Ridden and Rated: Six Flat Pedals

Oct 11, 2017 at 16:59
by AJ Barlas  




More recently there has been a steady increase in what's available when it comes to flat pedals. In the past, the number of quality, well-designed flat pedals for mountain bikes was limited to a short few, with the likes of Shimano, DMR, and Easton being a few of the better options available. Then Wellgo joined the list of pedals that people wanted back in the early–mid-2000’s with their MG1, magnesium-bodied pedal. They were reasonably strong and durable, felt good, and came in at a great, low price (you can still get them today for between $40 and $60 USD).

While the MG1’s were quite popular, largely because of the value they represented, the pedal is a little dated in terms of the platform, the same goes for the older pedals from the other brands mentioned above. Over the past few years, while searching for more traction, flat pedals have grown in size and a number of different takes on the concave, (or even convex), pins and their orientation, and thickness have changed flat pedals for the better.

Easton s Flatboy was ahead of it s time with a platform that is still to this day up there among the sizes of some of the newer ones.
Easton's Flatboy was ahead of its time, with a platform that is still to this day up there among the sizes of some of the newer ones.

During this hard push to improve the flat pedal, a number of manufacturers attempted to produce the thinnest pedals imaginable and while there still are a lot of wafer-thin pedals available today, I for one am glad to see that a number of newer designs are what you could call a more reasonable thickness—at the slimmest portion of the pedal, about the size of the bearings, give or take.

Thin pedals, with their ‘extra ground clearance’ this and their ‘lighter weight’ that were cool and all, but they were more prone to the platform bending or worse, snapping due to an impact, and the continued move to bushings—which allowed for a thinner pedal body—often resulted in pedal slop and in some cases complete failure in far too short an amount of time. If someone is to throw down good money on a set of pedals, those pedals should last a decent amount of time.... and, no, a single season is not good enough. For a while there, none of the new stuff could boast the longevity of the Shimano DX, Easton Flatboy or the DMR V12 of old—I even still have three sets of Eastons, accumulated over the years, that are running fine to this day, despite up to 10 years abuse in Whistler, Squamish, and god knows where else. Thankfully, though, in a lot of cases, things have changed for the better with regards to the bushings and pedal life.

Flat pedals for life and another World Championship for a legendary racer.
Sam Hill has won DH and now Enduro World Series championships on flat pedals.

Originally this push to design a better flat pedal was no doubt helped along by the success and popularity of the ‘Flat Pedal Thunder from Down Under’. Sam Hill, possibly the most well-known, flat-pedal rider on the planet, began his rise to fame shortly before flat pedal designs really began to move forward. The rise of Sam saw the flat pedal become more widely accepted on bikes, especially in a competitive sense, and his popularity and success had an unmistakable influence on flat pedals. Even to this day, we can still thank him for that.

So here we are, 2017, and in the last five or so years we have seen some pretty interesting new products hit the market for those who like to ride bikes using ‘children's pedals'. While there still are plenty of ultra-thin pedals available, the more recent movement has been to thicken the bodies slightly in an effort to produce a more durable pedal. They’re still not the thick and horrible aluminium blocks from some of the designs of yore, but rather, they spread the material to the key areas of the pedal, areas that aim to provide riders the traction and the confidence that the foot will remain planted, while being able to take a hit and spin freely, free of play, for a time to come. At least that’s the hope.

In light of this more recent evolution in the design of the flat pedal, we’ve gathered six models that have caught our attention for one reason or another, and we’re giving you our thoughts on how each pedal rides and who they're possibly better suited to. This isn’t a comprehensive list of pedals from the now-saturated flat pedal market, each with a multitude of options that bear a remarkable resemblance to another. Rather, it's a tighter grouping of pedals from companies we feel went outside the box to try and develop something that each brand believed would help riders get on with riding and forget about worrying about where their foot was on the pedal. For the record, we know there are more than six pedals out there that definitely meet this criterion, but we did have to draw the line somewhere. Perhaps a future Ridden and Rated will include those... Alright, on to the reviews then.



DMR Vault

DMR Vault Pedal
Details:
• 105 x 105 platform
• 17mm thick in the shallowest part of the concave
• Double concave profile
• Extruded Alloy body
• One cartridge bearing and one DU bushing per pedal
• Cromo or Ti axle
• 11 pins/side (22 pins/pedal) 7 rear loaded, 4 top loaded
• Most pins thread in from underneath
• Pins can be fine-tuned by flipping them
• Weight: 430g/pair (chromo axle)
• MSRP: $147 USD

DMR’s classic V8 and V12 pedal designs worked really well, and as we noted earlier, were one of the earlier pedals that gave riders a good quality, great traction option. The design, however, was getting a little long in the tooth and DMR saw a need for a larger platform so that aggressive trail and DH riders could get more traction than the current crop at the time. The Vault was first released in 2010, seven years ago now, but it has remained a staple and a benchmark for many.

The Vault features a dual concave to the pedal profile—DMR is one of only a couple that utilize the technique—which is said to provide the foot with a more planted feel as a result. On the trail, the Vault is notorious for providing ample grip, thanks to the large platform, concave shaping, and seven long pins (three at the rear and four at the front of the foot). While the four stubby pins at the sides can be upgraded to a sharper, higher traction option, for the majority of people the stock setup provides plenty of traction.

The heavily chamfered design does a great job at blowing off rock strikes and impacts with obstacles and the renowned serviceability, on top of an already durable pedal, makes the Vaults a very worthwhile, long lasting pedal.

Positives
• Great grip and feel underfoot
• Great mud clearance
• Blows off strikes well, best of all here.
• Completely serviceable
• Update-able pins/Customizable grip
Negatives
• Prone to bend/twisting the thinner sections of the platform on rock strikes
• Pins are a thicker diameter, which some won’t like the feel of.
• Doesn’t feel as big as others with similar size because of the shape (could be a plus for some)





Nukeproof Horizon (Sam Hill edition pictured)

Nukeproof Horizon Pedal
Details:
• Large 110 x 100 platform
• 17mm thick in the shallowest part of the concave
• Forged 6061-T6 alloy with CNC finish
• Two cartridge bearings and one DU bushing per pedal
• Cromo or Ti axle
• 10 pins/side, 6 rear loaded, 4 top loaded
• Adjustable pin height with washers
• Weight: 430g/pair (chromo axle)
• MSRP: $129.99 USD

This is quickly becoming a favourite. In the past, I've found a pedal with a more concave profile to be more desirable, but the amount of concave coupled with the shape and size of the Horizon pedal platform makes for a great feeling pedal that gives a planted feel—one that is rarely put off. The fact that Sam Hill rides it must mean it’s good too, right? Honestly, we all know that's not always the case (by no means singling out Sambo) but where the Horizon is concerned, particularly in the Sam Hill, we’re left with an excellent flat pedal.

Initially, I wasn’t convinced on the polished option of the Sam Hill signature when looking at the Horizon, but after riding it in plenty of variable conditions I can say that it does keep the surface clear of grit. That and the more refined surface created by the machining have resulted in a better connection between shoe and pedal. In practice, we haven’t had the chance to compare the regular version, so perhaps we’ll chalk it up to placebo until we do. The fact that there is no bearing bulge anywhere on the pedal absolutely adds to the pedal’s great feel, with the potential for that to interfere with foot placement removed also.

Most of the pins on the Horizon pedal screw in from beneath the platform, making it a little easier to remove them when damaged. There are also washers that make adjusting platform feel and traction easy. The four pins at either side of the platform—over the axle—are of the hollow variety which grants more traction than a regular, solid, round pin. The combination, even with the adjustable pins set to stock, provides incredible grip. We’ve been running the Horizons for a good portion of the summer and have yet to experience any play with the bushings, which is also quite promising.

Positives
• Great grip
• Incredibly planted feel (the best here)
• Shape works well with a range of shoes (narrow or wide soles)
• Feels bigger than the sizing suggests
• No bearing bulge
• Easily customizable pin length
• Completely serviceable
• No play after loads of abuse
• Decent price (especially if you went the non-Sam Hill, non-polished finish)
Negatives
• Pins are a thick diameter, which some won’t like the feel of.
• DU bushings have a tendency to create slop when they wear





Deity TMac

Deity Tmac Pedal
Details:
• 110mm x 105mm platform
• Extruded and machined 6061 T6 aluminum
• Super concave 2.5mm deep pedal profile
• 14mm thin at the center
• Symmetrical pedal profile
• 14 pins/side (28 pins/pedal) top loaded
• Three cartridge bearings and one DU bushing per pedal
• Heat treated Cromo axle
• Available in seven colors
• Weight: 409 grams
• MSRP: $169 USD

When the Deity TMac pedal hit it excited a number of people. The combination of a large platform, the largest of the pedals here (with the exception to the unique Pedalling Innovations Catalyst below) and the aggressive concave shape seemed to work well for all. Even despite some concerns with a unique profile, the amends made to work with these different approaches to the platform worked out on the trail. It’s clear that the team at Deity put three years into developing the TMac pedal.

On the trail, the pedal grants an incredible amount of confidence, with the combination of 14 hollow pins per side, the big platform, and the very concave shape resulting in gob-loads of grip. Drop the heels as you enter a rough section of trail and keep on trucking, it's a rarity for your foot to shift the least bit out of place. Despite all of the traction, subtle movements of the foot, whether to reposition or make up for a slip, are possible. That said, if you are wearing really grippy-soled shoes (like the 510 VXi or S1), you might find making those shifts require more effort, though they're still possible.

This pedal may be a bit big for some folks, especially if you have a smaller foot. My size US 10.5 was fine with most shoes, but the new Specialized 2FO was just too small to take advantage of the pedal shape and pin placement. All of the pins being of the hollow, top-loaded variety may not sit too well with some folks, but I’ve never had major issues with them in any pedals that ran this style of pin over the years. Yes, they can be sheared or torn out, possibly resulting in that placement being useless, but in practice, it happens less often than some would have you believe, and is a better scenario than bending the pedal body because the pin wouldn't give.

The TMac’s were my new all-time fave until the Horizon came along. Both are incredible, though they do offer different feels. The TMac provides a little more grip thanks to the amount of hollow pins, platform size, and concave, but the feel of the Horizon is more positive, with a fraction less grip than you experience with the TMac. The Horizon is a little easier to reposition the foot too.

Positives
• All out grip (the grippiest here)
• Great concave
• Massive platform (feels large)
• Hollow pins (more grip)
• Easy to find foot placement
Negatives
• DU bushings could create slop when they wear
• Big platform can be more prone to strikes
• Cost. These are the priciest pedals here.
• Some won’t like top loaded pins





Chromag Scarab

Chromag Scarab Pedal
Details:
• 110mm x 105mm platform
• 13mm thin at the center
• CNC machined from 6061–T6 aluminum.
• Heat treated chromoly axle
• Double concave design
• Adjustable pin height
• 10 pins/side (20 pins/pedal) rear loaded
• 42 pin placement options
• One cartridge bearing and one DU bushing per pedal
• Weight: 430g
• MSRP: $169 USD

Chromag’s Scarab pedal is one of the older pedals of the six here—the DMR Vault the only one older—and it's included for good reason. The Scarab was Ian Ritz and his team's first, full-production pedal and they went to town when designing it. Many aspects of the pedal were painstakingly debated and worked on with this, the end result, being what Chromag consider the ultimate in flat pedals. Thin, but still enough material to provide what they feel to be an adequate double concave, chamfered edges to help minimize getting hung-up when connecting with obstacles, one sealed bearing and one bushing per pedal, and highly adjustable pins.

The pins are actually one of the unique features of the Scarab, differentiating Chromag’s flat pedal from many of the others available today. They include the ability to adjust the height via a washer, as a number of others do, but also provide a whopping 42 placement options per pedal. The pins also include a shear line, which is said to allow the pin to snap off when struck against an obstacle, limiting the amount of damage that the body of the pedal could see as a result.

Riding the Scarab, I found the platform to feel considerably smaller than the Horizon and TMac, which is interesting because the TMac has the same basic measurements and the Horizon is actually supposed to be smaller (than the Scarab). A lot of this comes down to the diagonal surface of the pedal and with the Scarab’s featuring a very rounded shape to the outboard side of the pedal, it loses quite a bit of the surface area, resulting in the smaller feel.

The Scarab also didn’t provide the same amount of traction as the other pedals listed here, regardless of the shoe or pin placement/height, and I regularly found myself repositioning my foot or simply hanging on and hoping to make it to the end of a rough section with feet on the pedals. It could be attributed to a number of things including the pins themselves (they’re not the sharpest), the concave of the pedal, or the size of the platform. Either way, if a slightly less grippy pedal is something that is more desirable, then the Scarab should be of interest, otherwise, the other pedals listed here will be better suited to your trail/DH needs.

Positives
• Lots of pin placement options
• Adjustable pin height
• Incredibly well sealed
• Serviceable
• Shear line in pins to limit pedal damage
Negatives
• Not as grippy as others
• Platform feels small due to shape





OneUp Composite

Oneup Composite Pedal
Details:
• Nylon Composite body
• 115mm x 105mm platform
• Contour profile (convex)
• 18.5mm thick at the center/13.3mm at leading edge
• 10 pins/side (20 pins/pedal) rear loaded
• One cartridge bearing and one DU bushing per pedal
• Cromo Axle
• Weight: 355 grams
• MSRP: $48 USD

OneUp has grown steadily as a brand that thinks outside the box and seeks to solve problems that they feel exist in the world of MTB. Their first pedal design is no different and they went down the route of a more unorthodox pedal profile, dubbing it as a contoured shape (or simply, convex), rather than the more commonly seen concave or even flat designs that we see with many pedals. Their rationale for this approach is they feel it creates more of a connection with the bottom of the foot.

The pedal is available in a more expensive alloy body ($125 USD) and the nylon, or plastic version that we have here. The two are identical in appearance, with exception to the thickness, where the nylon version comes in with a center measuring 18.5mm thick while the alloy measures 12mm. That difference is all due to the axle being used and in order to keep the price down on the nylon pedal, a more simple axle was required and, you guessed it, that cheaper, simpler axle is thicker.

On the trail, the platform was great, with a large surface area and shape that works really well with the foot. The profile, being convex rather than concave, seems to have more of a love/hate affair, and personally, I had some problems with it. The pins do a great job of helping keep the foot in place, but I found that I was solely relying on them for that grip, with no concave to help cup the foot, providing added support. It also tends not to feel as planted as more traditional concave designs.

Other testers had better experiences, though, highlighting the fact that pedal feel can be quite personal (and hence a number of quite different pedals here). Other testers found the traction outstanding and really got on with the design. The contoured profile is more subtle than others with a similar profile and the pins, both their placement/spread and quality of the pin itself, result in a pedal that grips better than any other nylon pedal currently available. For 49 bones with a completely up to date size and loads of pins, it's a hard bargain to argue against.


Positives
• Cost. By far the least expensive option here.
• Massive, excellent shaped platform
• Grippy pins
• Easy to find foot placement
• Rear loaded pins
• Weight
• Contour/Convex profile (could be a negative for some)
Negatives
• DU bushings could create slop when they wear
• Wide platform (more prone to strikes)
• Nylon can crack and fail before a more expensive alloy typically would





Pedaling Innovations Catalyst

Pedalling Innovations Catalyst Pedal
Details:
• 128mm x 95mm platform
• 6061 aluminum
• 16mm thickness
• 14 pins/side (28 pins/pedal) top loaded
• Dual sealed bearings and DU bushing internals
• 30-day money back guarantee
• Cromo Axle
• Weight: 505 grams
• MSRP: $99 USD

The Catalyst pedal was designed by James Wilson, the man behind MTB Strength Training Systems and an advocate for flat pedals in the cycling industry. That advocacy took a new shape when he realized he was dissatisfied with many of the pedals on the market, feeling that what was available didn't properly support the foot or how we best move, causing issues with balance and a loss in power thanks to inefficient use of our legs muscles.

The result of his research fueled on by that dissatisfaction, is the Catalyst pedal, which without question is one unique flat pedal. The 128mm long platform is all about providing the front and the back of the foot with adequate support to enable what James feels is the proper position and therefore, the most efficient use of input when riding. The large surface area is home to a total of 28 pins per pedal (which is the same as the Deity TMac), they spin on two sealed bearings and one DU bushing in each pedal and come with a 30-day, money-back guarantee if you decide they aren’t for you.

On the trail, we found that the pedal definitely works best if the rider employs the placement that James recommends, which is with the axle in the middle of the foot. Some riders have a tendency to ride with the axle just forward from the middle of the foot, but in trying to do so with the Catalyst pedal we found our foot would get thrown out of position, especially when attempting to pick up the bike (jump/bunnyhop). While it felt odd for one tester to move the foot back, the resulting balance and quality of control were immediately improved with the support supplied by the large platform.

Once comfortable with the larger platform and slight shift of foot placement, we found the pedals to provide a great transfer of power, more balance, and increased stability over long sections of trail. Moving the bike around, manuals, jumping, etc. were the same as usual and possibly even easier to execute. It’s a difficult sensation to pinpoint as the changes to muscle recruitment are subtle, but the pedals seemed to result in more control of the movements required. This could be thanks to the more relaxed calf muscle and achilles tendon, allowing for the more refined movements to correct the angle of the foot, adjusting for weight transfers and shifts.

While they provide excellent control, more efficient power transfer, and stability, grip is still not quite that of others in this test. When the going got really rough, or in wet conditions, the pedal didn’t quite provide enough traction to continue smashing. Even with the longer pins in extreme circumstances such as these noted, the foot could get moved about easier than others here in the test—something we feel comes down to the sheer amount of surface area between the leading and trailing pins. One tester also found that adding grip tape to the areas between the leading and trailing pins greatly helped with traction.

Positives
• Massive, unique platform provides incredible support
• Most ergonomic friendly flat pedal there is
• More power transfer without extra gym time
• Improved stability/balance
• 30-day money back guarantee
• Cost
Negatives
• Axle bulge across center is more pronounced by large surface area
• Weight
• Top load pins
• Lack of traction


Must Read This Week

240 Comments

  • + 56
 Odd review, sure think there are quite a few more popular and better pedals on the market. And comparing a plastic to a bunch of aluminum pedals when OneUp also makes an aluminum pedal that would wipe out most the negatives mentioned...

Grippiest pedal I have owned and took a beating like nothing was the RaceFace Atlas. Then I learned the hard way that when the outer bearing goes out (without wanting!) the f*cking pedal falls off because the screw holding it together doesn't have a big enough shoulder! Bad Design!

Now on OneUp aluminum and they are thinner and so far taking all the same abuse. The convex I really like! Thinner I like. The pins aren't quite as grippy as Atlas, but sometimes I couldn't move my feet to re-position on the atlas so it's kindof a catch.

I hate DU busings...
  • + 2
 How long did it take the bearing to go out? I put a set on at the beginning of the season and rode all year in whistler with tons of pedal strikes. Worth replacing for next season for safety?
  • + 1
 Guy I know had that happen as well, ruined a good week or so of riding for him. Luckily raceface got the parts to him in that week, and for free. Still, after riding the TMAC it's just as comparable to the atlas in terms of grip.
  • + 4
 Can confirm that my atlas peddle fell off. Returned to MEC and they gave me a new set no questions asked.
  • + 2
 @robdonovan: The Burgtec and the Specialized Boomslang are really good as well. I am riding the Boomslangs now and they are my favorite.
  • + 20
 Are HT pedals on the Pinkbike blacklist?
  • + 0
 Coming from some DMR vaults, I can say I like the atlas pedals a lot more, my favourite pedal so far. Personally they feel more grippy and comfortable underfoot. I did need to buy a bearing kit after a season of Whistler bike park riding as they started to squeak. My bike has a fairly low BB height so I pedal strike on basically everything, they took all the abuse with ease, definitely be going on the next bike!
  • + 1
 Totally agree. I bought the tmac pedals when they first came out and for certain applications they are great but in my opinion, for aggressive downhill riding they are too big. I took them off my bike after i had a hard crash because of a pedal strike. I bought a pair of spike oozy pedals and have absolutely loved them. Awesome grip and have had very few pedal strikes
  • + 4
 Would love to have seen a lengthy chester read. for the price, for newer riders, they are a fantastic purchase.
  • + 0
 Could not have said it better myself. Spot on.
  • + 3
 I had the exact same issue with my Atlas pedals, and it almost made be crash head on into a truck while pedalling back to the trailhead. I had a bearing sieze with only 10km on them, and Race Face wouldn't warranty it saying it was a "wear part". First ride on a brand new pedal and i had to buy a rebuild kit. No thanks, never again.

Boomslangs I'm running now are amazing. Thin, strong, maintenance free, just expensive...
  • + 7
 Remember Beartraps and Shinburgers? Dayum!
  • + 21
 Really odd review.

"Bushing could...."
"Nylon can..."
You didn't destroy it in your review? Then write it like that. I don't want to hear from you what you expect to be in future. I want to here facts.

Negatives of all aluminium pedals: -corrodes in winter (salt)
-loses colour pretty fast
Why didn't you mention this for example?

Sorry PB but this review was a real fail.
  • + 3
 @CRAFTY-P: my shins remember them well.
  • + 0
 @SlopeStyleDrew:
If you are after ultimate grip, it’s hard to beat Boomslangs/5.10 Impact 2 combo. I personally don’t like that much grip since it makes it impossible to reposition the foot by a tiniest bit. Fir me It’s like clipping in without the benefit of clipping in. One Ups just hit the right amount of grip for me for trail riding, but for pumptrack/ skatepark/ dirt I use Superstar El-Plastique. Amazing pedal.
  • + 1
 @RollinFoSho: I doubt it .They advertise on the home page.
  • + 2
 @stepheniskool: I have (Had) the T-Macs and my pedal flew off the spindle after maybe 20 rides. ...
  • + 6
 Pretty sure this whole article was just a thinly guised plug for Catalyst pedals.
  • + 1
 @stepheniskool: One set has some play in it at about 3 years old, the set that the pedal fell off were probably a year and a half old used on a 5" trail bike. Ridden 3-10 times a month depending on kids sports.

I would put a new bearing kit in every year to keep them safe if it were me. The kit is $45 though, so I just bought new pedals.
  • + 4
 @jedidiah: yeah, James Wilson definitely paid more than Nukeproof, Chromag and DMR all together. The dude is such a tycoon
  • + 3
 Crankbrothers anyone ?
  • + 0
 Locktite that shit and no issues Atlas best imo
  • + 3
 @jeff444: there’s nothing to lock tite, the small outboard bearings just completely disintegrate. It’s not the screw coming loose.
  • + 1
 @Spadluv: hell no, on the topic of pedals falling off spindles, got 2 weeks out of my crank bros
  • + 22
 Sam Hill didn't popularize flat pedals, even in racing. This is one of the worst bad takes in modern revisionist history of mountain biking. Plenty of 90s stars bucked the clipless trend, most notably Palmer.
  • + 3
 And Rob Warner, someone who is still very much in the MTB public eye. I would say it's classic millennial historical revisionism...except AJ is 37.
  • + 8
 He did a bit though
  • + 3
 He brought them back into the limelight in the modern era of mountain biking after they had faded from view in the post-Chainsmoke era of mountain biking when clipless were dominant for a time. It's covered in Mountain Biking History 101, a highly recommended elective that can replace your Art History electives at many mountain colleges. I just made that up. I crack myself up. I'm freaking funny.
  • + 5
 @TucsonDon: So your saying that Palmer, while a major figure in the history of flat pedals, primarily influenced popularity of the flat pedal style during the Baroque period, whereas Sam Hill's influence began during the Abstract Expressionism era and continues on to the contemporary Post Modernist era of flat pedal riding in which we live today? That makes complete sense.
  • + 1
 Kovarick?
  • + 1
 Rennie?
  • + 24
 Crank brothers stamp pedal large is my best bet
  • + 8
 ditto this, though I really should thread the pins out a bit more
  • + 8
 Yup, loving these, larger surface area and thinner than all the pedals in this review.
  • + 12
 Agree. I've had a lot of flat pedals on my various bikes and the large stamp with the longer pins leaves me wanting nothing.
  • + 11
 I second this motion, my favorite pedal by far.
  • + 12
 stamp of approval for the large stamps!
  • + 8
 CB stamps are the best flat I have ever had on my bike and I am surprised they were not included in the comparison
  • + 34
 Let it be known that on this day 10/26/2017, someone wrote that they liked crankbrothers pedals and other people agreed. I love my Mallet E btw
  • + 4
 I didn't think this day would come but my go-to pedals are Mallet Dh and Stamp size Large. I've got pins that stick up 5mm but am about to put them up to 6mm for a touch more traction. Bearing life is really good and they take about 3 minutes to service.
  • + 4
 Agreed. I just bought a set and am loving them. Was most recently riding DMR vaults. I picked them up after seeing them listed as dirts or somebodies #1 pick for flat pedals. They were OK but seemed way overpriced and just never felt great to me.
  • + 4
 Yep loving my Stamp large.
  • + 4
 Canfield. Canfield. Canfield. Crampon. Crampon. Crampon.
  • + 21
 Why include the OneUp composite and not the aluminum version? At $125 and 335 grams the aluminum would have been apples to apples with the other pedals tested.
  • + 5
 probably cause the are every bit as good and 48 bucks. on some now... so far so damn good...
  • + 6
 Yeah, also why Deity has a cost as negative while chromag with the same price, hasn't price listed on negative?
  • + 1
 @Citrons: maybe the different sets were tested and input given from different riders? Its all subjective anyway, some will dig things others wont with everything....In the end..... Go with what you know.
  • + 17
 Some good information here but not sure what the reviewer felt to be small about the Scarabs. They're big enough to host your post-ride bbq on. The Scarabs also sit a little further away from the crankarm than many other pedals which increases their lounging feel.
  • + 4
 The Scarabs are much smaller than the T-mac's. I don't know how they're listed as the same platform size. And the new spindle sits closer to the crank arm than the original. Which vastly improves the q factor. I'll be on them for another season for sure.
  • + 1
 I also feel the Scarabs are smaller than they actually are. They feel "roundier" somehow.
  • + 3
 I've got the Contacts which are the same platform as the Scarab but have a spindle that has them a bit closer to the crank. The current model of the Scarab just moved the spindle to the old position as the Contact. Hmmm. I'll take my two year old Contacts that were bought for $90 and still going strong with one service on the bearings since then. I've got a size ten and have gone through two sets of shoes in the time I have had these pedals. I really like the amount of pin positions as I tend to take them off the outside rear of the pedal as that's the main pin spot that shred my shins. I can just add a couple more to the center rear and inside to compensate for grip loss.
  • + 1
 What would have been useful is a group photo of all the pedals side to side so that we can appreciate the size/shape differences
  • + 2
 @MrMentallo: Same here, took apart my Contacts for a service after more than one year of use, they went from black to silver, but bearings still like brand new, full of grease, and smooth, use them for DJ and concrete skateparks. Best pedals I ever had.
  • + 13
 I am sorry but I don't get the expensive pedal market. For 35 to 40 Euro I can get a set of super grippy plastic pedals, beat them to years only to buy a next set just because of mercy. I broke a set of Nukeproof Electron, got a new set for free. Even if I had to pay for the new set, I would be still spending less than the expensive pedals, and I have a new set of pedals... Still don't get why people would speend 100+ USD on a part that is meant to be beaten to death.
  • + 4
 If you have size 13 shoes there aren't a huge number of options so you can be forced to buy high end pedals.
  • + 2
 I think I got my Superstar version of the composite Electron for about £20. No complaints. Spending over £100 on pedals seems like madness to me (excepting size 13 shoes of course). But then again I am a total cheapass.
  • + 1
 When I got my bike I had the shop put on a pair of the Electrons; composite body & metal pins seemed like a winner, but they came apart literally as I rode out the shop. Turns out the entire batch they had in store were missing the nut that holds the body on the axle. Got upgraded to DMR V12s for no extra cost and I couldn't be happier; never slipped a foot on even the sketchiest rock gardens.
I get your point though, my ~£50 pedals perform just as well as my mate's Vaults at twice the price.
  • + 1
 @juanpkumicho you just said you broke a plastic pedal. thats why i dont ride plastic pedals on trail bikes. its fine if you are at the dirt jumps or whatever and your pedal breaks. 10 miles from the trail head? that would suck a lot more.
  • + 1
 @panaphonic: I use simple VP-069 on my race bike and sz 13 five tens. I like the combo myself.
I got some Saints on my plus bike but have pedal strikes here and there.
  • + 13
 All you people who are saying "how come my pedals aren't tested" should try reading the whole article instead of just scrolling through the pictures:

"This isn’t a comprehensive list of pedals from the now-saturated flat pedal market..."

and if that wasn't clear enough:

"For the record, we know there are more than six pedals out there..."
  • + 2
 That's why we all bring them up! It was a stupidly put together comparison/article in the first place. Not everyone knows what other options may be available.....We'll take it from here.
  • + 2
 @bikebike69: Exactly! We can further express our favourites beyond what they posted about. And personally, I've never met anyone who rides the nukeproof horizons, oneup Composite, or the pedaling Innovations Catalyst.
  • + 5
 I hope Pinkbike staff likes beating its head against the wall. Every review they write, readers complain "why don't you compare these to other pedals or do a shootout"? So after they review six or so, they do a comparison and people either complain there isn't enough reviewed or why did you compare it to this one? Because that's what they rode and reviewed you idiot!
  • + 3
 Read the whole article? Bah!
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: I was just thinking the same thing. People ask for a shootout for YEARS and then they get slated.

Everyone is different, and some are fussy, some ain’t. I’ve had 3 consecutive vaults (diff colour ways) for years, I love them. However, people seem to like Raceface ETC, I’d be keen to try some.. but not many people well get throw as many pedals as the reviewer. Sometime you find something that’s just right. I’m not pro, so I can’t feel the millimetre doffeeences between pedals..

Are these same people who complain the same people who want tonnes of adjustment on their shock with minimal gain?... who knows. I just think pinkbike have done a good breakdown of what the masses have asked for for a while now.
  • + 2
 You must be new around here.
  • + 4
 @steviestokes: And lets not forget how people bitch that PB doesn't review the more affordable options. So in this shootout, they have $170 pedals and $50 pedals to let you know if you should sink an extra $120 on pedals, so of course, people begin bitching about it not being fair and they should have reviewed the most expensive pedal from OneUp.
  • + 12
 I'm really surprised that PB(pretending to be experts on the subject) weren't aware of, and therefore didn't mention the biggest benefit of composite over metal.
Plastic/composite GLIDES over rocks, where metal GRIPS them.
It's the same reason why sliders(bars, swingarms, frame etc..) on sport bikes are made of nylon/plastic, as opposed to metal, and that most racing orgs ban the use of metal bar ends. Nylon/plastic etc. glides over asphalt, where metal grips, and rips the bike apart.
One would think that a rag who considers itself an expert on all things MTB, thus will give its readers advice on products, would be aware of that
  • - 2
 Proof please?

And based on my experience with pedals, no notable difference between plastic and Al during pedal strikes.
  • + 5
 @Uuno: You must have special low friction rocks in Finland because I notice a huge difference in rock strikes between my AL Pedals and Chester Composites. @YoKev is right, the plastic doesn't get hung up nearly as bad as the AL ones.
  • + 5
 @Uuno: The proof is called kinetic friction coefficient.
  • + 0
 @JeremyC: If the only part of the pedal that is contacting said rock is completely plastic, then your statement holds up...what do most plastic pedals have for pins? Umm that would be metal pins, at least pedals that have grip.

So what you're experiencing is not the surfaces rubbing, its the ability of plastic to flex. Which done enough times will break them, pick your poison.
  • + 1
 I broke an XO crank arm due to my pedal stricking a rock at high speed. The crank arm gave out before the pedal or rock due to the two sticking together as you said. Granted it was a pretty a typical stretch of trail but it can happen. Luckily SRAM was great about warranty.
  • + 9
 The Catalyst! Great to see it being reviewed here. The best pedals I have ever used. I guess they are that not great for hucking ( which I don’t do) since they are so huge but for all around trail riding it really gives me more power and endurance. More hip and big muscle group involvement, less calf and ankle fatigue.
  • + 4
 It sounds like the reviewer did not put on the longer 8mn pins on the catalysts, otherwise there would be no complaints about grip
  • + 1
 @gutterdog: My first pair which I got from the early days didn’t come with extra pins but the newer pair I bought came with the pins. I haven’t used them yet. No real need for now, but since you mentioned them I just might.
  • + 0
 Nope. I've ridden a couple sets on customers bikes. Pedals don't need reinventing.
  • + 1
 @MitchThompson89: Still on your Straitline Defactos Mitch? Best DH/FR pedal ever!
  • + 3
 Yeah, I've got four pairs of these Catalyst pedals now. Been riding them since they were introduced (over two years now) and still loving them. Before that I have had about ten years on several pairs of fairly concave Wellgo pedals (B-52 or B-25 I think it was) because I thought concave was the way to go for a ball-of-foot-over-axle placement. It probably was and maybe I even got more grip out of these, but comfort on the Catalyst is superior. Only downside for me as my bikes are a bit cramped (old DMR bike) is that by moving my feet forwards, reach effectively became shorter and chainstays longer so it became a bit twitchy on the descends. But with most modern geometries it shouldn't matter too much.
  • + 3
 Yep, I love the catalyst, they are so comfortable! With the longer pins I have no problem with grip, even with my completely worn through soles on my shoes. Given the comments about grip in the review I’d be interested to try some of the others, but I don’t think the extra grip would be worth losing the support
  • + 1
 @Demoguy: Defactos are great but a little heavy cf others but they take a beating. I am changing the bushes for the first time in 3 years.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: Also have Catalysts. I figure if I'm going to spend $100 on pedals I might as well support the small guys doing something different. Plus, I've tendinitis in my ankle and I thought these might add heel support.

It took me a good number of rides to get used to the huge base. They rock going downhill. Super planted. Because they are so large your whole foot is stuck to the pedal. This reduces my agility on the pedal causing me to take straighter lines. There is less room for those quick changes in balance. So, more straight line rumble and less flying squirrel.

Whether that is good or bad depends on the rider and their style. Personally, I like it.
  • + 2
 @david-kooi: I read his "Flat Pedal Manifesto" and it made a lot of sense. If I were buying a new set of pedals the Catalysts would be on the list.
  • + 10
 vp harriers. thin, grippy, take a beating. they will develop a tiny play from the bushing but it is not noticeable.
  • + 3
 +1 on Harriers bro. Also FYI, they have just done a small redesign with a much better spindle binding.
  • + 3
 +2. Love mine. There is a tiny bit of play in the bushing, but it's only noticeable if you move the pedal with your hand. Not noticeable on the trail at all.
  • + 1
 VP aims are super grippy, concave and cheap as well, also VP VICEs are indestructible although they are not that concave, which is a shame
  • + 4
 Another +1 on the Harriers. I really want to try the Altitude version also.
  • + 3
 @seraph: VP Harriers! The extra 10mm or so of width feels excellent if you have a wide foot
  • + 1
 @gnarcasm: Woah Woah this version is news to me sounds like what I have been looking for
  • + 2
 I really don't understand why the harrier got no review because they are cheaper and got more grip because of the largest platform on the market right now. You can buy a axle with bushings for aalmost nothing. Heavy duty pedals who also one of the lightest ever if we talk about the size..
  • + 7
 Raceface Chester - cheap, light, multiple colours, great shape and grip (with 5 10's) and can take a beating. When the price is low your expectations naturally lower too and when they are totally exceeded by the performance of the product crack a beer and pat yourself on the back... Me and my nates called Chester...
  • + 2
 Meh. Too small for me. I use them on my commuter bike, but far prefer my atlas pedals on my MTBs.
  • + 8
 What?! No mention of Brooklyn Machine Works Shin Burgers?!

For reference... www.pinkbike.com/buysell/209975
  • + 4
 I think Shinburgers with the 'pyramids' drilled and tapped with grub screws threaded in would be the ultimate pedal.
  • + 9
 Cheapest aluminum pedal reviewed is $120?????
  • + 5
 Nah I got a set of Horisons for way less than that off CRC a couple of months back. Great pedals but no locktite on pins so you'll loose heaps initially. Thats my only gripe.
  • + 3
 I thought the same. A con on all of them should have been "cost." Even the composite ones. $48 for plastic? Ouch.
  • + 2
 Not exactly packed with features, but a plastic DMR V6 is $20.
  • + 1
 @biking85: I do like the V6, nice cheep pedal, but the bushings do wear! Check out Nukeproof Horizon comps, plastic with pins and the same size and shape as the Sam hills tested.
  • + 3
 Updated V12's best pedals I've had in years and a great price ~£60
  • + 2
 Indeed. $60, two seasons on and still going strong.
  • + 4
 I was surprised to not see Shimano Saints on here. I have them on my bike and love them. I also work at a shop and sold all kinds of them. We had them for sale at $100 which is great for Shimano quality and great price considering it’s in Canadian
  • + 1
 I watched my buddy go down hard on a DH run after his Saint clipped a rock. Took the bike right out from under him. Bent the axle and left a chunk of aluminum embedded in the rock! I recommended chesters and he switched out. My experience with high speed rock strikes has been positive with comps, only negative with aluminum.

That said I roll Catalysts on my DH (large platforms help my ankle issues) and I have to be careful about pedal placement when going through the shit. Great pedals and they are tapered pretty good for rock strikes. I use chesters on my 160 bike and DJ bike and they do indeed glide over rock strikes.
Saints are chunky and every time I inherit a pair (which happens several times a year) I throw them in the recycle bin. I've given this pedal selection issue much thought and I'm satisfied with where things are. Also worth mentioning my ankle problems are less severe on the Catalysts. I have to wear ankle braces now for throwing down on the DJ tho.

Wish someone made comps the same size as the Catalysts.
  • + 8
 Two words... Burgtec Penthouse
  • - 1
 Superstars Nano X cost exactly half of the burgtecs price.
  • + 1
 Too pricey for not enough pins and too thick. Vaults surpass them IMO.
  • + 1
 @seraph: they run unusually close to the crank arm too. Makes some of the platform unusable as a result.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: I have heard the same re space to cranks. I had some MK3s and they had amazing grip but weighed a ton. Maybe the MK5 will be the go.
  • + 1
 @seraph: im a burgtec owner but it was a close run thing for me- nearly went with the Vaults which id only tried once and they felt great to be fair. The company ethos and history actually swung it for me because im a sentimental fool. The Mk4 Penthouses are superb and the narrowness isn't at all an issue- even coming from Saints which sit about 6 inches out from the cranks. However the 'lack of pins' is a misnomer- the fewer pins is only part of it- their distribution in the pedal body is more important and fewer pin points = more pressure and grip. Burgtec's are renowned for savage grip and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend them to anybody on that basis alone. The cost... yep i cant argue that one though i feel they are worth it.
  • + 1
 @nickkk: mmm you may have sold me on them. The MK3s had amazing grip so assume the MK4 would be similar.
  • + 0
 @fartymarty: you won’t regret it- racer951’s comment isn’t an issue I have ever had with the burgtecs- your shoes would have to be particularly clown like for that to present itself. I’m a 9/10 shoe and it’s excellent. The narrow Q factor aides clearance and stiffness with pedal body so it’s benefits are there for good reason.They’ve been nothing less than consistently grippy and tough for me.
  • + 1
 @nickkk: I am tempted to get a pair as IMHO are the best quality flat pedals you can get.
  • - 1
 @fartymarty: Superstars Nano-X
  • + 1
 @colincolin: you cannot seriously compare the superstar pedal to the burgtec, as I say I don't like the low offset of the pedal but they are absolutely a quality product, from the concave design, dual bush and bearing internal and great finish and durability.

The superstar pedal is cheap and they do last fairly well but they at not concave, finish is nowhere near, internals and design are based on a 10 year old pedal from HT which they named it after after copying it. Oh, and why does one side always spin more freely than the other?
  • + 6
 What happened to Staitline, Hope, RaceFace and Spank? They all make some bad a$$ pedals Big Grin
  • + 3
 I was thinking the same thing. It used to be Straitline was the standard for flat pedals. Oh well. They can't review 'em all.
  • + 2
 @TheR: I'm still on Defactos and they're still great altho a little heavy cf others but cest la vie.
  • + 2
 I've been on a pair of Catalyst Pedals for a few months now, and they have been the biggest performance upgrade I've experienced since dropper posts. Especially on a hardtail, the extra comfort & control they provide is amazing. On all previous platform pedals I've used (Straitline, Chromag, Xpedo), getting my feet blown off the pedals was a regular, several-times-each-ride experience. Catalyst Pedals have virtually eliminated that; previously I found that I had to keep my feel level while leaning over for turns, now I can drop my outside pedal, and raise the inside one without fear of my foot getting rattled off. I have noticed that in muddy conditions, the large platform can work against you, as it collects more mud, and the more widely distributed pressure makes it easier for your feet to slip. But I think experimenting with the longer pins would help fix that. Here in Western CO, if the trails are muddy, riding is a no-go anyways, so not a big issue for me. Props to James for walking (pedaling) the talk of platform pedals!
  • + 4
 I like how all pics are black and white so we can’t see how beat and scraped they are. Oh and blurred pins are a nice touch too.
  • + 4
 I've beat the hell out of my Straightlines and they haven't missed a beat. Ive moved them between two bikes and still have yet to service them.
  • + 4
 My Straitline Defactos have been hammer on now for over 3 years,i have yet to do a rebuild,just the odd grease,here and there. tons of grip ,Bombproof!!
  • + 4
 I had to rebuild my Defactos after4 years of use. They are still going strong 3 years after the fact and have been mounted on 3 different bikes...
  • + 3
 Straitline Defactos!!! Grippy, Comfy, Beefy, and "No Contest" on the ease of rebuild. Sledgehammers! I've used only "Deez"for over 5yrs from my Trials to DH and all my rides in between... Thanks Straitline!
  • + 2
 Cant prop enough. Im 200 lbs with similar riding style to a bulldozer,3 bikes and 4 years later still going strong.
  • + 4
 I find the selective negative point about potential bush slop a bit funny - all tested pedals use a bearing / bush arrangement so why is this only a negative for some?
  • + 3
 Been using forte converts for like 9 years. Kona wah wahs have been around since then, too. Both are/were great options for around $50.
  • + 1
 My converts are at three years and are doing great. They are beat looking.
  • + 1
 Yep my Wah Wahs are awesome. And there's a rebuild kit for them.
  • + 1
 Despite wanting to do my best Sam Hill impression, I didn't like the horizons compared to the DMR Vaults. Recently got the OneUp ALU and I'm getting on with them, but I agree with the review that the grip comes form the pins not the platform
  • + 5
 Canfield Bros! End of Story!
  • + 1
 I've tried many flat pedals and I do love the Deity T-Mac. Only Twenty6 pedals offered more grip but almost to a fault. The T-Macs work perfect with my 510s and my Teva shoes. Deity also offer a composite that I've been happy with but I have not been able to compare them to the OneUp pedals yet.
  • + 2
 Nukeproof nylons, have had them for about four years. Were about $40, never serviced them and are so grippy. My only complaint being they rip the sh!t out of My five tens but i think that's the same with most flats
  • + 2
 I have had aluminum crack before nylon composites for some reason. The new composite gives a bit on pedal strikes and the aluminum is brittle bends and cracks. RaceFace Chester has been awesome.
  • + 1
 Don't get how fox had to do a recall for the air shock can because someone blew it off stuffed with tokens and over pressurized on a massive hit and RF can keep the atlas pedals on the market. As the first commenter said they are dangerous. Mine failed the same way just sliding off within the first year and cut my calves open while my foot slammed into the ground during a sprint. My buddies failed after two weeks. RF offered to replace but no thanks. Their casual commentary: We sell thousands of these and this is an isolated incident. Right.
  • + 1
 Another PB article that points out I'm doing it wrong. I use Felt pedals I got for free and put a shit ton of grubscrews in. I ride on the balls of my feet like I was sprinting with $30 dollar skate shoes and I have to lift my foot for even the slightest movement.
  • + 1
 Blackspire pedals are awesome. They are light with 10pins per side. They are warranty for life and free rebuilds. They are made right in Vancouver . I have 3 sets of pedals and before a trip i bring the pedals to the shop Andy they provide me with a free rebuild which takes about 10 mins. After 2 years of use I cracked the pedal body and they handed me a brand new set free of charge. Check them out they are worth it!!
  • + 1
 @zialen: yeah, @Blackspire-Super-Components rocks. Their pedal warranty and free pedal rebuilding service is fantastic.

Right now, they have their Robusto pedals on sale for $50.00
  • + 4
 "Ridden and Rated"

Where are the ratings?
  • + 1
 This^
Which ones best???
  • + 1
 Bought two pairs of used flatboys like 5 years ago, put one in my wife's bike and one pair has been in 3 of my bikes. they still have plenty of life in them. Maybe I don't ride enough.
  • + 2
 the problem with this review is that quite frankly, it sucked. Not enough pedals and pedals belonging to different categories (metal vs. composite).
  • + 1
 HT Space Junk; they have studs that are actually scary (they stick to proper bike shoes), and a thin profile. www.suncountrycycle.com/merchant/2438/images/large/photo1.JPG
  • + 1
 Or maybe AE03 They're called? I thought it said, "Space Junk" when I bought them. They're really nice.
  • + 3
 You can never go wrong with a pair of RaceFace Chesters for under $50. Light, thin and durable as hell.
  • + 2
 what do ball or needle bearings do when they wear? how do they respond to mud and grime compared to DU bushings? Such a weak argument in my eyes.
  • + 1
 Well, I have on pair of VP-559 on my en-dh-uro bike and 3 pairs of VP-535 on my others bikes... Not expensive at all and very durable (the 559 pedals i've ride by nearly 10 years!)
  • + 1
 As a bigger rider who rides hard and often and has virtually broken every pedal I have ever ridden, what do you guys recommend? What would you say is literally the most durable pedal on the market?
  • + 1
 Check out chunked pedals from Australia. Fully CNC machined, a little pricy but they're so beeft
  • + 1
 @MitchThompson89:

Chucked at still at it?
  • + 1
 I had very good luck with Twenty6 pedals & I'm 250+
RaceFace Atlas have a bigger platform, I had bad luck with my one set but they sent replacement parts pretty quickly.
  • + 1
 I would recommend looking at something from DMR if you haven't already... Their whole success is built on the reputation of their pedals, can't fault the v12 mags I have. Then the other uk option is hope, designed and built to last. Take a look at the reviews around on the internet.
  • + 1
 Shimano m530 clipless haha. I am pretty sure they are made of adamantium. Flat pedal... I'm not so sure.
  • + 1
 @valhallascott: Sorry for the necro, but fyi: I called them up for some replacement pins and another set of pedals, and they're not making bike stuff anymore, only selling what stock is left. (I should have asked if they'll continue making replacement parts)
  • + 3
 Point1 Podium 2's are the best pedal I've owned. Gamut owns them now, they need to resurrect them
  • + 3
 They did. And they're great.
www.gamutusa.com/podium-pedals
  • + 1
 I love my Sam Hill Horizons. The grip is unreal and I'll give my head a shake when I say sometimes they can be too grippy with my 5-10s.
  • + 2
 Tmacs for the win! I wear a size 13 and these pedals are by far the best i have used
  • + 1
 How about a review of flat pedal shoes? I love the rubber on my freeriders but i have a narrow foot and that shoe is wide? who else has comparable rubber?
  • + 1
 almost all of the pedals above 400 gr? WTF? there are plenty of pedals under $100 with bearings that weights less that can of beer
  • + 3
 Crank brothers stamp is my latest and I'm happy with them
  • + 2
 im still using my shimano saint for 3 years and it still good..just need a set of new pins
  • + 0
 It's interesting that there are so many great flat pedals available at many price points, materials sizes etc. But if you chose clipless there's Shimano or mostly shitty pedals.
  • + 1
 Yeah, us clipless guys really miss out on the opportunity for personalization that flat pedals provide.
  • + 3
 XPEDO flats!!! 280grams and 90$. work great and no problems...
  • + 1
 I really like my DMR Vault mag/ti. Super light FTW. I've had them for going on 5 years now. 2 rebuilds and they still rock. Super light (did I say that already?)
  • + 1
 It would be nice to have different size options available for flat pedals. Not a lot of sizes, maybe 2 or 3 sizes to suit people with larger/ smaller than average sized feet.
  • + 2
 Spank spoon are sized. Give them a try.
  • + 1
 Syntace Number9
  • + 2
 Like canfield and HT's feel and grip but both need rebuilt every 4-6 months. Might look at those Deity T-Macs next.
  • + 2
 New Canfield's don't need rebuilding like old versions.
  • + 3
 Superstar Nano flat pedals - outstanding!
  • + 2
 Outstanding may be stretching it, but they're a pedal worth checking out if you're on a budget. Thin, grippy, large platform, reasonable weight and often on sale. Excellent vfm.
  • + 1
 I have 5 year old nano tech flats on dh, superb after all this time and newer nano-x on enduro bike. Nano-x are larger and have more grip but overall I'm supper happy with both considering the price/performance.
Also amazing customer support, for enduro bike I originally bought discounted deltas with Ti axles, after a year they developed play and because spares were not in stock I sent an email to superstar. They replied that they there are some issues with supply of those spares but since my pedals are less than 2 years old they will just replace them under warranty, so basically I got new nano-x with Ti axle for free. 10/10 experience!
  • + 1
 Totally agree with you!
  • + 1
 Had a set of plastic nukerproof electrons for over 3 years now with no issues.

Light thin and fairly tough unless your going real big. Cost me less than £30 too
  • + 2
 STRAITLINE DEFACTO. CANNOT BEAT IT. EVER. BEST FLAT IN EXISITENCE
  • + 2
 new mallet e `s are great Smile
  • + 1
 .243 racing.......nuff said......had these pedals for over 10yrs bent multiple cranks they are straight....... CM!
  • + 2
 What leaves the best scar?
  • + 3
 The Brooklyn Machine Works Shinburger will never be surpassed.
blog-imgs-19.fc2.com/b/m/a/bmaniac/IMG_3393.jpg
  • + 2
 @R-M-R: haha, what about old Hutch Beartraps? i44.tinypic.com/28gz5g9.jpg
  • + 2
 My Scarabs leave me a good one. Like 9 cms. Those fucking pins are like little knives. They make you pay a high price for a mistake.
  • + 1
 @passwordpinkbike:

My arachnids were like that, bit too much!
  • + 2
 These do. Makes a really nice skin flap. They'll cost ya though!

bmxmuseum.com/forsale/h3_copy11_blowup.jpg
  • + 2
 What a shit shootout. Vital ftw
  • + 2
 Not sure why they didn't include VP Harriers?
  • - 1
 Sixpack Millenium AL:

-6061 alloy CNC pedal body
-concave platform
-Cr-Moly axle
-6 sealed bearings + 2 DU bushings
-28 replaceable Pins / pair
-15mm flat (with pins 22.6mm)
-Size: 110x105mm
-358g / pair (with alloy-pins)
  • + 1
 + I use six packs vegas neylon, best $40 bucks invested in bike
  • - 1
 I really wish we had more thin pedal options, like the Crampon pedals. I’ve tried many of the pedals in this article on modern geo bikes, with low BBs, and pedal strikes were frequent and unbearable.
  • + 2
 I would much prefer a little bit more cosmetic damage to a pedal rather than a pedal that will develop slop within a season.
  • + 1
 I’ve had several of those pedals and never had a problem with slop or bearing issues.

Regardless, my point was still that most of these options are too thick for low BB bikes. I just used the Crampons as an example of some that had a functional profile.

This also isn’t just a cosmetic issue, pedal strikes can create awkward scenarios or lead to crashes if they happen in the wrong place. I could care less what they look like, but not grabbing roots and rocks is really nice when you are clipping along.
  • + 3
 In reality, most pedal strikes are going to happen regardless of how thick your pedal is. It's really more of a marketing gimmick than anything (not that it's not entirely untrue but it's not that big of a deal), not to mention how good your technique is or isn't. The crampon feels absolutely horrible, it's convex shape makes it feel like you're going to slip off the front or rear of the pedal constantly. Sure my TMAC's are thicker but holy crap the amount of grip you get outweighs that immensely.

If you're having a problem striking pedals (I ride a current low BB height bike as well) then hone your technique. Simple.
  • + 3
 @Adodero: I usually bounce pedals off everything- either the bikes bounces a bit or what I hit moves over.

If you are smashing pedals hard enough to lose control, that is a serious misjudgment reading the trail and knowing your bike! A pedal that is 10mm thicker only loses 5mm of ground clearance. The slanted leading edge is definitely more than that.

Thinner is better because it puts less strain on your calf and achilles. The ground clearance problem is not such a big deal.
  • + 2
 @R-trailking-S: Ithink if you hit your pedals hard enough to crash that the rider had either not seen the rock or root or has misjudged where to pedal. My pedals and cranks boots are scarred but it's pretty rare that a pedal strike takes me off the bike.
  • + 2
 @Someoldfart: I just tried it with my eggbeaters- on these it would have ended really bad if I had tried to pedal through because they fit perfectly around roots...

That being said I did that on purpose- had it been flats of any thickness I probably would have nutted myself as I slipped off the pedals.
  • + 2
 What about canfield crampons?
  • + 4
 Love my crampon ultimates.

I like them so much they ended up on my commuter bike. The bushing thing isn't a super big deal as you can't feel the slop and replacement bushings are like $4
  • + 2
 @UtahBikeMike: Ya man their customer service is superb as well.
  • + 2
 i feel like spank spikes and raceface atlas' should be on here
  • + 3
 dmr vaults for the win
  • + 1
 Twenty6 pedals for lyfe!! Until I can't find them anymore...
  • + 2
 @whattheheel I loved the Predators. Big platform eliminated uncomfortable side overhang for my size 13’s. Tons of traction, great shape. Annual bearing/bushing replacement and good as new, for 4 years until I finally noticed one pedal body was broken. Called them up and unfortunately not in the biz anymore, but they found an old pedal body for me and mailed it to me as a replacement! Awesome product from an awesome company.
  • + 1
 Seriously, really good pedals. Tyler's a cool dude who made them himself out in Montana, too. I told him they should be called Tiger Claws because they're freaking insanely grippy... but they'll take a chunk out of your shin in a heartbeat if you let them.
  • + 2
 Tyler is the coolest mofo I have met in this game by far!! All of his goodies are great quality and I am Soo gutted he is out of the the mtb game. I have ralleyes, prerunners and predators that you can have when you pry them from my cold dead fingers!!!
  • + 1
 @whattheheel: Haha, yep. Same here, I have multiple prerunners myself.
Really hoping that his other CNC stuff took off & he's too busy for the twenty6 stuff.
  • + 2
 That is what happened. He is too busy with other projects for MTB parts which is a bummer. I wanted another set of predators with my son's name engraved in them. The daughter has three pairs with her name on there and he going to be like WTF when he gets older.
  • + 1
 @whattheheel: Well, sucks for us but good for him.
  • + 1
 Pretty much. I still like to bug him and keep him on his toes tho.
  • + 2
 rip everyones shin
  • + 1
 shimano saint & hope tech never even got a mention #thatsucksdabobby
  • + 1
 No Burgtec? Fail...best pedals by far!
  • + 1
 And to think I learned BMX and dirt jumping on Odyssey Triple Traps!
  • + 1
 Still riding my old Straitline Amps. Great pedals
  • + 1
 Fake news pinkbike fuck you
  • + 2
 Spoon 110??
  • + 2
 Race Face Atlas
  • + 1
 buy the new shimano saint pedals, they are so sick
  • + 2
 Sam Hill.
  • + 1
 Been riding wellgo b185 and they feel great and last quite a while.
  • + 1
 Spank Spikes would have slapped these other pedals in the @ss
  • - 3
 Until the bearings seize
  • + 3
 I’ll take my Spank Oozy pedals over all of these
  • + 4
 @Jennafrancis: going on 3 years w/ no service on my spikes, when should I expect my bearings stop being their usual buttery selves?
  • + 0
 Lovin my HT AEO3's that I've had for quite a while now. Raced, bike parked, no issues
  • + 1
 odyssee black widow ... that was a scary pedal bitd
  • + 2
 Harriers?
  • + 1
 Specialized Boomslang and Five ten shoes. Best system out there!
  • + 2
 Burgtec? Hope?
  • + 2
 Look away now,shins.
  • + 1
 Anyone aware of longer spindle flat pedal?
I like my leg spread...
  • + 1
 Spank Oozy´s all day long!
  • + 1
 Flat boys on my commuter
  • + 1
 No raceface atlas?
  • + 0
 Forte convert... $50 and at least as good as any of the above.
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