Everything You Need to Know About Kona's New Process Bikes

Sep 12, 2017
by Mike Levy  



There was a time when Kona, that Pacific Northwest company famous for their tongue in cheek humor, was better known for their, well, tongue in cheek humor than bikes that people really lusted after. But then a funny thing happened in 2013: Kona made the forward-thinking call to apply the long front end, short rear end, short stem, slack head angle geometry paradigm to their brand new Process range.

Talk about a U-turn.

Sure, Kona wasn't the first brand to add length and subtract degrees from their head angles, but they were the first major North American company to do so, and their new Process lineup immediately became known as some of the best handling, most fun bikes on the market. No, they weren't light or sexy or even remotely well-rounded, but those first Process 153s, 134s, and 111s blew minds when it came to the primary reason that most do this whole mountain biking thing: F. U. N.

Four years on from testing the 111 (pictured at right) and I still think it's one of the best handling hooligans of a bike that I've ever ridden, and its longer-travel brothers received similar praise from many other reviewers as well.
Kona Process 111 Photo by Amy McDermid
RIP, Process 111, you legend.

But things have moved on now, and countless other brands are doing the same thing with their geometry, making it the norm rather than something special. Those original Process bikes are still a blast to ride, but Kona needed to do a refresh - no, a complete redesign - for 2018, and that's exactly what you see here.

Below, we'll go over the changes, why Kona made those changes, and what those changes mean on the trail. And instead of doing a silly "first ride review" that carries about as much weight as a wet paper bag, I'll talk about how the 29'' Process 153 AL/DL 29 compares to its smaller wheeled bro, the 27.5'' Process 153 CR/DL.





The old Process bikes were fine, so why the redesign?

Those original Process bikes were, and still are, very good machines. In my mind, all Kona needed to do was shed some weight from them, maybe by going carbon, but that wasn't in the cards for those first generation Process designs. Kona was working on it, we know that much, but Ian Schmitt, Kona Product Manager, was coy when it came to why they never came to fruition.

Instead, they went for a complete redesign, which begs the question: Are these new bikes new just for newness' sake? Or is there a real reason for the fresh look?


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
The big wheeled Process 153 AL/DL 29.


''The original Process had all the tenants that we normally attribute to a modern trail, enduro, I don't really care what category you want to describe it as,'' Schmitt explained. ''A bike that's really fun, slack, long reach, low bottom bracket, short chainstays, easy setup, low standover, progressive suspension. Something that was very intuitive, like an old friend,'' he said of those first Process bikes. But he also said that Kona wanted them to pedal better, to be more progressive and, lo behold, be able to fit a water bottle inside the front triangle. I feel kinda vindicated for all my bitching and moaning about not being able to carry a bottle on the bike.

So the new Process bikes see a raised main pivot compared to their predecessors in order to up anti-squat characteristics for better on-power feel, and a leverage curve that's more progressive overall while also getting an almost regressive hump near the top of the travel. ''At 30% sag, you sit at the top of the progressive component of the leverage curve,'' Schmitt says before going on to say that this provides traction without that annoying wallow-y feeling. The new leverage curve is designed around metric trunion-mount shocks, but it will also play nice with coil-sprung shocks to boot.

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bigquotesWe wanted a bike that pedaled in the 'open' position very well; we wanted a bike with a progressive leverage curve that was able to use coil shocks; we wanted to maintain that standover height. In order to get all those three things, we went ahead and changed to a vertically oriented, trunion-mount shock, which looks more like our Operator design.Ian Schmitt, Kona Product Manager, on the Process redesign.

That sounds great and all, but couldn't they accomplish all of the above with the old design, I asked Schmitt. ''That's a great question. Yes, we could have done those things with the old Process design, but what's the biggest thing that you don't want to carry on your back?'' he replied, referring to packs.

''We switched to this design specifically because, one, it falls in line with all the other bikes we see in this room [referencing the rest of their MTB range w/ vertical shocks], and because a water bottle fits in the front triangle, which is a huge selling feature for us. That was the driving factor, but it also allowed us to increase the frame stiffness.''
Kona Process Photo by Caleb Smith
Good news: you don't need to wear a backpack to keep from getting dehydrated anymore.

I'm more likely to use the Bing search engine than don a backpack, so I can get behind Kona's train of thought.



Hit Me With the Tech Details

Depending on what you're into, the new tech that comes part and parcel with an all-new design is either going to get you excited or maybe have you writing a novel in the comments section. Kona's new Process series does sport some nifty features, but they're definitely not looking to reinvent the wheel with these new bikes. Instead, they've included useable ingredients and focused on reliability and rigidity.

Kona has always favored beef over extreme weight savings, and that theme continues for 2018. All of the new bikes make use of large 20mm ID sealed bearings at the rocker and main pivots, bearings that add grams but should also add dependability. There are smaller sealed bearings at the other pivot locations, and new three-piece locking pivot axles are used to keep stuff from rattling loose over time. Yes, I know you check your pivot hardware all the time and follow a rigorous maintenance schedule, but I guess this is for the very few riders who don't do that.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Massive 20mm ID bearings at the two main pivots and locking hardware should keep things running smooth and rattle-free.


All of the bikes, carbon or not, see aluminum chainstays used for durability's sake, and I also suspect that it doesn't make sense cost-wise to build them out of carbon fiber. There's room for a 2.5'' wide tire on a 35mm (internal) wide rim back there, too, so there shouldn't be any concern about clearance.

Cable routing is a facet of bike design that's often deserving of criticism, but Kona looks to have things sorted, with the aluminum Process range seeing external bosses and tailgate-friendly routing on the top side of the downtube. Carbon Process' get internal routing that's borrowed from Kona's Hei Hei frame, and the port on the downtube is also home to a spare derailleur hanger. Tricky.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Internal cable routing only for the carbon frames, while alloy models are external only.


Dropper posts are getting more travel but our legs aren't getting any longer, so many bikes are coming with shorter seat tubes to compensate until human evolution can catch up. Kona has gone down this road, too, with the large and extra-large sizes fitting a 170mm travel post, the medium taking a 150mm, and the small a 125mm (but most riders should be able to use a 150mm dropper on the small, Kona says). All of the posts, regardless of travel, can be slammed in the frame just so long as it's not a Reverb that uses a Connectamajig - it sticks out a bit at the bottom and gets in the way.

If you're going to use a dropper, you may as well have as much travel as you can.



Geometry Numbers

If you're into fun and being a hooligan on a bike, Kona's original Process range was right up your alley. With short rear ends, long reaches, and slack-ish head angles, the bikes put a focus on laughs rather than KOMs, and that approach was a hit with many riders. ''We value playfulness. We come from Bellingham, Washington," Schmitt said of what they want when it comes to handling. ''The trails require a bike that's fun and playful,'' he continued, so it's no surprise that it's much the same with these new rigs, thankfully, with Kona applying that same M.O. across the 2018 Process range.

Much more interesting, however, are the similarities between the 27.5'' and 29'' wheeled bikes: both sport 425mm rear ends, the same 66-degree head tube angle, the same reach numbers (475mm on a large), and stack that's only a handful of millimeters apart (621mm on the 29er, 616mm on the 27.5'' bike). Just as important, especially on long-travel bikes like these, all of them have 76-degree seat tube angles.


Kona
Geometry for the 29er Process.


The bottom bracket drops are obviously different between the 29'' and 27.5'' bikes, though, with the former sporting 29mm and the latter having 19mm less. The other number that has to be different is the fork offset; it's 51mm on the 29er and 42mm on the 27.5'' bike. Another thing worth noting is that Kona's 29er Process bikes might have the shortest headtubes in history; they're just 100mm long in order to keep handlebar height similar between them and the 27.5'' wheeled rigs. That's so short that there isn't even room for OneUp's new EDC tool to fit down there!



The New Process Lineup

There are seven new Process models that span two wheel sizes, three different frames, and two materials, and all of them fall into the same 'I want to pedal up most of the time and send it all of the time' category to varying degrees. Let's start with the four 27.5'' wheeled bikes first, though.


Kona Caleb Smith
The top of the line 153 CR/DL 27.5 costs $5,999 USD.


The carbon fiber 153 CR/DL 27.5 sits at the top of the range and has a 160mm-travel Lyrik RCT3 Solo Air up front to go with its 153mm of rear-wheel travel via a Super Deluxe RCT shock. There's Eagle drivetrain bits, WTB rims, and proper Maxxis Minion DHF EXO TR 3C 2.5'' and 2.35'' rubber. All that adds up to $5,999 USD. Oh, and I hope you like baby blue...


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
  $4,799 USD will get you the 153 CR 27.5.

Process 153 AL DL 27.5
Process 153 AL 27.5
The 153 AL/DL 27.5 (left) costs $3,599 USD, while the 153 AL 27.5 (right) goes for $2,999 USD.


One down is the all-black, carbon fiber 153 CR 27.5. There's a Lyrik Solo Air up front, a Deluxe non-Super shock out back, and more Eagle gearing. This one costs $4,799 USD. The aluminum bikes are next up, with the $3,599 USD 153 AL/DL 27.5 and $2,999 USD 153 AL 27.5 sporting the same geometry but in a more cost-effective package.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
My Squamish test bike was the 153 AL/DL 29 that costs $3,599 USD.


Those who prefer big wheels have two bikes to choose from, both of them being aluminum. There will be carbon versions down the road, Schmitt said, but they're still a ways out. The top tier (for now) alloy 153 AL/DL 29 is the bike I rode in Squamish, and it has a 160mm Yari fork and Deluxe RT shock combo, 2.3'' Maxxis Minnion DFH EXO TR tires, and a 12-speed Eagle drivetrain. $3,599 USD will get you that one. I'd expect the top, top tier carbon version to have a similar spec to the high-end CR/DL 27.5 bike when it's released, so keep your eyes peeled for that one.

The $2,999 USD 153 AL 29 includes cost-saving details like a Trans-X dropper post, an NX 11-speed drivetrain, and WTB's STP i29 rims, but it's all hung off the same frame (with the same geometry) as the pricier 153 AL/DL 29.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
The big bike is the $3,999 USD Process 165.


Last but not least, especially if you like to go big, is the $3,999 USD Process 165. As the name tells you, the aluminum bike has 165mm of travel, and it's paired with a 170mm stroke Lyrik RC Solo Air. This rig is 1-degree slacker up front (65 compared to 66-degrees on the other bikes), and rolls on 27.5'' wheels. I didn't get a chance to ride the gray beast, but it'd definitely be happy in the park. That said, it features the same suspension kinematics so it should pedal relatively well given its travel.

Sadly, the Process 111 is no longer, although I can understand why given that the market for that fun oddball was probably quite small. There are still two Process bikes of the old design in the catalog, though, with the 153 SE costing $2,199 USD and the 134 SE going for $2,099 USD.





Kona Photo by Caleb Smith


I know, so many freakin' numbers. Probably too many if you're more interested in how the second generation Process' ride, so let's get on to that part. Finally.

I spent a few days down the road in Squamish, B.C., to ride the 153 AL/DL 29 on some pretty hairy trails; picture long, steep, scary rock slabs and singletrack covered in wet spaghetti monster roots that want to put you on your ass. Typical Squamish-ness that made me wish I had brought my knee pads, and not the kind of place that you'd expect big wheels to excel, at least up until the last year or two.

It's only recently that 29'' wheels, a lot of forgiving travel, and slack head angles have been combined, and the results of that are often (but not always) a bike that is happy to go over anything from a nasty rock garden to a small car, usually without much fuss. The trick, however, is to make a bike that's happy to eat a family hatchback but also willing to dance with you when some finesse is required. After all, plowing is fun but every trail is full of corners and opportunities to play around.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Sometimes just holding on and riding out is enough to make you smile.


I rode a large-sized 153 AL/DL 29 and, surprise surprise, it's pretty happy to carry speed over anything you point it at, but it's also a bike that can dance. Now, that is a surprise. The aluminum bike never felt like it had a big footprint to me, likely due to that tiny rear end and what looks like an overbuilt frame that's surely quite torsionally rigid. It's not a lightweight, clearly, but it doesn't ride heavy, and also doesn't feel like it's stuck down in its travel like some of these all-mountain sleds tend to be. When you want to leave the ground, it'll do so; when you want to stay stuck, it'll do that as well. Neat trick, Kona.

It's also remarkably easy to get the bike's front end up, be it just to pop over something at a slow speed or for a grin-inducing manual through the trees. I found myself grinning quite often on the AL/DL 29, actually, which has to be a good sign.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
Big wheels be dammed, the AL/DL 29 loves to be gooned.


The AL/DL 29 is happy to dive in and out of corners, too, even more so than many 27.5'' bike of similar travel. That's a welcome trait, and one that I wasn't expecting given that some big wheelers like to spend more of their time upright than leaned over.

And how does feel when you're on the gas? Well, it has over 150mm out back and heavy rubber, so it pedals like it has 150mm out back and heavy rubber, but it's relatively efficient. It still isn't going to be my choice for a five or six-hour monster, but that's not really what Kona was aiming for with this thing. The shock, when left open to do its job, does stay quite calm when you turning the cranks over with some skill, but I'd still reach down for that cheater switch if I'm going to be trucking up anything smooth-ish, and that's more than fine for a bike like this.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
The big wheeler can go through anything, as you'd expect, but it can also be as playful as you want it to be.


After my time in Squamish, I got my hands on the baby blue 153 CR/DL 27.5 to ride on my home trails, trails that are, unfortunately, less technically demanding than the goods Squamish has to offer. The speeds on my trails are much higher, however, and the 27.5'' wheeled bike was more and more at home as things got quicker. It doesn't feel quite as nimble as the big wheeled AL/DL 29, which is unexpected, but this could easily be down to me putting a lot more time on 29ers lately. One thing is for sure, though: this baby blue bomber is extremely secure and stiff feeling; it's probably the most flex-free, solid bike that I can recall, which is confidence inspiring, to say the least.

Again, the pedaling is decent and, if you're on singletrack, there's no reason to firm the shock up. Fire roads, yes, but I wouldn't bother on a proper singletrack climb, just like with the 29er.


Kona Photo by Caleb Smith
There are plenty of steep rolls in Squamish for you to pucker up on.


Which bike would I choose? The carbon fiber 153 CR/DL 27.5 costs $5,999 USD and comparing it the aluminum 153 AL/DL 29 that goes for $3,599 USD hardly seems fair, but life isn't fair. Life is also surprising, though, and I'd choose the less expensive big wheeler, parts spec and frame material be dammed. The 153 AL/DL 29's big wheels go over and through everything and, since my riding style seems to suit 29'' wheels lately, I'd happily reach for the heavier bike with the cost-conscious build.


383 Comments

  • + 162
 Perfecting a design can be a long "Process"
  • + 133
 I have 111 problems but a bike aint one.
  • - 4
flag vonroder77 (Sep 12, 2017 at 1:40) (Below Threshold)
 @ecly13: Hehehehe love it!
  • + 56
 Yeah,man,but what you Kona do?
  • - 24
flag Boardlife69 (Sep 12, 2017 at 2:40) (Below Threshold)
 After a Mexican lunch the process becomes stinky.
  • + 27
 @vonroder77: You mean hei hei love it!
  • - 63
flag enrico650 (Sep 12, 2017 at 5:41) (Below Threshold)
 Mr. Levy
So the 29er is more fun than a 27.5 bike?
We already know you like 29ers. Please don't insult us
  • + 16
 @nozes: if they only knew what the word kona means in portugese...lol
  • - 1
 @vonroder77: hei hei hei
  • - 6
flag Poulsbojohnny (Sep 12, 2017 at 7:59) (Below Threshold)
 @Boardlife69. Extra thumbs up. That was pretty funny, no matter what the thumbs down indicate.

@NJrookie. Oh, but we do. Just imagine the laughs back in the day if you rode a Kona Stinky...
  • + 5
 @NJrookie: i have no idea what it means xD
  • + 10
 " Another thing worth noting is that Kona's 29er Process bikes might have the shortest headtubes in history; they're just 100mm long in order to keep handlebar height similar between them and the 27.5'' wheeled rigs."

E29's in S/M are 95mm.
  • + 1
 @thiagogsx: Me neither
  • + 0
 @jclnv: Yes but if I'm not wrong, E29 is running IS instead of a ZS headset, which makes impossible to run an angle set later.
  • + 1
 @vonroder77
Or it can be done in a single session...
  • + 0
 And they did it so you could put a water bottle on it...
  • + 5
 @NJrookie: Oh we found out what it meant when we were part of a Kona media launch in the early 2000's in the Algarve, Southern Portugal. All our hotel rooms were booked under "Kona", we all sported Kona t-shirts, etc. A very embarrassed maid enlightened us to the translation.
  • + 3
 @mtnboy: lmao....thats hilarious.
  • + 7
 Haters kona hate.
  • + 1
 @NJrookie: in icelandic it means woman
  • + 3
 @George-k: in Portugal it means a womans southern part.
  • + 1
 Alice Cooper,sees a Kona bike on the golf course: Hei, hei Stoopid!
  • + 71
 The reason why I've been in love with Kona for years is because they were doing stuff their own way, not simply following current trends and hypes. However looking at this lineup I'm glad I own and ride Process 167. It's outdated with 26 inch wheels, but unique with its shape, style and ride.
  • + 24
 The 167 is on my n+1 list. Awesome looking bike
  • + 4
 total dream bike!
  • + 2
 @OzMike: same here! One of the coolest bikes ever. The new 165 looks interesting too, but the 167 is a classic.
  • + 5
 Yeah, I was bummed to see the 165 had a really high standover and seems to be more of a trail bike than a hooligan park bike like the 167.
  • + 10
 never ever seen one for sale!
  • + 1
 F.ck yeah man!
  • + 3
 Yeah, I love my 167! Got it used this year and have been having a blast on it.
  • + 1
 @FindDigRideRepeat: The 165 is more of an super enduro bike, something to ride for megavalanche, than a real park bike. Tho it would probably do just fine in a park with that spec.
  • + 5
 I moved in BC two years ago and bought a 167. The best bike I have ever have so much fun !!!
  • + 3
 Yeah right, what setted kona proceess lineup appart was geometry, low anti-squat and accordingly low pedal kickback, and few rotational forces on the shock linkage, both points largely contributing to the huge traction/sensitivity/terrain tracking of the rear suspension.
The only perfectible think was the leverage ratio, too constant (linear) across the travel.

Judging by the main pivot location, they add a lot of AS so the PKB will increase consequently.
Shock gets vertical mounting so a lot of rotational forces on the weak trunion mount.
Now all the modern bikes gets a longer reach/wheelbase and a steeper Seat tube.

So Kona, what set your process lineup appart now from a trek slash or other modern implementation of single pivot bike with linkage activated shock ?
  • + 1
 @gnralized: Good questions indeed... most of character gets lost.. prices are still good btw!!
  • + 4
 26 will never be outdated
  • + 2
 My buddy has one - Rasta colors!
  • + 2
 @crysvb: they'll come back. Park bikes are designed to be 26. Just built a session for $400 with spare parts from the old bikes hehe
  • + 62
 Dear kona get we get a video of Aggy rippin the new 165 ? thanks
  • + 54
 Looks like a Trek.
And a Norco.
But the hell cares. It looks awesome!! The blue/minty one is amazeballs! Wink
  • - 1
 Looks like strive
  • + 6
 Haha yeah it does look like a session. But it looks damn hot!
  • + 14
 Actually, it looks like a classic Kona Wink
  • + 3
 And Transition nowadays too.
  • + 6
 Im with you @ShinDigz - I think it look sh!t hot. Who gives a damn if it looks like a bike, it is a bike! If it rides just as well as my 2015 153dl, with the same stand over and a slight increase in pedaling performance, I will be stoked.
  • + 2
 looks like Rocky Mtn Slayer IMO
  • + 18
 I am the first person to moan back at someone who comes out with the usual single pivot v multi link thing but I have to wonder why Kona didnt move to horst suspension here when the arrangement would essentially be unchanged and there are benefits to be realised (its not like moving from a single lever bike to a multi arm design)

I also find it quite funny that nobody has said 'single pivots suck' yet like they do when they see an Orange, just because it has a linkage to drive the shock.
  • - 8
flag FlorentVN (Sep 12, 2017 at 4:22) (Below Threshold)
 Definetly not the same than a single pivot. There is a big misunderstanding on that horstlink thing. You can achieve pretty much the same with both faux bar and horstlink systems
  • + 8
 @FlorentVN: please explain how the Kona isn't a single pivot?

As said above, I am the first to praise single pivot designs especially those that exhibit simplicity like Orange and Starling, this Kona has all of the complexity of a Horst but is a single pivot. How do you believe it to be otherwise? The wheel pivots around one point - happy to be convinced otherwise if you care to explain it.
  • - 7
flag WaterBear (Sep 12, 2017 at 6:10) (Below Threshold)
 Reading your comment makes me think I don't know what "single pivot" means. The bikes in this article have some kind of 4 bar arrangement. This means their instant centers can move around and they can do complicated things.

Orange bikes can't. They tend to have significant PKB because of where they put their fixed pivot, and I have always assumed that this was a necessary compromise to achieve whatever anti-squat characteristics Orange were after. In pretty much every significant way, the design Orange use and the design Kona used are different.
  • + 11
 @WaterBear: No they are single pivots. No instant centers. Look at the bikes.
Some of the best handling bikes I have owned are single pivots,
  • + 9
 @WaterBear: Look more closely - the Kona's wheel is mounted to the chainstay not the seatstay - It is a single pivot (compare to a transition for example) - In pretty much every significant way, the Kona and Orange are identical - All the Konas arrangement can offer in addition (in terms of suspension, discounting other factors such as stiffness) is the ability to tune leverage ratio, but I bet it wont be far off that of a single pivot there either.

Many other bikes are also single pivots but people dont fall into the trap of saying how badly they will ride as they are visually more complicated.

This is why I made my point about why Konda didnt move to a horst design, the arrangement is already there.
  • + 5
 @WaterBear: Its really about axle path. Look at the chainstay. There is no extra pivot between the main pivot and the wheel axle. This means the rear wheel axle only moves in a constant radius arc. That is single pivot. With horst and mulitlink/VPP systems the wheel can move in a path other than a constant radius. This single pivot has a linkage driven shock, but that is just modifying the shock rate.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: Most people use the term single pivot to describe a suspension layout where the rear wheel rotates around a single point. It is easiest to spot by counting the number of pivots between the rear axel and the main pivot. In this case that is 0. In a Horst or VPP there is an additional pivot between the main pivot and rear axel.

Kona is using a linkage driven version of a single pivot. They have 2 "bars" between the axel and the shock. As opposed to classic single pivots like Orange, where the swing arm drives the shock.
  • + 6
 Truth, erry time there is an orange bike the single pivot hate comes out loud and proud. Makes me want an orange
  • + 3
 It is a single pivot period. This is the same design Kona used to use . It's almost identical to the old Kona design they were famous for and the old look that made Kona look the the way they did. If you watch the videos of this bike you will see the guy in the brakes a lot going down hill. The suspension doesn't move hardly at all. You touch the brakes and it locks the suspension up and loos traction. The work fun is thrown in because the bike doesn't go through objects but bounces off and over objects. It gets poppy and fun. You can pop off of stuff and it'll jump nice . It doesn't rob energy but then again you are not getting the traction of a virtual pivot or a horstlink design. If you soften the suspension up it goes through stuff but then it'll change gears on you and you'll really feel the chain tug.
I like the design it is strong and long lasting . Kona has always had the KISS attitude. I do really like the DW link design also where you ride through stuff. This is for optimal traction. @El-Train:
  • + 2
 @NatuRaOx2: thank you good explanation. I am torn between Merida one sixty or this Kona any advice appreciated.cheers
  • + 3
 Single Pivot, the linkage drives the shock. It does not perform like a true 4 bar (horst link) with regards to isolating suspension from braking. Having ridden a 134 for 3 years now, it squats slightly under braking and the suspension stiffens up, it does not perform well under braking on rough or rooty trails. The pivot location on the older bikes provided no pedal kickback but also provided little to no pedaling platform with anything larger than a 30t ring. So it pedaled poorly, and braked poorly. It's geometry was also steep (68deg for a 140mm bike is steep), but this new one looks to solve pedaling and geometry (as it's the 153, which had good geo). Should be improvements all around.
  • + 4
 @ekho: Transition. Big Grin
  • - 3
 @Racer951: that single pivot term has been over used initially by brands using FSR and VPP in order to denigrate other designs. It just lost its meaning. Yes this bike is a single pivot if you consider the axle path (so is trek split pivot or evil bikes design by the way) but no it can t be compared with a simple mono pivot design. The fact that there are pivots and rockers allow to play with leverage ratio direction changes, kickback, anti squat, anti rise in a way it is impossible with a mono pivot like orange. That s a bit misleading i think to say that it s just a single pivot and it s worst than horstlink. From my point of view, you can achieve basically the same thing.
  • + 7
 Kickback and Anti-squat are a result of the main pivot location on a single pivot, not the linkage. It doesn't matter if it's a link driven shock or a swingarm driven shock, the main pivots location in reference to the chainring is what affects those. Split pivot is a way around the horst link in isolating brake from suspension forces, and horst link/fsr/ict does the same thing. All true single pivots (whether shock is driven by swing arm or links is no different) have connected forces that cause either squat (most common) or jack (least common, only lawill and similar designs had true brake jack but it's named after it now). On shorter travel bikes this is less exaggerated and is more noticeable on longer travel bikes. That said, squat can be a benefit for certain styles of riding, some guys prefer it and it helps compress the bike into corners, matching the forks (Barrel flipped the brake arm on his stab to force brake squat back in 2002).
  • + 3
 @FlorentVN: It's clear you lack any real understanding of the subject and you are just repeating what you have heard online, sorry.

More than half of your statement is completely false - go and read up on anti squat / rise and pedal kickback.

You have been drinking far too much marketing cool aid and not enough actual mechanics.
  • - 2
 Im going to have to side with @FlorentVN here. When most people say 'single pivot', they . mean non-linkage driven, like orange. After lateral stiffness, The compression curve is the most important part of a frames suspension design. This changes how poppy, buttery, or linear (pedal-friendly) a bike is, and influences the geometry of the whole bike. We sometimes get hung up on Geo numbers, but especially in a full suspension those numbers are dynamic, and two bikes with equal HTA can handle dramatically different if they have different rear suspension kinematics. Thus, saying 'single pivot' usually denotes a simplified, truly single pivot bike with a single point of rotation, while Kona, Evil, etc that only have a single pivot between the brake mounts and drop-outs are usually labeled as a linkage-driven single pivot.
  • - 4
flag WaterBear (Sep 12, 2017 at 10:11) (Below Threshold)
 @RLEnglish: Well I will be damned, you are correct. The rear axle is connected directly to the front pivot.

This does not change the fact that they are 4 bar designs, although the IC does not move.

Welp, I will jump in there and say that you are right, I wonder why they went with this design haha. I take your point now that moving that one pivot from the seatstay to the chainstay probably would have been a good idea.
  • + 2
 @NatuRaOx2: that's a load of bobbins, I'll dig out the video of my gopro mounted on the seat tube of my process 153 ( also single pivot) going down a DH run sits nicely in the travel throughout, whether I brake or not ! I run my shock quite firm for reaching too!
  • + 5
 @WaterBear: they are not 4 bar designs - they are single pivots, google '4 bar design'.

@hamncheez: Orange bikes don't have lateral stiffness issues, i agree that this design allows a more engineered approach to leverage ratios but as I say, why not go to the Horst and realise other benefits.
  • + 0
 @Racer951: I agree, most people would prefer the performance of the Horst link, but I still say MOST bikers will identify a single pivot suspension design as something like Orange or the new GT, since they are very simple and all of them have much more similar performance characteristics (not necessarily bad ones) than a linkage driven design, which allows for a wider range of performance tuning and therefore justifies a different label.
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: what you are saying just isn't true though, not at all - unless you look into / understand the leverage ratio obtained using a linkage how can you say that?

What if a linkage single pivot had a very similar leverage curve to a non linkage single pivot, do you still think they would ride differently if stiffness and pivot location were identical?

I know it's hard to stomach, but the bike industry is full of marketing jibberish - this isn't me saying the Kona isn't a great bike, I wouldn't say that as I quite like single pivots I just wish people saw through the marketing junk a little more.
  • - 1
 @Racer951: like "regressive hump near the top of the travel" ?
  • + 4
 @MX298: The nicest bikes I have ridden have a linear progressive leverage curve, no strange shapes to the graph, no digressive to progressive to digressive curve that makes a bike harder to predict.

Would I be right in saying Santa Cruz ditched the strange curve in favour of the more predictable linear progressive curve of the new Nomad 4?

I don't mind a flattening off of things near bottom out to prevent it being hard to reach full travel but dont want any strange feeling bike in the mid stroke, each to your own.
  • + 3
 @Racer951: I said, "which allows for a wider range of performance tuning" meaning you can do more with a linkage, not that the curve you get from a true single pivot is bad or good, just that there is much more variation possible with linkage driven single pivots.
  • + 2
 The thing with Orange is that their back ends are very very ugly. Maybe the suspension is great. I have no idea. But the bikes are fugly.
  • + 2
 Yeah it's a single pivot but, not all single pivots are the same. That kind of thinking is limiting
  • + 2
 @Racer951: Hmm. I looked it up on Wikipedia and as far as I can tell, a 4 bar linkage is a pretty broad class of linkages. To quote:

"A four-bar linkage, also called a four-bar, is the simplest movable closed chain linkage. It consists of four bodies, called bars or links, connected in a loop by four joints."

Could be wrong about this too, though. I'm batting zero so far.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: This is why I ride a Canfield. They set up their dual-link design such that the instant center is nearly stationary, and is located where the chain meets the chainring. Zero kickback. They did this while simultaneously engineering high anti-squat numbers that persist throughout travel. So the AS is something like 90%+ throughout the entire travel (at least in the lower gears, where it matters most, but even the high gears have relatively high AS throughout travel). I have never bothered to look at the leverage rate curves but I can tell you as an owner that DVO Topaz rear shock works perfectly, neither bottoming too easily nor with too much difficulty.

On their downhill bike the more-or-less stationary IC is located high on the bike and they ran an idler through it to prevent kickback. This allows the rear axle to have that nice rearward path that's so desireable on DH bikes.

It's a brand worth looking into.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: the balance is on my list for next bike. It looks like a great trail ride.l
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: But the Kona isnt a 4 bar linkage, its a single pivot - the wheel pivots around one point - its not a 4 bar system, it just uses two other 'bars' to compress the shock.

4 bar is an engineering term, how it crosses over to the cycling world is often in marketing not reality.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: They're great bikes. Bomb proof, too. The Balance can do everything from trail to park.

FYI if you check the closeouts on Canfields web store they have the 2016 Balance for $1500 USD.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: only medium and small. I'm 6'1" with a 76" reach so prob XL.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: What I like about canefields design is that since the anti-squat is consistent throughout the travel of the bike, you can run offset bushings, play with sag, or just have you suspension set up poorly and you still can get good performance out of it.
  • + 2
 @NatuRaOx2: Its much stiffer then a single pivot and offers more leverage ratio options by design. But youre right about braking! I had a stinky and a stab primo when I was a downhiller in the early 2000. It was very bad when braking and on the world cup they had some prototypes with floating brakes to solve that. Every time I look a kona im amazed to see that design come back over again despite its very poor braking performance.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: 4 bar and single pivot are not mutually exclusive. The seat tube, chainstay, seatstay, and rocker are the 4 bars required of a 4 bar linkage.

@atrokz: That is disappointing Frown I am 5'11" and I ride a large. It's a great size for me so you are XL for sure, but if you e-mail them they will tell you.

@hamncheez: Yea the AS is awesome. What I noticed right away was the vanishingly small kickback. My old bike had great anti squat in the low gears but also huge kickback, so when pedaling uphill over rough crap it was like you were on a hard tail. The whole bike would bump up and over the obstacle. The Canfield is completely different. When you hit something while pedaling up the suspension is just as active as when the bike is in tall gears and you're bombing down. It's awesome.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: Giving it more thought, I bothered to look it up explicitly on Wikipedia. Visit this link:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_suspension#Rear_suspension

To quote:

"Linkage driven single pivot

Another implementation of the single pivot design attaches the swingarm to the shock via additional linkages, typically creating a four-bar linkage actuating ("driving") the shock to create a more progressive leverage ratio between wheel travel and shock absorber travel."

Now we know.
  • + 2
 Im out - this is becoming an argument with no conclusion if copy and paste is all you are interested in.
  • + 3
 @WaterBear: while a 4 bar linkage arrangement can be done may ways, the term for bike suspension has generally meant the true Horst link 4 bar, and the single pivot, seat-stay driven rocker link called 'faux bar' for years to help differentiate. As it stands, the Single pivot, split pivot, and horst/fsr/ict link designs are 4 bars, but one is truly a single pivot with regards to how it behaves.
  • + 1
 @atrokz: Ah, gotcha. I was wondering what the difference in the bike world might be. Thanks!

@Racer951: Not trying to prove you wrong, just legitimately curious what the definitions are. Thanks for taking the time to reply as much as you have.
  • + 16
 This bike seems good and i'm sure will attract the masses. However i can't help to think that it lacks a bit of craziness. That design is far too common these days. It works well, convenient from a design perspective, it fits a water bottle but it doesn't stand out for any reason : concept, price, riding style, shape... Just released but have the feeling that i saw it before.
  • + 36
 It's actually harkening back to their original faux-bar suspension days in my mind. Reminds me of the old Stinky and Stab frames from the late 90s and early 2000s.
  • + 13
 I think this redesign is a mistake. They now look like Treks, probably have more pedal kickback than "old" Processes. The only thing that differentiate those bike from the crowd is a slightly shorter chainstays, but short chainstain hype is passing already. I am disappointed.
  • + 2
 @seraph: yeah the chainstay and main pivot look to be very similar to the mid 2000s Stinky. I really like these other than that worthless top-tube/seat tube gusset. That gusset would function better if it were to extend over the top tube more.
  • + 3
 Faux bar , horstlink, vpp, any weird name you can invent are all good as long as you place the pivots properly. It's more a lack of creativity that i denounce. They did a good job with the old Process. I'm sure they could have dug the concept a bit more. Like specialized with the enduro. They keep the base for which they are famous : FSR, X shape frame but keep adding creative features : Tilt adjustable Seat post, integrated tools, SWAT...
  • + 4
 @seraph: exactly, monster rocker arms Konas are back
  • + 3
 @seraph: My first full suspension frame was a a green stinky, loved that thing at the time, it had about 130mm of travel and I thought it was a DH bike, oh how things change....
  • + 1
 @lkubica: the pivots are actually in really neutral positions, and the chainstays connect the rear wheel directly to the main pivot, so they all should have really low pedal feedback. Maybe upsize the chainring a few teeth and have pretty much 0 degrees of kick at the bottom of the cassette
  • + 4
 @Racer951: I still use my '07 Stinky. Never going to sell it, I love it! I've had it from new, since 2008. Used to be for DH but now I've stuck a 400mm long seatpost in and I use it for enduro style riding.
  • + 3
 @lkubica: can you show me which trek they look like? I have a new trek and well it looks nothing like my bike.
  • + 1
 @FlorentVN: the old frame design had a lot of limits... Why stick features on a design that needs some revisions itself?
  • + 6
 @2bigwheels: it looks like a rocky mountain Slayer
  • + 0
 @markar: it shares a similar silhouette. I'll give yah that.
  • + 1
 @markar: Finally the most recent relevant comparison. & in his review of Slayer, M. Levy is dumbfounded by its standing-climbing chops.
  • + 16
 The "old" process (153 deluxe) beeing the funniest bike i ever rode on, i seriously doubt this can be better ! IMO, it now looks like any other bike there: trek, norco, ellsworth, cube, transition , giant, kona ... all these bikes have the "same" geo now! are we heading to a global uniformization??

R3ACT technology FTW haha Big Grin
  • + 3
 I looks good. But also, like you mentioned, it looks like a session. If I saw this out on the trail today and never saw this article, I would instantly think it's a trek.
  • + 2
 I've got the same 153. Agreed -- funnest bike I've ever owned!
  • + 1
 @ivanwing: he didn't say "funnest", just suggested that it puts a smile on his face Smile
  • + 15
 Personally quite happy wearing a pack, so squeezing in a water bottle send a silly reason to change a bikes design.
Surely it should all be about how it rides.
That said if the bikes as much fun as my 2014 153 I'll be very happy.

Interesting they've kept numbers the same between wheelsizes, same rear end means 29er will have mid issues 27.5 not as flickable?

Either way I put the deposit down on my 153 29er last week!, but bikes not due until early November (in UK) :-(. I can't wait that long
  • + 15
 Haven't worn a pack in 18 months of riding. Hate it. Won't buy a bike that won't give me the option of one and based on the volume of packs I sell declining. This is becoming the trend.
  • - 3
 @bonfire: ^^ THIS
  • + 10
 Back pack makes for good insulation in UK weather. And hate filling pockets with stuff. Multi Tool, pump, spare tubes, food, phone. Spare layer. It's nice for short rides not having one but il gladly give up bottle mounts just to not have to look at another generic looking bike. The Al dl 29er and the basic carbon 27.5 are my faves of the bunch. The top minty looks naff and has poor spec for the high price IMHO. Glad they made them coil friendly. The rockshox air cans can't keep up and hamper my 2014 153 but been told they don't play well with Coils so stuck a bit.
  • - 1
 @bonfire: cool people don't wear packs, ride 29ers with giant chain stays and like, whatever the new fork offset is that is better. Mountain bikers are a bunch of sheep.

Riding with a pack sucks though. Best to just ride with someone that does so you can use their stuff when you break down.
  • + 13
 @bonfire: I get that some people hate packs, but I don't. It's becoming trendy these days so people feel a need to poke me about my pack. Sort of like how I love to jump my bike but I ride clips. All the other guys at the jumps feel a need to occasionally remind me that having clips somehow means I have less skill.
  • + 7
 Don't use a pack. Put a water bottle in the front of your pants. Ladies love you, and you have water during your ride.
  • + 13
 I nearly always wear a pack unless it's a very short ride. The key is learning how to use it. All the items carried have to be distributed evenly so the weight sits right. The pack MUST be able to cinch up tight so the items don't shift around there. And the pack must have a hip strap and a chest strap to secure it to your back. If all this is taken care of then you might just forget you were wearing one after a while! And the added space is nice for longer treks thru the mountains for lots of water and food!
  • + 7
 @DragontalesDH: Yep, totally agree.

The only thing I don't like about a pack is that it raises my center of gravity which means I need to make sure to stay low and back on steep rough stuff.

However, I've lost count of how many times my pack has saved me from serious physical harm during a rolling, tumbling wipe out. With the right pack secured as you mentioned its the perfect back armor / support.
  • + 6
 I went OTB twice in the last couple weeks and my pack saved my back both times. Now if I only would have worn knee protection....I would have fewer scabs!!
  • + 2
 @DragontalesDH: This. I use a Reebok pack that I got at Costco 15 years ago. Chest and waist strap. Cinch it down and it doesn't move enough to be a bother except if I screw up. The size is perfect and the pocket setup is perfect. I have yet to find a new pack that has the same size and setup. Most are either far to big or so tiny you might as well use a bottle.

And yes, I can put a bottle in the frame of my Kona but its a huge pain in the ass to remove and replace. I suspect it will be the same with all the new bikes that now fit them. No thanks.
  • + 3
 @wibblywobbly: hopefully you buy them a brew after they bail your ass out with the tools they're humping up the hill. Smile

(I'm one of those people, the pack never bothered me.)
  • + 1
 started wearing a bib this year (sombrio) and it is awesome. the one bottle that a bike can hold wont get me through pretty much any ride, but i can hold 3 bottles in my bib and am set for most rides. combine that with a backcountry research strap and all my tubes and tools are on the frame. its awesome.
  • + 5
 Tracey Mosely used to do all right wearing a pack...
  • + 2
 The same geo of the 27.5 and the 29er would mean that one or the other will be a compromise. The geo looks to be better suited for the 29er since it's a bit on the steep side and would make the bigger wheel more agile and the 29er has better roll-over abilities. But not riding either yet, I can't be certain and could be completely wrong
  • + 7
 @Xorrox: THAT'S why I wear a pack--the spine protection. Tuck and roll when getting bucked, and that little water cushion works wonders to protect you. Sure, if I was running up the sh*t trail at the edge of town, a pack would be a overkill.. but most of my rides are 2+ hours, so a single bottle isn't really cutting it for me anyway.
  • + 3
 @Xorrox: I agree, as little as 0.5 liter in a water bag acts a cushion for the spine.
  • - 1
 @bikeis4life: I put some power bars and CO2 in the back of my shorts to even things out.
  • - 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: alright I've never understood the point of a water bottle holder on an Aggro trail bike. I've lost too many water bottles on the trail from trying to put on in the frame for a quick ride. If your actually riding the terrain these bikes were meant for then no Bottle is gonna sit nicely in the frame. I have a bottle cage on my XC bike because it doesn't seen much rough terrain. But this!?

I seriously thought the bottle cage for longer travel bikes was a joke this whole time until recently. It's useless unless unless your not actually using the bike for its intended purpose.

Rant=Over
  • + 3
 @DragontalesDH: .
lol you're just wrong.
I know plenty of people who race and ride "the terrain these bikes are made for" with bottles. Ive run my current process with the bottle under the downtube plenty without losing it.
Maybe you should try some different cages.
  • + 1
 Nearly bought a Process 111 a few years ago as it looked like the perfect bike. The only reason I didn't was the lack of bottle cage space so reckon this is a good move. I'll personally never ride with a backpack again, feels so much nicer without.
  • + 4
 @richsoffar: your probably right about that.

Perhaps I'm just bitter about losing bottes.

Stil pack for me.
  • + 1
 @catweasel: not convinced you can use one of the greatest riders of all time as an example in this case... but to help you, I wore a pack today riding some pretty awesome uplift trails and kept up with my non pack mates, and led them happily on the jump trails, so you can use Me as your example.
  • + 4
 @pimpin-gimp: pimpin-gimp does all right wearing a pack.....
  • + 1
 @wibblywobbly: Curious if the hip packs are any better. The Source Hipster might strike a balance of having more supply than a bottle but still less cumbersome than a full pack. I haven't tried it though
like this -->
smile.amazon.com/dp/B01DW8QB72/_encoding=UTF8?coliid=I1KBFFYC1ZQ6CR&colid=2S7UF6GARKJOI
  • + 2
 @sutter2k: I have tried a few different hip packs. the Da Kine low rider is good, but when filled up with water you can barley fit your keys in it.

The bigger High Above bag works well. Bottle on the side and a platypus bag inside will get you thru a summer day, but it will be stuffed up like a sausage and until you drink the water it will feel weird and bulky. Plus some water bottles like to randomly fly out of the holster. The new, smaller High Above pack is awesome. One bottle, good pockets, plus made in the USA and I like to support local business. I just need to find away to keep bottles from flying out. It's really annoying when on rough terrain on my hardtail.

The Evoc with the bladder is really good. I like it a lot, but when filled with water, tube, tools etc you feel the weight down low. Probably the best one though. good organization, but gets bulky. Feel like at some point you might as just well wear a pack

The source hydration looks good on paper, and while I see the logic of the upper body harness, it seems like the kind of thing you wear with no shirt and it should be made of leather. #notenduroatall
  • + 1
 @sutter2k: I had an Osprey hip bag with bottle but only used it as a last resort as it tended to 'ride up' and sit around the stomach after a bit of peddling. Got rid now and prefer my frame bag. Holds everything; water, tools, pump etc.
  • + 2
 @catweasel: thank you, it's about bloody time I got recognized for my achievements on this site.
  • + 2
 @adrennan: Sombrio smuggler bibs are the best.

Rock a full size bottle, OneUp EDC Pump and tool (carries a tire boot/patch). Tube on the top tube. Going to mod my EDC tool to hold a dynaplug. Can carry an extra bottle and some nutrition in the bib if its a big day.

Just don't know what else people need into their packs for a day ride. Packs are heavy, constricting, and just a pain in the ass.
  • + 2
 @bonfire:
A packs weight is defined by what you put in it. Basically what your shoving in your pockets anyway. Constricting is based on design and fit.
I had some bad ones that don't work. And you know it's there all the time. but my current dakine one is perfect for me, can move totally freely and it doesn't bounce around at all nothing moves inside. Just got to find a good one.
  • + 1
 @markg1150: Sure. The bike world is huge and people can do things differently. Unlikely I am going to ride with a pack for rides under 3-4 hours.

I have owned and still own plenty of packs, used to wear one all the time. I don't need advice on what pack, nor how to pack it, nor how to wear it. Been there and done that.

Took me a while to fully release from the pack, was pretty attached to it (but what if I need that thing...). But stoked that I have, especially in the summer.

Try it out, go for a ride without one or don't. You do you. But whinging about how a bike looks similar because it has a shape that allows options is goofy.
  • + 2
 @wibblywobbly: Confirmed, no pack for me, 29er with 451mm chainstays. sorry
  • + 14
 @mikelevy - Could you give us a bit of a compare/contrast to the Transition Sentinel? That's been described as a bit of a monster truck - is the 29er Process more playful than that?

And how about a comparison to the 111 - I'm sure the new 29er is way more capable descending; you make it sound like it's not losing playfulness due to the extra squish. But how about rolling winding terrain, and how about singletrack climbs?
  • + 13
 "I'm more likely to use the Bing search engine than don a backpack" this is gold just need a cool Pepsi to wash it down haha
  • + 13
 @mikelevy: Any plans on @konaworld offering a frame only option?
  • + 3
 Please let them have this in the works... I would be buying the 29er if it becomes available.
  • + 0
 @bkchef2000: check konaworld.com there's lots of frame only models
  • + 1
 @singdinger: i have a honzo!
  • + 2
 @singdinger: I don't see process frameset options yet
  • + 1
 @xeren: if you click on any of the process models, they'll say theres a frame-only option available, and the price
  • + 1
 @jaycubzz: yeah i know what you're talking about, i see it on the honzo and the older process models, but not any of the newer ones, at least not on the USA site
  • + 2
 @xeren: oh interesting, it comes up for the new ones on the canadian website. strange.
  • + 1
 @bkchef2000: same here!
  • + 10
 Will they still sport below average components at a beyond average price? Nice bikes, not a fan of the short chainstays but Kona did it for me when they were cheap.
  • + 11
 The days of Kona being a "great bang for the buck" have long sailed. As you mention, specs are below average with lots of house components at prices competitors are charging. Combine with that ho-hum warranty service (I have recent experience) and you realize quickly that there are better options.
  • + 4
 Idk man, price looks pretty damn good to me. 3600 for that long travel 29 and that leaves room to upgrade to charger damper and maybe a rear shock like an x2.
  • + 0
 Just had this conversation this morning. Kona is one of the largest producers of mountain bikes, among Trek, Specialized and Giant, and yet they are also still priced as high, if not higher than their competitors. I remember back when Kona was the cheapest option.
  • + 3
 Haven't done a part-to-part comparison yet (trying to contain my bike lust, as my 111 has served me well for 1 1/2 years and will need to do so for a bit longer), but frankly, the prices seem pretty good. I'm not seeing you get a lot more bang for buck with, say, a Jeffsy (the obvious competitor).

What bugs me is the Guide brakes and SRAM drivetrain. I like the ease of maintenance and reliability of my Shimanos - hey, bleed them yourself if needed, without any nasty DOT fluid. Good power. I know people like Guide brakes for modulation. And the drivetrain is a serious turnoff for me - the cassettes are just ridiculously overpriced unless you're a serious weight weenie. And the lower end ones are all pinned. I'm a big guy - I don't like the creaking pins in my X1 cassette. In fact, I just spent the extra money on a new driver for my hub so I can switch from my worn out X1 cassette to an XT.
  • + 10
 @PHeller: ...Kona is one of the largest producers of mountain bikes, among Trek, Specialized and Giant...

Normally I don't comment on PB but sorry, that's just not correct, at all.
  • + 0
 @X-hogboy-X: so they arent? I dunno, I guess I always thought of Kona as being pretty big. Maybe...#4 in the industry? Sales/Manufacturing numbers are kinda hard to find.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: I've worked for the Kona art dept for over 10 years & there are stacks of bigger companies. I can think of at least 6 outside Trek, Spec & Giant off the top of my head that would be bigger.
  • + 0
 @X-hogboy-X: I'm not necessarily talking bigger companies, but more how many MTB sales are made per year. I'm sure because Kona does not have the same presence internationally as some of its competitors, it probably doesn't sell as many bikes, but I still feel that Kona doesn't offer the same value as it once did (decades ago). It' just weird to me to think of Kona as a boutique brand in terms of pricing.
  • + 7
 Is it just me or is Kona the first company to make a newer model steeper. The previos Process 153 had a head angle of 65 (or was it 65.5) and now it is 66. Weird for being one of the first companies in low, long and slack.
  • - 2
 I think they've brought the reach in 5mm as well.
  • + 1
 Pretty sure the first 'new' iteration of the Process had a 67 degree head angle, then the next version where they made it a bit longer was 65.5. So it is 0.5 steeper - but maybe they had a 170mm fork in mind originally? I think that would change it half a degree...I certainly don't know for sure.
  • + 1
 @paulhaysom: Yeah, I was speaking about the 2015, 16, 17 version. I don't know about the fork, since they've done the 165 version, which has a 170 fork. And the looks of the previous were meaner than those of the new one, it looked much faster.
  • - 6
flag jclnv (Sep 12, 2017 at 8:11) (Below Threshold)
 425mm rear centre = absolutely useless.
  • + 4
 @jclnv: short rear is the best part of these bikes
  • - 1
 @fastback570: Well it would 100% stop me from buying one. Shame as the rest of the geo/sizing is perfect.
  • + 6
 @jclnv: I don't really get the fuss about wanting a longer cs. I went from a 445mm cs to 425mm with the same reach and MUCH prefer shorter. More fun, easier to manual and get front end over obstacles, easier to bunnyhop roots, can get the back end through tight bits more easily. I guess climbing is a bit less efficient but can't tell much difference. Feels just as stable through the rough. What do you think the advantages of a longer cs are?
  • - 4
flag jclnv (Sep 12, 2017 at 12:16) (Below Threshold)
 @tremeer023: More front grip.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: Yeh good point, I can see how front end grip would be improved. Overall though I'm not sure if that makes up for all the benefits of shorter cs. Tyres are very good these days and a slight body weight adjustment could achieve the same front end grip. Each to their own though.
  • + 3
 @tremeer023: When you are making a bike longer in reach and slackening the head angle without changing chain stay you get a bike that needs more effort to control the front wheel since you are much closer to the rear one. To avoid that you must also extend the chain stay. For example look at Pole Evolink or Nicolai Geometron, yes they aren't as fun to ride as some shorter bikes but the ride they offer is very composed and balanced.
  • + 5
 @jclnv: everyone's like "I want don't need low stack height" and then also like "I want more front end grip". Hmmm.

You can have it all though - playful, climb well, descend well, but you might need to drop that handlebar... I think Kona nailed the geo.

Know what has good front end grip? Old school XC bikes. They also eject you over the bars. These days you don't need to ride in back seat though.
  • + 1
 @skylerd: See the above post.
  • + 4
 @vid1998: Geo tweaks will always be a compromise. Personally I like the mullet approach -- long front for charging and short rear for play. Yes, a little more effort to control the front but less effort to jump, manual, and rail. Id love to try the geometron or pole, but I bet the mega wheelbase will have its own trade-offs, possibly major, depending on your riding style and terrain.
  • + 2
 @beast-from-the-east: agreed. For me the main trade off is that the long wheelbase produces a boring ride, unless you are flat out straight line down the hill. Horses for courses though, so depends what your local trsils are like. Maybe for racing it's an advantage but as you say it's always a trade off.
  • + 0
 @beast-from-the-east, @tremeer023: Long wheelbase needs a steep terrain to really shine as you need to go quite fast to make it lively. I also haven't ridden neither Pole nor Geometron, but from what I've heard those who have tried either, preffer it to something shorter.
  • + 6
 Is there actually room on the 29er to put a water bottle AND a Super Deluxe? Clearance inside the frame seems tight.

I'd love to see a direct comparison between this and the Sentinel. It will come down between those two for me.
  • + 2
 NSMB has a size MD they're photoing, and it looks like a decent amount of room to me: nsmb.com/media/images/nsmb_2017_Kona_process_153cf_firsrimpressions_d.original.jpg

I'd likely use a side loader cage though.
  • + 2
 @ScandiumRider: plenty of room on the 27.5 but the 29er looks to be tighter. I'm sure there's room for a bottle if they included bosses but the shock clearance looks tight and it's interesting to me that they didn't do a Super Deluxe on the 29 DL model....
  • + 6
 Nice. I really wish they hadn't gone so aggressively short on the head tubes. I get why they did it on the smaller sizes but there is no XL person wishing that his head tube was shorter. It's like, oh, force me to run 3cm of spacers and a high rise bar - great.
  • + 3
 At least you can.
  • + 2
 I noticed that their 27.5" models actually have a reasonable head tube length of 140 mm. It's the 29er models with the super short head tubes.
  • + 2
 @gdharries: It's because 29ers have a higher stack. Personally, I like shorter headtubes. I'm 6' and I'm always slamming my stem as low as possible or usually very low rise bars.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: I have a XL 2016 Hei Hei and actually find the opposite. There's three spacers in mine, just to get the bars to a reasonable enough height without being too bent over like on my XC bikes of yore. I like the theory behind shorter head-tubes, but not the real world fit.
  • + 1
 I'm 6'-3" and like my front end as low as possible, especially on 29ers. Even with the stem slammed the front end of my short travel 29 trail bike is as high as my 26" park bike. So I appreciate what Kona has done here.
  • + 5
 Got a chance to pedal the bikes. I felt the new design climbed better than the original. Not as "loose" in the start of the travel if that makes any sense. Really enjoyed my time on the 29er. I will be making room to own that bike.
  • + 9
 Does it have a threaded BB?
  • + 4
 Yup, without this info it is a pretty incomplete advertisement, er review.
  • + 3
 it does not
  • + 2
 Bummer...
  • + 5
 "There are still two Process bikes of the old design in the catalog, though, with the 153 SE costing $2,199 USD and the 134 SE going for $2,099 USD."

These are the two bikes I'm actually most excited about in this list. Sweet first full suspension bike options. Would absolutely recommend these to newer mountain bikers.
  • + 5
 The Kona guys in my mind is both calm and enthusiastic. They would get together to discuss the designs and products in the office, but also would go out to shred the trails like crazy. They can be well-dressed like proper business people, but also can be smoking and drinking with you like your best friends in your life. I guess that was the reason why their products are special, and always have something different from other brands.
  • + 6
 Too bad there is no piggy back shock option on he Process 29. Surprising considering it's intentions. maybe it's a weight thing, price point. Transition went all in with the shock...too bad!
  • + 0
 It seems that Kona's link-driven single pivot is less sensitive to shock performance than Horst link designs, so you get pretty nice descending on a budget shock. The drawback being a little more bob when pedaling since it's not as anti-squatty-y.
  • + 4
 New 153 CR I ordered will arrive in a couple of weeks, I will wait on selling my current 153 until the new CR 153 proves she is better than her mommy at making me happy (I am spoiled by riding a dialed Process for the last 3 years) shop told me that this is much better, and I gave them my money....
  • - 6
flag mollow (Sep 12, 2017 at 7:49) (Below Threshold)
 You fool
  • + 4
 What happened to companies alternating builds between SRAM and Shimano? All I see here are kits I'd have to immediately swap the brakes on. Nitpicking shimano fanboy? Yes, but it's also my hard earned money and Kona just took themselves out of the running by limiting their specs.
  • + 10
 Simple. They get good deals from OEMs when buying in bulk.
  • + 7
 Seems short sighted to me. Not a tough task to sell the new sram brakes and buy some xt's, and likely won't leave you much out of pocket...
  • + 7
 @bobj: Because when I'm on the fence between a Process and a Norco Sight and the Norco comes with the spec I want I'll buy it instead of the Kona.
  • + 4
 @jollyXroger: Not only that, but I've heard that SRAM are a bit more reliable with deliveries, hence the bias towards SRAM, especially with smaller manufacturers.
  • + 8
 @pooceq: Also Sram is said to put a lot of pressure on bike builders to force them to equip the whole bike in Sram/RS/Truvativ stuff.
But yeah, it's sad not to have a Fox Performance/Shimano XT build
  • + 3
 Lead time is 2 times shorter with SRAM for OEM. Both are reliable on the date announced though. So, if you spec shimano brakes, you need to wait that much more to produce your bike.
  • + 1
 Don't they come with guides?
  • + 1
 @FlorentVN: I find that fascinating as I have been told by sales reps that bikes won't be on time because of SRAM. Curious as to who is accurate here.
  • + 0
 @bonfire: basically sram leadtime are on par with other components while shimano by default is longer. If no goox forecast , you know that using shimano you ll have to extend leadtime.Now what could happen is that demand is so high that sram standard leadtime are extended. That happened last year with eagle x01 vagand it happens with gx eagle this year. So yes sram could be the reason why a bike is late but from my experience it would take even longer in average with shimano. I have the case with a model i equipped with sram groupset but shimano brakes.
  • + 0
 @Powderface: if your looking at a sight instead of a range your looking the wrong way, if your looking at a trance instead of a reign then your wrong, and if lookin at a reign just do the right thing get a range
  • + 2
 @Powderface: wouldnt make more sense to be looking at two bikes in the same travel category when comparing each bike for what you want? I have ridden 153s and I have ridden sights. I would not put those two bikes in the same category.

Personally I'm taking the Sight for it slightly snappier feel but hey.
  • + 6
 @Powderface - I wonder about that as well. I haven't done the research to see if that's true, but I seem to be seeing more and more SRAM spec as new bikes are introduced. I wonder to what extent that's got to do with the rather interesting after-market dynamics around Shimano. If you're a brand that sells through LBSs, specing SRAM might be a way to keep the shops happy. Most riders will replace bits with the same brand - so you won't have people come into the LBS for a new cassette, or to replace a smashed derailleur, only to discover that because Shimano is screwing over their distribution channels, the dealer's wholesale on those parts is as high as what you'd buy them for online. Instead, they'd be quoted prices for SRAM bits, and those would be roughly in line with what you'd see online, so there's none of that dance the dealer has to do where they're telling you to order the parts online and bring them in for install.

Frankly, I prefer Shimano brakes (reliable, easy to maintain, no DOT fluid) and drivetrains (no pins in the cassettes, and much cheaper even if a little heavier) from an ownership perspective. But SRAM builds solid stuff, and I'm sure the prices to the OEMs are competitive with Shimano. Plus hey, Eagle 12sp might get people excited.
  • + 2
 @FlorentVN: That was super insightful. Thank you for you time. Both of the examples you gave were what I experienced with the Eagle's.
  • + 0
 Their spec isnt limited, obviously if you want to spend your hard earned cash on a pair of shimano brakes go ahead its not a proprietary system that is only sram compatible. Many companies are going with a GX eagle build and sram is probably selling it as a bundle with brakes, I would recommend trying the sram brakes first before voicing your opinion that is probably dated to 2010
  • + 1
 @g-42: this right here
  • + 1
 You aren't a shimano fanboi. Just a fan of durable components... ... naw. Sram sucks
  • + 1
 I'm on the fence I'll go with whoevers mking the best products and at the moment sram is absolutely killing shimano and it's not even close. No doubt the tide will turn again in the future but at the moment sram all the way.
  • + 1
 @Tr011: Because I prefer shimano brakes to sram my opinion is 7 years old? Who pissed in your cornflakes this morning?
  • + 5
 Frame only please kona uk/Europe
Not everyone likes having to strip and entirely new bike of all of its parts and faff selling it on fricking eBay with all the retards on there.
  • + 6
 Good for them putting external routing on the aluminum models. Unlikely we'll buck the internal routing trend, but one can hope.
  • + 5
 To all you people saying it looks like this bike or that just stuff it. Kona has used that design forever. forever being before most of you or the bike companies you mentioned were born.
  • + 4
 I own a current 2015 134 have owned a 153 and have and operator. I love the process lineup and Kona bikes in general. Sorry but i don't see myself trading in the "old" model 134 which is pretty much the perfect bike for me for the sake of carbon and did you really just say you changed the suspension platform so you could fit a f*&cking water bottle??? wtf? . How much does that carbon 153 weigh btw? My carbon front triangle operator aint no tiny dancer.
  • + 4
 The thing that made me fall in love with my Process 153 2016 was the ride. Yes, looks are important, but the ride should be the decider. As long as Kona has still made a fun bike, I'm still going to be a buyer.
  • + 6
 Does the 165 remind anybody else of a beloved oldie...? ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb6509101/p4pb6509101.jpg
  • + 6
 So people love Slash design, Yeti brandless downtube, Wreckoning's color. Then we now have the powerpuff girls.
  • + 2
 So long travel carbon 29ers are pretty much the most desired bikes right now and they don't have one to offer for a while? Seems like an oversight. Not that people don't want the 27.5 it's just clearly there's a yuuuuge market for the 29er.
  • + 3
 This is what I don't get. 29ers typically weigh more and exert more forces on the frame, so carbon seems to benefit the big wheelers more in that regard. The Process 111 was a pig, and I can't imagine a 150mm travel all-alloy beefy built 29er will be at all lightweight. I expect the Process 153 AL29 to weigh in north of 34lbs.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: Doesn't have to. I built an alu Remedy 29 (2014-2016) at around 28 lbs without cutting weenie corners. the 153 is likely more metal, but it can be done pretty easily. But, yeah, the build above is likely 32+.
  • + 5
 And yet another new bike that didn't pick up on Pivot's super Boost standard.
  • + 6
 Nice bikes but I came in here excited to read about the new 111
  • + 8
 The bike that truely changed it all. No not the 153 but the 111 and now.... It's gone... Kinda a shame
  • + 5
 Honestly, if they made a 29 carbon 111 or something below 130mm with 140mm up front, I'd sell my Fuel and hop on board in a second.
  • + 5
 Whenever I see cable routing like this, it makes me happy, but I still am reminded of Turner's as the pinnacle of elegance.
  • + 2
 is it me or in the process of looking at these bikes it really looks like a session?
that being said the new design is very simliar to the operator and i guess it makes sense for kona to go back to their classic 4 bar design. but the geometry is a lil dissapointing when it comes to the head angle. 66 is just to conservative (for comparison my banshee rune is 64.5 and guess what? it climbs just fine and rips any descent properly. altho i would like to see the geo numbers on that 165 model
  • + 2
 Just demoed one on Friday night. Really nice ride for a first impression. I have a 2106 Process 153 andthe new version is an improvement. Seatpost angle is better and the pedaling is better. Being a less than pro enduro fitness level, I'd ditch the 34 front ring for a 32. Otherwise, I know what my next bike will be.
  • + 4
 I like that the NW is continuing to represent with progressive companies such as Kona, Transition, Norco, RM etc...keep it up.
  • + 2
 Am i reading this right... carbon only for 27.5 153 and no carbon for the 165 and no updates for the two that needed it... 111 and 134.

Why are companies doing these big hype releases that are half assed?

These companies are missing the boat. No carbon 111. No carbon smuggler. Stupid. Not everyone needs 150 plus in travel... infact... most dont.
  • + 3
 A heavy, loose fitting backpack gives the rider an extra mid-air boost on big jumps. It may not actually make you jump farther, but it feels cool. 1st PB comment ever for this guy, feeling pretty good about it.
  • + 4
 165 for me please, lots of suspension I prob dont need but it looks the coolest, and thats whats important yo
  • - 16
flag mollow (Sep 12, 2017 at 7:50) (Below Threshold)
 Not everyone rides like a pussy like you
  • + 6
 @mollow: meooowww
  • + 1
 @Smokey79: meow meow
  • + 2
 Can't wait to ride their new bikes....kinda reminds of the RM Slayer in their design though. Which obviously isn't a bad thing considering the price is way down from the Slayer.
  • + 4
 The only thing I need to know is that we have another sky blue bike. (Yeti, Evil, Canyon, etc.)
  • + 0
 When you see it person it's not. More like an off teal.
  • + 1
 Agreed - how did teal become the color of choice for mountain biking? it's everywhere!
  • + 2
 Looks good, but not as good as the current 153, that being said, if raising the pivot point and switching to carbon makes the suspension a little smoother and the bike climb a little easier then they are on to a winner.
  • + 1
 Raising a pivot point DOES NOT make suspension smoother, on the contrary, for a single pivot it makes suspension less active due to increased pedal kickback. That's why the previous Processes were so good, they pedaled poorly, but descended superbly.
  • + 5
 What happened Kona? You used to be cool.
  • + 15
 They've lost their way. The Process brought Kona full circle to their fun roots. Now some pencil pusher has redesigned the whole line because a water bottle friendly front triangle is, apparently, priority number one.
  • - 2
 @Powderface: Kinda feels like that "hug your comptetitor" phenomenon. Like grocery stores end up right next to each other. Kona is kind of doing the same thing by catering their design to a water bottle. There's a considerable amount of people who want the water bottle but catering to that kinda loses their uniqueness.
  • + 4
 @Powderface: so bikes aren't fun when you put the water bottle mounts in the frame? The old bikes are fun to ride they are not supposed to be just fun to look at... You think the new bikes won't be fun?
  • - 1
 @2bigwheels: When you want a bottle inside a full sus front triangle, you've got two options. One is to raise to top tube, the other to curve the downtube. I love low top tubes for cornering etc, it's the main thing I look for in a bike. Luckily Kona doesn't seem to have lost that. The curved tubes is a matter of taste. I personally love the looks of straight tubes over curvy. I don't mind the backpack but I'm not in the market for a full sus frame either. But I do understand that those who'd ride with a water bladder in backpack or bodyarmour may be disappointed by the looks of the new bike.
  • + 3
 The Saddest thing is that they won't sell the awesome camo version : www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-Hub,2/New-Kona-Process-Spy-Shots,9821
  • + 1
 @Powderface: did anyone read Levy's first impressions? They said fun, in bold.
  • + 2
 @beast-from-the-east: Just double checked, it wasn't in bold. It was in capitals, with some punctuation thrown in the mix. Either way, cursive is what it is all about. Dylan Sherrard cursive. See, I'm no grammar-nazi. But don't get me started on typography. Yeah, watch your font settings. I've got a secret suitcase so full of snippets of fonts. Large, small, italic, bold, the whole lot. So much, I could blackmail you.
  • + 1
 DOH, could have had a horst link...

I know, it's just one aspect of a four bar suspension design. Just that I can't wrap my head around not using either a split or a variation of a horst for the braking aspects. Kona did their very best back in the day to convince consumers they needed magic links and brake therapy. And here they are re-imagining the whole line and there is no longer a patent in the way...?

For sure linkage and damper designs are light years ahead of where they were 10 years ago. And maybe back to back/blind test a rider wouldn't notice at this point. Just seems like a no brainer to move that pivot.
  • + 1
 check out the interview from when the process was first overhauled, they discuss your point: youtu.be/mtrtDTp1g5Q
  • + 2
 @mikelevy. With that STA and the 29er wheels did you buzz your shorts on steep Squamish rolldowns. I ask because that's the one downside still of 29ers for me...ie clearance when one needs to get low and crouch for steeps
  • + 2
 Duct tape yo junk to your leg, You can thank me later!
  • + 1
 quick question: any indications on the 29ers' weight for a size XL? yes they're made sturdy as can be, and according to the reviewer rides lighter than its weight would have you guess... but how much should one expect?
  • + 1
 @SyKon BikeRag weighed the 27.5 CR at 32 lbs; alu frame is 1/2 lb heavier plus bigger rims and wheels for another 1-2 lbs so probably around 35?
  • + 2
 tenant: a person who occupies land or property rented from a landlord

tenet: a principle or belief, especially one of the main principles of a religion or philosophy
  • + 1
 Maybe once this lis franc injury heals there will be some big 29ers in the used market. I love my 111 and can only imagine how much better it'll be with more travel and less chainstay.
  • + 4
 I want Kona geo with zerode drivetrain design.
  • + 3
 What happened to the short travel bikes? Will there not be any options for shorter travel?
  • + 0
 The new trail oriented Hei Hei lineup is for that now.
  • + 4
 @2bigwheels: I wonder about that. It looks like Transition went monster-truck with the Sentinel, but from what Mike is writing here, the 29er Process is a bit more playful. If they've truly maintained that feel, and they've got it to pedal and climb decently, then I can see how it would ride very much like the 111, just give you more burliness and squish. I love my 111, but if I could get a bike that rides pretty much the same (i.e., is still fun when it's not all fast and steep, is remarkably responsive, does a pretty decent job on the ups) but gave my middle-aged body a bit more squish to absorb bigger hits, I'd be all over that.
  • + 0
 "We switched to this design specifically because, one, it falls in line with all the other bikes we see in this room [referencing the rest of their MTB range w/ vertical shocks]"

Why is everyone trying to make their bikes look like trek's and Norco's
  • + 1
 Alright the carbon 153 27.5 bike looks super sex awesome. But whats up with that black 29er the top tube looks just awful i get that they had to do that make up for the ultra short head tube but jeez that is not apealing.
  • + 3
 Why the heck does PF92 still exist? let alone on an alloy bike..... Transition wins this battle.
  • + 4
 I'll buy an orange stage 5 before anything else
  • + 4
 And again, canadians are getting shafted. 3000 usd is not 4000 cad, Kona
  • - 2
 Thats the Canadian way. The border between Canada and the us was actually a business deal between a wealthy Brit and a wealthy american. They knew they could make money off the railroad if a border was in place to limit shopping. Since then we stand on guard for thee, a true north proud and hosed. We pay more for less all the time. Higher prices less variety and are controlled nation wide by Toronto and Montreal.
  • + 1
 @Gasket-Jeff: Nope! look up "54 40 or fight!" The Americans wanted 54th parallel and the British wanted the Columbia river. 49th was a compromise
  • + 1
 @justincs: and this all happened of course before propaganda, politicians have never manipulated ppl for the benefits of themselves.
  • + 4
 sorry but it now looks like any other bike there ... (2014,134 owner)
  • + 5
 Looks like a Session
  • + 3
 The most appropriate "looks like a session" comment in years and it's down voted. Wha?
  • + 0
 @garrettstories: because it looks nothing like one
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: you sure about that? looks pretty damn simliar just different numbers... but i guess you can say it looks more like a slash...
  • + 1
 I don't know what the price will be in the UK, but as much I would like to have the 29nr (because I've enjoyed Kona ownership) it will stack up crap against a YT in terms of value for money.
  • + 3
 Aww man allows us to choos the color! I want the sky blue one on a AL frame! Big Grin
  • + 3
 What I want is possibility to buy an aluminium bike with decent equipment.
With Kona now (and with most of other brands) if I buy Alu bike I get Yari. Why Yari? Alu bikes are suddenly not good enough to be equipped with Pike?
  • + 4
 ohh so stoked , I,ll take a 153 29er PLEASE !!!Smile
  • + 2
 ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb15166992/p5pb15166992.jpg

All bikes look the same. It is the times that we live in.
  • + 1
 Glad to see I'm not the only one to think that. I'm actually surprised you didn't get downvoted for saying the shocking truth...
  • + 1
 @Mountain-Dalek: The truth must be spoken!!!
  • + 2
 Think this may be the first Kina bike that I may be interested in. Looks nice! And I like the numbers.
  • + 3
 No 111 carbon?!?!?!

Oh how I savored the idea for the last 3 years.
  • + 3
 The blue and top tube make this look like a Yeti.
  • + 1
 The all new kona patrol/remedy/range/slash/snabb looks like a proper piece of machinery.... all jokes aside I'm glad Kona's keeping to their hooligan roots tho
  • + 1
 Look very nice, but shame they have left the 29ers at a low spec... Guess next year will be the carbon bling version... Time to save up my pennys!
  • + 2
 First world problems, I won't be able to swap my ohlins ttx22 coil from my old process over to this one Frown
  • + 1
 Konas "new" Trek bikes.
Bet they're super happy about them. Probably match their iPhone8 with its super nifty 2014 technology.
  • + 1
 Kona went from 28-29lbs on the last scandium six inch bikes to 32-33lbs on the Process. Any guesses on the carbon? My guess is 30-31lbs.
  • + 1
 Kona really love the development process to make a new and improved process
  • + 1
 Stay length on the 165? 425 on the 29er sure makes the 429 on my 26er seem dated. Wish they sold framesets here in Aus.
  • + 1
 425 on all sizes of the 165
  • + 2
 So sad to see a pressfit BB
  • + 1
 kinda reminds me of the NS snabb.. hmm kona plus NS equals the Kona snappcess... if it hold true to kona heritige
  • + 2
 Hei HEI, I thought yeti owns that color
  • + 2
 I thought Yeti had the patent on the color turquoise?
  • + 2
 have the scrapped the 134 and 111?
  • + 1
 are the reach figures correct? 450mm for a medium my old yeti sb66c in XL had a similar reach.
  • + 3
 Looks like kona remedy.
  • + 2
 Protrek
  • + 3
 RIP Process 111
  • + 2
 Nooooooo! I can't afford to discover that I want a different bike!
  • + 0
 Looks generic, in design & colour. Spec seems low for this price point. Wonder how long it'll be before I see these on the local Xc trails?
  • + 2
 Bottles are for babies, real men carry a pack.
  • + 3
 Guess im a baby...
  • + 7
 packs are for sweatbacks (I just created a new bigoted term for pack-wearers)
  • + 2
 That was long. All we needed to know was that it's a Norco now.
  • + 0
 not quite. Instead of a sophisticated ish suspension platform, its still a Kona.
  • + 2
 If these were Transitions they'd all have reduced offset forks.
  • + 2
 That 165 has my attention!
  • + 1
 Had a Stinky back in 2006... still stinks... Thanks, but no thanks Kona...
  • + 3
 My next bike!
  • + 0
 Please please please make a carbon 111! I'd love you forever and like you for always Kona.
  • + 1
 That blue one has a whole load of Yeti SB66c going on about it
  • + 2
 Except for the outrageou$ price.
  • + 1
 one of these is definitely my next bike. decisions , decisions...
  • + 0
 Let's just copy the rocky mountain slayer? Ok cool that works for me let's go for beer and pizza
  • + 1
 If you add one more Hei to Hei Hei you have She,nei-nei
  • + 1
 Have had my eyes on the new Reign 1, but that 165 Process... hnnnng
  • + 1
 Kona have been great since '88
  • + 1
 ok no joke that does look like a session.
  • - 1
 All the new bixe are looking the same. Enduro geo came out and has been refined to the best which maxe all bixe look the same.
  • - 1
 Which part
  • + 1
 No small, no 26, no future riders!
  • + 1
 pretty, but looks like a TR patrol
  • + 1
 Shut up and take my f@@ing money.
  • + 1
 Nice update kona! Carbon process 29 134!
  • + 2
 Trek slash look a like?
  • + 8
 Come on, Konas have always looked like this, before Trek and every other company Wink
  • + 1
 OH DAMN Big Grin I like it a lot !!!!
  • - 3
 I'm sorry, but Konas just don't ride well. The placement of that rear pivot just doesn't allow the suspension to work the way it's supposed to. They should just revert to the standard Horst link. Great looking bike, though.
  • + 1
 still Presshit...I mean Pressfit, sorry Kona.
  • + 1
 Yes.. Maintenance.. Right...
  • + 0
 i think i found my upgrade to the baby blue but is it press fit?
  • + 1
 Tldr: no more 111
  • + 0
 Transition and orbea have the best 29ers at the moment.
  • + 2
 @Xc2dh1: I'd add the Whyte S-150 to that list.
  • + 1
 @kwapik: and Intense, the Primer is a flying machine!
  • + 1
 They look like a Patrol
  • + 0
 Actully more likely me a folding chair!
  • + 1
 Anti_Bingite
  • + 0
 What if I don't need to know anything about the bike?
  • + 1
 no coil shock option!
  • + 1
 PF92...no thanks
  • + 3
 you've had issues? Its been totally fine on my '15 153.
  • + 1
 Didn't have an issue on my Jake the Snake or Honzo's PF BB...
  • + 1
 bike to basic
  • - 1
 And the widest tire you can fit in the back is ... ?
  • + 6
 2.5 on a 35mm rim apparently
  • - 3
 Yes they will snap... at least the ones coming to my local shop. Plus they will give you a hard time with the while life time warranty. Abolute garbage!
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