First Look: 2022 Antidote Woodsprite

Apr 20, 2022 at 16:32
by Henry Quinney  


Antidote, a Polish company that specializes in in-house production of its own carbon bikes, has today released their new bike - the Woodsprite. The bike, which uses 29" wheels and a 135mm of rear-wheel travel, aims to take many of the characteristics from their Carbonjack enduro bike and bring them to a shorter travel platform. Antidote says that traits of the Carbonjack do indeed run through the Woodsprite - particularly in terms of its suspension and geometry. The bike is certainly familiar in appearance, especially in regards to its silhouette with the rear shock sitting just behind the seat tube.
Antidote Woodsprite Details

• Wheelsize: 29"
• Travel: 135 (r) / 140 or 150mm (f)
• Carbon Frame
• 65.5° head angle
• Chainstay length: 450mm
• Reach: 455, 485, 515mm
• Builds from €7799
• Frame only from €3799
antidotebikes.com


The bike is made of the Vectran composite that Antidote has been using on their bikes for years. One of the chief benefits of adding into the composite mix of the frame is the claimed increase in impact resistance and strength. There are also claims that Vectran carbon fiber is better at damping vibration. The bike uses CNC'd frame links made of a 7075 T6 alloy. A medium frame with all frame protection added weighs 2.5KG without a shock.

The bike is meant to be paired up with a fork of either 140 or 150mm of travel. It has clearance for 2.6" tires and features a 180mm post mount on the rear.



Frame Details

The carbon frame, which can come with the color of your choosing, has smooth uninterrupted lines that seem to extend from the headtube, all the way down the seat stays to the rear axle. Each bike features its own serial number and it seems Antidote is aiming for craftmanship rather than mass production.


Anitdote claims that the bike houses its shock in this particular location to keep the bike's center of gravity lower. Either way, it certainly frees up a lot of space within the front triangle and easily accommodates a water bottle. All the bikes come with a fender to try and prevent too much mud and grit from getting on the shock.

Some may have misgivings about the shock's placement though, and not without reason. We of course want to reduce the chances of any of our suspension or hydraulic systems ingesting any dirt or grit. That said, nobody seems to mind about their seatpost, rear brake, or fork legs. Maybe it's just a perception of it being more likely to get covered in crud, but either way, it's clearly a system Antidote believes in as it appears on all their bikes.


Geometry


The geometry has some values that scream progressive whilst others that seem a little less so. For instance, the bike is built around a 65.5-degree head angle and a 76.5-degree seat tube angle. These are combined with a roomy 485mm reach for a size large and long 450mm chainstays that should mean there's plenty of weight driven through the rider's feet. Antidote says it does this in the name of balance and better weight distribution for the trail bike. I think it's interesting to see bike brands diverge in terms of rear center lengths. It seems in some ways the question of reach is giving more settled answers, with measurements of around 480 or 485mm quite typical on a large trail bike, but between brands, they could match that up to anything between 430 or 450mm chainstays. The Woodsprite's rear is certainly on the longer side of things.

Suspension Design


The Smart FDS suspension on the Woodsprite is compatible with both coil and air shocks. The shocks are orientated with the piggyback over to the non-drive side. The shock is driven from their lower end by the swingarm directly and from the upper by the linkage as it floats between the two.


The leverage ratio of the bike is relatively constant until the sag point of the stroke, at 2.55 for the first 35mm of travel. It then ramps up and is progressive from 2.5 to 2.2 in a very consistent through to the end of its travel. The anti-rise is also very consistent. Falling from around 85% to around 80% at sag, before reducing further in a very linear fashion to 64% at the end of the stroke. This value would suggest the bike is more likely to prioritise geometry conservation over separating braking forces from suspension action.


The anti-squat is slightly lower than some, with some bikes reaching over 100% at sag, whereas the Woodsprite varies between 85 and 95% at sag. This means the bike will want to compress slightly under suspension forces, even if only slightly. Values such as these can also mean the bike is better at gripping over rougher or chunkier terrain though, as the wheel is simply happier to go into its stroke.

Build Options

Antidote sells the Woodsprite in several different build kits, including suspension kits from EXT, Rockshox and Fox, as well as drive trains from Shimano. Here are some selected builds from the range.


EXT Era & Storia Lok V3 / SRAM X01 €8699

Rear Shock - EXT Storia Lok V3 210x55mm
Fork - EXT Era V2 150mm
Headset - CaneCreek 40
Drivetrain - SRAM X01
Brakes - SRAM Code RSC 200mm
Bars - Antidote 35mm / 810mm width
Stem - Industry Nine
Seatpost - BikeYoke Revive
Saddle - WTB Silverado
Wheels - Industry Nine Enduro S Hydra
Tires - Maxxis Minion DHF/DHRII Exo+


Fox 34 & Float X / SRAM X01 - €8399

Rear Shock - Fox Float X Factory 210x55mm
Fork - Fox 34 Factory Grip2 140mm
Headset - CaneCreek 40
Drivetrain - SRAM X01
Brakes - SRAM Code RSC 200mm
Bars - Antidote 35mm / 810mm width
Stem - Industry Nine
Seatpost - BikeYoke Revive
Saddle - WTB Silverado
Wheels - Industry Nine Enduro S Hydra
Tires - Maxxis Minion DHF/DHRII Exo+


Rockshox Pike & Super Deluxe / Shimano XT - €7799

Rear Shock - Rockshox Super Deluxe 210x55mm
Fork - Rockshox Pike Ultimate 140mm
Headset - CaneCreek 40
Drivetrain - Shimano XT
Brakes - Shimano XT 4-pot 203mm
Bars - Antidote 35mm / 810mm width
Stem - Industry Nine
Seatpost - BikeYoke Revive
Saddle - WTB Silverado
Wheels - Industry Nine Enduro S Hydra
Tires - Maxxis Minion DHF/DHRII Exo+



For more details please visit antidotebikes.com


168 Comments

  • 261 1
 So a teeny tiny sexy boutique brand is somehow better value than Santa Cruz?
  • 66 0
 It's seems like the Santa Cruz CEO is making carbon frames himself Wink
  • 51 1
 Everybody is a better value than SC. Pon Holdings (or whoever SC’s) corporate overlord these days has a portfolio of brands, so they’re happy keeping the FU prices on the premium brand.
  • 64 2
 And they are made in Europe rather than the Far East
  • 17 0
 @lkubica:
It's seems like the Santa Cruz CEO is printing money himself.
  • 10 4
 Yet Santa Cruz are always sold out
  • 4 0
 @endorium: lots or people with $ and willing to spend
  • 3 0
 We have officially come full circle.
  • 10 0
 @jaydawg69: yep, nothing wrong with that though. Got to enjoy life
  • 4 4
 Exactly what I was going to say. No specific seat tube and chain stay for sizes, no lifetime warranty. Santa Cruz seems to be the craftsmanship brand.
  • 71 0
 As other commenters have noted, Santa Cruz offers "yesterday's bikes at tomorrow's prices" and their build kits are actually more expensive than the sum of component MSRPs. That should never be the case for a high volume Taiwan manufacturer.
  • 35 54
flag guylovesbike (Apr 21, 2022 at 11:28) (Below Threshold)
 @fentoncrackshell: This! I would also add that a bike company shouldn't be allowed to make profit above a certain level. In fact, the bike industry should be regulated by the country to be allowed to make no more than a 5% profit margins, while their CEOs should make no more than 150k$ per year. Also, I think we could extend that to other industries, maybe even be more strict in that we shouldn't allow any profit at all. We could call it communism.
  • 8 9
 @gticket: Lifetime warranties are kind of useless. Standards change and technology improves. Hardly anyone wants to ride some short and twitchy bike from 2015. If SC wanted to do something useful and different, they could offer transferable warranties to keep resale values higher.
  • 17 5
 @guylovesbike: I'm not advocating for communism, just pointing out that an informed, unsponsored buyer will pass on SC. They either opt for much cheaper, comparably equipped options from other big brands, or spend similar money for way more boutique, innovative stuff from brands like Antidote, Forbidden, Deviate, Raaw, etc.
  • 12 2
 @guylovesbike: I thought you were being serious at first and was about to construct a vehement reply, until the last sentence, nicely done.
  • 22 4
 Didn’t you get the insider memo? Economy of scale doesn’t exist in the MTB market. Branding is king.

Just try and post a comparison of ANY motorcycle prices to high end MTB prices and get ready to be down voted to oblivion. Hundreds of fast moving parts and engineering complexity verses few moving parts and some connecting tubing. Yup, MTBs in general should cost thousands extra to build, makes perfect sense no? Keep drinking that cool aid people, it makes it more enticing for everyone and their neighbor to try and get into the MTB manufacturing market.

Trickle-down economics is alive and well in our sport.
  • 2 0
 And yes, the bike looks good!
  • 9 6
 @fentoncrackshell: I get your point, but this common conception that someone intelligent would never buy from a company that prices higher than some competitors is narrow-minded. Companies like Santa Cruz build a brands that some people relate to, hires some athlete that people will look up to, and support initiative, in this case local trail building, that people value. I'm not a SC fanboy, it's true that they are not at the forefront of modern geometries these days, it's also true that their product is sold at a premium compared to some, but they still do a lot of things extremely well.
  • 5 3
 @guylovesbike: If pricing isn't included in the list of things they do well, what's the point of everything else?
Walmart builds local trails, yet people can actually afford their bikes. Starting at $6k with components expected on a $1,500 bike is a joke.
  • 1 0
 @fentoncrackshell: And by a lot of things, I mean clean tube-in-tube cable routing and external bottom brackets.
  • 11 2
 @nickfranko: Pricing isn't included in the list of things Apple does well, this is probably the reason why we rarely see what I think people call an iPhone in the wild
  • 15 8
 @alis66: Are you saying you think an entire industry has somehow hidden its massive profit margins from the public? You're saying we would be paying a fraction of what we do now, as evidenced by how inexpensive motorcycles are relative to high-end MTBs? Nobody in the industry, no hungry up-and-comer willing to make less to grow their market share, no disgruntled former manager, no sharp-eyed journalist, nobody has spilled the beans? We're all paying triple or quadruple what we could be paying because what, Big Bicycle has hijacked the market using the power of being extra-greedy capitalist pigs?

You're either under 18 or you've had a stroke/traumatic brain injury recently. Which is it?
  • 3 0
 How do you know how much Santa Cruz costs? Its a big cityu you know.
  • 4 0
 @fentoncrackshell: except if you break a 2015 5010 you get a 2022 5010.
  • 18 0
 @JakeEPooh: Jake from state farm is that you?

No need to get personal or riled up. It’s frustrating to see so many mores complex things cost less than a decent MTB. The argument that some cabal is holding prices high is tin foil hat stuff, agreed. But really, just look at the two things side by side in your driveway. How and why is there such a discrepancy in cost for a similar product? Compare prices for brakes, chains, forks, shocks, fluids, tires, cables, and on and on. Why are they higher?

The story of the making of the first grim doughnut was great. So is the saga of Neko Mulally’s BYOB and race in WC. Open, honest reports of one off custom builds. So is every bike brand just like those custom builds? Have we really learned nothing to incorporate simple designs and bring down costs while keeping profits?

As an industry, it could be better for less well off riders. The high end market is great, love it, and enjoy it. But ask any non-enthusiast how much they think a mountain bike should cost and enjoy the answers. Prices to perceptions are way off.

Have you ever seen prices go down? There is a large potential market for simple, reliable, modern geo bikes for the masses. Not just hard tails either. It can be done and has been done in other market segments. The belief that bikes are so complex that costs can’t be managed is false. Everything doesn’t have to be cutting edge materials to work well. Profits will be there, no capitalist pigs need apply.

Unfortunately it won’t take one up and comer, one manager or even brand to make a shift. More side by side comparisons like Budget vs Baller (but not so damn budget, looking at you Mike Bear) are needed to really push better priced components to the forefront.

It would be great to see regular follow ups to the winner of the value bike field tests compared to the higher priced segments. To showcase what those thousands extra really get the average rider. Then throw on a few choice upgrades to the suspension, tires and brakes to see the real difference from value to baller.

This antidote is definitely baller, and better priced than others. Hope they sell well and succeed in putting some downward pressure on other brands.

To be 18 again, that would be awesome! Ageism jokes, haha, but in this sport brain injury jokes are not good. Ride long enough to see friends and loved ones get hurt and you might understand.
  • 5 0
 @alis66: this is timely because I just went to a big moto dealer with my dad to buy him a new helmet. Now he did spend $900 on his helmet and could have spent more but I was surprised that bikes seemed cheaper than I would have thought. You basically get a free engine. Padding and protection was also cheaper than MTB-specific (and often made by the same brands). All the "lifestyle goods" are identically priced astronomically just like their MTB-counterparts though, so we can meet for a beer in our plaid shirts and blinged-out jeans and bitch about prices over $12 pints.
  • 6 3
 @guylovesbike: can you show us on the doll where communism touched you?
  • 1 0
 @guylovesbike: I think your onto something
  • 1 0
 @fentoncrackshell: They’re not going to give you a 2020 frame in 2025, and even if the “lifetime of the frame” is over in 10 years, they’re still gonna offer crash replacement prices.

Yeti gave me a deal I couldn’t refuse for my clapped out sb66, despite buying it on deep discount during the 29er craze. Pay premium prices and expect premium service.
  • 7 1
 @alis66: There's a quote from Pivot's Chris Cocalis comparing motorcycles and MTB's.

"When Cocalis shows someone one of Pivot’s $10,000 mountain bikes, he’ll hear some people scream, 'I could buy a motorcycle for that!' Which, he agrees, is true. 'But does any motorcycle with a carbon frame, carbon wheels and suspension components on par with what comes on a high-end mountain bike even exist? Yes, it does. It’s called the Ducati Superleggera V4. It matches up quite well — and it costs about $100,000.'"

LOL - some of the bike industry is high on its insular supply.

www.gearpatrol.com/outdoors/a691720/bike-price
  • 5 0
 @njcbps: here’s a thought experiment. Let’s say you built a bike to motorcycle spec at motorcycle volumes. Almost every part is either die-cast or forged. Most parts alu, way more parts steel. Say you make most parts with proprietary standards for ease of manufacture and assembly and custom in-house built coil suspension and brakes to the lowest ridable spec. Geometry and suspension geometry is free. Lastly, order say 50000 units. You could probably have a decent, working mountain bike for 500$ or less.
  • 1 0
 @guylovesbike: on point. Beware the slippery slope of candy crusted fantasy...
  • 1 0
 @guylovesbike: Sorry bro, derisively downvoted you before getting to end of comment. Well said lol
  • 1 2
 @fentoncrackshell:
I’m a very informed, unsponsored buyer and we just bought a Juliana Wilder (aka a SC Blur) for out household.

It’s a very nice bike for a lot of reasons; I’m just privileged / lucky / whatever enough that price isn’t the #1 factor for me.
  • 1 0
 @guylovesbike: So? Every other brand does that too.
  • 1 0
 @rockstar02: Or more like on something.
  • 3 0
 @alis66: Dang it, I was actually sort of hoping you were a jerk. That way I wouldn't have to feel guilty for being such a dick to you. Why did you have to go and ruin it for me? What with your humble attitude and self-deprecating humor, you! Now, once again, I've exposed myself as just the kind of douche who starts unprovoked flame wars in the comments section of cycling websites.

I think the industry runs pretty efficiently, all things considered.
  • 1 0
 @fentoncrackshell: I agree. That being said, I put an angleset in a friend's 2015 Intense Carbine, 160mm fork and decent shock. Her friend borrowed it and won a local enduro on it...
  • 1 0
 @alis66: Your not comparing apples to apples. A top the the line race equipped dirt bike that the pros are riding can easily cost $25k-$50k. They are not riding off the floor models by any means. When you build up a $10k Mtn bike there isn’t much you can do to make it better.
  • 1 0
 @guylovesbike: separating people from their money, we can call it e-communism. Just like communism but you don't have to do all the work and is much more fun.
  • 2 0
 @Bikethrasher: I respectfully disagree. The comparison you present is comparing apples to caviar.

The best off the shelf dirt bikes cost much less than race bikes (Honda CRF450R is $9600 and the works edition with all the best parts is $12400).

Extrapolate the math presented and you get 1/2 to 1/4 the price of a race bike for top end OEM equipment.

So where are all the $2500 to $5000 top of the line OEM mountain bikes? Go further and save costs by using non-top shelf parts and an excellent working reliable modern MTB’s should cost even less. Perhaps way less with good solidly designed in house parts.
  • 4 0
 This dirt bikes to MTB comparisons are funny. Even the cheapest motor bike is 10x more technologically advanced then even the most fancy MTB, sorry! MTB bike is a very, very simple thing. No electronics, basic mechanics. Suspension technology on MTB is bike technology from 1960s ... The only thing that differs is focus on weigh, but even the pricey carbon frames costs like $4k in shop, so they are like $1k of labour? The real difference probably lies in the quantity and the size if the market, let's face it, moto industry has much more talented engineers and bigger money behind it. Moto companies most probably invest heavily in automatic production, just like car companies (or they are really the same companies).
  • 2 0
 @alis66: either the people who buy motorbikes are smarter or the people who sell mountain bikes are smarter. As a mountain biker both those options make me stupid, truth hurts, hulk smash.
  • 1 0
 @alis66: Eli Tomac’s Moto will set you back a Cool $50k. Google it!
  • 72 1
 Sick looking bike. Love how they put RockShox on the XT build and Fox on the X01 build, going against the convention of brand matching.
  • 13 34
flag danielfloyd (Apr 21, 2022 at 8:43) (Below Threshold)
 I mean, if you're not a pro racer who's sponsored by a specific brand it really doesn't matter. I ride a Specialized bike with a RS fork, and Shimano drivetrain, with a Fox helmet, and Giro shoes. Whatever floats your boat.
  • 32 0
 @danielfloyd: he’s getting at the fact that most OEM bikes come with RS/ SRAM or Fox/ Shimano. The RS/ SRAM is definitely due to the fact they’re owned by the same company and I’m sure can get brands better pricing when buying “in bulk.”
  • 3 0
 @Jdricks: True, but they are buying both products and getting the bulk discount just the same. The only disadvantage is that Antidote will have to produce an equal number of both builds.
  • 56 0
 I think i must be a frog being slowly brought to the boil because this seems reasonably priced?
  • 15 0
 After seeing the new SantaCruz bikes every other bike seems reasonably priced
  • 3 0
 I think it is a brilliant bike for that price, and I'm stoked to see them choose that as well. It looks bespoke and premium, and I'd much rather fork out for a talented and focused small manufacturer than some big corporate mob (SC).
  • 26 1
 You had me at the exposed carbon. Good looking bike
  • 24 0
 wait, no way! Bikes come with their own unique serial now?? So cool!
  • 31 0
 It's like a real-world NFT
  • 8 1
 @nilswalk: Non-fungible cycle?
  • 2 0
 @emarquar: Non Functional Testicles
  • 18 0
 "Each bike features its own serial number"
  • 6 0
 Well, afaik each frame has it's unique serial number, regardless of the manufacturer.
  • 15 2
 Wow that's two bike reviews in a row where they actually quote a frame weight ! In this one they even mention what size was weighed. All those years of complaining about it have paid off ! Keep up the good work PB !
  • 8 0
 What's the point of opting for the a Lok EXT when there's no way you're never going to be able to reach that lever?
  • 3 0
 Agreed, I would try to get the Arma instead
  • 12 2
 Where's @Waki?
  • 3 0
 Idk you assume he’s getting the bike. If you follow and know him well enough, he HATES boost 148mm spacing.

He has a full on dissertation on Instagram about why anything other than 142mm is pointless. Geez I had a bitch fest with him on antidotes page talking about this. 148mm is universally across all of antidotes current frames. Legacy DM, Legacy CJ, and pace maker were 142mm
  • 10 2
 Prolly telling people there bike sucks when he can barley ride himself
  • 4 0
 @freeridejerk888:

Idk, all I know is he sold his CJ 27.5. I don’t hate waki, but man his ego is through the roof. He’ll get more respect if he take accountability. 148mm is here to stay. It’s been that way since 2016 (guesstimating). He needs to stop moaning like a dying mule, because frame manufacturers aren’t going to “magically” obsolete 148mm and 157mm.

I personally wish more companies choose 1 universal standard. Like pivot has all their frames with super boost (157mm). It means you can use your wheels for your trail, enduro, or DH. Antidote has 148mm.

But if you go to the likes of Santa Cruz their wheel spacing is all over the place.
  • 10 3
 Probably being a douche somewhere about something he doesn't understand. You know, the usual.
  • 6 1
 @nickfranko: did you just quote the majority of the PB commenters?
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: brilliant!
  • 1 0
 @kroozctrl: the two newest Pivot bikes are boost 148 with udh.
  • 4 0
 @HenryQuinney
The first two build kits (SRAM) are priced in Euros, the last (Shimano) shows as being in dollars (assuming as USD). Are those figures/currencies correct? If so, does that indicate market availability (N.A. gets the XT version only)?

Nice write-up, and that's a great looking bike.
  • 7 0
 @dlford Hi there - that's just my sausage fingers hitting the wrong button! I've amended it now. Thanks for the spot!
  • 6 0
 @henryquinney: "If your fingers are too fat to dial, please mash the keypad now."
  • 4 0
 Really liking what this bike has going on. Although it's not even close to progressive enough for a coil, even if it's just a 'trail' bike.

I suspect that the long chain stay length is even more needed because of the shock placement distributing weight rearward. You'd think 1-2#s wouldn't matter in the scheme of things but I feel like low rearward mounted shock bikes have even more handling issues than typical bikes on short chainstays.

Really is a sweet ride.
  • 4 0
 Do you really think the weight of the shock being 4" further back than if it was in front of the seattube makes any difference?
  • 1 0
 I would agree but the Storia should work just fine on that bike..
  • 1 0
 Its a very small part of the total system weight distribution, when the rider is included, so I'm not entirely convinced it will radically change things. I'm more interested in the anti squat number and the anti rise curve they chose. Seems strange for a split pivot, definitely curious.
  • 11 4
 no down tube storage ....im out
  • 9 2
 Jokes aside: every modern new bike MUST HAVE it!
  • 9 1
 It's the new water bottle mounts.
  • 7 6
 Sounds like a comment from someone who never had one but loves the idea. Wasn’t a game changer on my Slash. Just a way to store stuff you forget about that makes the bike heavier.
  • 4 0
 It's not a boxy downtube, one of the reasons why it looks so great.
  • 3 0
 @Caddz: Not really. I love having my spare tube and patch stuff in my storage area, never having to think about if I accidentally removed it from my pack. On top of that, the weight is centralized.
Plus, unless you're talking XC, that weight means next to nothing when it comes to actual performance.
  • 1 2
 @nickfranko: That's fine, I'm also in the club that says water bottle cage doesn't matter that much to me. Would it be nice? Sure, but would it prevent me from buying a frame I really want? No. The storage thing is in the same boat, I'm fine if its there and it may even get used, but not having one, doesn't prevent me from wanting to buy the bike.
  • 1 0
 seat tube angle reminds me of the twenty-tens
  • 1 0
 @Caddz: or maybe it was something as simple as a joke
  • 5 0
 I wish Bike makers would consult the PB comments section about naming their bikes. Example: woodsprite is good but Slutty Woodsprite a better name IMO.
  • 2 0
 I'd shack up with that purple slut to be sure.
  • 4 0
 Awesome looking bike with a very competitive frame weight. I'd personally like a bit more antisquat...
  • 2 0
 As best i can tell, that is a bit misleading. Finally someone has mentioned rider size in relation to anti-squat (because anti-squat outcomes are directly influenced by rider centre of mass). But note they talk about the rider in standing position (which increases the centre of mass). So then it is difficult to compare the figures to other bikes where the results are probably in the seated position.
  • 1 0
 @Bhaack: The term "antisquat" itself isn't very scientific or accurate, since its calculated on the estimated location of a riders center of mass, which is quite the assumption. If you're really precise in your estimate, that position would change from size to size, so to maintain the same antisquat across sizes you'd actually need to alter the kinematics from size to size.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez:
Agree about the need to consider different anti squat outcomes for different frame sizes. Something I have been investigating for myself - but i can build a bike just for me. But the industry still has a way to go. E.g. we only just fully transitioned to 1x up the front and the front chain wheel size can have a way larger impact on anti squat. So now that huge variable has been simplified for a designer. Norco has used different rear triangles for different sizes as another step forward. Unsure if the industry will progress towards this level of refinement with anti squat any time soon though.
  • 2 0
 On a side note, we should have some sympathy for all the tall riders who have limited experience of efficient peddling bikes because they are configured for the average rider.
  • 1 0
 @Bhaack: Its tough, because with 1x11s frame makers tried to optimize for 28t and 30t chainrings (on 29ers), but with Eagle everyone is now runnign 32-34t, so newer frames are optimized for that size. Its also a problem in that taller riders on larger sizes need more antisquat, but that increase in antisquat also increases chaingrowth and drag on the suspension. In this respect shorter people have an advantage as they need less "absolute" antisquat to get the same effective antisquat as taller riders, and can therefore have less chain growth.
  • 6 1
 The cheapest build looks the most appealing. Beautiful frame.
  • 4 0
 Antidote and Mondraker really do make some of the best looking frame designs out there imo
  • 3 2
 I think the reason to worry about rear shock catching mud is because it makes a big difference to suspension performance. Less grit ingestion keeps the suspension supple. And many people do worry about their forks as well. In muddy areas like around here, we run front fenders year around. They really cut down on the amount of mud and grit on the stanchions and seals. Or at least the cheap zip tied plastic fenders offer coverage. The manufacturer integrated versions are mostly too narrow and don't provide protection to the stanchions. As for seat posts, it would be great if they were in a less exposed location. But it matters less and there is no other option. With that said, a dropper with a minute amount of stiction matters much less than when your suspension loses small bump sensitivity.
  • 3 1
 Idk why people keep moaning about this topic. There is a f*cking fender in the back. It is mount via 3m dual lock. How do I know this? I’ve ridden a CJ 27.5 and I own a CJ 29.

You guys moan about this every time antidote releases a new frame in this design.

Mud doesn’t get in the shock at all because of that fender.
  • 1 0
 I hate it when companies put their rear shocks directly in front of the wheel where all the shit from the wheel will get thrown into and damage your expensive ass shock. If you ride that anywhere with an abundance of small loose rock or heavy mud you will be replacing shocks weekly. That being said... Antidote at least bothered to make a competent guard for the shock unlike Propain when they ran this layout
  • 2 3
 It’s ok though as apparently we don’t care about rear brakes(??), seat posts or forks getting covered in crap
  • 2 0
 @mashrv1: rear brakes are completely out of the path of the tire, generally so are fork stanchions, and unless you enjoy having a dropper post and literally never using it, the stanchion is going to be protected by the body of the post. Not to mention that there's really not much of another practical way to design any of those items to move their sensitive parts out of the way unlike the rear suspension where the shock can be placed in the rear triangle like all the other conventional designs.
  • 1 0
 @Bobtheguy: we’ll yeah, that’s why I took that wording from the article. Forks can get covered in crap, fenders like RRP do a great job of stopping it. Rear brakes are a non-issue as you say. Droppers there isn’t much you can, but some people do still ghetto-rig some kind of fender if they are likely to give the seals a particularly hard time
  • 1 0
 I hope this is another case of a brand where now that they have a dedicated trail bike they can release an updated Carbonjack as a real race enduro bike instead of having it be an all-mountain bike that still caters to trail riders somewhat. Kind of like the case of Canyon when they released the Strive a few years back.
  • 1 0
 So we're all just ignoring the fact that it's single pivot and only shares the carbonjack's aesthetic but not actual suspension performance? "Smart FDS" *rolls eyes*

The statement "[..] traits of the Carbonjack do indeed run through the Woodsprite - particularly in terms of its suspension [...]" is a bit misleading.
  • 1 0
 That bike looks so good, it hurts my eyes. I'm not sure I could concentrate on the trail ahead of me, for looking down at that sexy top tube. Does anybody know the going rate for 12 year-olds? I think I may sell one of my kids so I can afford one...
  • 1 0
 finally, numbers started to get right there Smile

upgrades required:
- inside frame toll box (FTB) or at least extra under top tube toolbox mount
- dedicated water bottle (that matches frame shape
- hidden rear shock ??? - that could be saving for our muddy condition

Id say NEXT Carbon Jack will be even better Smile
  • 5 1
 As yes, the rumored invisi-bike.
  • 4 0
 danggggg, that is a sexy machine!
  • 3 0
 Looks like old Propain bikes. Did Propain sell their old suspension design?
  • 1 0
 It´s a litle different. It´s more like the old Cube design, due to the closed triangle, Propain has as rear end.
Propain has a VPP actually.
  • 1 1
 With regards to the suspension design: If you have to use a fender to protect the shock from muck , maybe the shock shouldn't be so close to the tire ? Similar to how a door with a "pull" or "push" sign on it is a sign of poor door design.
  • 3 0
 Holy crap! That is gorgeous!
  • 1 0
 Spec sheet says i9 hydra enduro s, pictures have carbon rims, where is the mistake?
anyway great value for a small brand with a sick build!
  • 2 0
 That' s a beautiful bike. looks well designed and engineered. well done guys.
  • 2 1
 Propain had this shock placement. Many shocks died due to the crus thrown at them and stancions scratching. California bike. Wouldn't last two weeks on the uk
  • 1 0
 Realy? Never heard of that and never had trouble with it.
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't last 2 weeks in California either lmao, with all the little rocks around here getting thrown at the seat tube from the tire that shock would be gone in under a month
  • 9 0
 @Bobtheguy: according to the other article you'd probably have it stolen sooner than wearing any part out.
  • 3 0
 Could use a hair more AS for it's intended purpose imo.
  • 1 0
 I agree, but to their defense, those AS values are for a 32t chainring, and (unfortunately and unexplainably) most bike kinematics analysis are for 30t chainrings, which produce a higher antisquat.
  • 3 0
 Woodsprite? Is Pussy Willow already taken?
  • 3 1
 Such a cool name for a bike
  • 1 0
 Gimme that Fox/XO1 build with a 150mm 36 up front... Excuse me, I need a moment alone..
  • 1 0
 Is there no small size? If not, then smallest reach is 455mm.....??!! Someone correct me if i missed something.
  • 2 0
 That's what I saw too. I will say though as someone who is 5'6" and finally bought a size medium after riding smalls for years I can't believe I waited this long to size up! I've got short legs (28.5" inseam) and slightly longer than average arms (+1" ape index) and a 450mm reach feels great.
  • 1 0
 Forgetting price for a second, Antidote really make some of the best looking bikes on the planet
  • 2 0
 This is how sc became passe!
  • 2 0
 Every bike I've ever owned had a serial number
  • 1 0
 Except the stolen ones of course
  • 1 0
 looks like a... no it doesn't look like a session. It looks like a 2022 antidote woodsprite!
  • 3 3
 Why so inconsistent with posting the build weight? You've got frame weight.... but not the complete bike weight?
  • 4 0
 Because they don’t actually have enough parts to put a full build together?
  • 8 0
 IMO frame weight is all that matters, too many variables to compare when you are talking build weights. Frame weight is a consistent way to compare....again, MO, I can certainly understand if you'd like to see the build weight. I"m just giddy that they're telling us the actual frame weight.
  • 1 0
 187cm is more like 6'2" on your size recommendation by the way.
  • 1 0
 Outside money couldn't even pay for the stick to be photoshopped out
  • 1 0
 Haha. Outside money. They can stick Outside up their misplaced rising intonation tight little bottoms.
  • 1 0
 it looks like a Solid Strike but in carbon....
  • 1 0
 They finally built an XL size
  • 1 0
 Wood Sprite like the magical/mythological being?
  • 2 1
 Looks like a Bold without the hidden shock.
  • 1 0
 Spring time is here and love is in the air.
I´d love to own this bike
  • 1 0
 Will there be a polished version as well?
  • 2 1
 Weird
  • 3 3
 I’ll wait for the video
  • 1 1
 no ones gonna say it............Water Bottle?
  • 1 0
 No ones ? Do you even read (comments)?..
  • 1 0
 @ka81: funny you say that. I realized I opened this first thing this morning and never re loaded the page when i commented about an hour ago lol
  • 1 0
 Amazing craftsmanship.
  • 1 0
 Looks amazing tup
  • 1 1
 So glad Propain got rid of this fugly design
  • 1 1
 looks sick>
  • 1 1
 deleted> comment
  • 1 2
 I'm out. You can't slam the saddle all the way down. Right?
  • 1 0
 if it's like my carbonjack, its limited, but yes you can. I've got a one up components 210 dropper and it fits just about all the way in.
  • 1 1
 Looks like Propain.
  • 1 3
 Baleeted

Delteated

Del Taco?
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