Atherton Bikes Launch AM.130 and AM.130.X

Oct 11, 2022 at 3:29
by Seb Stott  

In response to "a tidal wave of requests", Atherton Bikes have launched what they call "a light, modern trail bike".

The AM.130 joins the AM.150 enduro bike (which we recently reviewed) and the World Cup-winning AM.200 downhill bike in the young company's repertoire.

Those with excellent pattern-recognition skills will have guessed that the new bike has 130 mm of rear wheel travel. This is paired with a 140 mm fork, or in the case of the AM.130.X, a 150 mm fork for a slightly more gravity-biased ride.


The AM.130 takes advantage of the same highly-customisable 3D-printing process as Atherton's other bikes, but they say they've been "stripping out even more material where it didn’t directly contribute to the bike’s strength". There's no word on exactly how much lighter this makes the AM.130 than the AM.150, but the claimed frame weight is 3.1 kg without shock and around 14.9 kg for a size-medium full build.

That's not the lightest, but unusually for a trail bike, it passes the most stringent EFBE Cat 4 (Enduro) and Cat 5 (Downhill) tests, meaning it should have no issues handling big landings in the bike park. While many trail bikes have a warranty that doesn't cover bike park use, Atherton offer a lifetime original-owner warranty on the frame no matter where you ride it.


Atherton will make 22 (yes, twenty-two) sizes, with reach numbers from 410 mm to 530 mm in 10 mm increments. The effective seat angle goes from 77 degrees in the smallest to 79 degrees in the largest size, to avoid tall riders sitting too far off the back. The chainstay length goes from 430 mm to 436 mm across the size range, which in my opinion is hardly a noticeable change and is very much on the shorter side either way. The head angle is fixed for all sizes, at 65.5 degrees with a 140 mm fork or 65 degrees with a 150 mm fork.

There are four main build options in the AM.130 line-up, starting from £4200 ($3,990 USD) for a frameset with a Rock Shox Super Deluxe shock.

AM.130 frameset.
AM.130 Build 1

Full builds start with Build 2, with a RockShox Pike Select fork, Deluxe Ultimate shock and Sram GX gearing, priced at £6600. The top-of-the-range Build 1 gets a Pike Ultimate, Super Deluxe Ultimate and Sram X01; it goes for £7800 / €7410 / $7410 USD. Build X has the longer-travel 150 mm fork, with a Fox 36, Fox Float X2 and Sram GX; it costs £7300 / €6935 / $6935 USD.

The more gravity-focussed Build X with a 150 mm fork.

There is also the opportunity to upgrade selected components or to fully spec your own “dream build”.

For more information, check out athertonbikes.com






284 Comments

  • 138 8
 Stunning. I'm over the hydroformed, seamless look of traditional brands. Geometry has mostly settled down, nearly every bike from major brands ride well. Why not get something that fits you perfectly and is a beauty.
  • 83 1
 Because of prices. Love the bike but well out of most peoples budgets.
  • 32 17
 @djm35: it’s also heavy.
  • 25 43
flag hevi (Oct 11, 2022 at 11:09) (Below Threshold)
 Round(ish) tubes are a hangover from road bikes and are not optimized for the structure. These bikes could be improved strength and weight wise by not using such basic form shapes.
  • 37 2
 @somebody-else: agreed, while it's beautiful and modern it is not "a light, modern trail bike" so if that's what the tidal wave wanted, the tidal wave may be disappointed...

Just in terms of base numbers a Scott genius is 13kg which is a trail bike with more travel at 150mm front and rear, or there's a YT izzo which matches the AM.130 for travel with 130mm front and rear but is far lighter at 11.4kg.

Doubtless there will be people who say 'weight isn't important!' well sure, to some people it isn't but if you're specifically marketing your bike as light weight in its category then it should at least attempt to be.
  • 25 36
flag Worley1 (Oct 11, 2022 at 12:11) (Below Threshold)
 @bunjiman82: don’t eat so many pies it’s a few kg. People are finally realising a bike that’s too light doesn’t ride as well as one with some weight on it
  • 3 0
 @bunjiman82: Exactly. I either be disappointed if the 150 version weighed this much. I suspect the problem is it’s hard to take the weight or as all the bikes use the same tubing and technology for the lugs. They can’t change the carbon lay up in the tubes as they are mass produced and shipped in standard lengths that are then cut to size. As a result you can’t to the carbon equivalent of double butting and changing wall thickness
  • 22 2
 It's not just about the weight, although I understand why people care. This bike, assuming Atherton are good on the warrantee (and I've no reason to think they wouldn't be), can be ridden in the BikePark with confidence. That's a good indicator that it's relatively tough. That might be a good feature for some?
  • 12 2
 @slimboyjim: true though I've gotta ask, how many people do you see rocking the bike park with just 130mm of travel to soak up those big hits....?
  • 21 2
 yes, its a bit heavy for carbon fiber, but its likely lighter than any aluminum alloy 29er frame in existence.

For the pinkbike crowd, a one pound weight penalty is very much worth the EFBE Cat 4 & Cat 5 rating!
  • 14 2
 @somebody-else: Frame weights the same as a Santa Cruz Tallboy.
  • 3 0
 with a lifetime warranty !!! why not , yes !!!
  • 33 1
 Let's compare high end bikes with a reputable pedaling platform at least. I don't think anybody is cross shopping a YT.

The frame spec is 3.1kg. Yeti spec the SB130 at 7.1lb with a Float X (presumably also a medium which seems customary), and charge $4.2k USD for Vietnamese labor and overseas shipping. Some back of the napkin math puts a comparably equipped Atherton frame at 7.9lbs.

That's half a water bottle of sprung weight, or 1% of total bike+rider weight (essentially all that matters besides unsprung and rotational weight). Have you ever ridden with a half full water bottle and thought "well this bike is now rubbish, better dump it out?"

I have no dog in this fight, I can't deal with a short dropper post so the Atherton is not for me. But if a bike otherwise appeals to someone a pound in the frame seems a relatively silly thing to make a decision over.
  • 9 0
 @acali: the frame weighs the same as a tallboy, except the tallboy is weighed with a shock and hardware, and this one is weighed without that stuff. So once you mount a shock, this frame weighs ~500g more than a tallboy.
  • 8 0
 @hevi: talking about weight, username checks out.
  • 5 0
 @somebody-else: Does pinkbike tell its reviewers “Use whichever system of measurement you’re most comfortable with! KG, lbs, doesn’t matter! Same with currency, let the readers do the conversions.” Anyway thanks for letting me know its heavy.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Last Coal frame weighs 2.9kg
  • 3 0
 @hevi: Aren’t round tubes part of the whole customizable fabrication concept, with tubes cut to length? Not sure that would work with specific shapes. Round tubes also seem to be plenty strong and light. Last uses them on their alloy frames and those are lighter than any of the hydroformed alloy competitors.
  • 6 0
 The Scott ransom 29er with 170mm travel fr & r weighs less than this at 13.7kg for a full medium build which is bike park rated...
  • 1 1
 @hevi: based on your long researched report that your going to post for all to see yeah bro??
  • 4 3
 @bunjiman82: No that doesn't sum up. If the bike weighs 14.9 and the frame 3.1, the parts are 11,8. With those same parts (and a 170 mm bike should probably have heavier parts) the Scott Ransom frame would be 1.9 kg and even less than that probably with heavier fork. It might be 13.7 kg with carbon wheels and XC tires etc. But that's not a fair comparison?
  • 3 0
 @Hakkapelitta: i'm just going off the standard quoted weight from major reviewers. But that is the full carbon 900 tuned with carbon wheels yes, though not xc tires.
  • 3 2
 @hamncheez: pretty sure there are lighter 29er al frames. Radon makes a bike park sustaining enduro frame at 3,2kg, so surely they (or Giant for example, not to name Liteville etc al specialists) go well below 3,1kg for their trail bikes.


@jdejace "Have you ever ridden with a half full water bottle and thought "well this bike is now rubbish, better dump it out?"" you are missing the point, 500g total is nothing, but 500g less frame weight makes it a lot easier to attain 2-3kg weight diference between 2 bikes, and that's huge.

But all this is not the point : this AM130 is aimed at wealthy riders who want more "local" manufacturing, have precise geometry needs, and like this look. And that's fine.

What I don't understand (cf @bunjiman82 ) is why make their 130mm bike as heavy and tough as the others in the line up.
Someone who wants only 130mm surely would benefit from a lighter bike, and if bike park use is frequent then I'd go for the 150mm and play with shock length/sag/offset bushings to make it an actual 130mm the rest of the time.
  • 5 0
 @bunjiman82: Interestingly my Cotic G4 Flaremax in an XL weighs 14.1kg with pedals and last time i check it was made of same stuff they like to make gates from
  • 4 1
 @jdejace: I've always thought that people undervalue durability. If the bike is full on DH rated then of course it weighs a touch more. Reminds me of my trusty Canfield Riot. That thing was portly for a 140mm trail bike but it was also indestructible. People make a conscious decision to prioritize weight over durability and the result is people at the local trails telling me they're on a shop loaner because their frame snapped and they're awaiting replacements. Personally I hate that a lot more than enduring the extra pound.
  • 2 1
 @bunjiman82: the amount of ovalised BBs on the alloy models is rediculous and the carbon ones like to grow cracks.
  • 3 0
 @tomo12377: lol exactly!
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: I'm sorry on what bike are we talking?
  • 2 0
 Its pretty easy to see if a bike has a certain certification. Thats easy to measure. Whats going to be interesting is if they can make a 130mm trail bike pass DH certification without it being way too stiff. Rachael was bragging in her instagram that they kept the flex "trail tuned" so it would have some compliance, but not too much. I guess we will have to wait for reviews.
  • 1 1
 @bunjiman82: Yeah, but you can take it to the bike park, sounds like it would survive stuff the YT bike wouldn’t. Not really comparable.
  • 2 0
 @nrpuk: possibly but note that I also gave other comparisons including the much bigger and burlier 170mm Scott Ransom which is bike park rated with a lot more travel and still lighter than the AM.130...
  • 1 0
 @bunjiman82: me on my geometron g13 :⁠,⁠-⁠)
  • 2 2
 @RedBurn: Untill they go bust hahahahaa
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: that’s easy, you just reduce the tube diameter whilst increasing the tube wall thickness.
  • 1 0
 @threehats: easy to say, hard to do
  • 1 1
 @bunjiman82: Not many admittedly, but perhaps there haven't been the bikes to consider it for many?
Here in the UK we don't really get the elevation so bike park runs aren't that long, and that makes shorter travel bikes much more feasible. If you are someone who only wants/can afford one bike, perhaps this may fit the bill?
I've seen 140/150mm bikes at Revs, which is a very slight difference, and acknowledged to be one of the more (if not most) challenging uk bike park...
  • 1 1
 @bunjiman82: Yes, that’s true, but a 130mm rides differently, so it’s not the same as a the Scott either. It’s not a bike I’d choose, but it’s definitely quite unique.
  • 1 0
 @hevi: lineup believes same. See their bars.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: nope. Liteville 301 is way lighter
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: actually, it’s hard to go stiffer and lighter without compromising strength and durability. But taking any tubular product and decreasing stiffness whilst increasing strength is much easier.
  • 1 1
 @somebody-else: not really considering the dh tires. They are at least 2 lbs heavier than the usual tire spec on comparable bikes.
  • 1 0
 @Klasa: no DH tires on spec. Two options come with Trail casing and the X comes with Enduro casing.
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: my guess - the Atherton linkages are all very short, so likely not a lot of weight to save / change in those locations.
The tubes are cut… so spiral wound at a constant wall thickness - I think this is an interesting area that Atherton could explore in the future… if they reduced the qty of sizes then they could likely model / design spiral wound tubes that have varying wall thickness where needed. Who knows how many grams that saves, or increase.
Then their lugs are double lapped, maybe the more xc frames could be single lapped?
I suspect they would not want to save weight in the lugs or machined surfaces as any failures in these areas could lead to terrible PR at this early stage in the business.
  • 1 1
 @bunjiman82: comparing apples with apples? Atherton spec DH casing tyres and alu rims. Hardly comparable. I guess the bike isn’t designed for weenies but for strong riders,
  • 39 3
 "While many trail bikes have a warranty that doesn't cover bike park use"

Not trying to be edgy by asking this, but what brands do this? I've never seen this an exclusion on a warranty
  • 37 0
 Canyon I think does this, I haven't read their warranty myself, but the pinkbike lawyers have given them flack for it.
  • 8 5
 Canyon most notably. Probably Trek and Giant too but not confirmed.
  • 21 0
 Propain as well. In their FAQ "Can I use the Hugene in bike parks? Our Hugene is assigned to bike category 4. Regular and permanent use on North Shore trails and in bike parks should therefore be avoided. Use in rough terrain and moderate jumps are no problem. After intense use, you should check your bike for damage before and after each ride."
  • 14 0
 It's not to say those brands will check where you were riding when you broke your bike and decide not to warranty it. But the EFBE Condition 4 is defined as: "Operation including conditions 1 to 3 as well as downhill grades on rough trails which require advanced technical riding skills, at speeds less than 40 km/h. Jumps and drops up to 120 cm. Examples: All-Mountain, Trail MTB."

So, technically you could say that bikes without the Condition 5 certification aren't officially designed for drops over 120 cm. Really, though, I think frames with Condition 5 are likely to be stronger than those without, which should just give extra piece of mind.
  • 23 1
 @athertonbikes:
Did the bike you built for Chuck Norris meet category 6 requirements?
  • 6 0
 anyone hear of any real world examples of this being used to deny warranty? As a consumer wouldn't you just say you were trail riding? Unless they asked where it happened and you were not aware of the exclusion, which I could see happening.
  • 20 0
 @Josemer: North Shore trails? They call out a trail system specifically?
  • 5 0
 @mthamster: Copied from the website. I assume they use its either in reference to north shore features, or saying if the bike is not intended for regular use in trails that rough
  • 6 0
 YT when I demo'd one in Whis
  • 15 1
 @mthamster: I had to look it up because I didn't believe it, but yes. They do indeed call out the North Shore specifically haha
  • 37 10
 If your dumb enough to tell the bike shop "yeah it cracked when I was sending this drop on the pro line," you don't deserve a warranty.
  • 3 42
flag bikewriter (Oct 11, 2022 at 10:11) (Below Threshold)
 @plustiresaintdead: You sound like my old racist dad talking politics.
  • 33 0
 For everyone's knowledge. Buddy of mine broke his frame (not an Atherton frame) he sent it in for warranty and they dug up a social media post (video) of the broken frame at the bike park that it broke at in the very spot it broke and I believe it was his story not a full on post. They didn't warranty the frame lol.
  • 42 2
 @dwhere: Not really a fan of "Lying is the best policy". Maybe that's why I am not very successful in life, but I prefer integrity.
  • 6 4
 @kirny6: Reminds me of the very recent story where a Teslarati (diehard Tesla owner who uses fire and brimstone and threats to defend Elon and his cars) forum member dug up a DUI charge against a Plaid owner who posted pics of his steering yoke delaminating. Even though several Plaid owners provided proof the cheap yoke was peeling, the Teslarati said alcohol on this one owner's hands caused the issue.
  • 5 0
 Pretty easy to say you weren't riding in the bike park. Half the customers I see with warranty claims say they were "just riding along..!"
  • 2 0
 And if they did - who would say - "Oh, I broke it at a bike park."
  • 11 0
 @PeakHopper: As per Propain, "Whether rocky, rooty or sandy, with the Hugene you are agile enough to master any trail." Except for, you know, one of the oldest and most well known trail networks in the world.
  • 15 1
 @initforthedonuts: It met Gee requirements, so it was considered fine, if not overkill, for Chuck Norris
  • 3 0
 @PeakHopper: It's a pretty outdated classification, and by "North Shore sections" I think they mean those 12 foot skinny drops to flat or whatever the f*ck people used to do back in the day.

Anyway the Canyon Strive and Spectral is also category 4, so I guess you shouldn't take those to the bike park either.
  • 3 0
 @kirny6: you gotta tell us the brand if you tell us the story. They put forth work to find out how not to help someone. That's like anti-work.
  • 1 0
 @mthamster: lmao ok i'll just move
  • 3 0
 @gramboh Yep, distributor seen some pics on social media which showed a trailbike being commonly used in bikeparks, dirt jumps etc. Let's be honest, it's just riding. No one wants to take care about frame rating. I really appreciate Atherton's attitude in this topic.
  • 5 0
 A mtb bike that can't handle bike park it isn't a MTBike nowadays ... call it fat gravels instead...
  • 3 0
 @fiekaodclked: Lol you and me both. I cant imagine what my reaction would be if I was told "sorry, you were riding your local trails" in response to a warranty request.
  • 2 0
 @Josemer: "I assume they use its either in reference to north shore features" They can take my hucks to flat over my dead body
  • 1 1
 without having any knowledge whatsoever I'm going to guess Specialized
  • 4 0
 @Trailsoup: I know MTBers use "north shores" as term for wooden features and drops. So I think there is a good chance you might be right.

"Our Hugene is assigned to bike category 4. Regular and permanent use on North Shore trails and in bike parks should therefore be avoided. Use in rough terrain and moderate jumps are no problem. After intense use, you should check your bike for damage before and after each ride."

Source: www.propain-bikes.com/en/bikes/trail/hugene

I am being really nitpicky here, but it doesnt say "north shore sections" it says north shore trails. I don't know if that makes a difference to be honest.
  • 1 0
 @initforthedonuts: "Did the bike you built for Chuck Norris meet category 6 requirements?"

Don't know, but Gee's bike is cat 7...
  • 1 0
 @kirny6: And if they go such length to not cover you waranty you just say that was your friends bike/video/whatever. Social media post is not a proof.
  • 1 0
 @Scart35: Not really how it works hence the term "limited Warranty" not to mention he was literally standing in the video with his bike and gear on at the drop he cased talking about his broken bike.
  • 34 9
 33+ lbs for a 130mm travel trail bike? I love what they’re doing, but that’s really f*cking heavy for a bike that’s supposed to be efficient.
  • 15 11
 My Forbidden Druid was around 32-33lbs with burly tires and a coil shock, way more capable than you could imagine for a 130mm ''trail bike'' . It's not all about weight
  • 27 2
 @souknaysh: except this bike is 33lbs with an air shock and regular tires. So it'll be 35 with a coil and double downs.
  • 7 3
 @souknaysh: I’ve got a 31# Druid with a 160mm Lyrik and beefy wheels/tires (plus the Cascade link, making it 142mm). I don’t understand where a heavy trail bike fits when there are tons of lighter options. 4-5 lbs is a huge difference.
  • 7 3
 Exactly. It’s way too heavy for a 130mm trail bike. I wonder if the tubes are made to a lighter spec than the other frames out if it’s the same carbon pipe on the all
  • 13 2
 @toast2266: Only 8 pounds heavier than my 2022 stumpjumper. Which I built with XT parts, Grip II Fox 34, aluminum wheels and meaty tires. But at least this Atherton would cost $1,500 more....
  • 4 2
 @stevemokan: I mean there is some personal preferences, suspension platform, looks etc etc. Not saying it's good or bad. Just saying weight isn't everything when shopping for a bike.
  • 6 2
 The weight is a deal-breaker on this for sure.
  • 6 0
 Another Druid rider checking in- depending on where/how you ride, a 130mm bike that pedals well and can stand up to the occasional park day/enduro race makes a lot of sense. Even if it weighs a bit more.
  • 14 1
 The lightest 130mm carbon trail bikes out there are from Last and the venerable Specialized Stumpjumper, both about two pounds lighter than this Atherton frame. Given the geo and EFBE Cat 4 & 5 rating of this bike, I don't think a 2 pound weight penalty is bad.

Complex suspension designs aren't my thing, but it matters to most people, and those other two bikes are single pivot flex stays. This Atherton bike has the most sophisticated suspension layout that the legend Dave Weagle ever cooked up.

Its been beaten to death on this website that people prefer alloy over carbon, and I feel like Atherton Bikes straddles that line, since its both (titaniujm alloy and carbon tubes). Its also right in-between- lighter than pretty much any aluminum 29er frame, but heavier than all but Santa Cruz carbon frames.
  • 5 2
 My steel hardtail is 33.7lbs. It’s all relative.
  • 8 1
 The frame is 3.1kg, like 6.8lb. So any other competitor isn't going to 3lbs lighter. It's all in the build. The frame weighs the same as a pair of 29DD's
  • 3 3
 A bike with this amount of travel,to be what it is supposed to be,shouldn't weight more than 30lb.
You can try to push your "weight doesn't matter" agenda but it doesn't stick with me.
  • 3 2
 lol 33 lbs is not that heavy. Us older folks are used to riding trail bikes that used to be considered light at 33 lbs.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: already said it above but the Last alloy frames are 2.9kg (not sure which size.)
Assume they are Cat4/5 rated since they are enduro frames used for racing…
Sounds like you’re familiar with their carbon frames. Those are truly light.
Not hating on Atherton bikes. Actually really like them Smile
  • 2 0
 @jimbob79: pics of 29 DDs?
  • 1 1
 @jostaudt: doubt the last alloy frames are cat5
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Not sure. Can’t find anything about the category on their website. Just know they‘re reliable enduro frames that people ride hard.
  • 3 0
 It's not so much that the bike is "too heavy" for a 130mm trail bike. It's just the marketing BS of calling it a "light trail bike" and how much the frame costs for the weight it is. You could find aluminum 130 trail bikes at this weight for a LOT less money... OR spend this much on another carbon 130mm trail bike and get down below 30 lbs for a medium easy. (my tranceX in XL is just under 30lb)

This is always the problem with taking a longer travel bike and making a shorter travel bike out of it. Sure it's as "burly" as the longer travel bike, so there is that. But most people looking for "light trail bikes" actually want them light. Especially for 7500-8grand!!!

If it's like their other bikes you get a BUNCH of sizes to choose from which is good and bad cause it's not very likely that you'll get to do back to back test rides of those different sizes to get the benefit and I know their Enduro geo chart seemed like there were some odd sizing choices made? Course you could go custom. But again, that's good and bad as it's a lot of money to spend on something that you could end up getting geometry that you don't actually like and then what do you do with it...? For most of us we'd be copying geo from another bike anyway. So you have to ask why your not just buying that other bike?? Smile
  • 5 0
 @stiingya: As the saying goes: Light, Strong, Cheap. Pick two. Or in this case, pick one.
  • 1 0
 @toast2266: That's the thing, in this case it's pick one. But mostly you get to pick two!! So you gotta really want to support the Athertons... Smile
  • 25 1
 Do I wait for the Pound to totally collapse, or is parity with Dollar good enough?
  • 40 1
 What? You can't wait another week?
  • 22 4
 Liz Truss & Kwasi Kwarteng have got your back; just give the Dynamic Duo another week or two & you’ll be picking one up for lunch money prices….
  • 8 0
 @Corinthian: They don't call him KamiKwasi for nothing. Shame he's decided to take the whole f*cking country with him though.
  • 7 0
 Well the genius that is our new chancellor has now said he's handing in his homework on 31st October, so I'd wait 'til he gets his marks back and then buy one.
  • 2 0
 So strange the see the £ > $ price. What’s next?
  • 12 0
 @MonsterTruck: Parity with the Rupee if these clowns stay in power for much longer.
  • 1 0
 Looks like it has: starting from £4200 ($3,990 USD)... Although I guess the difference is UK VAT?
  • 3 0
 If I wasn't crying I would laugh... It's a great time for all y'all outside UK to get some cheap UK made stuff.
  • 1 0
 @tb927: Well, it looks like more fun and games today www.bbc.com/news/business-63223894
  • 17 3
 These are really nice looking bikes but the lack of of dropper insertion length makes it a no for those with shorter legs looking for more than 150mm drop.
  • 3 2
 oo woof that interrupted seat tube. the 490 reach with a 400 st length got me real happy until I saw that seatube kink.
  • 41 2
 Our bikes have a low standover height and seat tube length which helps to allow even those with short legs use our bikes comfortably.

We do have less insertion than some brands but this is often due to other brands having significantly longer seat tubes which artificially boost their overall frame insertion. (It's definitely worth inputting your measurements to our fit calculator to see what dropper you could potentially run)
  • 2 1
 @Athertonbikesteam: exactly! Insertion length is less important than overall drop. I have a 30" inseam and if I cannot run a 180mm dropper then I just feel cheated.
  • 3 4
 @kokofosho: good thing you were here to confirm what Atherton bikes had to say.
  • 4 1
 @Athertonbikesteam: Exactly what is the optimal insertion length in your opinion? Asking for a short friend.
  • 3 0
 @Athertonbikesteam: Can you confirm the max insertion depth on a 400mm seat tube? I don't see it listed anywhere on the geo charts. Thanks.
  • 4 0
 @Zaeius: you get 202mm insertion on a 400mm STL. But as mentioned above we tend to have less insertion, often due to other brands having significantly longer seat tubes which artificially boost their overall frame insertion.

If you fancy chatting further drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com
  • 14 2
 how is this brand actually doing? i havent seen one irl, for a time with all the crowfunding and the celebrity status i thought the Athertons were doing some sort of Cult MLM/pyramid scheme. But it seems they are doing well....¿¿¿

can someone input on this?
  • 2 0
 I thought they initially had investor backing from Piers Linney (Dragons Den). Not sure how involved he is now though.
  • 1 0
 I heard tales of one an hour up the road from me, in Santa Fe :/
  • 4 0
 I've seen a single one in the flesh. Which puts it on par with Geometron, Last Tarvo and Actofive in terms of rarity. But I agree that for a long time one could suspect Atherton bikes of being vaporware.
  • 6 0
 There are much older and more developed brands who I rarely or even never seen before. Can’t jumpstart a brand to the moon. Even with their name
  • 1 9
flag Narro2 (Oct 11, 2022 at 16:04) (Below Threshold)
 @leopaul: thats true, with 95+% of bikes being built in Taiwan, I don't think Atherton Bikes "built in great Britain" strategy is really gonna work. Or it's gonna be an uphill battle for some years.
  • 3 1
 For balance I've only ever seen one yeti in the wild within the UK, but you get the impression they are a big brand in the US.
  • 3 0
 @Narro2: mountain biking is an uphill battle by definition...
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: I live about 20-30mins from Mojo, and see a few Geometrons on our local trails (one of the people here I ride with most frequently has one). Similarly, when I lived in the North of England it seemed like you were never more than 6ft away from someone riding an Orange, and 3 of the riders I rode with regularly were on them.

I'm not sure how strong it is in this case, but I think you do often get a local bias with sales for smaller brands like these that have a more defined location/nationality to them.
  • 1 0
 I've only met two other nukeproof mega owners, both at bike parks.
  • 1 0
 @L0rdTom: no not really. Only in a few places.
  • 14 3
 Its about time brands start building trail and Enduro bikes to ASTM Category 5/Bike Park use. Bikes with 170mm of travel, ubiquitous at Downhill and Enduro races, and with marketing like "a bike that laughs in the face of the steepest, rockiest trails" are still only designed to Category 4. Go to any bike park, full of non-DH bikes on every level of trail. The industry should change to reflect this. Good on Atherton.
  • 17 8
 Why. I don’t want my 130mm trail bike built to cat 5 standards as it means is massively over built and therefore overweight for its intended use. It should be designed for pikes/34s and exo/exo+ tyres. If you want an enduro / park bike this isn’t it even if it’s built to weigh enough
  • 10 1
 @chrismac70: Not sure why you're getting down voted. Seems sensible to say "I am fine with building a 130mm trail bike to cat 4 and shedding weight."

Especially since the market is ripe with "aggressive trail", "all mountain" and flat-out enduro bikes that cover the gamut of intended uses. I'm not sure it makes much sense to build a cat 5 bike with less than 155-160mm of rear travel - I don't see anyone shredding jump laps or doing DH runs on 130mm bikes.
  • 8 1
 @KJP1230: Keep in mind what ASTM Category 4 actually says- jumps less than 122cm/48in and speeds less than 40kmh/25mph- it's a surprisingly low bar to hit even on trail rides, not even counting all the SB130's/Stumpy's I see at the bike park every time I go. Heck just two days ago I rode Angel Fire bike park with a friend on a Meta TR.

FWIW I do understand wanting to keep weight down, and I have somewhat less of a problem with a 130mm bike being cat 4. But the 150-180mm enduro bikes I see no excuse, they are outnumbering actual DH bikes at many parks nowadays.
  • 3 1
 @KJP1230: Ermmm.... I've taken my 2019 Transition Scout 150/130 to the Atherton's bike park. I wish I could ride like them!!
  • 4 1
 Thanks Isaac! Just makes sense right?
  • 3 1
 "it's about time..." how long have these categories been around? How many people were even aware that there were these categories for bikes? I'd never heard of them before.
  • 3 0
 @chriss78: buy an AM130 and you will - 100% guaranteed
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: totally agree
  • 3 3
 @IsaacWislon82: 4ft high jumps at 40kph is hardly a typical trail ride. I would have to go to a bike park to find anything like that and I wouldn’t take a 130 trail bike
  • 1 0
 @el-nombre: I had no idea about them either until about a year ago when I started shopping for a new bike.
  • 2 0
 @korev: I have an Atherton V3 Commencal since 2012, sadly I'm still s**t .
  • 2 0
 @el-nombre: ASTM F2043 was first published in July 2000 and updated in 2006, 2013, and 2018
  • 7 0
 Front center varies by 133mm or 18%, but rear center varies by 6mm or 1.4%. For a balanced ride, where one end of the bike extends at about 13x the rate the other end does between sizes.

I have to ask, what's the point of the incredible fine-tuning of reach and whatnot if you're going to basically ignore weight distribution? The bikes look amazing otherwise, and given how easily their manufacturing method would allow them to change that, it seems like a pretty significant oversight on a $4500 frame.
  • 2 0
 3990 USD. Full custom add £650. Sound like $4500?
  • 2 0
 It’s easy and it makes them look good
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: Ya, changing up the rear triangle with a complex suspension design ain't easy. Changing up the front triangle is much easier haha.
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: increasing the reach has no effect on the suspension kinematics. Increasing the chainstay length requires altering the pivot locations, linkages (this bike has three) etc. So it's really easy to size up the front triangle and leave the rear triangle the same
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: “so it’s really lazy to leave the rear triangle the same” fixed it for you.
  • 3 0
 @somebody-else: what's wrong with you
  • 1 2
 @hamncheez: I can read a geometry chart? F to R center ratio goes from 724/430 (1.6837) to 857/436 (1.9656) for f’s sake. I realize the brothers like to hang off the back… but at some point you have to sell something that makes sense.
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: you’re right, I don’t know where I got 4500 from. Either way. The whole tech was developed to make custom geo easy, seems silly to only use it on the front half of the bike!
  • 1 0
 @nataspihsrow: here's the confusing reply via email from Tom at Atherton regarding custom chainstay lengths:

'Yes the custom can be made to whatever length you are confident in, however we cant change geometry. However it may increase lead time from the current 20 weeks as it will require the team to make new data from scratch.'

Sounds like the tech does not make custom full-sus geo easy.

The first twelve sizes meet @Uuno 's criterion of RC/WB >.35, but size 22 would need at least 453mm RC
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: If they did a simple single pivot, or even just a horst link, it would be much easier to adjust chainstay lengths. With that DW insanity going on down around the BB, they can't even easily do the trick that Forbidden does where they keep the rear triangle the same from size to size and adjust the front triangle's BB forward to "lengthen" the chainstays.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Santa moves the pivot axle attachment points on the mainframe further back, but I doubt they're making different rockers for different size mainframes....
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: Yes, thats what I just said Forbidden does too.

With the atherton DW6 design this is much harder to do because of the many links down around the BB, and the proximity of the seat tube to the vertically oriented shock.
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: I'm guessing Tom left one or two words out there - maybe he meant "we can't change suspension geometry"?

Either way I'm not really sure why they persist with this (very expensive) production method if they aren't really going to take full advantage of its single biggest design feature. Not sure if you were aware or not but this whole project was originally called Robot Bike Co before the Athertons got involved - www.pinkbike.com/news/robot-bike-co-r160-first-look-2016.html

They were very big on pushing the "you can have any geometry you want" barrow but seems as though that really just means different reach figures. I really like the construction concept for the theoretical flexibility in geometry, but it's not cheap, and if they aren't willing or able to alter the back end to keep things in some kind of proportion to the front, then as a taller rider who's had plenty of bad experiences on long FC/short RC bikes in the past, I'm not willing to pay a ton to have a rearwards weight bias that I don't like, especially on a supposedly easily-customized-geometry frame. It does look cool though and I bet if you're on the short side it's actually an awesome bike.
  • 1 0
 @nataspihsrow: Gee weighed in on this in some interview I can't find. He pretty much said "We know best, so we don't want to offer too much flexibility on geometry because then some customers might create poorly riding bikes, and thats not only dangerous but reflects poorly on the brand". Saying "We know best, better than you" might sound condescending, but in this case its not just anyone its The Athertons.
  • 1 0
 @nataspihsrow: okay, but why can't suspension geometry be changed? Is the machine that makes the nested aluminum swinglinks any less programmable than the printer that forms the lug in which they are housed? The rest is in the Weagle-assisted cutting software. I liked it better when the lugs & pivot hardware were silver as shown in the still-accessible photograph album linked to the Aston article to which you linked. Were I to ask for a custom frame, it would have these, a more symmetrical seat/toptube lug, and the original headtube lug. I had a LeMond Tête twenty years ago and remember fondly its ride quality. Mostly the Atherton makes me want to get a discounted Insurgent. Size Small has the most generous RC/WB, and is not that small at 1213mm, similar to an Atherton size 8. I'm 6'
  • 3 0
 @ceecee: I think their software is configured to adjust the geometry of the 3D printed stuff automatically because changing that doesn't involve any changes at the machine, there's no vises/fixturing in a 3D printer. Adjusting machined links means changing the machine workholding and programming all the time though (I work in this field btw) so that's probably way more difficult, and while most CAD software can auto-update geometric features I doubt their setup can also automatically update certain kinematic parameters (eg keeping anti-squat or leverage rates the same).
  • 1 0
 @nataspihsrow: All this being said, yes its really hard to adjust chainstay length, yes its really hard to keep the kinematics the same, but they are still making bikes without using molds.

Should kinematics be the same across all sizes? Antisquat tyically decreases as you go up in size because its a fuzzy calculation made on assuming where the riders COG is, which is obviously higher for taller riders. Chain growth is a consistent thing to measure, and its the primary source of antisquat. To keep antisquat (an imprecise, rough, inconsistent measure) the same across sizes, then actual chaingrowth, the measure of how much the rear axle moves away from the bottom bracket for a given chainring size, needs to increase, but no bike companies that I'm aware of do this. Additionally, heavier riders can have more chain growth without it affecting suspension performance compared to lighter riders. More chain growth = more antisquat, all things being equal. Should that be taken into account too?

Since the Athertons don't have to use expensive molds and can justifiably charge a lot for their frames, why not demand utter excellence from them? Why not demand a truly custom bike, where every size is tailored in every way, not just reach and stack numbers? I'm starting to change my mind on this. Just because its hard doesn't mean its not worth doing.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I do get that, but in this case I can see some dumb things too so the fact that they are the Athertons becomes pretty meaningless.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: also I think you could push the rear axle backwards 20mm and have a pretty small effect on anti-squat. The leverage rate curve is potentially more of a change though, if the other geometry stays the same you'd end up with longer travel for bigger sizes. I thought variable RC was the reason they have the DW6 thing though, so you only have one tube for the chainstay and one for the seatstay, which makes it easy to vary the length of the rear end without changing the primary pivot locations, instead of a whole rear triangle which is harder to do like that. Or maybe you just can't really make an actual triangle using the lug/tube method because you have to slide all the parts together simultaneously.
  • 1 0
 @nataspihsrow: If you just lengthen those two tubes, then yes it increases travel AND increases the leverage ratio. It also messes with antisquat, anti-rise, lateral flex, etc. The last thing you want to do is have larger sizes be MORE flexy (compliant) than smaller sizes.

As stated above, the easiest way to change rear-center by size is usually to change the main pivot location on the front triangle, relative to the BB. This design can't do that easily, since it would require also moving the top rocker main pivot, which has the seat tube in the way.
  • 11 5
 Comment section seem to be excited about these bikes but I can't really see why, they are expensive, geo is a bit conservative, they look okay but I wouldn't say amazing, am I missing something here?
  • 12 1
 If the geo is too conservative for you, you can literally order the bike adjusted to your wishes.
  • 4 1
 Yes, you missed 'custom geo' selection and '22 sizes'
  • 5 0
 There are a lot of things I want to say but the 22 sizes is interesting. For big mass production operations like most every other bike company, that would be a nightmare. But if every single Atherton bike sold is made to order, then it's not too bad. I wish them success and profitability. Pricing($4000 USD) isn't too terrible considering that it's made to order in the UK and the sizing would theoretically be perfect for the vast majority of people, assuming that they actually chose their correct size. For comparison, the Yeti SB130 frame MSRP is $4000. Same with any Santa Cruz frame. Yes, it's weird that there's a parity between USD but GBP, but I got US pricing directly from Atherton's own website.
  • 3 0
 The flip side is they should have no waste, no end of line, they only come in one colour so there are lots of commercial advantages that offset the printing time
  • 1 0
 I'm assuming the GBP/USD price difference is UK VAT - international orders would be taxed on import.
  • 3 0
 @Tomahawk66: you are right we remove the UK VAT - EU countries and Switzerland have a certificate of preferential origin so there is 0% import duty to pay there, the US rate is 11% ... other local taxes might apply but the customer feedback we are getting is very positive on that score
  • 4 0
 Things worth considering:

-Anyone who has ridden an ebike will talk about the benefits of a bit of extra weight in how a bike rides, especially if you are gravity oriented.
-Ive pedalled heavier bikes uphill with little issue, just get a bit fitter.
-Its rated for DH and yet is a trail bike. While its expensive, its clearly going to last forever.
-If you had ridden at Dyfi you would know that if Dan can use it there, then this is a bombproof bike
-Im tired of buying superlight bikes with superlight components that break, have cheap weak pivots and components etc

I wait impatiently for a big travel enduro from them in the 160/170 bracket.
  • 7 0
 Yo Gee, can you do an aggressive Ti hardtail next??
  • 2 0
 Didn't they build one for Dan at one point?
  • 3 0
 @FSA-MTB: it was a BMX (so yes, technically a hard tail haha)
  • 8 5
 Bikes look great but stack is ~30mm too low in larger sizes--- No way a 6'5" XX-Tall rider will want to ride a bike with a stack height just 28mm higher than a 5'0" XS rider.

Stack should be set so that the bar height is the same height as the saddle height they used to measure effective seat tube angle for that size.
  • 20 3
 Correct fit is vital for us so we vary the stack somewhat across the sizes but we feel its' better to err on the side of "too short' a stack and add spacers rather than spec too tall a headtube with no room to decrease because this is so limiting...
  • 5 1
 @Athertonbikesteam: Thank you. Because some of us XC marathon types like to climb on our "big bikes" in the off season and group rides. You can spot us with slammed negative rise stems cuz most companies have stacks and headtube lengths equal to wheelbases (slight exaggeration).
  • 4 9
flag HankHank (Oct 11, 2022 at 12:06) (Below Threshold)
 @Athertonbikesteam: surely you can change the angles of the lugs so that you can get the perfect stack, or at least the stack the rider wants?

It feels odd that you can do 22 sizes to get a great fit and then rely on spacers for a critical part of the geo.
  • 4 2
 @HankHank: how exactly do you think you can change the stack? Given the same fork a2c length, and the same steerer on those forks, there's not a lot you can do. Either a long head tube and minimal spacers, or shorter ht and more spacers, or taller bars...
  • 4 1
 @Henk-K: your do exactly what you suggest.
The beauty of these bikes is you really can get the geometry dialled, so @Marcencinitas is spot on that 30mm is tiny. It just seems an easy thing to fix given an the other challenges they've overcome.

I'm 6'3 and have had enough bikes with silly amounts of spacers to know that they look so much better with a proportionally-sized head tube
  • 1 2
 @bikewriter: You can spot those XC marathon guys walking their slammed-bar bikes down the steeps because all their weight is pitched over the front wheel. I think I even saw one flip over his bars and lose the olympic XC race because he couldn't huck a 4' drop.
  • 9 3
 The thing is simply beautiful!
  • 2 2
 Dream bike material, right there
  • 5 1
 @hllclmbr: fancy sitting and staring at your own Atherton Bike? Drop us an email....sales@athertonbikes.com
  • 2 0
 @athertonbikes: Hopefully he'd ride it too...
  • 4 1
 This is an impressive bike.....and I love the sizing with the reach in the frame size + option for Tall. Model names are clear with the travel indicated and type of riding (AM).....thumbs up.
  • 2 3
 It would be if it was 2 or 3 kg lighter fully built
  • 7 2
 That kink in the seat tube is going to prevent me from using my favorite long droppers Frown
  • 2 0
 Sorry, I know I'm going to hear about this but.... I don't like how these bikes look. They look like I was in a bike design class, and like usual I procrastinated and built it last minute on my way to class out of random leftover parts.
  • 2 0
 Has anyone tried to order one? I just went through the order flow on the site and got as far as frame size and wasn't able to get past that (I'm not gonna buy one, just wanted to see what the process and lead times were like).

Safari and Chrome on OS X @athertonbikes
  • 1 0
 They know about it and are trying to fix it (apparently the person who knows how to fix it is out w/ COVID).
  • 1 0
 timing...
  • 2 0
 Seems like a cool bike, but I don’t really get this ‘short-travel bike that rides like an enduro bike’ trend. The whole reason I want less travel is because it reduces weight and gives a more lively feel. Might as well just buy an enduro bike with more travel if you don’t get the benefits of less travel.
  • 3 1
 Oh man, I feel the breeze on my face. I'm getting closer and closer to Atherton making a trail 29er hardtail, and when they do, I'll find a way to spend like a dentist even though my bank account says otherwise.
  • 5 0
 4200 Brittish pounds for the frame. My times have changed fast.
  • 9 2
 Thank the British government government for that

Brexit - add 10%
Truss coming to power - add 10%
  • 6 0
 @rich-2000: Those additional costs only apply to us, they're getting cheaper every day for the rest of the world.
  • 3 0
 That's about $5 by today's exchange rates. Tomorrow we'll be paying people to take them away
  • 1 0
 I am seriously considering building this up as a marathon XC bike for the BC Bike Race. The frame is only 1kg heavier than XC frames, and I should lose that on my muffin top anyway. Maybe with dual lockout for better pedal? What do you think @athertonbikes, @Athertonbikesteam?
  • 1 0
 Sounds like the 130 ticks all your boxes Markus, we'd love to follow you on your adventures too! Drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and we can build you up the ultimate marathon machine!
  • 4 0
 Makes me think of my old Turner 6-Pack... with updated geo Wink
  • 2 0
 22 sizes...and still too big for my 5' tall GF. She's a year or two out from upgrading her frame anyway, we'll see if that changes.
  • 2 1
 5ft tall is probably too short for a 29er anyway.?
  • 2 0
 With her being only 5' it's no surprise that you are tootell.
  • 2 0
 Ibis have a short designer so the frames go to small sizes.
  • 1 0
 @jimbob79: She would prefer riding a 27.5. If 26 was still around, she would be on that (at least for aggressive trail riding). She already gets tire buzzed on an XS Transition Patrol with 27.5.
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: Naw, I am just a snitch
  • 1 0
 @korev: Ha, they don't have anything even remotely close to small. Their shortest reach bike is like 20mm LONGER than her Transition Patrol, which is too big (but tolerable).

She just bought an Epic with a 385 reach off the buy/sell.
  • 2 0
 I pity the other test houses who are left to ponder how EFBE’s appropriation of the vague ASTM ‘condition’ classification system became a Pinkbike byword for durability
  • 2 2
 who else didn't know there was categories for bike frames? I cant wait to walk into my Local bike shop and ask for a category 5 bike frame.... like some 8 year old doing a jump off of a curb "woah thats was a category 10 send on the supercycle" can't believe my category 4 bike took that send...

such a weird thing to find out when you've spent your whole life MTB'ing... not only ow many times has pink bike suggested that people should under bike because its more fun, does that mean i can sue pinkbike if i snap my frame and hurt myself?
  • 2 0
 Love the look of their bikes Geo's always seem on point. I selfishly hope they do am XC race spec hardtail next!
  • 9 6
 I'm sorry, $4600 for a frame? What the actual f ck.
  • 4 3
 Seems par for the course. You can easily buy many Asian produced frames for ~$3500. This one is made in the UK, with a novel construction technique, and can be customized (for even more $). You can spend way more on an Asian made road frame, if you want to get really silly.

That's wtf.

Not that there's anything inherently wrong with Asian carbon.
  • 10 3
 @hllclmbr: most people don't need a novel construction technique or custom geometry for their full suspension bikes. You can get a Stumpjumper EVO frame for $2900 that features modern progressive geometry and a great warranty.
  • 2 0
 Its actually cheaper than an S-Works or Yeti frameset in the UK
  • 1 0
 @seraph: You make a Stumpy sound like the Honda Accord of bikes.

They make all kinds of stuff for all kinds of people. This one isn’t for you. It is for others tho, based on the comments
  • 5 1
 @seraph, it's $3,990 USD - the UK prices include VAT.
  • 3 0
 No bother, just wait till next year, you’ll be able to buy the whole of the UK for $4600 the way things are going.
  • 2 3
 This is a whole new business model for bikes, one that might give them an edge. They could rapid prototype any bike and bring it to market way faster than any brand. I am excited to see if the cost could come down and if they could expand into other cycling markets.

maybe let them try making team GBR track bikes for the next olympics. Why not?
  • 3 4
 CLASSIFICATION OF BICYCLES
All bicycles are designed with a specific type of riding in mind, and the components in the bicycles are built to withstand the stresses resulting from that kind of usage. If a bicycle is subjected to higher than expected forces, the frames and components may fail prematurely.



To make it easier for you to decide if a specific model is appropriate for you, we have created several bike categories and classified each bike into one of them. Below you will find a description of each bike category.



Note that these divisions are for reference only. There is a huge number of other factors that can have an effect on how much a bike can withstand. For example, a heavy rider that does not have good technique can destroy a bike that will hold up forever when ridden by a light, experienced rider. Therefore it is important for you to take this into account when choosing the bike category that suits you best.





BIKE CATEGORY 0

Intended use: UNDER PARENTAL SUPERVISION

Products in this category can only be used by children under appropriate parental supervision on smooth surfaces. They should never be used near stairs, on steep downhill slopes, near swimming pools or ponds, on public roads or in areas with the likelihood of traffic.



BIKE CATEGORY 1

Intended use: ROAD RIDING

Bicycles in this category should only be used on regular paved surfaces or alternatively on very smooth unpaved surfaces at speeds not exceeding 25km/h. The tires must maintain constant ground contact. These bicycles are not designed for any kinds of jumps or drops.



BIKE CATEGORY 2

Intended use: ROAD & GRAVEL

Bicycles in this category can be use on paved roads and on reasonably smooth off road trails. They are designed to handle small jumps and drops that exert forces equivalent to jumping a bike onto a flat surface from a height of approximately 15cm.



BIKE CATEGORY 3

Intended use: PUMPTRACKS & FUN

Bicycles in this category can be used on pumptrack lines for beginners and easy off-road trails. They are designed to withstand jumps and drops that exert forces equivalent to jumping a bike onto a flat surface from a height of approximately 25cm.


BIKE CATEGORY 4

Intended use: XC & TRAIL

Bicycles in this category can be used off-road on easy and moderately difficult MTB trails, and are designed to withstand jumps that exert forces equivalent to jumping a bike onto a flat surface from a height of approximately 40cm. These bicycles should not be ridden at speeds exceeding 30km/h on rough surfaces.


BIKE CATEGORY 5

Intended use: DIRT JUMP

Bicycles in this category can be used on all kinds of pumptracks and dirt jump trails. They are designed to withstand jumps that exert forces equivalent to jumping a bike onto a flat surface from a height of approximately 60cm. These bicycle should not be ridden on rough MTB trails.


BIKE CATEGORY 6

Intended use: ALL MOUNTAIN

Bicycles in this category can be used off-road on all kinds of MTB trails, and are designed to withstand jumps that exert forces equivalent to jumping a bike onto a flat surface from a height of approximately 60cm. These bicycle should not be ridden at speeds exceeding 45km/h on rough surfaces.



BIKE CATEGORY 7

Intended use: DOWNHILL FREERIDE & ENDURO

Bicycles in this category are designed to cope with the hardest MTB trails and are designed to withstand jumps that exert forces equivalent to jumping a bike onto a flat surface from a height of approximately 100cm. They can be ridden at hight speeds on rough terrain.
  • 3 0
 Text sourced from NS bikes and Octane1? I like the disclaimer that a "heavy rider that does not have good technique can destroy a bike that will hold up forever when ridden by a light, experienced rider".

Looking at this classification I would always and only buy a bike from Category 3 with its Intended Use: FUN Smile
  • 1 0
 Sorry did you just make these up or are they official categories?
  • 1 0
 @littleskull99: this was from a website for European regulations, I shit you not. I am laughing because i never knew there was "categories" of bikes.... 20 years of riding mtb and road bikes and i still learn the industry makes up some shit so we have to buy new bikes.
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: yea, im not sure what the deal is, makes me question everything, not once did my local bike shops say i cant take my santa cruz 5010 to a bike park... I cant even find any ratings of categories for Santa Cruz bikes.
  • 1 0
 I weigh 240 pounds and ride pretty hard. If I were in the market for a new frame, I'd seriously consider this for the warranty.
  • 2 0
 Way more refined looking with frameset options, a contender now for sure.
  • 2 0
 well, was hoping for the 170, that one is cool but not for me
  • 1 0
 Bike looks awesome. Apologies if I missed it, will this be offered with an option to run it as a mullet?
  • 2 0
 I asked them a few weeks back and they said "Mullet won't work I'm afraid..." but didn't expand on that.
  • 2 0
 They do the DH bike as a mullet (AM.200.M ) so perhaps in the future.
  • 2 0
 Looks like it comes with the previous-gen Rockshox shock? Strange..
  • 1 3
 I'm a big fan of the innovation and adaptability of the Atherton Bikes Manufacturing process, and also think the bikes have a great aesthetic; along with the kind of pedigree that few manufacturers can match...

however, one of the primary things I was taught in sales is K.I.S.S. = Keep It Simple Stupid;

Sales is very much linked to psychology and can't help but wonder if rather than a USP, 22 sizes is to the detriment of the business, as would be customers are perplexed by excessive choice... initial excitment becomes excess analysis and ultimately confusion; even after purchase, buyers may continually wonder 'what if' regarding sizing choice

It might be better to use a conventional sizing model with 4 or 5 standard sizes (perhaps even dropping prices to reflect the reduced workload), then upsell custom sizing at additional cost for customers who request it
  • 3 0
 They have a bike fit calculator to guide you to the correct stock size and also recommended custom sizing for an upcharge.
  • 1 0
 @LaXcarp: I get that and hopefully it gains customers due to the unique approach, but it's a risky strategy, which imposes additional responsibility on the brand if a customer is not satisfied.

As for resale value... (which ties into brand perception)
  • 2 0
 We believe that perfect fit is absolutely key to an amazing ride experience - it's something that has always been important to Dan, Gee and Rach in their race careers and its proved to be massive for our customers too who almost without exception talk about the confidence that they get with this bike. Chosing the perfect size is actually very easy - just input 3 measurements into our fit calculator - or send them to us at sales@athertonbikes.com and we'll do it for you. If anyone is unsure about sizing we'll chat to them about their experiences on their current bike, the type of terrain they ride, riding style... so we'd argue that a customer is way LESS likely to end up with the wrong size bike
  • 2 0
 @Athertonbikesteam: Glad to see you're passionate about your creations and appreciate that a huge amount of work has gone into making these bikes the very best they can be.

Your response has given me a lot more confidence that you've put plenty of thought into this and I can appreciate that your unique approach may benefit the wider industry down the line as more data is gathered; after all, bike geometry has evolved massively in a few short years, so perhaps a tailored approach is the next logical step.
  • 1 0
 @Athertonbikesteam: where is the fit calculater? I have perused your site and cannot find.
  • 1 0
 @littleskull99: Site is def a little clunky; you have to click through a product (frame, build) and then they render the calculator on that page: www.athertonbikes.com/atherton-am-130-frame-1.html
  • 1 0
 Hey I have a 13.800 with pedals size large Bronson ,what is this with the weight ?
  • 1 0
 Well atleast they didn't just add the udh hanger and change colors like 95% of other manufacturers.
  • 10 9
 most underrated bike brand
  • 7 0
 How is the Atherton bike brand underrated?

Honest question...
  • 2 2
 About $4800 USD for a frame? That made the Allied folks cheer "we're not #1, we're not #1!"
  • 1 0
 Where are you getting your numbers from? it says $3,990, which is similar to a lot of brands now. It's expensive but it's more interesting than a 5010 frame for 4k
  • 1 0
 $3990 USD ... the dollar and euro prices don't include taxes. We have preferential origin status with EU which means 0% import tax - US customers will have to pay 11% import duty..
  • 1 1
 Looks nice but who thinks up the names for the latest Conti tyres. Drunken Scrabble!
  • 1 0
 Same weigh as my Orange Stage 6 Evo.
  • 2 1
 Looks like a Robot Session.
  • 1 1
 It’s about 750g heavier than a Stumphumper Evo, which isn’t all that bad I don’t think.
  • 1 0
 Finally a bike brand that thought about midgets,tall riders...
  • 1 0
 6.6k and it has select forks.....stop that.
  • 1 0
 Atherton XC or Down Country next?
  • 7 10
 I 100% get the difficulties of putting water bottle bosses on this bike, but it kills me to think of a trail bike that you can't put a bottle on. Otherwise I think this looks sweet!
  • 18 0
 this is an Atherton bike...the help rides behind you with the water bottles (see picture of Gee above)
  • 26 0
 Hey all our AM.130 and 150 models come with water bottle mounts as standard
  • 2 0
 Do I see bosses above the first T and the E? www.athertonbikes.com/media/athertons/IMG_1814.jpg
  • 3 0
 I think it has mounts, they are just hard to see. If you look real close and some of the pictures and watch the video on the Atherton Bikes site it looks like they are there.
  • 1 0
 @Athertonbikesteam: Oh great, sorry I should have cast a more critical eye!
  • 1 1
 Looks like a Ses...Fuel Ex...before 2022
  • 1 0
 Duh I meant frame only.
  • 1 0
 I'd pay in dollars.
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