Review: OneUp's EDC Stem & a New Way to Tighten Your Headset

Nov 27, 2019
by Mike Levy  
OneUp EDC Stem and Carbon Handlebar


Without threads on our steerer tubes like your dad's old 10-speed has, we need to tighten our headsets some other way. To do that, we usually start by pounding a jam nut, AKA the starnut, down into our steerer tubes before using it as an anchor to pull everything together. It all sounds a bit rudimentary, doesn't it? OneUp thinks so, and their new EDC Stem employs a clever, integrated preload system that does away with the need for a star nut. Of course, it isn't exactly a coincidence that getting rid of the star nut makes it possible to install OneUp's steerer tube-mounted EDC tool.

The EDC stem can be had with the preload system as shown here for $115 USD, or you can buy it without for $85 if you'd prefer to stick with the starnut.

EDC Stem Details

• Intended use: DH / enduro / trail
• Material: Aluminum
• Integrated preload system w/o starnut
• Lengths: 35mm, 50mm (tested)
• Stack height: 38.5mm
• Weight: 189-grams (50mm, w/ preloader)
• MSRP: $115 USD
• More info: www.oneupcomponents.com
Guess what the EDC Stem is called when you buy it without the EDC preloader? The Stem. Please, OneUp, never ever change. You can get it in either 35mm or 50mm (tested) lengths, but only with a 35mm clamp zone.


Sea Otter 2019
From left: An O-ring for display purposes only, the cone that goes above your headset topcap, the preloading collar (hidden inside the stem when installed) that pushes it down when you tighten the 3mm bolt, the stem itself, and OneUp's EDC spacer and aluminum cap.


Reviewing a stem goes something like this: ''It sure feels stiff, it didn't creak, and it looks... Like a stem.'' Okay, so there's usually not much to say, but OneUp's new EDC Stem has another job besides holding onto your handlebar and steerer tube: It also tightens your headset while letting you skip the proven starnut routine.

In typical OneUp fashion, it's a clever little thing. There's a collar trapped under the bottom of the stem and hidden from view when it's all installed. A conical washer goes under that collar, but on top of your headset, and when you tighten a screw on the collar it pushes the conical washer down to take up extra room and preload your headset.

The system calls for an extra piece of hardware on the stem - the tiny preload screw that requires a 3mm hex key and the matching nut - but you ditch the starnut and big M5 bolt that threads into it. You'll also need the interlocking EDC headset spacers if your steerer tube sticks out above the stem (remember, there's no topcap anymore).
OneUp EDC Stem
Don't drop anything on the floor.

OneUp EDC Stem and Carbon Handlebar
The cone is wedge-shaped, with the preloading collar sitting on top of it. Tightening the collar pushes the cone down to take up the slack and preload your headset bearings.


Installation

To install the stem, you'll first need to remove that ancient starnut as you won't be needing it anymore. You'll also have to get the preload collar and tiny preload nut into the bottom of the stem (facing the correct way), which requires using a 4mm hex key to compress it slightly while wedging into the groove. It seems a bit finicky for a guy like me who's all thumbs, but it's not difficult. After collar and the clamping bolts are in, you slide the greased-up black cone down onto your steerer before doing the same with the stem.

But don't tighten anything yet, please.


OneUp EDC Stem and Carbon Handlebar
The cone goes above any headset spacers you're using and below the stem.


Before you tighten any bolts, is the top of the steerer sitting a few millimeters below the top of the stem when it's at your desired height? Normal, non-interlocking headset spacers can go below your stem to tweak handlebar height, but not on top of it. So, if the steerer is above the stem, you can add OneUp's interlocking spacers until you've got a bit of real estate on top. They snap into each other, and then the anodized aluminum top cap snaps on top of it all.

Now comes the part I'm gonna moan about.

This is when you need to push the stem down by hand to try and take most of the free-play out of the headset, but you'll also be busy trying to get your stem properly aligned while also needing to tighten at least one of the two clamping bolts to hold it in place, and hopefully all before you drop the hex key just out of reach. I'm not gonna lie: A starnut seems unrefined, sure, but a caveman could do it without much trouble. I suspect he'd struggle to install the OneUp stem with its preloading system, and depending on how you feel about working on your bike, that may or may not matter to you.


OneUp EDC Stem

OneUp EDC Stem


Once the stem is straight and the clamp bolts are tight, can you take up the remaining slack by tightening the small preload screw on the side of the stem. Doing so squeezes the collar, which then pushes the conical washer down to preload the headset bearings, but don't go past 3Nm of torque. If the headset has too much play in it for the preload system to take up, you'll have to repeat pushing it down by hand. When the play is completely gone but everything is still turning smoothly, you lock it in place by tightening the preload locknut on the opposite side with a 4mm hex key.

Bottom line: Installing the EDC stem isn't exactly difficult, even if it might take you a few tries to get the stem straight and the free-play out of your headset. That said, it's not nearly as foolproof as dealing with a traditional starnut.


OneUp
I had mixed results with the EDC Stem and its preloading system.


Performance

I had my headset rattle loose a few times on the trail after I first installed the stem, and it turned out that I must not have gotten enough slack out of it when I first pushed the stem down by hand; there seemed to be too much for the preloader to take up. After standing on the side of the trail, trying to compress the headset by hand as much as possible while simultaneously trying to hold it straight four or five times, I began to really appreciate the primitive simplicity of the starnut.

Eventually, when I had to start testing a different bike, I moved the OneUp cockpit to it but used the already-installed starnut instead of the preloader and had zero issues.


OneUp EDC Stem and Carbon Handlebar
OneUp
If you use the EDC Stem, you have the option of storing your EDC tool in your steerer tube without needing to cut threads into its inner wall. Alternately, you can also store it in the handle of their impressive pump.


It deserved a second attempt, though. While the stem itself looks great, I didn't get along OneUp's headset preloading system until I recently installed it on the Norco Optic. Since then, the headset has come loose only once on the trail, and I was able to take up the slack without issue. That's great, but I guess my question is this: When did the starnut do you wrong?

I know, it seems a bit crude to be whaling on a component with a hammer, but starnuts sure do work well. You can use a cheap guide to make sure they go in straight, but you don't even need that; if you're careful, you can tap them in straight using just a hammer and the bolt itself. Expanding plugs do the job when it comes to carbon steerers, too, but when it comes to aluminum steerers, I'd rather deal with a hammer and big ol' bolt than a tiny screw and more little pieces.

Maybe I'm just closed-minded about this one, but put the damn EDC tool in the handle of OneUp's very good mini-pumps instead of down your steerer tube, and then combine the OneUp stem with a boring starnut. It just seems like a lot of trouble to put your tool somewhere it was never intended to be. As a bonus, the stem is $85 without it, saving you $30 USD.


Pros

+ Stem is solid, trouble-free on its own
+ Can ditch caveman-esque starnut
+ EDC or SWAT tools fit in steerer tube

Cons

- Headset preloader is finicky
- Need to hold stem straight while pushing down by hand
- The starnut did nothing wrong



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesOneUp's stem looks great and is competitive with other high-end options when looking at weight and price, but I just don't see the need for a different way to preload my headset. Want to carry their EDC tool? Put it in the pump handle where it belongs. The cockpit marketplace is crowded with a bunch of options that all do the same job just as well, so I get why OneUp would want to approach it from their own angle. Thing is, the stem is nice on its own, without the so-called feature to make it stand out. Mike Levy







277 Comments

  • 158 38
 I might be old school but I still have my multitool in my backpack. With different bikes I don‘t need to buy more than one multitool or switch the tools from bike to bike. But I also don‘t race enduro, so perhaps I would buy one of those bike mounted tools in a heartbeat if I did.
  • 49 127
flag fiatpolski (Nov 27, 2019 at 2:23) (Below Threshold)
 Wow, some downvotes for stating my opinion.
  • 18 1
 In this case being old skool means keeping things easy. The waynthey should be
  • 98 0
 @fiatpolski: you must be new around here
  • 25 1
 It was probably a DownDuro vote... ;-)
  • 7 0
 @vhdh666: nothing simpler than a tool at the ready within arms reach.
  • 11 1
 @fiatpolski: welcome to PB
  • 40 10
 Perfect example of over engineering something that needed no fixing on the first place.
  • 14 3
 @fiatpolski: its the internet... don't sweat it
  • 12 50
flag dkcove (Nov 27, 2019 at 6:17) (Below Threshold)
 ....cue downvotes for my opinion
  • 25 2
 @endurocat:

I think the actual goal for their designers was to create a uniform system to allow the use of their (very successful and awesome) edc multitool without their customers voiding fork manufacturers warranty.

I bet they had a ton of potential customers say something along these lines, “Oh that’s awesome! One less thing I’ve got to carry in my pack. Wait, what? I’ve got to thread my steerer tube? Naw, I’m good.”
  • 14 6
 @endurocat: I wouldn't even say it is over-engineered. It actually is under-engineered. Sure, the expensive (+$30) machining, conical split clamp and screw hardware preloads between the stem and headset, BUT this does not stop the STEM from walking up the steerer over time that they experienced. The $1.00 star nut works and the +$30 One-Up option does not.
  • 5 0
 Companies and manufacturers dont like these type of comments..................
  • 3 1
 @tmadison12: Wrong.
There's better solutions to this contraption.
SKS has a new attachment for the water bottle cage that does the same job for less money and keeps the weight at the bottom of the bike.
  • 11 0
 @pcledrew: Is anywhere on your bike/person not within arms reach?
  • 10 2
 Wheres the field test pink bike i thought new content was to be released every Monday?
  • 3 0
 For well over a decade I've been riding with the Hope Head Doctor. If you don't like the the star fangled nut because it is simple hence cheap and you don't like that kind of stuff on your bike, this one is more expensive and still works.

The one thing I would love to try is what I've seen from Azonic, not sure what it was called. Instead of the star nut, the top cap just had a very long bolt that threaded into a small cap that rested against the bottom of the steerer, so at the bottom of the (lower) fork crown. As simple as can be, cheap and again you didn't need to have a star fangled nut jammed down the steerer. Not sure if they also have them for tapered steerer tubes but it wouldn't take much to adapt it.

Just looked it up. It is called the Azonic Head Lock. Can't find it on the Azonic website though.
  • 24 1
 Always ride with a buddy who carries all the tools. You wont go wrong with that. If it does, find another buddy.
  • 3 1
 @klondike08: behind my back
  • 2 0
 My new bike has a second set of water bottle bosets with a bracket and Velcro strap. Super simple and reaaaally convenient.
  • 1 0
 @endurocat: You mean like Specialized did a million years ago?
  • 4 4
 @fiatpolski: @fiatpolski: thats the snowflake pinkbike audience for ya mate
  • 1 0
 I had one on my DH bike bitd, you could get your headset good n tight with that thing!! @vinay:
  • 2 0
 @tmadison12: Fortunately their pump is excellent and the tool fits in that.
  • 2 0
 I've always hated wearing a backpack and have finally been able to completely ditch it outside of epic rides where I need changes of clothes and a ton of food.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I had the Azonic and a similar (lighter) one. It was a lot of hardware, extra weight, and no advantage in respect to the venerable star nut ...
  • 1 0
 @endurocat: and come up with a Stem that is heavier than most ... compare for example with Renthal sub 125 series (or the uber expensive Enve sub 100 grams)
  • 4 0
 @fiatpolski I just have both bike's steerers threaded with the OneUp top cap and just have one EDC tool I slip into the bike I am using that day. Simple enough, and the gaping hole where your top cap should be means you won't easily forget to take the tool with you when you gonfor a ride.
  • 5 1
 Star Nut, universal standard- almost for FREE, ONEUP, non-standard, $115! No, hell no!
  • 1 2
 if i ride enduro I still wear XC jerseys with the 3 mandatory rear pockets that holds tools, cell, even a water bottle. Add baggies to the mix with side pockets and what more do you need? Carrying the weight is easier than pushing and peddling the extra weight after all I am a little bit of a weight weenie where it counts.
  • 2 0
 If I remember correctly this preload system came with headsets on Marin's and others in the early 90's. It was horrible then....and sounds like it still does not work very well now.
  • 1 0
 @jordanaustino: I know! I've got the smaller one myself and love it.
  • 3 0
 last place I want extra weight..in my stem / handlebar.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Doesn't Intend use something simmilar?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: check out the granite stash tool, that's how it works
  • 1 0
 @endurocat: so does one up, their pump mounts to cage with tool in it.
  • 1 0
 @ckcost: Yes this is just a rebranding of a system that mechanics from the 90's hated. The issue of not being able to get enough preload was a problem then as well
  • 62 1
 I can't line my stem up at the best of times. I don't think I'm OCD, but I never think it's straight. This stem would drive me nuts if I had to tighten it and simultaneously line it up.
  • 38 2
 EDC... not OCD...
  • 2 0
 reminds me of old stems that would always move when tightened.
  • 11 0
 @DDoc: But they were also mad long so you could easily see if they were outta line.
  • 11 0
 Put a level or straight edge against the top of your fork stanchions in a horizontal position. Sit on the bike and sight from each bar end to the level. You can get your bars dead straight like this.
  • 10 0
 There is an awesome trick to Line the stem up: line the bars up with the top or your forks and the stem will be straight Smile
  • 18 0
 @Mlloyd550: unless your bars are bent slightly. You could remain oblivious about them being bent with the "squint/left eye/now right eye/now left eye" method.

The answer is simpler. OEM just need to laser etch a line all the way up the outside of the steerer tube that is dead front center. After you cut the steererr to your preferred length, you cut a small notch on the top of the steerer and have a nub in the top of the stem that drops into the groove you cut. Slap a spacer on top of the stem & tighten down the preload cap.

But that would be too logical.
  • 4 0
 Lay a PVC pipe on your fork arch and against both stanchions parallel to your handlebars. Then look across your bars and adjust them until they line up perfectly.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: agreed. Annoys me. Before an endurance race that required my bike be shipped bars turned to the start line, I etched a line in the centre of the top of the steerer. SRAM, Fox et al should do this ASAP. Like yesterday...
  • 2 1
 @MikeAzBS: What do you do trailside after a little spill then? Bring the PVC pipe on every ride?
  • 4 0
 If you don’t already know this, don’t try to line up the stem and tire. Instead use the handle bars and two symmetrical spots on the fork. The top caps can work or where the stanchion meets the crown. One of the best tips I ever received.
  • 1 0
 @robway: unless you own a 2009 RockShox Boxxer. Good old twisted magnesium lowers. I was maddened by it the first time. The 2nd and the 3rd time a set twisted...I was up to speed and not easily fooled.
  • 1 0
 This is some over-engineered silliness that I would not expect out of One-Up.
  • 1 0
 It is your dominant and passive eyes playing tricks. I line the bars up with fork crown then look at it with one eye closed and then the other to make sure they look lined up the same.
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: slide it into ur steerer tube with the one-up stem.
  • 2 0
 @ns2000x: in those cases I just remove the bars and leave the stem straight. Way easier to line up bars since most have markings on them.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: known as Camera 1...Camera 2.
  • 1 0
 @Mlloyd550: Nice !!!
  • 27 1
 I can’t think of a component that I haven’t whaled on with a hammer. Isn’t that bike maintenance?
  • 57 0
 it's percussive maintenance and it has helped me repair everything from tv sets to car lights to diverging opinions.
  • 3 0
 Rubber mallet is one of the most often used tool in my toolbox.
  • 5 0
 @wowbagger: percussive maintenance...i'll use that in the future.
  • 1 0
 (☞゚ヮ゚)☞ @flipoffthemonkeys
  • 3 1
 @wowbagger: underrated comment
  • 34 13
 I didn't need the cutesy color images explaining how this works because I've seen this done before. DiaCompe's Diatech division had a headset design like this using a clamp collar and conical external washer to preload the headset bearings... ohhhh.... 24 years ago. It worked perfectly well, did away with the need for the top cap, bolt and wedge plug, and didn't require a proprietary stem design. It simply didn't take off because the industry was still in the process of giving up externally threaded steerer tubes, headsets and quill stems and didn't need two different threadless headset designs from essentially the same brand (as the modern threadless headset was designed and patented by DiaCompe USA in the first place). I'm pretty sure I still have some DiaTech headsets sitting in my used headsets bin.


Here...took me 3 seconds to find one new old stock on ebay...

www.ebay.com/itm/DIATECH-30mm-HEADSET-25-4mm-1-AHEAD-WITH-LOCKING-ADJUSTER-CLAMP-26-4-CROWN-RACE/202665817066
  • 2 1
 USE components had a similar thingy that was just a expanding spacer that went inbetween your headset and stem that worked by the same principle. I had one 'bout 15 years ago. Can't seem to find any reference to it on the interwebs now though. Worked perfectly well.
  • 25 0
 The issue we looked to correct in the Diatech, USE, and Acros systems is the lack of a locking mechanism. All rely on the low torque preload adjustment to hold the arrangement tight.

The OneUp system has a preload bolt and a unique off-center backup nut to hold that bolt tight. No one else has solved this problem (to our knowledge).
  • 1 0
 Look at those unsealed bearings.
  • 1 4
 @OneUpComponents: YST... top cover of headset was threaded into the inside of the top cup, you screwed it down with a conventional open end pedal wrench, and then tightened an allen head bolt to lock the adjustment in place. Again, no need for a proprietary stem.
  • 2 3
 @sino428:

They're as sealed as most cartridge bearings actually are, and because they're NOT tiny little bearings, they last longer and can be easily serviced.
  • 3 0
 @OneUpComponents: Acros' preloader (also the one used on their hubs) uses a design where the preload screw is self-locking. No backup nut needed.
  • 5 1
 And look at Shimano's Tharsis Stems as well, had one when I had DI2. Much simpler system.
  • 4 6
 @deeeight: So buy one of those, what's your friggin point?
  • 7 0
 @OneUpComponents: The EDC stem looks interesting, but tbh I installed your original steer tube threaded system nearly two years ago and it has remained basically trouble free. My top cap began to loosen recently, but had an extra one and upon replacing it no worries. I likely will continue to employ the original until y'all stop supporting it and/or the EDC stem comes in different lengths/colors.
  • 13 0
 By "cutesy color images", I'm sure you mean CAD/solidworks 3D renderings. Don't flatter yourself, they didn't do them for you or anyone else. All part of the design process.
  • 1 0
 It's this a Flex?
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: The Tharsis system works well but you have to keep track of that special wrench! Also it sucked on carbon steerers; not a problem for most mountain forks but a few of the RS xc forks are carbon.
  • 2 0
 @OneUpComponents: what is the advantage over the Pro-Tharsis-System from Shimano? Stem has the same locking system via bottom screw. THX for feedback.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: No different than keeping track of any other tool. Big difference is mine never came loose and you don't have to align the stem while trying to set headset preload.

I'll take keeping a small extra wrench in my bag over the EDC stem any day.
  • 1 0
 @deeeight: I know, was just pointing it out because I remember those kind of bearings from the bmx days and hadn’t seen them in ages.
  • 2 0
 @Lasse2000: One difference over the Pro-Tharsis stem that we wanted to improve on was the ability to adjust the preload trailside without having to carry propitiatory tools (bulky thin wrenches). Our preloader uses a 3 and 4mm hex which are in the EDC multitool right at your fingertips.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know how cannondale did it with their SI headsets back in the day? I remember the lefty on my old prophet having no top cap, and with the 1.5 steerer you could look down at your tire while you rode.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: If I remember correctly, they use a certain type of cartridge bearings for the headset bearings, thus not needing preload adjustment. I believe they still do this today on their lefty forks.
  • 1 0
 Funny, my experience with those headsets was terrible. Always loosened and had issues.
  • 2 0
 ok down vote for making me feel old because i had one of those … also i think you are missing one HUGE fact ; that system could have been used with any stem so its no good for one up
  • 1 0
 @drpmstrdan:

no good for them to sell at increased profit you mean ?
  • 1 0
 @deeeight: exactly
  • 18 4
 I think it's worth mentioning that the star nut is an old and perhaps outdated solution to the problem, smashing a $2 blade into the steerer of a $1200 fork (and gauging the inside of the steerer) seems foolish , so does cutting threads into your steerer (and voiding the warranty ) there must be a better solution, at least one-up are trying something
  • 2 1
 Look at the granite stash system, it's better
  • 1 0
 I agree. Very primitive.
  • 1 0
 @danlovesbikes: Cornelius makes awesome stuff (that i cannot afford, unfortunately)
  • 3 0
 @wowbagger: money is just an abstract concept.
  • 3 1
 Specialized SWAT.
  • 2 0
 Has anyone really had a problem with starnuts?
  • 1 0
 And still not better than a free starnut tha comes with your fork
  • 1 0
 @drivereight: yes , it's a cheap part and the rivet can fail , then your only recourse is to try and hammer it all the way to the bottom of the steerer (or to the flare ) which leaves long gauges all the way down.
  • 1 0
 SFN works great for aluminum, titanium and steel steerer tubes. For carbon ones, we've had expanding wedge plugs that are removable and don't need special tools to work with (the FSA one uses a 5mm and 6mm allen wrench) either and they've been on the market for a couple decades now.
  • 1 0
 Starnut is one of those things that you don’t fix because they fricking work. They work very well. It is a very simple solution. Unlike things like Hope Head Doctor which are a necessary evil for carbon steerers but you have to be mad to use them for steel or alu. Just because it isn’t elegant it doesn’t mean it is a poor design.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: unless elegance is one of your design criteria, so many areas of the bike are very refined these days, I think there is room for improvement with the SFN.
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: you don’t know whether there is a way to improve it Smile we have a very hard time believing in the end of evolution of certain branch. We want to improve things but sometimes you just can’t. At some point the law of diminishing returns kicks in. Nobody wants to stop you from trying really, but be aware of the fact that there’s just this much air in every room Smile
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: honestly this is low hanging fruit IMO
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: where is it then? Show me an example of a better solution? You have those long and heavy things going from the bottom to the top of the steerer, then you have things like Hope head doctor, then you have a thing like a BMX threaded steerer which is what One Up kind of did
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: you've answered your own question. Option #3 would do nicely hombre, hell , spline it while we're at it.
  • 1 0
 @DGWW: Now you just need to tell everyone to make threaded caps with allen key.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: sounds like you're really zeroing in on this unthinkable design
  • 17 0
 So this Week no fooking field test? Cmon PB What s happening
  • 17 0
 Field testing our patience, I guess
  • 3 0
 @lncorgnito: Probably caused by major bribe offers, new test etc, going on behind the scenes re the broken frame.
  • 15 0
 Star Fangled Nut just sounds better
  • 4 0
 Agree - like the EDC but this seems to be more a case of inventing a problem so you can find the solution.

Could be a real pain in the arse to sort out if trying to sort at a race / trail car park or similar too.
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: it probably had more to do with finding a way to use EDC without threading the steerer, which supposedly creates warranty issues and requires tools.

The less eloquent and featured SWAT insert does it better, though, by clamping at the bottom and top, then threading together. That way, the stem still acts as the main retaining force of the steerer and there is no risk of it coming loose.
  • 3 0
 @shinook: adapting bmx parts for mtb use. Good stuff.
  • 1 0
 @yzedf: now we just need a pivotal seat option for dropper posts.
  • 14 2
 Nah, the threaded solution works 100% fine if you want an EDC tool - and is even easier to align than when using a star nut. I'll just stick with that.
  • 3 0
 I think the main reason for trying to get rid of threaded your steerer tube is that it voids the warranty on your fork, not only so they can have a proprietary system.
  • 2 1
 So long as you’re ok with voiding any fork warranty.
  • 3 0
 If a suspension company tries to void my warranty on the rest of the fork, because of a modification I made to the steerer, I'll see their asses in court. that shit is unenforceable.
  • 2 0
 @groghunter: Agreed. I find it very hard to believe that Fox/RS/etc would void any warranty on the fork because the steerer is threaded for the EDC. I have no first hand warranty experience though. Does anyone? I keep hearing these warnings from people however I have yet to hear first hand experience from anyone who has actually had warranty denied because the steerer was tapped. Anyone? I have however heard stories of people who have successfully claimed warranty on a threaded steerer fork with no issues.
  • 2 0
 @freerider11: I can see them denying a warranty claim if it's the steerer tube that actually snaps as a result of threading, but I doubt any case would hold up if they deny you any issue not affected by the threads (like a damper issue or something like that)
  • 2 0
 @matt-15: Fair enough. I can't see how tapping the steerer with fine threads will affect its strength. I've tapped many forks over the years to use with the EDC and have never experienced any issues. Do people snap steerers?
  • 2 0
 @tmadison12: MRP didn't mind when I warrantied my CSU last year. And my Fox fork is out of warranty anyway.

Besides, no suspension manufacturer is going to turn you away for an issue in your damper because you threaded your steerer. And if they do, well that's what insurance is for.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: hope u got the money to bring em to court.
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I really do not see the big deal. If you were worried about warranty issue if your fork broke and sending back to fox. Take off the threaded portion with a hack saw before sending back. There is always someone running a shorter steerer! The current edc works fine. I would thread the steerer all day every day!@freerider11:
  • 1 0
 @Rig: they have and they will haha
  • 1 0
 @nyles: You have first hand experience of someone who has had warranty denied because the steerer is threaded?
  • 1 0
 Totally agree. Threading the steer tube is a way more elegant solution than using the star nut. I have it done on all my bikes and just swap the tool around.
  • 1 0
 @bohns1: People forget about small claims court. it's for exactly this kind of case, in order to prevent an entity with lots of money from burying a individual in paperwork.
  • 1 0
 Also social media. Just as specialized and backcountry.com. Being a corporate douce does not pay............@groghunter:
  • 5 0
 Luckily I have a multitool on my bottle cage and I can store more in the Swat compartement.

I usually thought: Well, the Swat box seems gimmicky but its really nice to always have your tool, Pump and other things on the trail.
  • 2 0
 I have that specialized water bottle tool too, but who ever designed that has very small fingers, almost impossible to open with gloves. and it gets dirty too hanging outside making it harder to open. also I don't know why EDC keeps trying to put more shit up high on the handlebars, better to keep the weight low, and no reason to redesign a part that works extremely well to add a tool you can easily store in 14 other places. I like the swat box concept, that seems like a no compromise storage solution.
  • 12 4
 You can store the EDC tools in the EDC pump which is a great pump. No compromise there.
  • 4 0
 @WAKIdesigns: the OneUp pump with the EDC is fantastic and I love that I can switch it between bikes in 10 seconds, I don't like riding with a pack or stuffed pockets. I appreciate the design they put into this stem, but as Levy said, there are better solutions to tool storage.
  • 3 4
 @JasonALap: the only thing that comes to my mind that is a better tool storage are Swat and Twat. If you don’t own a Spec or Trek then EDC pump + tool is the way.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Exactly, the pump is great, if you are talking about its size which sucks a bit instead of pumping. ( yeah I am with Syncros 13cm 70g)

@OneUpComponents Guys really, we already know you can stash our tools high up there into a streer, but I am sure you have seen the idea of putting some tools into hollow axles of our cranks...are you going to react on this? It would make much more sense so I would maybe get rid off my ghetto corck plug with a needle and tire plug which is sitting there now.
  • 1 4
 @bok-CZ: one company makes the tool set for the axle but it works on some magnet, hard to tell how secure that is. Sam Hill had one
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: aaah missed it, but it would be so easy to make it based on some expanding mechanism so it could fit more diameters, don´t you think? I would say it could work better than a magnet. Like a fork compression knob on face side of the crank axle expanding some collar around and voila, done
  • 7 1
 Installed mine with the bike upside down. Weight of the bike on the bars preloaded the top side, weight of the fork and wheel did the rest for me. Lining everything up felt way easier too.
  • 5 0
 I have had the EDC stem on my bike for half a year now. Until now I have had absolutely no problems, neither with the assembly nor during riding. The first assembly is a bit tricky but there is a good step by step instruction.
  • 6 0
 When you crash and your bars get twisted, is it as simple as twisitng the bars back straight with some force or does the entire system need to be loosened trail side then preloaded again and straightened?
  • 3 0
 The latter I'm afraid.
  • 6 0
 I have a few months worth of Colorado chunder on mine. Still tight, no issues.

However, it did take me a couple tries to get it installed properly. Five minutes I’ll never get back...
  • 8 2
 I have this stem installed on my new bike. It holds my edc tool. I didn't have to void my forks warranty by threading my steer tube. It works. Not much to say.
  • 5 2
 Carry tool in backpack? Fork warranty voiding averted!
  • 1 0
 So by threading your steer tube you are voiding your forks warranty? I have threaded the steer tube on both my bikes. I don't see how this would weaken the fork at all. Getting ready to purchase another fork, I don't want to put it out of warranty on day one. ?????
  • 1 0
 @jetterd7j: call the fork manufacturer and ask, no one here is gonna be able to give you a real answer on that because brands will handle it differently.

I have heard Fox voids for it, but again, I’d verify before doing anything
  • 4 1
 I’ve been using the oneup stem with no starnut for a while now and it’s never come loose... not once while riding rough, loose trails, flow trails, cross country trails, jump lies, and etc. Perhaps Mike Levy didn’t properly grease the wedge? I didn’t read the article very thoroughly. It’s also nice to have access to tools right in front of me. I also don’t like wearing a backpack all day.
  • 10 0
 I have a magical warranty un-voiding tool called a hacksaw.
  • 1 0
 @DrPete: exactly this. As I recall EDC requires 5mm on top of the stem anyways. Cut the threaded part off, pound in a starnut, send for warranty.
  • 2 0
 @DrPete: Also, if these companies don’t void warranties for a cut steerer tube, why would they void for threading the tube 5 mm. I suspect a lot of people here are just talking out of their rear ends.
  • 4 0
 I found the EDC stem challenging to remove all of the play in the headset just by trying to push it all together by hand. But I found an old Chris King preloader in my parts bin, which I used to get everything slightly snug and aligned before tightening the stem bolts and then used the EDC stem collar to fine tune. Removed the Chris King preloader and everything has been perfect. I would have ditched the EDC stem otherwise.
  • 1 0
 If you look at what's going on when your fork is getting a workout, a CK preloader can help keep your stem from being levered off the steerer tube www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiO6R4P1yxY

It's good that the stem steerer tube bolts are cinched down with 9 n-m, but it's hard to believe that the adjuster is going to stand up to the forces if ridden hard.
  • 5 0
 OneUp stem, not on my radar. But the EDC tool (Threaded into my fork), Pump and bash guards are some of my favourite components on my bike.
  • 1 0
 Question for you: what made you put the EDC tool in your steerer if you have the pump? Do you have something else in your pump instead? Only asking because I have the EDC and pump and the combo is fantastic.
  • 4 0
 @big-red: For me, yes. Tool and plug and pliers kit in the steerer (threaded). Compartment on the pump mounted to the bottle cage I keep a small swiss army knife, a selection of zip ties, spare cleat bolts and a small roll of gorilla tape. Tube, tire lever and patch kit inside a Dakine Hotlaps pouch strapped to the frame. Pretty much everything you'd need right there easily swapped from bike to bike.
  • 3 0
 @big-red: I got the pump after the tool. But I have a CO2 cartridge and some tyre boots in the pump just in case.
  • 3 0
 I have one of these with a full season of riding on it. Getting it pre-loaded by hand using the push down method for me just resulted in a knocking front end on the first ride. Tried again, could not get all the clunk out. Used a ratchet tie down under the fork crown and over the bars to pre-load everything which also allowed me to get the bars straight without the hassle of tensioning/aligning/tightening at the same time. Once tight, no rattles, never loosed up and that included tons of DH riding in CO, Whistler, and Finale. I've since been able to get it tight after fork services without the strap by closely following OneUp's instructions. It's still not easy.
Having the tool in the steerer tube is a neat trick, and my buddies love asking me to borrow it for trail side adjustments. Interesting idea that OneUp have, think there is another evolution that'll make it even better. In the mean time it holds my bars just fine.
  • 3 0
 Used this stem all throughout last summer. Never had an issue with it and aligning the fork to me didn’t see much more of a hassle than with a star nut. Only difficult part is that i actually feel the need to use a torque wrench to get the perfect tightness (and not over tighten) where a star nut cap can be tightened by feel most of the time. If you like to tinker with your bike and don’t mind a couple extra simple steps this stem is a cool component to have. Lots of hate here for people who have not personally used the headset.
  • 6 0
 Why don’t we use the same system used in bmx steerer tubes?
  • 1 0
 THIS!!! came here to say this
  • 2 4
 Erm... EDC top cap is just that Smile
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: yeah but with a 'specific' tool
  • 1 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 27, 2019 at 5:04) (Below Threshold)
 @nojzilla: so you want a BmX steerer nut weighing more than half a Yeti?
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: not really no, the steerer nut on my Kis forks weighs no more than a star nut an bolt or head doc......
or maybe a desighn similar to the One up system that uses a 5mm allen an not a cassette tool. yeah I know there's a tool on the one up multi tool in an ECD but I dont want/need that since I'm not enduro enough to ride water bottle an still use a camel back, I know right SO unfashionable...

I just think after all these years of star nuts gouging soft ally steerers an BMX having a good system for years MTB needs to catch up. Yeah Head docs are good but..........
I wanna look down my steerer an see tyre ;D
  • 4 5
 @nojzilla: if it ain’t steel it ain’t real
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: LOL, I remember when I got back into MTB 2007 after years of BMX. removed the forks an AMAZED an shocked at alloy steerers
  • 1 0
 Yes yes and yes.

It's crazy it's not an option for big wheel skiddy turny bikes.

Tree compression caps are the best in the biz; made out of 'Super douche lightweight' aluminum - perfect for MTB bikes. And enough colors to make insta glamers happy.

And they're 'engineered' enough that it doesn't need an web article explaining how to use it. Dunno, maybe SRAM or FOX will realize it's 2019 and add threads.

Prolly not
  • 3 1
 Seems like a lot of hassle and expense for a problem that doesn't exist. Don't get me wrong, I've got an EDC tool, pump and the old threaded steerer tube method. But I've had a lot of trouble trying to preload the bearings enough whilst not mashing the shallow top cap with a shimano cassette tool. Put it this way, I wouldn't buy another for steerer tube use, not with with this stem especially, as it's only in 35mm diameter. The pump is good, but I'd personally keep the star nut on my next bike.
  • 5 0
 You can use an expander plug to add tension, then remove the plug. This system is overly complex.
  • 1 0
 This is how I've been doing it since discovering expanding top caps a few years ago.

FSA Compressor = Win
  • 2 0
 A friend of mine has PRO stem that houses Di2 battery in the steerer tube and uses the same expander instead of starnut. It rattles loose all the time. It's so obnoxious to constantly be tightening his steering up! Also the PRO version uses large open wrench just like old threaded headset cups so there is no way anyone would take this on a ride with them.
  • 2 0
 I got the EDC Stem because it works for the ride setup I prefer: EDC tool in stem, fanny pack with phone and CO2... For this, it works like a charm. Installation took a while, but I had zero issues with it coming loose, all season.
Bottom line, echoing this review, is if you run an EDC tool in your steerer tube, this stem is awesome. (No need to cut a thread into your steerer tube and void the fork's warranty, as was the case for the old EDC installation method.)

If you don't have an EDC tool, or don't run it in your steerer tube, sticking with a star nut probably makes more sense.
  • 2 0
 Isn't the point of this product not to replace the star nut, but to replace the fact that currently you must tap you steerer tube to use the EDC tool? I think the setup hassle may be justified if it means maintaining warranty on a $1000 fork
  • 3 0
 Why not just position the star nut down really low and use a long bolt. Set up the stem then take out the bolt. More than enough space for the tool, no top cap and no effing around!
  • 2 0
 I've been running this stem for about 3 months now. Initially I thought it was great.

However, its an absolute pain in the arse to preload the stem whilst tightening it and aligning it to the bars. Once its done, it works very well.

2nd however... if you crash, and knock the bars, theres a very very high chance that the preload will disappear and you will have to loosen the stem bolts and re-tighten. On the trail this is an absolute f**ker of a job, and even worse in a race!

I had the tapped steerer for the EDC tool previously, I'll be removing the preload mechanism and moving back to the original OneUp top cap.
  • 6 0
 But why.
  • 2 2
 Becau$e.
  • 3 0
 I have an NS Magneto stem which also doesn't use a starnut for preloading. It's not very good... Sometimes it's better to stick with what works..
  • 1 0
 I could get really good deal on this set including the EDC tool and i need both a new 35er stem as well as a way to store the EDC system that allows me to carry a dual purpose pump mounted to the bottlecage.. but i'm starting to have second thoughts..
  • 1 0
 Just thread your pivot it's a piece of cake
  • 4 0
 PS: Where are the field test vids? I keep coming back and I keep being disappointed...
  • 5 1
 Leave the star nut in place until you've installed the stem then knock it out
  • 1 0
 what about when you have to adjust your stem
  • 2 0
 Can we not just have the tool mounted in the bottom of the steerer tube instead? then we can continue to use a star fangled nut and help with weight distribution (albeit marginally).
  • 3 0
 Unlikely since different fork manufacturers have different apertures in the bottom of forks, hence the plug that comes with the tool to nest it in the bottom of the steerer requries a beating to get into some forks and others you sneeze at and it falls in. The EDC tool is wider that the hole on the forks with small holes, and on shorter travel forks you might struggle to remove the full length tool from the bottom of the steerer.

I have an EDC and have cut threads into 3 forks. Being an engineer and having tinkered with bikes and cars for donkeys' years the process was a doddle, however I knows loads of riders who wouldn't want to go near their steerer despite the instructions with a tap so this solves that, albeit slightly niche, problem for them.

IMO the star fangled nut is, whilst simple and effective, brutal and archaic and I've seen plenty of cheap ones either collapase or rust apart failing trailside. Who carries a hammer and drift with them on a ride and an SFN fitting tool? Noone. Yes I'm being facetious but so are a lot of responses on here.

As a retrofit? Probably not, starting from scratch and don't want to cut a thread into a £1200 fork steerer and want to use a steerer mounted (and IMO excellent) EDC? Perfect.
  • 1 0
 Yes but put in the bottom could be quite serious if it fell out & no fun trying to ride your bike with a multi tool jammed between your fork brace & your tyre?
  • 5 0
 The star nut did nothing wrong
  • 1 0
 It seems to me that if you don’t mind an ugly steerer tube spacer with a screw sticking out of it, you could take the conical pre-loading wedge and shove it under any stem and have the same result. I can’t see any specific requirement for the need of OneUp’s stem itself. Then you could run the EDC tool on any stem and in any fork without voiding warranties. The only thing you’ll have to verify is that you have enough room between your stem and headset.
  • 1 0
 Sure, it might be annoying to install, but it could be great if you have some carbon 31.8 bars and stem that you're not ready to give up just yet and would like to store a cool multitool on your bike. Lastly, some frames (like mine) don't allow water-bottle accessories - simply won't fit.
  • 3 0
 I hate star nuts from a design perspective. The One Up threaded cap is simple & nice, but the EDC stem seems a bit awkward.
  • 1 0
 So let me get this straight, if I decided to put tap threads in the top of my steer tube and then for some reason my forks fail on the suspension end and it has nothing to do with the threads, they will actually say sorry, you're on your own bud, you voided the warranty with those threads you put in the steer tube. Is fox or SRAM really going to be that anal about it?
  • 1 0
 That's what people keep saying, but I doubt it. Hoping someone with first had warranty experience can chime in.
  • 1 0
 Yea I dunno, it really smells of the Magnussen-Moss act. There’s no way any method of securing the headset stack would cause damage to the lowers or any damper/air spring components. If they truly are denying warranty claims then it screams BS to me. To be fair most bike components are only 1 or 2 years warranty, so maybe those who were affected were out of warranty anyway.
  • 1 0
 "You first need to remove the ancient star nut." No problem. I will just push it all the way through the steerer tube with an uber long boltFrown

Seems like a lot of effort and engineering to replace something that already works fine and is much more simple.
  • 1 0
 I once got a headset tightening system that consisted of a long headset bolt that screwed onto a top-cap-like part on the bottom of the steerer tube. Its supposed advantages implied that the stem progressively moved up the steerer tube, even with the bolt tension, the friction from the stem and the friction of the star nut inside the steerer tube. The thread of the headset bolt was supposedely the only connection that could reliably keep the headset tight. Either that was a completely stupid system or this edc system will lead to a quicker loosening of the headset from there being one less clamping force keeping the stem from sliding up the steerer tube. I'm sure there is a bit of truth to both hypothesis.
  • 2 0
 Canyon has a better system - all contained in a preload ring and clamp under the stem. Means you can remove the stem without affecting the preload. And obviously there's no star nut.
  • 1 0
 The stem that answers the question no one asked....

My 1999 Norco Rampage (steel XC hardtail) came with a Diacomp headset with the same style of preload adjuster. They were junk. It would not stay tight and was a pain to adjust. That is why Diacomp stopped making them.
  • 1 0
 On a side note, for a company that was founded by ex Raceface engineers why couldn't that make a stem that rivals the beauty of the Turbine R? This stem looks cheap and is heavy when compared to the Turbine R
  • 1 0
 First off, I have a ton of their products, all of which I think working brilliantly (REALLY digging the bars, which are noticeably easier on my hands), but I have run this EDC Stem on both of my bikes and have definitely had issues especially with one of my bikes where it would never stay tight. The Stem (w/o preloader) itself is great, with nice touches like marks for easy lining up of the bar and zero gap tightening. Maybe that particular bike was too slack for the EDC stem and it couldn't handle the loading? Dunno, but I had to switch back to tapping the steer tube for the EDC tool - no biggie*

*Ok, sort of a biggie because of these two, what I consider, other design flaws:
- top cap (metal) inserted into stem (metal) could not easily be removed. If you aren't using the plastic spacer (which has give), you are basically going to damage the finish of the stem as you try to pry out the top cap. No Bueno.
- the preloader system is extremely difficult to remove once installed - you are going to damage the edges of the stem (unless there is some act of sorcery of which I'm not aware which enables you to easily remove it).

But on one bike, it seems to be working fine...

I'll stick with threading the steer tube for the EDC tool, or pop it into my pump if necessary....

And, as I said, I can rave about the other stuff they make! those bars......
  • 1 0
 So, no one remembers this? Big Grin Its cheap and does the trick: tightens the headset, and you can remove it after that, since the stem will hold perfectly...
chainreactioncycles.scene7.com/is/image/ChainReactionCycles/prod48381_IMGSET?wid=586&hei=498
  • 1 0
 It's engineering exercises like this stem that remind me of an old joke about a dog. Goes a bit like this "Why does a dog lick its balls?.......Answer: Because it CAN!"

NASA spent millions to develop a pen that can write in Zero-Gravity. The Russians brought pencils with them into space instead.........

This new system is obviously well engineered and executed, but - come on, this is a bit ridiculous.
  • 2 0
 Preload headset with threaded rod inside steerer, some washers and spacers, tighten the stem, take rod out. I'm not even a mechanic.
  • 3 0
 Fix what wasn't really broke much? headset and stem aren't that complicated
  • 2 1
 The one and only time I sent my bike into the shop for a damper service, they didn't even bother with pre loading my 1up stem, bike shop mechanics are a bit of a joke sometimes.
  • 1 0
 20 years from now when I do a restoration build on my 2020-vintage bike, this stem and squeeze rings is going to be seized. It’s going to stall my build and cause frustration.
  • 1 1
 @OneUpComponents I've got one and my gripe is the fact that you can't re-load the headset trailside if you twist your bars in a crash unless you have 2 Allen wrenches. i.e. if you're only carrying the EDC tool.

You can load the headset with just 1 Allen, but then to lock it in place, you need a second Allen to hold the loading bolt while you tighten the lock nut. (see items 10 and 11 in the exploded diagram in the article)

Kind of ironic.

I did have another incident where I twisted the bars a touch in a jump-case. I managed to just slightly loosen one of the clamp bolts a bit and twist the bars straight again without losing load on the headset bearings, but something to be mindful of trailside.
  • 1 1
 No. What’s ironic is that you didn’t have the tools to fix the stem on the trail when you have the stem to have these tools. If your argument is that it requires you to have two different size Allen keys to tighten while it provides you with a dozen different tools (including ones needed to tighten) then it’s just plain contradicting and not well thought out.

If your argument is that you physically need two seperate . You tighten the preload bolt and then the locking bolt-in sequence.
  • 1 1
 Two separate hex keys* to install the headset then you’re installing it incorrectly.
  • 3 3
 Has anyone else had sudden and total failure of their OneUp droppers when they ride in the mud? I’m on my third one this year. They work great until the first wet ride, then they’re dead.
  • 2 0
 I’ve been using one for 2 years, almost problem free. I’d guess the cable popped out of the cartridge. The only issue I had was when I once adjusted my post height, and the cable came out. It can be a bit tricky to set up properly, but once set up it’s been problem free, and that includes about 2 weeks of driving with it on my car rack in the pouring rain
  • 4 2
 Did someone sell you a e13 seatpost with one-up sticker!? That's not fair Smile
  • 1 0
 @samdeatley which version?
  • 3 0
 WPL ForkBoost Lube.Mine was sticking and I used WPL,didnt have to add air or anything.Silky smooth now.
  • 4 0
 Sram butter under the collar and make sure the pressure is near max.
  • 2 0
 Nope, got some free play in the seat but otherwise good. You need to make sure your frame allows the cable housing to move, as unfortunately that is part of the design of the OneUp post (on V1 at least). I’ve heard it can be an issue on the Santa Cruz frames. Perhaps someone more knowledgeable can elaborate.
  • 1 1
 I am constantly having to put air in mine. biking season is kinda over so I will get in for some warranty. I just put 300 psi in and it works great for the moment
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: With the OneUp design, the outer moves to activate the post, rather than the inner cable, so any tight cable routing can cause problems. I have one on a Commencal Meta and I have to be careful with the routing around the bb area, post works well otherwise.
  • 1 0
 @metaam: I realized that and accounted for it. They just don’t like mud. Anyways, thanks for the input everyone!
  • 7 5
 Solving the non problems. Good to see engineering, bit this seems to be flawed.
  • 4 0
 There is a problem, it’s just not a technical one. It’s “how can we sell more EDC tools without having to tell people to cut threads in their steerer?”
  • 1 0
 @scottishmark: That assumes that everyone wants an EDC tool!
I carry a small multitool. The EDC tool is a tool of convenience and not necessity.
  • 1 0
 @betsie: well yeah, but OneUp also need to make you want the EDC tool and they'll be hoping this helps that.
  • 4 4
 @scottishmark: I am pretty sure that the reality is less complex than some macchiavelian scheme to sell 50$ multitools. Some time ago OneUp made EDC tool to be fit either in the steerer or in the pump. They wanted to make a tool... please acknowledge that. They are a company making different kinds of stuff, they thought, why mot make a tool... now, they told me themselves in some online conversation they like to carry edc tool inside their steerers. Preference. Then they had to make this threading tool and a special starnut. I am pretty sure many people, just like me didn’t fancy that idea to thread the steerer. Finally OneUp wanted to make a handlebar and stem so they tried to go around threading the steerer while they were at it - Tadaaaaa!
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: i'm pretty sure you just said the same thing as me but in many more words
  • 1 3
 @scottishmark: you Scotts and your minimal communication. Wirebrush and Dethol
  • 1 1
 My statement was solving non problems.

My clothing company invented a pocket for my multi tool, great thing is that I keep it in the car then put in my pocket.
I was going to try putting the OneUp, whilst fitted to my bike into my car front door pouch, but I couldnt figure out how to get the bike in there!!! (Dont react WAKster, avoid the keyboard.)
  • 1 0
 I want a top headset that clamps to the steerer tube. Something like the Stiffmaster, but with the option to take in the play
  • 1 0
 Strange that Intend Stiffmaster isn't mentioned:
www.intend-bc.com/products/headset/stiffmaster

It is a bit more expensive, but promises to make a stiffer setup.
  • 1 0
 There have been a bunch of similar things over the years from Dia-comp and others. Yet the starnut is still here.
  • 4 1
 Got it, installed it, works fine
  • 2 1
 Why add more weight to the stem putting a tool in there? Its already heavy enough on the front. Yes its convenient but that is it. Rattle away my friends
  • 1 0
 The EDC Pump/tool..ahem, combo has done me right over the past few years. I've never used the pump, but Im happy to have it with me.
  • 4 0
 Death of a star nut
  • 8 6
 Wow a "semi" negative review from pinkbike ... I guess OneUp missed a payment
  • 4 0
 Nice...... no thx
  • 2 0
 Yet another non-innovation from the bike industry and something not a single person ever ask for or needed.
  • 3 0
 "The starnut did nothing wrong" lol
  • 1 0
 Looks mediocre and is overpriced. Cool, more wasted time on something unnecessary. You want to improve? Figure out how to implement the stem system on a motorcycle.
  • 1 0
 basically an old school threaded system....which works fine too
  • 3 0
 Stopped reading at 35mil only.
  • 1 0
 The best feature about this stem, is when you realize how finicky the preload is you can just tap your fork and use the reliable threaded cap, or a starnut.
  • 1 0
 So simply a Acros I-lock integrated...
www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVHiQSnrq0o
  • 1 0
 But these take up alot of stack , may not work for everyone (stem slammed)
  • 3 2
 Great Product but is a pain for preload and if it comes loose trail side :@
  • 2 1
 So it works the same way as a Dia-tech headset from the 90s, they never stayed tight either!
  • 3 1
 Hope Head Doctor is also an alternative that works well!
  • 1 0
 I have head docs on 3 out of 4 bikes (the 4th has a BMX type steerer) but, I find i have to be very caefull not to over tighten the head doc an warp the steerer tube, I tend to thighten a stem on the steerer an then fit the head doc to solve this.
As mentioned above MTB needs to adopt the BMX methood of head set tightening, either threaded tube or welded boss
  • 3 2
 An answer to a never asked question... I guess some engineer was bored one day.
  • 4 2
 More solutions to non existent problems. Yaaaay!?
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents can you now make it so my EDC tool doesn't rattle in my headset? Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Pros : you carry tools inside steer tube
Cons: heavy stem + heavy tools
  • 2 0
 Specialized swat is nicer imho
  • 1 0
 It may be a new way to mount a multi tool, but not a new way to tighten your head set, all headsets use collets
  • 2 0
 Starnuts arent dead, 26 forever!
  • 2 0
 You want to replace the free starnut for $115!! GTFO!!
  • 1 0
 Absolutely convoluted. Cool tool storage idea, but stop it with the tri-bike style headset adjustment nonsense.
  • 2 0
 Fuuuuuuuck all that nonsense.
  • 1 0
 I don’t understand why they don’t just use the edc tool to preload it? Don’t you have to thread your steerer?
  • 1 0
 The starnut may be simple but it is flawed, it works loose. Hope Head Doctor is the way forward.
  • 1 0
 The Easton Beartrap circa 2006 -- did the exact same thing with fewer parts.
  • 1 0
 I just keep thinking of Usher and pop ya collar ffs
  • 3 2
 Let's create a new market sector!
  • 1 0
 Whaling: fishing for whales

Wailing: yelling/screaming/vigorously hitting
  • 1 0
 So just a new twist on the Kona Impact headset then?
  • 1 0
 Creating problems, stick with a normal stem and top cap
  • 1 0
 It's the bike industry. If it ain't broken, do something to screw it up.
  • 2 0
 #pass
  • 1 0
 So we’ve replaced a star nut with all this shite. Brilliant
  • 1 0
 Thank you one-up, your components are on point!
  • 1 0
 Garbage in my opinion. Somewhat heavy too
  • 1 0
 It has to be 90 degrees outside to fill your tire using CO2.
  • 1 1
 I would have already bought 2 of them, but they are 35mm ...
  • 1 1
 Can always use a shim for 31.8 bars
  • 2 0
 @Weedling: Yeah, so why they do not sell such shim?
  • 1 0
 Specialized swat bib!!
  • 1 1
 Been using the hope head doctor for years instead of star nuts
  • 1 1
 Looks simple doesnt it
  • 1 1
 Instant garbage

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