First Look: 2021 Specialized Epic & Epic Evo

Jun 23, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  
2021 Specialized Epic


The Epic has been Specialized's flagship full-suspension race bike ever since its introduction some 18 years ago. In that time, the bike has been on the podium of top tier races countless times under the world's top riders. For 2021 Specialized is introducing two updated versions of the Epic. The goal with the new Epic platform was to bring the bike into the category of what Specialized considers "modern cross country."

Previous versions of the full-suspension Epic used Specialized's proprietary BRAIN shock that uses an inertia valve to discern between trail inputs and rider inputs. The BRAIN is still present on the 100mm front and rear travel race-ready Epic but the Epic EVO cuts the baggage and utilizes a metric shock to get 110mm of rear-wheel travel. That is coupled with a 120mm travel fork and a dropper post to make the bike more "shred friendly."

Both the Epic and Epic EVO are available in a number of different builds composed of SRAM and Shimano drivetrains and RockShox or Fox suspension. Bikes are available in sizes XS - XL with prices starting at $ 4,125 USD and ranging to $11,525 USD for the top of the line S-Works models, complete with SRAM's wireless AXS drivetrain and RockShox SID suspension.

Epic Details
• Wheel size: 29"
• Travel: 100mm
• Carbon frame
• 67.5° head angle
• 75.5° seat angle (size medium)
• Chainstays: 433mm
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: XS-XL

Epic EVO Details
• Wheel size: 29"
• Travel: 110mm
• Carbon frame
• 66.5° head angle
• 74.5° seat angle (size medium)
• Chainstays: 438mm
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: XS-XL
www.specialized.com
The bike is also light. The S-Works EVO we've been testing at our XC field test in Squamish tips the scale at 21.88 lbs, with our Schwalbe control tires installed. Specialized say that the S-Works Epic frame weighs in at 1869 grams for a size medium with a shock and hardware, while the Fact 11m frame used on the other models weighs 1947 grams. The Epic EVO frame is even lighter since there's no BRAIN, weighing in at 1659 grams for the Epic EVO, and 1759 grams for the Fact 11m frame.




2021 Specialized Epic

Suspension Design

Both models use a linkage driven single pivot suspension design, and the 100mm travel Epic features Specialized's BRAIN shock platform. The BRAIN is designed to deliver a firm pedaling platform until a bump is encountered, at which point it allows the shock to absorb the impact. The BRAIN has been refined time and time again, getting better with each iteration and coming a long ways from the overly clunky and unreliable shock of decades past. The location of the BRAIN is still at the rear axle, but it is now in a different orientation and designed to give a firmer platform with a smoother transition from closed to open.

The BRAIN has no doubt been a polarizing product and riders have had some trepidation with it in the past due to its need to be sent into Specialized for any major service. That hasn't changed, but Specialized now offer two years of service included for the original owner of the bike. Service intervals are now longer and dealers will also have loaner shocks to give customers to keep them on the trail for the few days it's away.

The kinematics of the Epic give the shock a more progressive curve with more mid-stroke support for a smoother transition to the BRAIN engaging. There's a firmer platform but better small-bump performance as well.

For the 110mm travel Epic EVO, the BRAIN is gone, and in its place is a higher volume metric shock and a flip-chip adjustable link that gives riders another half-degree of adjustability. This bike uses a very different leverage ratio than the racier Epic, and it has more anti-squat as it has to give more support in the suspension without the BRAIN.

2021 Specialized Epic
2021 Epic
2021 Specialized Epic
2021 Epic EVO

2021 Specialized Epic
There are some extra-wild frame color options for the new Epics.

2021 Specialized Epic

Frame Details

Both Epics utilize the same front end, but the EVO gets a totally different rear end as it doesn't need to integrate with the BRAIN. Additionally, there are numerous other updates across the board.

The new Epic frame is, you guessed it, lighter and stiffer than the previous generation. The 12m S-Works frame is 100g lighter than the previous bike while the 11m frame that the rest of the line gets is equal to the former S-Works bike.

Tubing on all frames is scaled by frame size for optimal stiffness and weight and the S-Works bike gets a carbon compression-molded link. The rear triangle is now said to be 15% stiffer to match the stiffness of the front triangle and 20 grams lighter. In the frame redesign, shock forces were a major consideration and side loading on the shock is reduced by 30% in order to help with performance and durability.

Both the Epic and Epic EVO use SRAM's Universal Derailleur Hanger and a threaded bottom bracket.

2021 Specialized Epic
2021 Specialized Epic

Riders won't find a SWAT hole in the downtube of the Epic bikes as the tubes are simply too small. Adding the feature would have also increased weight, not what most XC racers or riders are looking for. There is, however, a bolt on the downtube that allows riders to attach Specialized's external SWAT box if they so choose, in addition to having room for two water bottles.

Geometry

2021 Specialized Epic

With the Epic designed for World Cup level XC racing, the geometry has been updated to meet the needs of modern XC courses. The 100mm travel bike has a 67.5-degree headtube angle, 433mm chainstays, and 44mm offset fork with a bottom bracket height of 324mm. The size XS bike has a slightly lower BB of 314mm. The size medium has a reach of 445mm and 75.5mm seat tube angle.

The Epic EVO and its more trail-capable geometry sits the 110mm bike with a 66.5-degree headtube angle, 438mm chainstays, a 44mm offfset fork, and a 336mm bottom bracket height. The size medium has a reach of 436mm and seat tube angle of 74.5mm. The geometry can be adjusted a half-degree steeper with a flip-chip.

2021 Specialized Epic


Ride Impressions

We've been riding the Epic and Epic EVO consistently over the last few weeks in Squamish as a part of our XC field tests, so stay tuned for in-depth ride impressions on both bikes in the coming weeks.







254 Comments

  • 140 3
 We've got both versions of this new bike in the Field Test - I'm on the Epic EVO and Sarah Moore is on the Epic Normal. Video review soon!
  • 146 140
 We'd rather see the Grim Donut...
  • 40 0
 giver the beating it deserves, Overend style.
  • 5 1
 Looking forward to this. Curious if you are testing other builds besides the ultra bling.
  • 12 0
 I thought they fired Mike L, where have you been ???
  • 10 0
 wow. that evo is DCAF. flex stays to shave off a few grams. this thing makes me want to stand and hammer. would love a lap on one.
  • 18 21
 Are we talking Grimm donut soon?
  • 15 35
flag dan23dan23 (Jun 23, 2020 at 14:12) (Below Threshold)
 @Bedeye: Don't bring it up, I got down voted, +61, to -76 for a similar request...
  • 9 0
 Would love a full article on Curtis Keane's build with a pike and custom shock.
  • 114 0
 Looks like XC bikes now have more aggressive geometry than my 3-year old trail bike.
  • 20 0
 you'd be surprised what you can get away with on the descents with these new bikes!
  • 17 0
 For real. 66.5 HTA.
  • 11 0
 @tacklingdummy: 1* slacker than my 2019 Fuse and weighs about 9 pounds less. Granted, it costs 10x as much, but still. Dayum.
  • 41 0
 with the flip-chip in slack mode, the EVO has the same 66-degree HTA as my 2017 enduro.
  • 35 0
 @skyrez18: hear that @mikelevy? Epic Evo huck-to-flat in the review, pleasenthanks
  • 7 0
 The EVO is more aggressive than my 2010 Nomad was.
  • 5 1
 @skyrez18: LOL that is a particularly funny example from just 3 years ago. I think Spec was very, very slow to update the Enduro to "modern" geo and they're on the cutting edge with the Epic.
  • 3 0
 @tgent: they learned their lesson with the SJ Evo.
  • 8 0
 Only 0,2° steeper than the "slack" setting on my 2003 BigHit. Phew, that was close.
  • 2 0
 @onespeedbrian: hahaha.. Crazy isnt it?
  • 2 0
 @darrentheclaw: best comparison yet! Thank you for that.
  • 1 0
 And a slacker seat tube than many enduro bikes!
  • 37 1
 All of these are logical next steps from the previous Epic and EVO but the thing that caught my eye was the use of SRAM's universal hanger. Specialized getting onboard with something universal bodes extremely well.
  • 55 21
 Say what you will about the bikes, but Specialized paint schemes are really good across the board. Still, the price is too high for their bikes IMO. About the same as boutique brands without the corresponding ride quality.
  • 10 0
 Which boutique brands?
  • 7 22
flag dexterfawkes (Jun 23, 2020 at 9:15) (Below Threshold)
 @Fat4242: unno is the first one that comes to mind
  • 46 6
 I'd say that the ride quality is on par with the brands we commonly consider as boutique, such as Santa Cruz, Yeti and Pivot.
  • 22 16
 @rnayel: None of those are Boutique especially not Santa Cruz and not Pivot, they sell more than GT and Cannondale.
  • 13 7
 @rnayel: That hasn't quite been my experience based on the bikes I have demoed, but I could see people liking them a lot. All I am saying is that Specialized has an efficient supply chain and can likely make bikes for reasonably less than smaller brands like Yeti, Santa Cruz, etc., but they are charging the same amount, more or less. They are one of the largest bike brands on the planet in general.
  • 15 2
 @HB208: IDK what the pricing on these is, but the Spec Enduro is competitively priced in the US. You can get a full carbon build with decent suspension and brakes for $4500.
  • 66 3
 As a guy who has owned many-a-boutique brand bike (Ibis, Yeti SB series, etc.) I can tell you that the new Specialized Enduro offers better "ride quality" than any other bike I have ridden....ever. There is a reason that bike is being touted as 10/10 performance on every review under the sun.

Why would smaller engineering teams and lower production volumes of a boutique brand confer any performance advantage? Often times its these big players who spend the money on engineering and shock tune development to eek out that last 5% of performance.
  • 12 4
 @dthomp325: In Canada, Specialized pulled a bit of a jerk move, when the dollar was tanking during COVID, they increased the price of their Enduro range. For instance, the base Comp (NX build) went from 5700 to 6400, during the same product year, same bike, same inventory. If you bought the bike in January, you paid $700 less than in May.

Comparatively, you can get a top of the line build on an enduro bike from a mail order brand like YT or Commencal for not much more.

I own a previous gen Enduro that I bought at my LBS and it's awesome, but at the time it was cheaper to get a bling build.
  • 10 0
 Agreed. I have no interest in owning a bike from the Big S (except maybe the Enduro), but their paint schemes have definitely been on point the last few years.
  • 3 0
 @HB208: Are you referring only to their XC line? I have an enduro, and it's awesome.
  • 15 1
 @KJP1230: Artisan, hand-laid carbon fiber carbon fiber, lovingly cured to perfection in a wood fired oven.
  • 2 0
 @font style="vertical-align: inherit;">font style="vertical-align: inherit;">KJP1230 /font>/font>:


I always thought like that, because the big ones don't lack money
  • 15 1
 @rnayel: For what it is worth, I do agree that their build kits are down-right stupid in price. I was able to build a full-custom 2020 Enduro, complete with I-9 wheels, XT transmission, 2021 Fox 38 & X2 Factory, Deity cockpit and pedals, all for hundreds less than the Enduro Expert build.

For some reason, Specialized is the only company which not only doesn't provide price breaks for build kits, they actually seem to sell it to you at a premium over the retail price of all parts. In the MBR UK video review, they gave it a 10/10 for performance, and determined that they could build the S-Works version for cheaper at full retail, from a frame-only option. It almost makes more sense to buy the frame, then buy a complete bike from a consumer-direct, and rip the parts off.
  • 2 0
 @rnayel: Norco did the same thing, most of their bikes (atleast the Sight and Optic) went up $300-400 each after weeks/months of being released
  • 15 1
 @rnayel: Santa Cruz isn’t boutique. It’s a mass produced Far East product from one of the biggest bike companies in the world
  • 1 0
 @rnayel: that’s brilliant
  • 3 17
flag Happymtbfr (Jun 23, 2020 at 12:22) (Below Threshold)
 "Specialized paint schemes are really good across the board"

#RLOTF or
#LMAOROTF
  • 10 1
 @Happymtbfr: Waki??
  • 2 11
flag Happymtbfr (Jun 23, 2020 at 14:02) (Below Threshold)
 @tgent: do you have any other prejudices ? ;-)
I have been a member for many years
  • 1 0
 The ride quality of my 2010 Enduro was way ahead of its time. I demoed a couple other bikes in 2016, and they were only marginally better. I chalk that up mostly to 29-inch wheels vs. 26. At the time, it was a much better deal than a comparably-equipped Nomad. I don't pay much attention to price-to-component ratio until I'm buying, but that bike was a good deal. Paint job was killer, too.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: Bike Radar pointed out the same with the Santa Cruz Carbon Chameleon. Build would be cheaper if you just bought every part. Silly.

Specialized makes nice frames, but the full builds are really expensive. I test rode a Stumpjumper Evo and really liked it, but it was so over priced for the spec I went looking for other options. I got a Transition Patrol instead partly because it was a way better deal.
  • 11 1
 @Happymtbfr: Whenever I see a Swedish flag and a comment downvoted into the greys, I just assume it's Waki, that and I'm pretty sure he got the boot after the BLM post so figured he was on to the next account name.
  • 4 0
 $4100 for the Evo with full slx seems like a great price.
  • 2 2
 @KJP1230: Because smaller brands will think outside the bubble.
Remember when the big S told everyone they didn't want a 27.5 bike?
  • 5 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I literally do not. I remember when they were early to the 29er party. The 2014 Enduro 29 was an incredible machine that was very much ahead of its time - and regarded as such. As far as I can see, Specialized has continued producing 27.5 versions of most of their models up until now. Even their DH bike comes in a mullet version.

Every brand is switching to 29er heavy line ups. It's not because these companies favor one wheel size over another, arbitrarily. It is because 29ers have been outselling 27.5 for years now. Why do you think Yeti released the SB100, 130, 150 eight months before the SB165 and 140? Ibis updates the Ripley and the Ripmo earlier in season than the Mojo lineup. New Megatower a full season before the updated Bronson, etc. See the trend? The market speaks and it much prefers larger wheels.
  • 2 1
 @rnayel: supply and demand. Companies have been selling tons of entry level bikes since Covid. And factories have been shut down so they have been running out of bikes to sell. If they had kept prices the same, people would have been upset that bikes were sold out.

I actually agree with their increase in prices, as long as the profits are enjoyed throughout the supply chain.
  • 2 2
 @KJP1230: What they do now doesn't matter. They were very late to the 27.5 party.

From a 2014 announcement about tires.
"We really believe in the performance of our tires, so even though we don’t currently offer 650b bikes we still want to make sure all riders have the option of choosing their favorite Specialized tires,” said Specialized Global PR Manager Sean Estes. “We also want to make sure our dealers are equipped to service all riders as well.”

Estes noted that the tires are already available at some Specialized retailers with more expected to receive shipments soon. He declined to comment on rumored 27.5-inch bike and wheel development."
  • 3 0
 The New enduro is one of the best bikes I have been on of any brand.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: such a bargain 4500$
  • 7 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Wait, what? You're telling me that your position is: "I don't care what a brand has done in the last 6 years - I'm bitter that they prioritized developing 29er tires before they developed the same tires for 27.5 wheels!" Also, the quote you are throwing at me is from a press release where Specialized is saying: "We haven't built a 650b, but we are supporting that wheelsize with our tires." Shortly after this they began producing 650b wheeled bikes.

Dude - get off it, man. The company jumped with both feet into 29er's. And guess what - they were right! 29er's quickly caught on because that is what the market wants.

I get it - you like 650b wheels. That's rad, man. Find a bike you like and enjoy. You're formulating a grudge against a company that generally produces super rad machines because of an obscure comment about how they prioritized bringing tires to market. Meanwhile, you're trying to make the case that all these boutique brands are somehow "thinking outside the box", and I've pointed out how utterly untrue that is. All the boutique brands are prioritizing development of their 29er platforms before 650b. Even Guerilla Gravity - the most boutique brand you can think of - is offering four 29er models, and only two 650b models. There is a reason why.

To cap it all off, you're talking to a guy who likes smaller brands. I love to see creative approaches to mountain biked design. But just because Specialized is a larger brand, doesn't mean that they don't make top-of-class bike, which they clearly do.
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: Not bitter about anything, maybe you take this stuff personally I don't- don't even own a 27.5 bike.

You completely missed the point, it's not about tires, my god. I was just illustrating they didn't have 650B bikes in 2014. Someone else can correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't the first SJ 650B in 2015 and it was some thrown together model using parts from the 29er and it wasn't until the next year that it was a dedicated 650B frame?

My only point was smaller brands tend to think outside the box more than the big corporate brands. That's all. The late adaptation of 650B is just one example where Specialized big corp machine dug in their heels and weren't quick to react.

I can't find the video, but there is one where Specialized basically says there's no point to 650B. I'm going to hazard a guess the lost sales is what shifted the mindset, not innovation.
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: You're misremembering and mistaking the video where Giant's Product Manager said they were not going to offer 29ers. That video did not age well for them.

A lot of bike companies did not have good 650b offerings in 2013, or were just getting started. Most bikes were still sold as 26, and there was this growing movement toward 29ers in the XC/light trail categories in 2011-2012. Specialized jumped straight ahead to offering a 29er in their new X-wing designed Enduro, which won "Bike of the Year" from more than a few publications in 2013. Is this not innovation?

It's important to point out that lots of boutique brands are forced to be "innovative" because they need to find a way to design a bike without infringing upon patents. Remember when Specialized's patent on the four-bar, horst link FSR suspension expired, and suddenly all these small brands who had been producing single-pivot bikes and taking shots at Specialized changed their suspension layout to the identical design the next year? Super innovative.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: I'm not misremembering at all.

Just because everyone doesn't want to copy specialized doesn't mean forced. Canfield, Knolly, Banshee all have arguably better suspension designs than Specialized Horst Link.

Lenz Lunchbox was a short cs long travel 29er before the Enduro came out. Devin just doesn't have the add revenue to win bike of the year.

I get it now you're a huge big S fan and they can do no wrong in your eyes.

Found reference too it here on pinkbike:
www.pinkbike.com/news/specialized-2015-enduro-650b-2015.html
"Specialized officially adopted the mid-size wheel standard, two years after it sent out a memo to the press that the pioneer mountain bike brand had no intention of producing a 27.5-inch-wheel bike, stating that they were convinced that the 26-inch format was fine the way it was, that the 29er was a far better choice for a bigger wheel bike, and that the mid-sized wheel “...represented the worst of both worlds.” Specialized also covered their butts, writing that they would consider producing 27.5-inch bikes if there was sufficient consumer demand.Well that day has apparently arrived.

So was it innovation or lost sales?
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: Found even more, I was mistaken, it was a 26er front triagle.
From that same pinkbike article:
That said, being restricted to using a front section predesigned for a 26er to come up with a competitive 27.5 bike presupposes that compromises were made in the Enduro 650b’s numbers
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I don't think anyone, including Specialized, would argue that creating a 650b model of any bike is or was "innovative." Most companies did it because its what the market wanted.

I'd argue that Specialized's 2015 stance was "ahead of their time". 650b bikes are in decline and 29ers are the clear and dominant force in the market. Most companies, including boutique brands are reigning in their offering for 650b wheels. Specialized is an "innovator" after all - it took 5 years for their stance to be proven correct.

Also, you started out arguing that big brands are less innovative than smaller brands. I am arguing that this is not true, and that big brands are just as likely to create world-class bikes as boutique companies. Take a look at the suspension design of the 2020 Enduro, and tell me it isn't every bit as innovative a design as anything you've seen from a boutique brand.

Canfield, Banshee and Knolly - you literally picked 3 brands which have struggled to produce a single hit bike over the last 5 years. Knolly's continually get very average reviews, and Canfield's saving grace is that they are now licensing their suspension design to Revel bikes. I'm not saying these suspensions are bad, per se. But Specialized, Norco, Transition, Kona, Guerilla Gravity having been marching away with hit models and "dream build" designations, all using a FSR suspension design. So no, I do not think its accurate that these brands have "arguably better suspension design" than Horst Link. At least not according to sales and reviews for both large and small brands throughout the industry. But hey, what are "sales" and "reviews" worth anyway - those companies are innovative!
  • 3 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: “...represented the worst of both worlds.” I'm far from a twentysix4lifer, but I'm not actually convinced S was wrong when making this statement.
  • 28 6
 Hard pass on the "brain" shock. I had an older stumpjumper with a brain shock. It's a bitch to service. You have to send it in for some super special expensive servicing, and then fox told me they stopped servicing older brain shocks... So for those thinking of getting the brain version, I'd recommend going with something else as it is minimal gains (if any) in the first place. I'm against any proprietary components at this point..
  • 35 4
 Then.. Get the Evo..
  • 10 4
 Fwiw the newer brain shocks that rockshox does now are significantly better
  • 3 7
flag stumphumper92 (Jun 23, 2020 at 11:16) (Below Threshold)
 @livinfortheride: That was the point...........................................................................................................
  • 3 0
 This is the reason I skipped the Epic when I bought a new bike in 2018. The mechanic at the bike store admitted that Specialized only stocked parts for the Brain for 3 years...after that no support and no upgrade path.
  • 5 0
 Ha, same, 2012 StumpJumper, cost me $400 to service the fork and shock once after shipping. They F'ed it up and told me it was fine when it was clearly not and losing oil way too quickly. So glad to be rid of that bike and will never buy a bike with a proprietary shock again.

That being said, that Evo looks quite tempting, I'm in the market for an aggressive downcountry/light trail bike and that thing is pounds lighter than my current top picks (Ibis Mojo, YT Izzo, and Scott Spark) with similar geo...
  • 1 0
 Yup, 2010 Stumpjumper here that I bought used. Brain was $400 to service, did it once, keep saying "this is the year for a new bike". It's been sucking air for two years now, but I refuse to pay that again.
  • 26 0
 Okay this is epic.
  • 22 2
 that paintjob looks epic.
  • 7 15
flag RowdyAirTime (Jun 23, 2020 at 9:54) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like just another bike. Man, I was expecting something really "epic".

Very nice, 21.88lbs. Would be interested to see what the epic evo weighs? Bike looks good, but over USD $11,500 and not even any kashima? At least it isn't CAD $20,000 like their special edition Levo SL.

I absolutely love bikes and have 3 myself. Although I bought them at good prices, I still question the pricing of pedal bikes. I know everything is getting so damn expensive, but many top end bikes are at least USD $10,000 now. Seriously, comparing to a good motorbike, or great used car for CAD $15,000, no doubt, bikes are definitely overpriced. Bike and component manufacturers know the demand his so high and so many people around the world love riding bikes, so I guess they know they can charge high prices. Sorry for the rant...
  • 2 2
 @RowdyAirTime: it's pushing people into buying direct-to-consumer IMO. Almost all of my friends' recent new bike purchases were from direct brands, saving them over $1000-$1500.
  • 9 1
 @RowdyAirTime: read, bro:

“The S-Works EVO we've been testing at our XC field test in Squamish tips the scale at 21.88 lbs“
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18: Transition is actually pricing their bikes well. They are essentially the same price for each level of drivechain (NX, GX, X01), but you get way better suspension than most companies are offering.
  • 2 0
 @RowdyAirTime: I think Kazimer said the Evo came in at 21.88 for the s works, watched a review from Flow Mountain bike and Wil said his medium s works normal epic came in at 20.83lbs or 9.45kg without pedals
  • 9 0
 @RowdyAirTime: Yeah, what's up with those non-Kashima Rockshox, anyways?

BTW, I have both Kashima and non-Kashima Fox forks, and there's zero difference in ride quality.
  • 1 0
 @Oloid925: in other words - damn light.
  • 2 0
 @twozerosix: Exactly, with a 2.3 Ground control and a AXS dropper and different rear ended and 120/115 travel that is insane really
  • 4 0
 @rickybobby18: YEUP! And I think that's the case for many.. prices are getting steeper, entry level spec's are getting worse even while the prices go up. Fortunately for the mtb industry, there are a lot of wealthy people who ride, so they'll make the sales. But I can definitely see more and more direct to consumer brands popping up. And you can make the comment that I am just poor if you want (i'm not) but I'd still never spend over $4k on a bike, and that's still steep!

I see a lot more people complaining about prices lately. Usually they'd get downvoted to hell with people retaliating with their reasoning of why prices are so steep (supply and demand, etc.) Notice how there are more and more upvotes and negative comments on pricing.... We getting greedy out here boys and girls!
  • 5 0
 @stumphumper92: At least we don't play golf. One can spend a thousand dollars+ for a driver, and there're no moving parts. Then you need all of the other clubs, and green fees, and an ugly sweater vest.

We could be into fancy cars, or boats, or hunting,, or, well, every other hobby, except maybe running or swimming.

What's inexpensive these days?
  • 2 0
 @hllclmbr: Just green fees are more expensive than mountain biking, assuming you buy a bike every 4 or 5 years. Most courses are at least $20-25 (for a shitty public course). If you golf twice a week, you are looking at like $150-200 a month in green fees minimum. Plus, it isn't actually exercise...
  • 3 1
 @stumphumper92: I buy a bike every four to six years. Next bike I buy will likely be around $5.5k. Monthly, that is like $80 before factoring in the value of my old bike. It isn't THAT bad when you look at it that way. I am definitely wealthier than most people my age (mid-20s) because I have a white collar job, but no insanely so.

But yes, I really appreciate direct to consumer brands. They are getting good bikes into the hands of more people. I don't want to sport to only be dominated by upper class white dudes.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: That's why I got a Patrol instead of a Stumpjumper Evo about a year ago.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-sf: Great bike. Yeah, Transition seems to actually offer the best value outside of direct to consumer brands.
  • 1 0
 @twozerosix: What, I did read the PB article and already stated the weight for the sworks epic was 21.88lbs, so not sure what you are saying? However, I did mention I wonder what the sworks epic "EVO" weighs. Compared to the Epic which has 100mm front/rear travel, the Epic Evo has 110mm rear travel and a longer 120mm fork and 5mm longer chainstay's + a flip chip. The dropper on the Evo definitely adds weight, but the Evo does save weight not having Specialized's BRAIN shock platform. Again, this is why I wondered what the more shred friendly Evo weight is since there are a few differences compared to the XC race ready epic.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: Direct brands are a good option, but no demo rides to ensure the bike and size is right for you? Another way is to check year end bike sales. After demoing bikes in the spring. I got my 2019 Trance Advanced Pro 29 0 (X01 build & everything carbon) for a great price, only CAD $6,000 out the door and this bike is the same as other bikes selling for $11,000 CAD. So can be a good option to wait and look for the best deals in the fall when next years models come out.
  • 1 0
 @RowdyAirTime: i believe we are in violent agreement here. It says the Evo is 21.88. Non S-Works frame adds 100grams frame weight. Don’t know about the non-Evo except it being heavier due to having a brain (unlike myself most Tuesday’s).
  • 2 0
 @twozerosix: No way, it's all good. When I 1st posted, I thought PB showed the sworks epic weighs 21.88lbs, not the epic evo. Wow, that's pretty amazing, only 21.88lbs for a 115/120mm travel bike with a dropper. I guess I got it backwards and should have asked what the sworks epic weighs?

Without the brain, the "shred friendly" epic evo frame actually weighs 210g (almost 1/2lb) less than their "race-ready" sworks epic frame. What, almost sounds backwards, as Specialized longer travel downcountry frame weighs 1/2lb less than their race ready XC frame? However, the dropper, longer travel fork, longer chainstays, flip chip, etc on the epic evo would all add weight and easily make up for this frame weight difference.

Usually a bike manufacturers "downcountry" bike (using their XC frame), when adding more travel, a dropper and better tires probably weighs at least 1-3lbs more than their shorter travel XC race bike. However, this same approach does not look like what Specialized did, since the sworks epic has an almost 1/2lb brain, and Specialized uses the same tires, bars, etc on both bikes. The longer travel epic evo with a dropper looks damn light and probably the better bike to get, unless Specialized loses that good for 3 years brain weighing it down on their shorter travel XC race bike.

Again, still interested in the weight difference between the epic evo and sworks epic?
  • 2 0
 @hllclmbr: Yes I completely agree that there are more expensive hobbies. And we'll continue to pay the increasing prices cuz we love it! And that's how they're able to charge so much
  • 1 0
 @RowdyAirTime: I wonder which option is faster in a race: the extra weight from the brain system, or the decreased mental and physical load of flipping lockout levers all day. I'm hoping Spesh has done some experimenting with this.
  • 2 1
 @MaplePanda: Many people don't realize how much energy the human brain uses. Chess tournaments burn as many calories as serious aerobic exercise.

I wouldn't be surprised if not dicking around with levers, under duress, is faster than a third of a pound in frame weight and the tiny bit of lockout efficiency, but man, would that be a hard study to conduct.
  • 27 12
 Some people like skinwall tires...and some people think popped collars look cool.
  • 12 0
 And still people tuck t-shirts into their pants and shorts...
  • 42 2
 I like pineapple on my pizza.
  • 2 2
 @Highlander406: haha! Amen!
  • 11 2
 And sandals are sometimes just more comfortable with socks
  • 5 4
 Sometimes popped collars are to block the sun on the neck and not a fashion statement. I play golf as well MTB and when in the sun all day, the back of your neck gets roasted.
  • 38 0
 @tacklingdummy: that's what mullets are for...
  • 2 0
 @mattsavage: Touche. At first, I was thinking what does a 27.5/29er mullet have to do with my comment. Haha.
  • 4 0
 @Highlander406: you monster!!!!
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: but you know what golf stands for, right?
  • 1 0
 Still better than white tires... that's definitely a fan favorite for the double-polo collar popper
  • 4 0
 @Highlander406: *angry italian noises*
  • 15 1
 WANT! All I need to make it work is a 130 lryic, super delux coil, riser bars, dh casing tires, magura mt7s, enduro wheels, and a 7 speed dh drivetrain. Gravity-Cross slayer!
  • 20 7
 I can't believe they're still using BRAIN... My experience on the 2020 bike was clunky, awkward and uncomfortable..
  • 7 42
flag madmon (Jun 23, 2020 at 9:42) (Below Threshold)
 from a scientific point it can never work right because of the natural delay of any electronic circuit. I am a professional sound mixer [when the demic ends] and deal with delay issues all the time. How long does the video need to be delayed after being injected through a processor? Usually one frame and that equals 30 milliseconds. The new bike with an actual NORMAL metric shock will be the GAME CHANGER the big S has been seeking for a decade and this is a cool way to retire it's "lefty"
  • 28 2
 @madmon: It's not electric...
  • 22 1
 @madmon: what electronic circuit? the brain is a mechanical system.
  • 8 0
 Yeah. At least they removed it from the EVO version. I had an Epic and wanted to get rid of the Brain. However, with the proprietary shock mounts it was too difficult so I just dealt with it.
  • 3 0
 I haven't ridden once since the 2007 model, and I agree that they weren't the most comfortable, but my god could I rip on that bike. If I wanted to race XC, it'd definitely be on my list. And considering they don't include it on the EVO variant, I think Specialized is on the same page too.
  • 3 0
 I was given a 2018 to race for a season, never got along with the Brain. Even when it was working right, it didn't work right, especially on the fork.
  • 1 0
 @madmon: this isn't electronic and electric circuits don't naturally have some sort of fixed delay like you are implying. You could create a switch that responds within nanoseconds.
  • 1 0
 I'm no professional in the field of electronics but I do have a lot of experience. And I do think there is a delay in electronics though I feel it is becoming less in places. Back in the days when turning on a light it would either take a while to reach full strength or it would flicker a lot until it says "ping" and it would be on. Nowadays with led lighting, and again I'd like to point out I say this from personal experience, I flick the switch and and "bam", lights are on. Just like that, "bam", I tell you. But again, this only goes for certain fields. Cellphones for instance have become much less instant. Only battery discharge got quicker but everything else definitely became slower.

As for the brain in question though, all this doesn't matter for shit as the brain isn't electric.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: 2018's had some problems for sure. In the end, and to this day Specialized LBS's are replacing the entire unit free of charge. Had mine replaced last October and it has been flawless since.
  • 2 0
 @Augustus-G: No, I don't mean the failures, that's a separate issue. I mean I just don't like the function of the Brain. Horrible idea. The shock was okay, but the Brain on the fork is just stupid. Inertial valves require you to take a hit before it opens up, literally no suspension when you actually need it!
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: I think there's a big difference between the value of the brain on the front or rear suspension. Thinking back to my early brain-equipped epic, I thought it did what it was supposed to do well (even if that's not everyone's cup of tea) but I would hate that same feeling on the front of the bike.
  • 3 0
 @big-red: It wasn't bad on the back. I preferred it on a lighter setting though, so it would open with smaller hits. Still platform when hammering fireroads.

But I personally prefer a hardtail for XC. I know it's not the cool thing, and according to EVERYONE (but me), a full suspension is supposed to be faster. Except my race results don't lie, I am faster on a hardtail except on rare occasion. But I weigh less than 145 pounds, even when I am not in race fitness, so the extra weight of the rear suspension slows me down.
  • 1 1
 @JSTootell: Yes, the Brain Fork is as divisive a subject as it gets. Some love it, some hate it and a lot of people never figure out how to get it set-up for themselves. BTW, was yours the Top or Bottom Fade Adjust?
I've got an '18 Top Adjust which was a take-off from an S-Works Epic and I love the thing.
  • 1 0
 @Augustus-G: I don't know. There was no difference between any of the model line; the Comp got the same shock as the SWorks.

This was a Pro model, for 2018. Again, rear shock was always fine, it was the fork I didn't like. A friend has been through like 4 shocks now, mine never failed in the year I raced it (though it had been replaced just before I got it).
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: Yes there was a difference. The S-Works and Pro got the top fade and rebound adjust.
The lower models got a bottom rebound adjust. You can tell the Top Model by the Red & Blue knobs for the Fade & Rebound on the top of the right side of the fork. The two are very different in performance.

On the shock issue. It wasn't until last fall that they finally figured out the problem which was in the manufacturing process IIRC. There is a very long and detailed thread on it over at MTBR which includes several comments from Specialized employees.
  • 1 0
 @Augustus-G: I'm not sure what you are talking about. Can you show me an example?

Here are four different 2018 models, all with the same Brain. The same Brain the one I raced had too. They were all the same in 2018.
www.pinkbike.com/news/2018-specialized-epic-first-ride.html

www.bicyclebluebook.com/marketplace/buy-now/2018-specialized-mens-epic-comp-31966

www.ambmag.com.au/gallery/tested-specialized-epic-expert-477773/page4

off.road.cc/content/news/first-look-specialized-epic-comp-carbon-880

Specialized also knew what was wrong with the shock in 2018. They tried a bandaid fix until they were able to work the problems out. Before the bandaid fix, they denied a problem. Then after the obvious denial stage was over, they just did an easy warranty process. Once they did the bandaid fix, they lasted longer, but would still fail (especially for larger people, I am small). It all came down to the rush for production, moving from Fox to Rockshox and not giving enough time before production to verify that the production method was correct.

My LBS gave me the bike to race, it was their demo bike. A lot of customers had warranty claims on those things and I followed it closely as I didn't want to miss out on a race due to a shock failure (I have a pro license, racing the ProXCT).
  • 1 0
 @Augustus-G: Oh, I didn't realize you were talking about the fork. I was talking about the shock. I was on the Pro model, it had the Brain adjust on the bottom of the fork leg.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: We're on the same page now, LOL. I originally thought the Pro had the Top Adjust. I should have looked at the Archive web page.
On the Fork, from everyone I've talked to the Top & Bottom adjust models are two very different animals.
The common theme from the people riding the bottom adjust version is that it is very harsh.
Last year I picked up a Top adjust model with the carbon steerer 2nd hand and it has been great. A huge step up from the Judy it came with. (I've got a Comp model I've basically built an Alloy S-Works spec out of.)
I run it wide open and a couple of clicks to the slow side of center on the rebound. Pressure wise right at 20% sag. Like you I'm on the lighter side, about 160 lbs. kitted up. Maybe this new generation of SID Brain forks will be more like the older Top adjust model. ???

On the Shock, I knew about the rebuild process they thought was going to remedy the problem but didn't.
As to if they really knew it was not the end all fix, I don't know. There's still a mixed bag of reports about how individual LBS's are handling it. I was talking to a guy up in Michigan a couple of weeks ago and his LBS was still trying to put him through the Rebuild routine. I do know that since I got mine replaced last October it has been perfect. Mine had the dreaded "squish bob squish" syndrome and wouldn't lock up. I had to take a few months off this winter but have got over 500 miles of rocky desert riding on it since. Fingers crossed for the future.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: What are your XC courses like?
  • 1 0
 @gorideabicycle: Mix, some mild, some not. Fontana, Vail Lake, and Bonelli are all ProXCT courses. Most climbs are non tech.
  • 13 2
 No sandwich box :-(
Could have made this the ideal back countrybike
  • 5 0
 Mount the second water bottle and use it for storage
  • 6 0
 @diegosk: That's not a very **ahem** specialized solution.
  • 3 0
 Sand Wich And Taco
  • 1 0
 @diegosk: You don't need to. You can have 2 water bottles and the external SWAT box which works perfect for a tube, plug kit, chain tool, CO2 & tire lever. It connects to the bottom of the down tube water bottle cage and the lowest boss. Very handy piece of kit.
  • 14 4
 That’s most definitely NOT a horst link
  • 10 1
 Yeah, where is the pivot on the chainstay? No pivot, no Horst link design. This should technically be called a linkage driven single pivot.
  • 13 0
 @bicycle019: Article says single pivot.
  • 7 0
 No mention of FSR in the article...
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: That's been updated, not what it said earlier.
  • 9 3
 "The BRAIN has no doubt been a polarizing product and riders have had some trepidation with it in the past, due to Specialized suing a small manufacturer to steal their patents for inertial valves in forks and shocks..." fixed it for you.
  • 2 4
 Specialize will sue anyone for just about anything. Next they'll be suing competitors for using a similar shade of paint, or spec'ing the same components....
  • 6 0
 Man looks awesome! I'm holding out for a stumpjumper with the new enduro linkage though as I dont race XC anymore...
  • 3 0
 Most def' no Horst link on these two. Looks like a competitor's bike from back when the HL patent was still in play. Only it doesn't even have a seat stay pivot like all the "Faux Bar" imitator's did.
  • 4 1
 I love my Scalpel.
This is the Epic Scalpel?
Specialed spent so many years taking in money for their patent 4-bar, but now they are using Cannondale's... I agree, the Scalpel pivotless seat stays are superior for xc rigs.
  • 2 0
 The move from 71.75° HTA in the 2014-2017 model to 69.5° HTA in the most recent generation was a giant improvement. I'm honestly not sure if I want to go down to 67.5° on a bike that spends more time crawling up single track switchbacks at 2 mph than descending. Who knows—maybe it's rad.

Wish there was something to keep the bars from chipping the pain off of my top tube in a crash - something I managed on my last two Epics.
  • 2 0
 There is, it’s called Trek knock block
  • 1 0
 @L0rdTom: Is that retrofittable on an Epic? I'm not really interested in a Supercaliber.
  • 4 0
 Hopefully companies continue to make really good XC bikes like this and people begin to realize that you don’t need a battery and a motor to ride really far.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree!
  • 3 1
 F&$k...I am searching for a full sus XC/marathon bike to replace hardtail and this damn thing might be the first Specialized bike that I might actually consider buying...Revel yesterday, Epic Evo today, new Hei Hei....hell, even the Spot Ryve...all new little ripper snappers on the XC side with some favourable trail geo and long enough reach for my tall ass...what a time to be alive!
  • 1 1
 Pivot mach 4. Do yourself a favor and skip the single pivots.
  • 4 0
 Geometry is now in the database...
geometrygeeks.bike/search?q=epic+2021
  • 3 0
 Seems strange that they don't provide top tube measurements.
  • 1 0
 Interesting. That second bike looks like what I assume is the Epic Comp with rigid post/SLX build. That's not shown on their website yet. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. They have a Comp version of the EVO on their website, though, also with an SLX build.
  • 1 0
 The Epic Evo looks really promising - good geo, leightweight, probably super efficient and no proprietary rear shock. But then again, it's a Specialized so, in a very predictable fashion, the prices are going to be off the charts.

Edit: Yup, checked it. Just the frameset alone for the Epic Evo is 4000 USD. I mean, damn, 4k for a frameset. Let that sink in for a second
  • 1 0
 Their US site shows $3,525 for the frame.
  • 2 0
 Nice to see SLX and something other than crappy Formula hubs (Although, I'm not sure if low end Shimano hubs are much better) on the lowest end EVO.

The complete weight on the S-Works EVO is nuts!
  • 5 0
 2.6" tire clearance please...i see this bike ripping it up.
  • 1 0
 Should be good competition with the new scalpel design, which is ironically more fsr than the new epic.

On another note, how do people get away with riding such light tires on their downcountry bikes, I end up needing a full on enduro tire!?
  • 1 0
 So reach sizes on the epic evo coming up 10mm shorter each size, when in reality most would want longer reach with shorter stem on the evo. Higher bb's not an issue but slacker seat angle not ideal. Really think they should make a separate main frame to match the evo specific rear so it's not compromised.
  • 2 0
 Need Top Tube lengths in a geometry chart Specialized. Too much variation in how manufacturers measure seat tube angle to skip giving us that key piece to compare with Reach. Thanks
  • 2 2
 In all fairness to the writeup, though, they do describe the frame as a "linkage driven single pivot design". So I, and perhaps a few other commentators, overlooked that bit.
I mean, since when did anyone see a Special Ed design without a true four bar, "Horst link?
  • 7 0
 the previous generation epic/epic evo didnt have 4bar either.
  • 1 1
 @erm799: Oh. Well, I guess we all know who hasn't been paying any attention to Spec. Ed. for a good long while......
  • 3 0
 Why do the EVO modles have shorter reach and slacker STA ? Am a missing something..
  • 6 0
 They use the same front triangle. So making the head angle slacker makes the STA slacker and the reach shorter
  • 2 3
 The EVO doesn't have a different front triangle to compensate for the longer fork, and they didn't do anything different with the rear either. It is just over-forked (or up-forked?) version of the regular Epic geometry. Standards rules apply that HTA and STA will both get about 1 deg slacker with a 20mm longer fork.

The taller fork rotates the whole frame around the rear axle. Reach is a purely horizontal measurement from the bottom bracket to the head tube, so as the frame rotates back that horizontal distance decreases. Think about how much shorter that horizontal distance is when doing a wheelie.
  • 1 0
 Double post.
  • 3 0
 @showmethemountains: "Both Epics utilize the same front end, but the EVO gets a totally different rear end as it doesn't need to integrate with the BRAIN. Additionally, there are numerous other updates across the board."...

The rear end is different as well as the linkage, so it's all worked out!
  • 3 0
 @showmethemountains: Thanks for the clarfication!

I feel like they should have used a different front triangle as well.
  • 2 0
 @billreilly: Yes, the rear end is in construction due to the BRAIN being removed, but apparently not different (or not much) in geometry. The differences in the geometry chart reflect exactly what you would see when you put a 20mm longer fork on frames with identical geometry, i.e. the changes in HTA, STA, bb drop, reach, stack, etc
  • 3 0
 Stunning design and amazing paint. Looks like a simple and elegant machine.
  • 1 0
 STA is claimed to be 75.5/74.5 deg for the EVO, this has got to be effective and not actual?! Looks like it is leaning quite a bit back, not good for guys like me with long legs that need a high seat...
  • 1 1
 So they hopefully fixed all the stuff wrong with the old ones. Finally gave it more "modern" geometry (XL's no longer have 450mm reach) and of course. Made it 15% stiffer, again. I'm still not spending that much money on a Specialized though. Not when there are bikes out there named. ......... Seven. Moots.. and KTM.
  • 1 0
 Reminds me of my early 2000's titus racer X. Interesting to see the evolution of shock placement for specalized. I think they have iterated through every possible location over the years.
  • 6 2
 no Shimano?
  • 6 0
 There are both SRAM and Shimano versions.
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp: Only Epic Evo Pro/Comp, all other versions come with Sram
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp: sorry could not find them above
  • 1 0
 @trailzoid: excellent the one with our brains. Love it!
  • 3 0
 not a fan of specialized but kudos for geo numbers and threaded bb
  • 4 3
 What are these...bikes for ants???? How about an XXL...get on it Speci!!! While I'm on a bitchfest: you get on it too SC Blur!
  • 3 0
 Hei (Hei) Specialized, nice job!
  • 3 0
 EVO has me kind of second guessing my Ripley LS purchase 6 months ago.
  • 1 0
 Anybody know the rear tire clearance for the EVO? All builds have 2.3" tires, but there's no mention of max tire clearance on Specialized's site.
  • 2 0
 2.4 max on the rear
  • 2 0
 Stack on XS is more than a S?
  • 4 0
 because of lower BB
  • 2 0
 And I know what I will be ordering next year.
  • 2 0
 When will there be a new stump jumper
  • 3 1
 Am I the only one who isnt a fan of the tan side wall colour for tires?
  • 5 0
 I'm sure there are plenty of people that don't, but I grew up in the 90's and love me some skinwalls. It's helps to appeal the demographic in their mid 30's, with disposable income who need a light weight bike to make up for the beer belly that won't be shrinking any time soon....yeah that's me
  • 1 0
 @ajaxwalker: agreed it seems like pandering to that crowd. Tanwalls seem out of place on a 2021 fact-whatever-carbon XC race machine, though. Like putting BFGs on a Mercedes SUV.
  • 1 0
 @Shralpophiliac: A mercedes SUV, like a G Class? I would definitely put BFGs on that...
  • 1 0
 @jaycubzz: No, BFGs on a G class would make sense. To illustrate my point, let's pretend the Epic is a Mercedes GLC 43 and tanwalls are BFGs.
  • 1 0
 Bikeyoke makes a yoke to run a non brain shock on the current models. Combined with the SIDluxe it will be just as light.
  • 2 0
 just give us transition spur already, goddamnit
  • 2 0
 Looks like a revel ranger ngl
  • 2 0
 I wish there was an option to get rid of the Brain on the XC version.
  • 2 0
 I'd like to take that Evo for a spin. Bike looks like a rocket!
  • 3 0
 Now this is epic.
  • 2 0
 Great to see someone speccing 4 piston brakes on an XC bike (EVO).
  • 1 0
 Hey Pinkbike, remember when you said "bike's aren't getting more expensive"?
  • 1 0
 Weird that they fit a SWAT box in the new Diverge, but decided it's too heavy for an Epic Evo?
  • 3 0
 Nobody races gravel, and both epics use the same front triangle
  • 1 0
 oh gawd yes all the carbon... tell me how much it weighs... slowly and use your sexy voice
  • 1 1
 The Evo has a 3 to 1 leverage ratio. The epic 2 to 1 .
The Evo will feel like an Enduro / trail bike. The Epic will feel like a stiff XC bike.
  • 2 1
 Looks... meh. Probably a real hoot on the trail though.
  • 4 2
 frame weight?
  • 3 0
 Specialized say that the S-Works Epic frame weighs in at 1869 grams for a size medium with a shock and hardware, while the Fact 11m frame used on the other models weighs 1947 grams. The Epic EVO frame is even lighter since there's no BRAIN, weighing in at 1659 grams for the Epic EVO, and 1759 grams for the Fact 11m frame.
  • 1 0
 Not the down-country bike I was looking for!
  • 8 0
 It's longer and slacker than the OG downcountry bike, Kona Process 111
  • 2 0
 Stumpjumper st? Razz
  • 4 2
 Looks like a Hei Hei Smile
  • 2 1
 Still no size adapted chain stays... Lame
  • 1 0
 Man, is this an XS Enduro?
  • 1 1
 The $$$$ "modern cross country" Epic is now approaching the geometry of my decade old Honzo.
  • 1 0
 Any in depth reviews on how the EVO rides yet? Weights?
  • 1 1
 No rear brake routing option for Brits and Aussies.
  • 2 0
 You can run brakes moto if you want. Just have to be careful with the tube length and routing. I've got Marguas set up this way on my S Works hardtail with the one cable port on the left side. Works fine.
  • 1 0
 @LA-Law: Can you crash and rotate your bars counterclockwise without linking the hose at the entry point.
  • 1 0
 @jclnv: For sure. Magura's short (compared with Shimano) bar to hose length helps here but I bet you could make it work with Shimano or Sram.
  • 1 0
 looks like a reactor
  • 1 2
 1991 called. Trek is serving you a cease & desist letter on those paint jobs. Christ...so is 2020.
  • 1 2
 12x148 is such a kick in the teeth when 12x150 was commonplace It's like these things are done intentionally to irritate me
  • 4 0
 They're not quite as similar as those numbers make them sound. The equivalent standard to 12x148 Boost is actually 12x157 "Super Boost".

12x148 is actually 141mm between the dropout faces, with slots to make installing the wheel less finicky. 12x150 didn't have those slots, and adding them created the 12x157 standard

Bike companies went with the smaller 6mm jump from 12x142 to 12x148 instead of the 15mm jump to 12x157 because 12x157 seemed like overkill for XC, trail and enduro bikes. Also, concerns over chainline or q-factor, heel strikes on chainstays, etc
  • 3 0
 @showmethemountains: thanks for the info dude
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Hei Hei
  • 1 3
 Doesn’t look very ‘epic’ to me, especially for the price. But that’s my $.02

Suppose if it didn’t/wouldn’t sell a company like the big S wouldn’t make it.
  • 6 7
 Where is this Horst link you speak of.
  • 1 1
 Drop bar version?
  • 5 7
 Cannondale releases Scalpel

Specialized *hold my beer*
  • 2 9
flag ilyamaksimov (Jun 23, 2020 at 11:09) (Below Threshold)
 scalpel is better
  • 4 7
 That paint job looks like my 3yr old did it on his paint by numbers Disney app.
  • 2 1
 They should've stuck with the standard pastel offerings from every other bike company in the Bay Area.
  • 1 3
 1995 called and wants their skin-walls back...
  • 2 5
 Looks like the Scott Genius from a few years ago
  • 1 0
 looks like rose three hill
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