evo tubes are designed to fit full-width enduro-sized tires. All of those juicy features, however, come at a premium price. The MSRP is $25 USD (€19.90). Schwalbe

Schwalbe Aerothan EVO tube 2016
The 72-gram 27.5" Evo is one third the bulk and weight of the same size butyl tube.
Schwalbe Aerothan EVO tube 2016
The polycarbonate valve stem is not fragile. The vulcanization process dictates metal stems for butyl tubes.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesSchwalbe's Evo tube could be a godsend for the handful of racers who have not yet converted to tubeless, because it comes in at half of what the lightest butyl tubes weigh, and when installed, it rolls almost as smoothly as a tubeless tire. Most yet-to-be tubeless riders, however, are regular Joes and Janes who burn through one or two dozen tubes a year and who could never justify twenty five bucks a pop for such a disposable item. Paradoxically, riders who will find the Evo tube well worth its MSRP are those who never plan on using one.

Schwalbe's Evo tube is the ultimate back-up tube for anyone who rides tubeless tires. It is so lightweight and compact that for short rides I simply stash an Evo tube, along with a CO2 inflator and a mini tool, into the zip pocket of my TLD shorts. Two tubes can be tucked into the space normally reserved for an energy bar in a hydration pack. And, if you wear power panties, an Evo tube can free up a lot of precious pocket space in those cargo-bib shorts. The bottom line is that Schwalbe's Evo tube may cost three or four times more than that large, heavy, stinky, butyl-rubber anaconda you have been carrying around - but if you only use one, maybe two a year, the Evo tube represents a very convenient alternative. - RC





282 Comments

  • 384 5
 So thin you'll hardly know your wearing it.
  • 109 5
 Just waiting for the ribbed/mini... MAGNUM! stupid autocorrect!!!
  • 55 3
 Latex and gluten free!
  • 26 4
 What happens if I'm lactose intolerant?
  • 26 3
 Soy based for a rash free ride!
  • 11 2
 It comes with fruitty flavors !!!
  • 6 4
 Well I heard it's now considered a super food. Step aside kale!!
  • 4 3
 Reminds me of Fruit-Roll-Ups from back in the day.
So are they edible?
  • 115 5
 2 dozen tubes a year?!!
You are doing something seriously wrong and/or havent learned a lesson,yet.
  • 8 6
 is it vegetarian and GMO-free?
  • 30 2
 Damn right. 1 or 2 tubes a year tops (if any) seems more reasonable to me.
  • 21 6
 Meh... Tubeless.
  • 12 54
flag bikecustomizer (Mar 23, 2016 at 2:42) (Below Threshold)
 How could I test it and compare it to anything If there is even no info where to buy it... But one thing for now - I HATE PRESTA VALVE.
  • 7 0
 First few years of downhilling and street riding, went through dozens of tubes smashing into things or running the wrong pressure. As skills progressed and I got faster, I used less tubes to the point where I'm on a set for several years. 2 dozen, maybe he's a beginner.
  • 8 1
 A rubber to match my pill
  • 7 0
 Does it glow in the dark?
  • 3 0
 And apparently it's also edible, energy bar replacement!
  • 5 4
 i got a puncture just by looking at this tube
  • 7 26
flag bikecustomizer (Mar 23, 2016 at 13:11) (Below Threshold)
 @upchuckyeager

Because it is always total hassle with presta valve during inflating.
Auto (Schrader) valve rules.
  • 22 1
 @bikecustomizer

stop inflating your tires at the gas station
  • 6 28
flag bikecustomizer (Mar 23, 2016 at 15:40) (Below Threshold)
 HA HA HA! Smile What a smart joke!
Appriciated!
You kinda think you are guru and I'm a little stupid novice or avarage joe Smile ))
I gone through that all damn adaptors and other stuff to understood: THE PRESTA VALVE SUCKS LIKE HELL.(Especially when you try ty inflate with a compressor)
Avto valve - no problems.

Of course it all IMHO.
  • 14 3
 @bikecustomizer
"(Especially when you try ty inflate with a compressor)"

called it! That's your problem. Go invest in a bike pump ya mook!
  • 4 8
flag donpinpon29 (Mar 23, 2016 at 16:07) (Below Threshold)
 @bikecustomizer you sir, are RIGHT
  • 3 18
flag bikecustomizer (Mar 23, 2016 at 16:10) (Below Threshold)
 @scottzg
HUGE FACEPALM.....
  • 3 22
flag bikecustomizer (Mar 23, 2016 at 16:13) (Below Threshold)
 The Presta valve is what stops me of buying this tube, NOT THE PRICE.
When they make schrader vavle in it - will buy immediately.
BUT WHERE ???
  • 19 0
 @bikecustomizer elaborate more on why you are not impresta with the valve on this tube?
  • 2 0
 You could get a Stan's conversion kit for the price of two tubes, or a roll of gorilla tape and a bottle of sealant for the price of one. N+1=why wouldn't you???
  • 4 8
flag bikecustomizer (Mar 24, 2016 at 5:43) (Below Threshold)
 @tseaman14
Think about why all the shocks and forks use AUTO valve not presta (not talking already about auto/moto wheels).
If you still need elaboration, please, attend other specialist as I'm not going to waste my time on it.
___

Like presta ? Use it.
Me not. Have the reasons/experience. Just waiting for this tube with schrader(if ever) and buy it.
That's all, folks.
  • 6 1
 It's all a bit hard to schwalbe ( sorry only german+english speakers may roll their eyes at that gem).
  • 1 0
 Gluten Free jajajajaja
  • 1 0
 @bikecustomizer You know the main reason most of those things use schrader valves? They are much more robust. Makes sense when its an expensive piece of equipment like a Shock/Fork etc.

If you manage to damage or break presta valves while using them... Please leave any mechanical work to someone else. IME I have never broken one unless I've been extremely unlucky in a crash and that has only happened once.

Oh and you can't use a compressor without an adaptor.... But that's just being lazy Razz
  • 2 0
 @charlie079 shocks/forks use schrader valves so you don't lose any air as the pump detaches because it's spring loaded. Tubes use presta because they're lighter, close more securely, can't clog with dust, and the stems are more shear resistant and slimmer for narrow rims.
  • 2 0
 And those reasons too Razz
  • 1 0
 Dunno, but thinking about it.. fruit roll up's might make for great rim strips.
  • 257 1
 Call that a review? Load it up, smash it through some nice terrain then come back with a proper review
  • 42 2
 I want some information on how they perform.
  • 84 1
 Are they repair'a'ble?
  • 36 1
 Exactly,,, enough four play reviews. Are they patch-able? have you blasted a rock garden at 23psi? Have you hit a 12 foot drop into a shale littered chute with them?
  • 73 2
 @nojzilla / @fecalmaster - Yes, they are. The tubes can be patched with our glueless patches: www.schwalbe.com/en/zubehoer.html
  • 128 12
 Review: We put them in a tire and inflated them, they held air. We rode over thumb tacks, they lost air. Performance review: they work like a tube. Conclusion; why would you review a goddamn tube.
  • 7 0
 Sounds good,, if I can patch them I shall thrash them.
  • 34 3
 I rode these tubes through a downhill race last year. Stood up to 95kg of me, on an heavy ass XL bike, through rough as all hell trails, inflated at 25 psi. I approve.
  • 6 2
 @schwalbe Only that the glueless patch doesn't even stay on. I used 3 patches on my last ride every 5-10 minutes after the initial failure, then switched to a butyl tube a friend was carrying...
Otherwise pretty okay. I'll us them mainly for the front tire from now on...
  • 12 2
 Thats not a review, maybe a product presentation. At least try to blow it up and tell us when it happened... For everybody else, just buy latex tubes. Hardly ever punctured with them, and they may be 30g heavier but less than half the price.
  • 17 0
 Awesome review! Tune in next week for my own review of the CVN-78 Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier.
  • 7 4
 How exactly do you review a tube? You can't just smash it through some rough terrain and expect to get some kind of real data on how it performs. Everyone knows that flats can be completely random. You can ride for months without one, then get 2 in a week. So with that said what test would you like to see? Even if RC took them out and smashed them through some rough terrain for a month would that really prove anything?
  • 2 1
 @bayonetwork: I want to be able to simply grab my bike out of the shed and go for a ride. Hated having to pump up my latex tubes again before every single ride.

They work well indeed, but it was way too annoying having to pump both tubes before each ride.

Apparently these actually do hold air.
  • 3 1
 The advantages of tubless vs tube has been well documented since 1985 but every time I see a major gash causing milk spray in riders eyes, frame, shocks etc I remember the old days, well I guess tubeless is new to noob types. Either way options, give my uber options and schwalbe has done exactly that.
  • 4 1
 I'd imagine these would be more resistance to pinch flats. Less material to rip itself. Like folding paper vs cardboard
  • 1 0
 In a real pinch you could use it as a condom as well.
  • 51 1
 I was more curious to hear how it performed (mainly in the puncture and pinch flat areas, and based off of actual use, not claims made by the manufacturer) compared to a regular tube. I really like the idea of it as a compact backup, but only if I can trust it to get me through the second half of a rough backcountry ride should I get a flat running tubeless.
  • 5 0
 I use tubes on my slope bike. Got the lightest ones I could find (some bontrager super light somethings) and they do just fine. Slope bikes are pumped up pretty hard anyway and not really ridden on trails that provoke flats. It's 90 grams, approx. Holds air pretty ok! You'll want to check the pressure every few days or once a week, though.

I'd totally get these if they hold air better. Lighter, not much more money, basically a one time purchase...if it holds air really well then I'm totally sold. Kinda wish that valve stem wasn't see-through, though. Oh well! That's an easy fix.
  • 3 4
 Using tubes because I run high pressure (38+ on the 7inch bike, 55ish on the HT. Was a specialized turbo fan but these look promising.... sus tuning for traction!!!! HT's for street.....
  • 7 0
 I also want to get these for my konig play bike. I always run about 40psi and don't ride rough stuff. I think I could save probably close to 300g... That's some good going compared to other weight saving avenues such as titanium bolts or pedal spindles. An actual review would have been welcome though.
  • 46 0
 sounds more like a product plug more than a review. great innovation but let us in on how it performs ehy ?
  • 31 0
 It is actually thicker than my wallet after buying all these new fangled bike gadgets :-).
  • 31 0
 How is this a review? Did you even use it?
  • 21 0
 That's a fair point, I kept looking around for 'Sponsored Arcticle' but nope, its a supposed review of the product... Review by brochure, new to PinkBike in 2016.
  • 2 1
 I'm sure the brochure says [paraphrasing the above] that this tube is basically useless because who's using tubes? And those that are want them as cheap as possible and don't care about weight.

I think you guys are just used to the needless pontificatoin of some reviews here and elsewhere, and can't see that you can say everything that needs to be said about a tube in a sentence or two.
  • 3 0
 It would be nice to hear how it compared to a regular tube puncture wise on the trails, rather than just taking schwalbe's word for it. They didn't mention anything about fixing punctures with them either. Otherwise just call the article a 'first look' or something.
  • 24 1
 New Technology makes me angry. I like it.
  • 18 0
 I run tubeless with sealant. Went all last year without a flat, but I always carry a tube and pump just incase I slash a tire or get a tire pinch flat along the rim that sealant won't seal. This seems reasonable to replace a heavier tube I carry around all the time and most likely will never use except for an emergency. Sold.
  • 4 0
 Spot on. Will be dining the same.
  • 1 0
 same here, but too bad the tire sizes are more strict on these. I switch between a 27.5 and 26 bike and use the same spare 26 tubes, works well on 27.5
  • 19 0
 RC now im seriously curious about those power panties could you review some?
  • 16 0
 There are two reasons I read the comments; one is for the opposite view and two is laughing till I almost pee in my pants at some of the hilariously funny lines coming from you guys. Cunningham must be just sitting there holding his head with a why bother look on his face.
  • 16 0
 @RichardCunningham (or anyone else in the know): Can they be patched by any normal means?
  • 3 0
 If so, that sounds like about the lowest dollar/gram weight savings out there! If not, $25 every time I pinch a tube seems a little steep...not to mention a bit eco-unfriendly. I hope schwalbe comes out with an accompanying kit to address repair issues, if they haven't already!
  • 21 0
 You must use Smurf blood, it's very fast clotting. Doesn't wash out though!
  • 14 0
 Ah...nevermind. Found my own answer! Copied from Schwalbe website:

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: CAN YOU REPAIR THE EVO TUBE?

You can repair a puncture in the EVO TUBE with the new self-adhesive patches from Schwalbe without any trouble. The patch also works very well for all conventional tubes. When repairing the EVO TUBE you must not use sandpaper to roughen the damaged spot before applying the patch.
  • 4 5
 Will be 25$ per patch, I am sure.
They didn't develop this for regular use. I am sure they had in mind that each tubeless rider should carry one of those in his pockets (like RC promotes). If they achieve this, sales target reached.
  • 1 0
 Further up the thread Schwalbe have said they can be patched
  • 1 0
 The tubes can be patched using Schwalbe's glueless patches, that also work perfectly well on normal butyl tubes. Although, a normal butyl patch won't work on the Aerothan tubes.
  • 3 0
 www.bike-discount.de/en/buy/schwalbe-glueless-patches-479180

Less than €4/$5 for 6 patches. And seen as there glueless and no faff with sandpaper there's no reason 1 tube and a pack of patches wouldn't be sufficient for even the biggest of rides. It would be just as easy to put a patch on the one tube as it would be to change it out (that's hoping you don't get a huge snake bite of course)
  • 1 0
 Schwalbe portable sonic welder and patches on the horizon. Find it incredible with today's tech we still have issues with punctures. Where's the god dam nanobots we were promised 20 years ago.
  • 9 0
 I've had one now for a month as a back up and knock on wood have not had to use it yet. It's so small, light and compact. I don't carry a backpack so it's perfect for carrying in your pocket, or your could stash it under your seat. I don't think I will be going back to regular tubes!
  • 11 1
 Mind if I ask where you got it?
  • 3 2
 Just a comment on using it as a "back-up": That would mean that once you have a puncture in your conventional tube, you will replace it with this supersonic one, and then going forward you will keep using this type of tube (as on subsequent rides you would again be carrying the same supersonic back-up), right? I would not expect one to use this as a back-up, and when actually needed, replace it again with a conventional tube when arrived back home?
  • 22 0
 @MTB-Colada no that's not how we would use it. Many of us who run tubeless only need an inner tube if we really screw up like badly cut a tire or let all the sealant dry up. Then back to tubeless once home again.
  • 2 3
 Oh, OK, but what about people who ride with tubes?
  • 3 0
 I want to buy one just for a backup as well since the standard 29er tube is annoyingly large.
  • 3 1
 @MTB-Colada: That's up to you. If you can afford $75 USD for two tubes and a spare, run em. If you can only afford one as a back up, then I guess whether or not it stays in the tire is your call.
  • 2 0
 @rallyimprezive, @MTB-Colada: When you put it that way, it sure makes converting to tubeless seem economical. You can convert to tubeless for less than $25/wheel, then never have to worry about tubes again. Just have this as a lightweight backup, that may get used once every 1-3 years, as long as you keep your sealant up to par. Plus you get all the other benefits of tubeless, like lower weight, lower rolling resistance, more traction, no flats. Seems like a no-brainer compared to buying three of these, especially since these don't seem to have any additional flat resistance compared to regular tubes.
  • 8 1
 frankly i could not care less how it performs...this is perfect for a back up to bring along in a tubeless setup. i want to believe that is the targeted audience. saves room in the pack or pocket and potentially saves a disastrous ride.
  • 6 0
 This seems a great alternative to carrying around a regular tube as a spare, if only for the compact size. I might get one of these to tape to the frame when doing laps at the bike park. If you use it only as a backup to get you down the mountain, one of these should last forever
  • 4 0
 Agreed. Backup tube is the biggest thing in my pack, besides water...
  • 2 0
 This can shave nearly a pound of weight off your bike for $50 or £40 - rotating weight too. Think these will be going on my bike for sure
  • 5 1
 The problem is, if it is as "durable" as a 100g butyl tube then it is worthless as a spare unless you pump it to 35 PSI or more. I stopped carrying light tubes since I was flatting right after. Butyls go with a tiniest, tiniest pinching.
  • 6 0
 @RichardCunningham If we take the word backup tube seriously, this tube might be needed for some riders only after some years of laying-around in the bag (at least the case for me with my spare tubes). Any words of Schwalbe on long-term durability in non-used condition?
  • 7 0
 Exactly what I would want to know. @RichardCunningham, how about an accellerated aging test? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accelerated_aging
  • 10 0
 uhh did you guys really just call this article a review?!!
  • 1 0
 Article? This was a press release.
  • 11 1
 Sold. Awesome.
  • 7 2
 Hey Schwalbe! How bout you make these in fatbike tire sizing!!! The regular tubes on my fatbike are disgustingly heavy; but the rims I have don't set up tubeless for shit. So a super light version of these in fatbike sizes would dramatically lessen rotating weight while saving a small fortune on a new fatbike tubeless wheelset.
  • 9 0
 Coming soon: only $99/tube.
  • 21 5
 You are concerned about rotating weight riding a fat bike? That's like jumping out of a plane and being concerned that you are falling.
  • 2 0
 Actually, dropping 3lbs from swapping to normal tubes is quite noticable, but i flatted more often. The cheap fatbike tubes weigh almost the same as the tires
  • 3 0
 I tried to go with a lightweight 2.8" tube. It was noticeably lighter but flatted fairly easy. Went back to the heavy stock tubes and they seem nearly indestructible.

If these high tech tubes actually do hold up like a standard tube, but weigh significantly less, I'd consider dropping $25-30/tube for the fatbike. Like I said, that would be cheap compared to a new tubeless ready wheelset.
  • 2 0
 I ended up scoring a set of mulefuts and relaced them to my current hubs. Most fatbike rims ERD are pretty close and there is a good chance you can reuse your spokes and nips. I scored my rims for $100 used, but they're available new on amazon for around $220 a set. I relaced them myself and paid $30 to have my shop tension them. The tubeless and the bead holding were totally worth the effort
  • 7 2
 Mr. Cunningham,

I didn't read the full Comments section on this 'article', but I find your passage: "Most yet-to-be tubeless riders, however, are regular Joes and Janes who burn through one or two dozen tubes a year and who could never justify twenty five bucks a pop for such a disposable item" elitist, condescending, and fully uninformed. We Cro-Mags who still use tubes, REPAIR them with a 2 dollar self-adhesive patch kit trail-side without even needing to pull the wheel off. WTF, RC., don't forget the working-class still exists - we pay your salary, too. That said, I AM going to run these tubes when I race DH, and 25$ ain't a big deal, but no one, NO ONE, NO-f*ckING-BODY who has a 9-5 day job and isn't paid to ride and review, goes through 2 dozen tubes a season! That's one every other weekend -if you are lucky enough to ride every weekend of the year. Reduce, Reuse, Re-Cycle. "Disposable'? Hell Naw. Belee dat!
  • 6 2
 Oh damn - that energy drink really kicked in earlier. It's not called RESTRAINT! apparently.
  • 8 0
 Didn't BASF make cassettes back in the day?
  • 2 0
 They did. They made/make a buttload of chemical related stuff.
  • 7 3
 BASF made Zyklon-B and are the biggest chem company in the world, I believe. Edit - I'll fact-check ...... In 1925, BASF merged with Bayer, Hoechst and three other companies to form I.G. Farbenindustrie AG. Between 1933 and 1945, I.G. Farben played a central role in the Nazi economy. During World War II, the company manufactured poison gas, Zyklon B, used at extermination camps and employed forced and slave labor. Several company directors and senior managers were tried for war crimes and crimes against humanity. -Wikipedia
  • 7 1
 Oh sure! ya try to take over the world a couple of times and suddenly you're the bad guy!
  • 2 1
 HAHA! ^^^ I know how they feel...I'm a downvote magnet.
  • 2 0
 What the f*ck is wrong with you guys? I mean, seriously.
  • 4 2
 @mazze Better not to forget history. The victims would agree. Don;t get me started on IBM who basically wrote the punch-card program and supplied the hardware the Third Reich used to manage and monitor genocide. The US gov't didn't intervene.
  • 10 2
 @endlessblockades Somebody asks about cassettes and you start talking about Nazis and Zyklon-B? Seriously, are you retarded? You don't get to "Better not forget about history" me, man.
Let me tell you this: there is no country on earth that takes more responsibility for its dark history than Germany.
The American economy has been living off of wars nonstop for the last three decades at least, but who cares, let's talk German war crimes from 60 years ago.
My question to you is, why don't we talk about US Companies like Dow Chemical, Mobay or Monsanto? Does Agent-Orange ring a bell? No? It's just the reason for millions of malformed born children still to this very day three generations after vietnam war, because the US army dropped 80.000.000 Liters of that toxic stuff all over the country. No worries, eh? Oh yeah in case you forgot... America is the only country to ever drop not an Atomic bomb in the act of war. And not only one, but actually two. On civil grounds that is of course.
But let's just produce some big budget Hollywood movies like Black Hawk down, Fury and American Sniper, which glorify the shit out of all recent wars and totally deny any historic fact taking anything out of context like implying the Iraq-war being a consequence of 9/11 in American Sniper. You don't seem to know anything about history, as you are blinded by your All-American Hollywood-hero hypermoral. There was no such thing as bad deeds by American soldiers in any of the 10 wars since WW2, right? Because god has always been with America. There was certainly no violation of human rights and abuse in Guantanamo Bay ever, and no rape and genocide in Vietnam war like seen in one of the very few honest war movies like Platoon? Of course Oil and other economic interests like securing the USD as the oil trade currency had nothing to do with the Iraq war either. You don't know shit about history, all you know is novels written by Americans for Americans. By the way @justincs, WWI was not started by Germany. You should get your history facts straight.
I'm not denying anything that happened in Germany, but I refuse to be reminded three times a day by some shithead like you on the Internet, while the very rest of the world keeps denying all of its own crimes. You, as in you personally with your unquantifiable self-righteousness and ignorance (not as in all Americans for that matter!), disgust me.
  • 3 0
 Spameritards have killed 20-30 million people since WW2, they are great at killing people, the less weaponised and civilian the better. Absolute c*nt of a nation.

www.sott.net/article/273517-Study-US-regime-has-killed-20-30-million-people-since-World-War-Two

www.globalresearch.ca/us-has-killed-more-than-20-million-people-in-37-victim-nations-since-world-war-ii/5492051
  • 1 0
 Americans are the best at killing people, go US&A, go US&A!!!!
  • 3 0
 @mazze Easy, buddy. Maybe it was lost in translation, but I am -NOT- supporting American imperializm and geneocide, I am acknowledging it!!!! IE My comment about IBM.

Gott in Himmel, I ride a German bike.
  • 3 0
 Fair enough, then I apologize and distance myself from that part about self-righteousness and ignorance, but my point still holds. We are very counscious about our past and that is more than most other countries and its citizens can say about themselves... particularly when it comes to USA and Israel. Thus, getting it rubbed in like that is really annoying, especially when it is as pointless and way out of place on a mountainbike website like in this case. Most companies existing back then were involved in one way or another and that is only logical, as they could either be in or be dead.
  • 2 0
 @mazze You're right, it was super-insensitive and way out of context. I just hate that the $$ is more important than human rights and that our collective 'civilization' has made almost no progress in this regard.
  • 1 0
 @mazze: I never said they started it, I said they tried taking over the World a couple of times! English is a German based language but with humour added ! History is written by the Victors of Battle, do you really think any History is all that accurate/ unbiased?
  • 9 2
 Better tubes and derailleurs, is this where the innovation is going...
  • 8 1
 This isn't a review it's a sales pitch. What utter crap!!!!
  • 1 0
 Where's the info on wether or not it can be patched? Sales pitch!
  • 4 0
 If you run tubeless this would be a great backup. I would spend $25 for a 60% weight and volume savings on an item that I use once or twice a year at most, but lives in my pack for every ride.
  • 4 1
 This will get moderated and deleted, but this half-baked review is exactly why I can't read RCs writing. It's always a marketing blurb, always selling product for the mags. There no motion on if he used it effectively, if it's durable, etc. Have you ever went for a spare tube only to find its damaged from riding in the bottom of your pack for a year? Will this material be tough enough to survive? Step up or step aside, I mean he's not Even trying
  • 3 0
 Love the bright blue color. Could be good for my dirt jumper if it's as strong as a traditional tube, and can support about 50 psi. That weight savings might actually be noticeable, but that price is awful rich for my blood.
  • 8 1
 People spend $2000 on a carbon wheel set to safe the same ammount of weight. Thereby €40 for a set of tubes isn't much if you don't get much flats (i guess I have about 1 or 2 per year averagely, so for me it's worth it)
  • 6 0
 probably weighs as much as tubeless sealant
  • 2 0
 The website claims they're fairly puncture proof. Not convinced, to what level of butyl tubes do they rank them against. It also sais they're more heat sensitive so surely that works the other way and means a CO2 inflater may not be wise.
  • 4 0
 Will they be available for 1/4 of MSRP from Germany like the rest of Shwalbe's line-up?
  • 5 1
 This is MADE for dirt jumpers that can't quite go tubeless because they run tyres at too high pressure.
  • 2 0
 Why can't you run tubeless at high pressure? Serious question, I'm sure there is a reason but it eludes me.
  • 3 1
 Alot of rim tape/rims aren't designed for tubeless once it goes >45 psi

Dirt jumpers run their tyres ROCK HARD. Like 60psi+
  • 7 1
 You know you can get tubless road tyres right? Road riders pump their tyres to +/- 120psi
  • 2 3
 @gabriel-mission9 and @FurryCrew tubeless road rims aren't drilled, no need of a rim tape. It also exist for MTB, Mavic, Easton, some DT Swiss rims...
  • 6 1
 Incorrect. Many Road tubeless rims don't have sealed rim beds (eg. Pacenti sl23,stans grail,new enve just to pick a few). Any high pressure tubeless setup just requires an extra layer of tape. The reason nobody uses tubless for jumping is that there's no benefit. Theres no need for low pressure traction/pinch flat resistance and no need really for any puncture sealing. The likelyhood of burping tyres on wonky landings and having tyres flying off i imagine would be one of the main concerns.
  • 3 2
 do dirtjumpers actually care about the tube weight?
  • 1 0
 Dirt jumpers are some of the biggest weight weenies around. And it makes sense, the spins and twirls they are doing are made FAR harder by a heavy bike. Have you ever seen a fat ballet dancer?
  • 3 2
 DON'T FORGET ECLIPSE they are LIGHTER than SCHWALBE, they are since years on the market!
I also use them in my freeride bike they are nice.

www.ebay.de/itm/Eclipse-MTB-Schlauch-26-27-5-29-Zoll-world-lightest-MTB-tube-56-g-/321132084328?_trksid=p2141725.m3641.l6368


für 20 " von 1,5 - 2,125 " Breite Reifen - 39 g
für 24 " von 1,5 - 2,25 " Breite Reifen - 49 g

für 26 " von 1,5 - 2,25 " Breite Reifen - 56 g

für 26 " von 2,25 - 2,6 " Breite Reifen - 56 g

für 27,5 " von 1,5 - 2,25 " Breite Reifen - 58 g

für 28 " von 18C - 25C " Rennrad Reifen - 34 g
für 29 " von 1,5 - 2,25 " Breite Reifen - 58 g
  • 3 0
 60€ for a tube? I guess it is close enough to consider that an epic April fools joke.
  • 2 0
 only 2.25" on 27.5" ? hmm..
  • 2 2
 Says 16 euro so comparable price
  • 1 0
 The two Eclipse tubes I had, were exactly the same weight.
See: gewichte.mtb-news.de/img/a2/31/87/a23187cc51d18bcb4ba43c3b71f2d45fcbacd302/large_EclipseDHSchlauch.JPG There seem to be even lighter ones now, however, I used 2 of them and I don't recommend this product. They both failed despite using DH tires, but other than that pretty much 90% of those tubes were also leaking air through micro holes after only 1-2 weeks of using, so you had to pump before every ride. There were also quality control issues, such that some people even got brand new tubes with a twisted seam for 50-60€ and Eclipse rejected all warranty claims and was a huge pain in the ass to deal with. "A twisted seam does not compromise the tube's performance". Oh and Lezyne glueless patches didn't stick to them either. I repeat I do not recommend that product, especially as they are still at their ridiculous MSRP.
I'm happy about this new tube from Schwalbe, but I feel like they still could provide the tubes a lot cheaper.
  • 4 1
 This seems a nice replacement for Schwalbe 27.5" tubes I'm using. I don't and won't run tubeless, and I hate presta valve as well. Shame, Evo costs 4 times regular..
  • 2 1
 this makes sense for road/CX/XC, but for a 30lb mountain bike, this probably won't make much difference unless you're going for a ride with just a bumbag or your pockets as the size then would make a difference, still though personally i'd take the weight penalty and buy a box of tubes instead
  • 2 0
 While that's true, it's still one of the cheaper ways to save some grams of rotating mass.
  • 1 0
 you're underestimating how important changes in rotating mass are. i would gladly add 3 pounds of weight to my frame if i could magically reduce my rim weight by a single pound
  • 2 0
 So they don't come in 700c for road. If there is a road version roadies would be all over them I know tons of customers that would instantly buy them even if they were double the price just to save weight.
  • 1 0
 I would be one of those customers, but there's a disclaimer in the Schwalbe website stating that they should not be run with rim brakes (something to do with heat) and I am not ready yet to switch to disks on my road bike!
  • 1 0
 I noticed on Schwalbe's website, at the bottom of the page, it says "Reassemble only with the same tire size"...what exactly does that mean? If I were to go to a tire with a different width, I'd have to get a new tube as well?
  • 2 0
 It means that they don't want you to put a smaller tube in a larger wheel. Schwalbe's info states that you can use a 26" EVO tube in all popular 26" tire sizes, and the same goes for 27.5 and 29 inch Evo's. I tested mine in WTB 27.5 x 2.5 inch tires with no issues, so they stretch pretty well.
  • 1 0
 Still don't get it. How the hell could anybody put a smaller tube in a larger wheel? Like 26" tube in a 27,5' wheel?
  • 2 0
 ah ok, so it's basically saying you can't use a 26'' in a 27.5'' or vice versa.
  • 1 0
 @karoliusz I was wondering the same. Seems more common sense that it's not possible/recommended. But after stretching, and staying in the same shape for an extended period(say 1 year) and you go to swap to a bigger volume tire of same wheel size, would you be still able to use that same tube, despite it already being "stretched" once for so long?
  • 1 0
 @RichardCunningham, are you sure about that? Why would they say 'Reassemble'? It doesn't say 'assemble only in indicated tire sizes'. It's 'Wiedermontage' in German so it is not a translation glitch. Did you test them in a 2.0 tire after mounting them in a 2.5? Do they fully return to the original size after being stretched?
  • 2 0
 I think the point is you shouldn't first run them in for example a 26x2.5" tire and then pop them into a 26x2.1, as they might be too stretched after being inflated in the roomier 2.5" tire. The opposite (going from 2.1 to 2.5) shouldn't be a problem in my view, but don't take my word for it.
  • 4 3
 Man you people bitch a lot. $36 to save over a half pound of rotating weight is an incredible deal. Many people can't be bothered to run tubeless because a) it's a complete hassle and you have to carry a tube anyway, and b) low pressures equal destroyed rims. I haven't had a flat in nearly 3 years because I don't run tires at 22 psi like a fool. Also, tubeless fans your sealant weighs as much as this, perhaps more if you keep adding it. If these hold air and came in schraeder they'd be a perfect product for this guy.
  • 2 0
 Burn through a dozen of tunes a year? If I flat I patch it. The patch kit is also smaller and a lot less weight than a spare tube :p
  • 4 1
 That may be the downside. It is a thermoplastic so it probably won't work with a regular patch for butyl or latex tubes (which are thermoset elastomers, can't melt those). That said, there should actually be an easy way to mend them using another piece of thermoplastic film and a hot iron (and a piece of fabric in between so that the material won't melt to the iron). The only risk is that you melt both walls together as well or at the very least interrupt the shape and uniform thickness of the material surrounding the patch. But I suppose it could be done. And then the good thing is that you won't have to deal with the toxic glue used for regular patches and once you eventually have to dispose of it, it is easier to recycle than a regular butyl or latex patch.

The reviewer here doesn't seem to be too concerned about his ecological footprint apparently. Tubes apparently are to be disposed once they're punctured and you bring a CO2 cartridge on a short ride, not a pump. Damn, what happened to mountainbiking?
  • 5 5
 For me the question is how puncture resistant is it. I carry a heavish Conti FR tube with me because if I puncture my 1ply EXO tubeless tyre, I need a tube that can take at least a bit more beating. Carrying a 100g butyl as a spare is ridiculous since you will puncture it 100m further down the trail.
  • 4 0
 How about you actually test it.
Is it puncture-proof or not?!
  • 4 0
 What are these..."tubes" you speak of?!?
  • 4 0
 " And, if you wear power panties..."

What are power panties?
  • 2 0
 I came to the comments looking for answers and found none..
  • 2 0
 bib shorts?
  • 4 0
 Anyone figure out what power panties are? I'm scared to google that one...
  • 2 0
 Nice! I want one, but If you install this trail side after blowing out a tire set up tubeless will the left over sealant in the tire have any effect on the tube?
  • 2 0
 Word from Schwalbe is that it will have no effect. Bummer, cus I wanted to run sealant in this tube, in my front wheel. Sealant won't react to the non-rubber tube.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the reply!
  • 1 1
 I don't see the purpose in the real world unless it stops flats better than standard or current lightweight tubes.

Where I see this tube finding the most homes is strapped around bike frames of guys running tubeless that keep a tube for on trail emergencies. You don't go through more than a couple a year so the $25 doesn't hurt as much. As having 1/3rd the weight of a normal tube strapped onto a frame you paid extra for high end carbon to save weight on in the first place makes sense. Plus... it's shiny and blue and people like to brag.


But then again... that's not the "normal" average joe either.


This is a high end niche item. It won't move a crap ton of units but it will find a home. I predict I'll see a few of them floating around my office strapped to carbon full suspensions.
  • 1 0
 I'm using Michelin latex tubes which weigh around 120 grams. I use the same size for both 27.5 and 29er bikes. No problems yet, and no punctures. It can get pricey, too but at least it has been around for a while.
  • 1 1
 I hated on tubeless for years saying things like "Friends don't let friends run tubeless" etc etc... And in the beginning yeah there seemed to be problems that really sucked to try an fix on the trail. Had mates who tried it that were always walking their bikes home...
But honestly since making the switch this year I have had zero problems and I'm at the point where I just don't worry about pinch flats or tears at all now no matter what I'm heading into these days. Previously I had nearly 60 flats with tubes in one 3 month trip overseas while running Dh tires so yeah was pretty over that BS and yes I'm kinda hard on tires...
Get your tapes, valves and sealant sorted out and it just works. I've never needed a compressor either as my track pump has worked fine every time. If there's a problem I'm sorry but it's probably your shitty installation effort.
I've torn a few tires to pieces this year already and so far still not a single puncture yet, or even any burping issues and I've been running less pressure than I ever believed in the past to be safe.
A mate who rides like a bulldozer and weighs around 100kg crushed his carbon back wheel at the last race. Properly D'd rim a write off...
The tire still stayed on and held pressure fine and he finished his race run down a rough and very rocky 20min stage only noticing a lot of rear wheel wobble going on during his run.

So as a back up option if I ever do have a problem in a race or back country mission that is light and takes up less room in my pack and I'll prob never use but be more inclined to take with me its sounds pretty good.
  • 8 4
 Do they come in black?
  • 34 0
 Nah just the tires that cover them
  • 2 0
 Want this. My maxxis super light tube that I've never used is still way bulkier. This would be nice in a pinch.
  • 2 0
 @RichardCunningham Does it stretch when inflated, or is it pretty inflexible in its dimensions?
  • 2 0
 Schwalbe's site says not to use the tube with different tire sizes, so i'm guessing it's not as flexible as rubber
  • 2 0
 No, it does not stretch well. The material feels quite different from traditional rubber. I don't think it's possible to install, say, a 26" EVO tube on a 27.5" rim.
  • 5 0
 I was more wondering about its ability to deal with a 1.9, 2.1, 2.35, 2.5" wide tire without issue.
  • 1 0
 I must admit that I haven't had the pleasure (or the contrary) to actually ride with these tubes yet due to injury but they seem to fit 2.5" tires well enough.
  • 2 0
 I have mounted a pair in my Magic Mary and Hans Dampf 2.35" and used them for three rides. So far, so good. They do stretch, it's just that once they balloon up inside the tire, they are not as keen on retaking their uninflated shape as regular tubes are (but not to the point that it becomes a problem if you want to take the tube out again, I've tried).
  • 1 0
 @Crossmaxx Where did you get yours? I can't seem to find any in 26"
  • 1 0
 Uoops, apparantly they are not availible at the moment, sorry. Worth it or not - they seem popular.
  • 1 0
 @riggadon I got them from www.mantel.com. But they seem to be out of stock now.
  • 6 3
 Where is Schrader valve version?
  • 2 0
 I was thinking the same thing. I would probably buy these if there were a Schrader version available.
  • 4 1
 I still want procore when is it actually going to be available
  • 1 0
 My local bike shop has had 'me for ages. You might have to make some phone calls (I'm in Australia).
  • 2 0
 Where can I buy one? I've tried mt LBS but not in stock. Anyone have a suggestion?
  • 3 1
 Afaik they have not been released yet but it could happen any moment now. Probably also why pinkbike didn't review it, only rewrote the text of schwalbes website, with exactly the same info they shared in their last article of these tubes.
  • 3 0
 They're not available yet at the link you shared.
  • 1 0
 @Mattin you're right, I've missed the info about availability: "delivery period approx. 20 days or more".
However, there is already one written review for 29" version: www.bike-components.de/en/Schwalbe/Schlauch-19E-28-29-EVO-TUBE-p45928
  • 3 1
 Checked at the distributor, they will hit the European market in the first half of April.
  • 1 0
 Been waiting for these to come in stock. And yes that was my original idea too...to carry as my back up tube when running tubeless.
  • 3 1
 Who gets through 1-2 dozen tubes a year?

I haven't gotten through that many since 2010!
  • 1 0
 Maybe you're riding not fast enough?
  • 1 0
 Check out my vids, you'll see I'm not hanging about
  • 1 0
 I'll get one or two after I use up the 3 regular inner tubes I already got.

Riding tubeless I still haven't had a serious flat. *Knock on wood*
  • 3 0
 Is this the core in Procore with a presta valve on it?
  • 2 0
 I would be running to the store if these were slightly cheaper. I can't fathom spending 75$ for tubes.
  • 3 0
 Perfect size for my fanny pack.!
  • 1 0
 Looks like it could be useful as a backup tube for a tubeless system. It's weight would make it even nice for xc riders to even carry around.
  • 1 0
 So if its equal strength at that weight why can't they offer a tubeless equivalent weight with extra puncture protection too?
  • 2 0
 like the weight, 72 grams for 27.5-inch, the price point needs to come down to gain mass acceptance
  • 2 0
 I for one commend the Pinkbike users for calling out the bullshit "review$" on here.
  • 1 0
 Shouldn't they market this as the ultimate weight weenie product? If I recall my numbers, this is actually lighter than a typical stans setup.
  • 1 0
 For those of us rocking hip packs such as the High Above Cadcadia... These are perfect, take up no room at all.
  • 2 0
 So what's the difference between these and Foss tubes?
  • 6 0
 This one is German and made from euthanized Smurfs!
  • 1 0
 @wavetrance This are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more expensive (or it'll be). And it seems that the "thermoplastic called Aerothan" is the same EFT gliberish with a different name.
  • 4 2
 how have we not invented puncture proof tubes yet!?
  • 1 0
 Maxxis DH tubes are the toughest you can get. 1.5mm thick and nuke proof. Bloody heavy though.
  • 1 0
 Yea. The weight is not worth it IMO. I ran two DH tubes for one season, and after replacing them with standard tubes the difference was very noticeable.
  • 1 0
 Just wondering?, can you get a puncture repair kit for these new tubes.. Big Grin or do are you supposed to lob them away.
  • 2 0
 at $25 a pop, I hope they're repairable. lol
  • 2 0
 Yeah I know. But it doesn't actually say in the review and because they're made of a different material I was just wondering if you'd need a special type of repair kit!.. Smile Maybe they're working on it..another money making sideline.
  • 2 0
 If it's a vinyl like plastic, maybe you'd be able to use vinyl repair kits, like what they have for beachballs and the like.
  • 3 0
 You need a special repair kit from Schwalb but it's pretty cheap and also works on normal tubes. Check the website for more info.
  • 2 0
 Perfect for an extra spare when racing enduro. Right on.
  • 1 0
 I'm keen, these sound like a great idea, can i stomach £40 on tubes though...
  • 2 0
 same size as your wallet after you've bought a few :L
  • 2 1
 For this price, I'll Continue to carry a regular old spare tube in my pack when I ride. No thank you.
  • 1 0
 What about the length of the presta valve stem, looks too short for a composite rim?
  • 2 1
 Come on @RichardCunningham, it's a review when you actually USE IT. Stop re-hasing press releases and calling it a review.
  • 6 0
 Fgiraffe^^^ Of course I have used Evo tubes - this is, afterall, a review of an inner-tube. It acts just like any other tube: holds air, stretches about the same as a butyl tube, and I installled them in 2.5 WTB tires with no issues. I think 25 bucks is too expesive for alll but the wildest spenders to use as a regular tube, but I run everything tubeless, as most everyone does these days, so I focused this review upon the EVO tube's value as a backup - which is its strongpoint.
  • 1 0
 Has anyone tried using them at 60-80psi on a DJ bike? Would they still act like any other tube at those pressures?
  • 2 0
 Reasonably priced item from Schwalbe?
What's the catch ?
  • 3 0
 Presta valve only? Nah..
  • 1 0
 Rarely get a flat, run tubeless, this shaves a great amount of weight for such a low, gram to $ ratio. Sold.
  • 1 0
 Out of interest. How much weight does a Stans tubeless kit weigh when you've put your sealant into the tyre?
  • 1 0
 Straight up thought that was called the 'Atherton' for a hot minute...
  • 2 2
 It's be cool if they made an HD version that reduced flats by 99% obviously at the expense of some extra material weight
  • 2 1
 Wow you call this a review? More like a paid ad by Schwalbe.
  • 1 0
 Did you put it on a bike and ride it?
  • 1 0
 I wonder if this is the same material used in schwakbes procore system.
  • 1 0
 I believe you can find the power panties in Bonetrager's spring collection
  • 1 0
 Perfect item for a fatbike!!
  • 1 0
 Seems Nice but where is the review?
  • 1 0
 Can we have these yet? Can the same tech be applied to procore please!
  • 1 0
 Lucky it's just 4$ in my country. :-D
  • 1 0
 like a condom, you don't feel it, but it's there
  • 1 0
 How much are plugs?
  • 2 1
 What is an inner tube?
  • 1 1
 The presto valve stem looks to short for a composite rim.
  • 1 1
 $25 Tube in a Tubeless world...good stuff...
  • 1 1
 Golly.
  • 1 1
 tubes
  • 2 3
 Was anyone asking for a $25 tube in a world of tubeless tires?
  • 1 1
 Is this enduro?
  • 1 3
 I am not a vegan.
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