Ask Us Anything: Fox Factory

Jul 8, 2013
by Richard Cunningham  
Thanks to PB readers for a killer question and answer session! Want more? Contact Fox's tech center.

Fox multi image

Wonder what is in there? How to tune it? Why it was made that way? Find out for sure July 8, 2013. Don't be afraid to ask the hard questions, but keep it real - we are positive that nobody at Fox Factory will be talking about 2015.



Fox Factory throws down for an 'Ask Us Anything' session at its Headquarters in Scotts Valley, California, where the individuals who were instrumental during every step of the manufacturing process - designing, prototyping, manufacturing, tuning, testing, even packaging, will be on hand to answer your questions about Fox suspension. Opportunities such as this rarely, if ever, surface - unless you happen to be among the invited few to attend a product launch, or you are lucky enough to catch the three minutes each year when the entire crew is lounging in the pits at a World Cup event. For one day only, July 8, 2013, Fox Factory’s engineers, product managers, marketing hacks and pro tuners will be assembled at their computers, waiting to answer questions from Pinkbike members.



Team Fox Factory




Here it is; the one and only inverted DH fork that Fox Factory
produced. Fox used it to assess torsional stiffness and axle
design. Colin Meagher photo

How ‘Ask Us Anything' Works:

Starting at 9:30 AM July 8, Pacific daylight time and concluding at 4:30 PM, you can type your questions into the comment box following this article and the Folks at Fox Factory will take their best shot at it. Sometimes, your answer will pop up in a few seconds; others may take a while, as the Fox crew may want to pass your query to a specific person in the organization to get a more exact answer. Everyone who posts a question, large or small, will be taken seriously. To make the process as efficient as possible, try to follow these simple guidelines:


Keep your questions relative. For instance: If you want information about tuning, or advice on which shock is best for you, be sure to mention the bike you own, and brief personal info like your weight and riding style.

• Stay on topic. Try to keep your questions on one topic if possible. You can always ask about another item later.

• Feel free to name the person you’d like to answer you. That is exactly why Fox posted the pictures, names and job titles of each individual who will be in the hot seats today.

Hot about something? Fire away - this is the time and place to communicate exactly why your suspension may not have fulfilled your expectations, but try to state your problem in the form of a question so that it can be properly addressed. Constructive criticism is welcome. Haters, however, will be booted off the page by PB.

Use propping to acknowledge good - or not so good - questions. Bump them up or down to where they belong.

From the Top Bob Fox Wall O forks

Some of the Fox team attended the birth of every product on the Fox museum's 'wall of suspension.' Colin Meagher photo



Check out the tech section at the Fox Factory site



1,300 Comments

  • + 145
 Why do my soufflés always sink?
  • + 298
 They're kinda supposed to fall: egg protein just can't hold the shape independent of the hot air inside, so as it cools, it's going to fall at least a little...
  • + 114
 Now that is some good tech support.
  • + 8
 sweet
  • + 23
 Not even a cooking class would help you out like that.
  • + 54
 Any word on a downhill air shock?
  • + 20
 Our Race Dept is exploring that application. Pinkbike spotted a prototype shock at the Fort William World Cup.

www.pinkbike.com/news/Prototype-Fox-Air-DH-Shock-Fort-William-World-Cup-2013.html
  • + 6
 When will it be for sale
  • + 8
 will the inverted fox DH fork ever be for sale, if so when?
thank you
  • + 13
 It is early in the development cycle for the downhill air shock. We always test products in race conditions through our RAD program. Some products make it to production after only 1-2 seasons, some products (like the inverted fork) never make it to production. It depends on rider feedback, race results, and if the product performance provides a real benefit to customers.
  • + 8
 thank you... thats too bad i would love to see more inverted forkes out there.
  • + 5
 ^ The goal of achieving minimal weight while having lateral stiffness/other positive characteristics isn't very viable with inverted mtb forks.

Of course there are some good benefits with Inverted, but in MTB, the trade off's, design effort, and work-arounds to make up for the design is simply extra headache when you could just go with mtb conventional chassis and have so many inherent positives right from the start.. Such as: Lower casting arch-bridge + axle, lower/top crown VS. relying solely on a bigger heavier axle + top/lower crown, which still doesn't provide the same characteristics unless increasing weight/material by a lot.

Look at a motorcycle and how much material is used on the inv. fork/chassis/crowns/axle + the riding application of that moto bike, then, compare that to a DH bike and how much material you got while keeping everything light as possible. It just doesn't stack up the best when you take it to the MTB dh world.
  • - 5
flag freeride-forever (Jul 10, 2013 at 15:44) (Below Threshold)
 Spicy-Mike, bullshit.

You only have one benefit to offer that isn't actually a benefit? An inverted fork also offers larger legs where torsional stress is highest at the lower crown, which offsets the lack of some stupid arch. The arch broke off my casted piece of garbage 66VF & it still works fine, it's plenty stiff & never needed an arch in the 1st place with a 20 mm axle. In what world do you live where a 20 mm axle is bigger and/or heavier in an inverted fork than in a conventional? MX bikes are built to be as light as they can be too. FMXers are trying to flip & spin those things as much as they can & they already weigh 10X more than a bicycle. Weight is more critical in those situations than it is just riding down a hill. Inverted forks offer larger stanchion diameters making them stronger in all directions, more bushing overlap making them stronger, smoother, longer wearing & stiffer laterally. They are better lubricated for what I hope are obvious reasons, which means better performance & durability. They move dirt down & out rather than down & in. Their unsprung weight is lower, mud clearance is better & conventionals use poor quality magnesium castings on the lowers to keep their weight down because the strength to weight ratio of the design is inferior. The problem is that inverted forks will last longer & the greedy, corrupt bicycle industry likes to keep selling people replacement junk for their old broken down junk. Do you also go around trying to sell people on the superiority of derailleurs over gearboxes? How about the superiority of the IC engine over electrics? How about the superiority of a turd over a diamond?
  • + 3
 1) Power to weight ratio. FMX haz motors. I have a paper airplane with nothing vs. fighter jet..
2) We are talking about MTB, DH. Not the same, but please ride a Fox 40 first. I like Dorado's they are forgiving, grip well, but can distinguish the difference somewhat easily on certain terrain, under braking loads in regards to torsional stiffness. So..?
3) You are list these inv. benefits as if they weren't mentioned...I assume people know what you just said, but thanks. skimmed most of it sorta.
4) A benefit can be argued between 2 people, which is true. Maybe not benefit but different 'factors'. Stiffness was mostly focused.
5) You sell someone the superiority of something, when the other alternative is NOT applicable. You talk in a world of perfect idealism. Hey it's 2000, let me sell you the first electric car. Does not contain the optimized battery cells, no chargers at your local Safeway grocery stores, or even anywhere at that time, etc etc. GJ you sold someone, something, that in idealistic standards holds up greatly but at that time does not have the means of use or efficient operation. Or money. Or time. Or whatever. If it actually works pretty well, there is an obvious lack of need to transition.
  • - 6
flag freeride-forever (Jul 10, 2013 at 18:02) (Below Threshold)
 You sound like a corporate bullshitter. Claiming there's a lack of charging infrastructure making an electric car not viable, when there's a power outlet in every building. Often more than one, if you're not aware. Meanwhile we have massive ugly monsters that suck up crude out of the bottom of the ocean & more massive ugly monsters that spill it all over the place. FMX having motors doesn't help your case, it helps mine. DH "haz" gravity. You know that force caused by the spatial & temporal displacement of any massive body? In our case, that body is the Earth. Less weight on an MX translates into better performance just as it does on a bicycle. It offers even greater advantages to those who do double backflips than it does to those who go down hills. You said conventional has so many inherent positives from the start, but I don't see them. I see the superiority of inverted forks all around. I'm not a tech weenie that worries about how much my fork flexes & then makes excuses about why I suck. The fastest racers will still be the fastest on either design if either build functions more or less the same in those few minutes. I expect inverted forks to last longer & see it as sort of like having hard water versus soft. You may have adapted to putting up with it for so long that you don't see a need or a point, but once you put in enough time to see the benefits, you won't know how you ever did without it & you'll never go back.
  • - 5
flag freeride-forever (Jul 10, 2013 at 18:14) (Below Threshold)
 I hope you're not trying to say the world doesn't need electric cars. Pollution vs. no pollution. 30-40% efficiency vs. 90%+. In principle, one defeats the other on all fronts, but somewhere, for some reason there is resistance to progress. "Who Killed The Electric Car?" explains that one pretty good. Something actually working pretty well didn't seem to apply to the 26" wheel, resulting in something stupid coming along. It didn't seem to apply to 20 mm axles, resulting in something dumber coming along. It doesn't apply to the contraptions compressing shocks on bicycles either. They get cruder & stupider by the year. Money money money.

You sound like you're confusing a lack of options and/or resistance to progress with "works pretty well". Conventional forks seem like they work pretty well because that's pretty much all that's offered & have little other competition to compare to. IC engines don't seem to work pretty well. They break all the time. They're dirty, inefficient & have reached their limits. It's an inherently inefficient process. Conventional forks designed as well as can be, are inferior & less resistant to wear & tear than inverted forks designed & refined to the same degree. When industries try to push garbage for the sake of profits on people that don't know any better you end up with an endless cycle of consuming crap. I wish they would ask themselves what good their money would be if all they could ever buy with it was nothing but junk. Designed from the start to have a finite lifespan & to always need replacement. A lack of need to transition, doesn't mean it's not a good idea to do so. I bet you like derailleurs too. Some people could be convinced to eat their own shit for their own health if enough corporate & political blowhards brought it to them on a silver platter.
  • + 2
 what the...I support electric cars and believe the world should evolve faster than it currently is.
  • - 1
 Then we're on the same page. I think the MTB world should evolve much faster too & use more inverted forks & more internally geared drivetrains.
  • + 1
 Wooooooo, I'm the ghost of Christmas future and fox has developed the float x2 and now more scarily have created a 29er 40 fork !
  • + 1
 i don't know the exact system to question so i randomly selected a comment .
We recently purchased fox float evol R and fox float 3. Here my question is how to determine the damping coefficient of the fox .( we know how much stiffness we require) and as we know the stiffness how to change the pressure according to it.
Please answer.Smile
  • + 41
 Hey fox, now I am usually not one to naysay about a product, company or person, and I genuinely enjoy your products, but what is with not sending a shock pump with your products anymore? I have owned a number of your forks and shocks and have always received a shock pump with them, however about a year ago I dropped almost a grand on a fork and no pump...that's not cool! I called you guys to see if they just forgot to include it but they said I had to buy one. What's the deal with that?! That is like selling shoes without the shoe laces, sure you can use them but it is gonna suck when you really need them...

So why no pump when you drop a grand on a product??

Also, if you are wondering why I dont use a previous shock pump it is because I pass them on when I sell the product, I dont like to be a dick
  • + 16
 A few years ago we had to decide if we were going to raise retail prices or stop including pumps with aftermarket forks as production cost were going up. We decided to pull the pumps rather than raising prices. Maybe we wrongly assumed that people would keep their pumps when buying a new fork. I guess everyone isn't as nice as you are Wink
  • + 51
 So you pretty much raised your price indirectly by not including a pump.....
  • + 16
 its criminal that forks that cost close to £1000 don't come with a shock pump.
  • + 21
 Do you get a pump when you buy new tires!? NO. everyone wants something for free! You pay 1000$ for forks you can't afford a 30$ pump??
  • + 31
 no, do your tires cost 2 grand?
  • - 13
flag btonczyczyn (Jul 8, 2013 at 13:31) (Below Threshold)
 Some off road tires for lifted trucks cost 800$ each. My point is if you can afford 1000$ forks I'm sure you can afford a pump
I used to work retail for paintball and everyone wanted something for free. REALLY!! Who are you and why do you get free stuff
Go try pulling that at Walmart or somewhere else!
  • + 19
 I just picked up my new 2014 40 Float and was a little surprised to see no pump. It'd be nice to couple a new fork with a new pump. Pumps get bashed around, brought on rides, and as far as I can see, are pretty cheap right out of the box. They couldn't cost you more than $10 bucks each in bulk. So $1700 or $1710. What's the difference? I know I can go out and buy another, but a fork like that should come with the one tool you need to keep the fork dialed day to day. I'd pay a few bucks more for a quality shock pump that I don't need to question whether or not its working properly.
  • + 6
 I know fine tuning would be required on the trail (although my 40 Float seems pretty dialled straight out of the box!) but if you buy from a reputable Fox dealer, they should be more than happy to get your air pressures dialled... And given that the spring rate controls the sag - once it's been set in the shop (in theory) you should be adjusting the damping, not the spring rate (unless your weight has significantly changed!)

I've had the same shock pump for the last 3 years and, so far, it's absolutely fine and doesn't need replacing. Personally I would rather all the money I spent on a fork or shock, was spent on the fork or shock and not a pump that I wouldn't necessarily need.
  • + 8
 if you pay $800 for tyres the shop usually fits them and pumps them up for you!
  • + 7
 I'm fine with more FOX stickers ! Wich I didn't get on my 2012 40s
  • + 2
 Ok so you want fox to put some air in your fork for you for the first time? I agree completely with KUBANER. buy your own shock pump and stop complaining!!
  • + 5
 I don't see this as a problem. If you're buying an aftermarket shock/fork, that means you probably already own a bike and the crucial tools you need. I don't know many newcomers to the sport who build a bike from scratches.
  • + 2
 Yes completely agree
  • + 4
 Come on FOX. We know the MTB industry is INSAAAAANLY over priced already. No excuses. $1000+ for a fork that is mass produced is stupid. But we gotta ride our bikes!
  • + 2
 Yeah i knew I would get the critics who would say "you can spend a $1,000 on a fork but you can't afford $30 for a pump??" or, "any experienced mechanic, like myself because I am really friggin awesome, should have all the proper tools to build a bike blah blah..." that's not really what I was getting at. Of course I can afford a pump, a 10 year old has $30 laying around, and I think most monkeys could be taught to build a bike properly (this in fact I do know because I have built thousands of bike, no really thousands, and I worked with some actual monkeys). I just feel like it should be included when you buy such an expensive fork, as a part of customer service. I guess I just have to keep my shock pumps now, store them up like a squirrel does nuts, and be a dick from now on...oh well
  • + 11
 I guess fox had 3 options when they decided to drop the pump...

1 - Increase the price (piss off the customer)
2 - Drop the pump (irritate some customers)
3 - Cut costs elsewhere in the business (e.g. Lay off some of the staff, use cheaper parts in the forks, reduce the R&D budget)

I think out of the options they had, they chose the least of all evils.
  • + 2
 or leave the price the same for a bit less profit for a fourth option but everybody needs money I guess
  • + 1
 Don't buy new. You can find great deals on used forks. Some people think the need the latest and greatest fork so they sell their perfectly good fork for a fraction of the price of a new one.
  • + 1
 Good call (THE-GRUNT)!! Yea nothing wrong with used items as long as you do regular service
  • + 2
 Everyone is bitching about the high costs of MTB parts, including the forks, but manufacturing costs will only come down with increased demand. Its the price we pay for being in a rather exclusive group and relatively small in numbers compared to just about any other sport out there. And yep, the manufactures have to make money to stay alive (see the recent Contour news as an example). Fortunately for our sport there are enough manufactures competing against each other to keep the prices from being even higher then they are now. Imagine a sport where only the elite and sponsored riders could afford their gear (like Formula One).
  • + 43
 What are your plans on competing with Rockshox and Cane Creek as far as dual rebound and dual compression goes?
  • + 5
 We offer high speed and low speed compression damping in our RC2 FIT dampers and RC4 shock dampers. Rebound damping is primarily driven by spring rate; the need to dissipate energy stored in the spring. Our dampers dissipate rebound forces using two damping circuits in parallel, valves (for high speed) and orifice (adjustable low speed). For shocks, we offer multiple rebound valve tunes to cover the range of spring rates and frame linkage curves. We work with each OE to select the proper rebound tune for their particular bike. We offer multiple rebound tunes in the aftermarket.
  • + 5
 Separate High and Low Comp on an enduro-type shock like the new Float X would certainly make it easier for non-factory-racers types to adjust to all the massive range of riding conditions, trails, rider weights and heights (I'm 6ft 4in so combatting pitch under deceleration is a challenge) and don't forget huge variations in ambient temperatures. Residing in the UK but sometimes riding in much hotter climates, its the 2 latter variances when the lack of separate high comp adjustment has driven me to a CCDBA. But its heavy...... I could get high speed compression shim stack tuning done by Mojo but who can afford to send it there twice a year for a separate winter tune and summer tune.....? Is it likely to happen? Please !
  • + 43
 Anything I can do to make my 2013 CTD Float 34 fork better? It's honestly pretty awful...
  • + 8
 Service or tuning tips please.
  • + 6
 Yes, is there anything one can do with the oil weight/levels or shim stack to give it some more support and more low-speed compression?
  • + 7
 There are kits available to update the 2013 FIT CTD, FIT CTD-Remote, and FIT CTD-Adj dampers to match the performance of the 2014 versions. The kit for Performance-Series FIT CTD and FIT CTD-Remote forks is PN: 803-00-820. The kit for Factory-Series FIT CTD-Adj forks is 803-00-821. Contact FOX directly of your local International Distributor for more info.
  • + 0
 What components are in this kit? What is the US price? Please provide the phone number/email/website for the additional info. Thanks
  • + 7
 The kit includes a new compression piston, blowoff piston, blowoff spring, flow divider, and mid valve spring perch/check limiter. Please contact FOX US directly for pricing at 1-800-FOX-SHOX ext. 4801.
  • + 77
 Nice cost saving measures - using customers as product testers - especially after word comes out that even Fox acknowledges the 13's are crap. Sounds like the 13 customers should get the 14 internals as compensation for preforming product testing duties.
  • + 41
 So after buying a brand new 2013 fork for nearly one thousand hard earned dollars, all you have to do is replace 80 percent of the internals and you're all set!
  • + 5
 @enduro29er...thanks for the question, you beat me to it. My 2013 CTD is crap as well. Hopefully the fix works
  • + 7
 I agree with mykel and PowRyda. This kit at the bare minimum should be at least a zero margin product for Fox. They should only charge what the materials/labor cost to create the kit. There should be no profit from this kit.
  • + 9
 I think they should be shipping these kits out free of charge with proof of purchase on the fork. Seeing as how Fox themselves have admitted the shortcomings of the new CTD forks.
  • - 2
 One clarification: FOX doesn't think the 2013 CTD fork and tune were crappy. We want to differentiate between the fork and tune. Going into the 2013 development we received a large amount of feedback from OE customers and end users commenting on not getting full travel and having too much feedback in the arms on 2012 and previous model forks. The 2013 CTD was tuned specifically to address comments.

There are many riders out there that love this setup but finding the balance of a comfortable ride and fast riding fork is an ongoing challenge. We received feedback from our racers and enduro riders that although the 2013 fork is comfortable to ride, it was difficult to push hard when raced. Taking that information, we applied it to the 2014 forks and are very satisfied with the results.
  • + 12
 Just ordered... $35 for the kit. Cheap compared to the $1000 for a new Pike. Hopefully this will work out.
  • + 6
 That all sounds good but isn't Fox all about making performance product that riders can push to the limits not just a "comfort" product?
  • + 4
 Different riders and riding styles require different amounts of compression damping so one pre set set up is never going to work for everyone. IMO all high end forks should have a knob for fine tuning low speed compression (HS would be nice too Wink ), otherwise you end up with unnecessary hassle trying to get it right with oil weights and custom shimming/valving.

Let's make the problem with the basic CTD damper (w/o trail adjust) very clear. My 'Zocchi 55CR feels dialled for most situations 'cause I can fine tune the low speed compression. Most CTD forks on the other hand will most of the time feel wrong 'cause the damping is never quite perfect. And the Fancy CTD equipped Fox costs at least 1/3 more than a 55CR. Trail Adjust luckily fixes the problem and it definitely should came with all the CTD forks.
  • + 2
 Is there such a kit that I can order for the proprietary 2013 rp23 that came on my stumpjumper evo frame? (No boost valve)
  • + 9
 throw it away and buy a lyrik.
  • + 3
 @novajustin That's what I did. Such a smooth fork.
  • + 3
 I just called Fox to get a quote to make the low-end CTD for spec'd on my Enduro 29er comp. $225US. Or I sell the fork, put $225 on top and buy a Pike...
  • + 3
 @novajustin the shock...
  • + 14
 FOX please recall the 2013 forks and replace them with 2014 models, or at least provide the new internals for free. Especially if they are indeed just $35 a set this is a no brainer for any company who values their customers.

I saved all my hard earned pennies for almost a year to buy my $4+K Bronson with a 2013 FOX CTD fork. I have too say so far I am very disappointed with the fork, honestly it is shocking how bad it is. My thoroughly thrashed 7-year old Pike is smoother and better in every way!

Not getting full travel, not enough rebound, still breaking it in but in no way can I call this a smooth operator.

Called FOX today the guy over the phone said he has never heard of the forks being low on oil and called the people on the forums idiots for suggesting as much. Everyone knows the 2013 CTD models are loaded with issues and kinks, the right thing to do is to own up and set things right. Good customer service goes a long way so does word of mouth…treat your customers right FOX!
  • + 1
 @GoRideYoBike, was referring to the first posted question regarding a CTD 34 FORK. You asked your question about your shock under someone else's question regarding their fork.
  • + 1
 @alexsin, get the Pike. Charger damper FTW.
  • + 13
 @FOX-Factory - Support in Australia is useless. Have tried to make contact several times with your distributor to finally get a very brief reply advising the upgrade wont' be readyin the country for at least 4 months!!! Were do we go from here?

I ride a 2013 Talas CTD 34 160mm and yes, the performance is very poor for a very expensive piece of equipment. If you are directing your customers to their local distributors, would be great if they had availability to these upgrades ASAP.

Is ther a way you can assist? Thanks.
  • + 11
 @iguanabartola: thank you for bringing up your service issue, we are sorry you are having trouble with your TALAS. We will send you a message directly and want to work with our Australian distributor to help you.
  • + 5
 Thank you and wait for your message.
  • + 4
 vimeo.com/66418749

This is a Fox fork compression fail video on Vimeo. this says a lot about the new damper problems.
  • + 2
 Wow, good example. Any other fork would have popped you in the air after the rider's action. Also, you don't need a big hit to blow the full travel on the Talas. I went OTB as a result of heavy diving of the forks on a very small obstacle and at low speed. I run the forks 20psi above the recommended air pressure plus firm setting on Trail mode. Terrible performance.....
  • + 1
 That looks more like too little air pressure than lack of compression damping. If you choose to run your fork soft enough that you can bottom it with an arm pump, you will have great small-bump compliance but will pay price on anything bigger.
  • + 4
 Hi guys. Regarding the Australian distributor. I have had 5 dealings with them. Generally useless. Out of the 5, 1 was direct dealing and I was appalled by the lack of knowledge from the staff. I myself work for an agricultural distributor and I know for a fact that we would last 5 minutes if we performed to the level of Sola Sports. All I needed was the foot nut on the rebound leg for a 2013 40. 2 phone calls from my lbs and then I had to call them myself to sort it, which was a 10 minute phone conversation leaving me still unsure that they knew what i needed. This revealed to me why the service is so poor in this country. Maybe I am spoilt in the fact that I am from New Zealand and have a very good relationship Blueshark. Now that is a company that knows its products. 1 phone call and 30 seconds and I had the nut being sent out to me. Just to let you know Sola Sports sent out a nut for a 36 not a 40. I have been on 40 and 36 since 2006 and also have acquired an 831 not to mention all fox rear shocks. Please make a point to find a new distributor in Australia. I'm sure everyone would jump at the chance. I love your product and will be on fox for life. I realise Sola sports can rest on your name and justify its existence purely by parts supply to OEM forks alone but do they deserve to rest on your hard work? Thanks for your time.
  • + 4
 Took me 11 emails over a month and a half with no replies to query a warranty matter. I only got a response after I sent my final email cc'd to all the North American departments. There is just no quality help from the Australian distributor. Has lead me to deck out my current DH bike in Rockshox.
  • + 4
 I agree entirely solo sports are hopeless and a very poor representative of a great product

I have a giant reign 2013 and I broke the rear shock, solo sports told me they can't get the correct size in to Australia. I know this is not true as they just supplied a friend with the same bike a replacement only days befor I asked. After pointing this out they still maintain that they can't sell me a shock for the reign.

Having only one supplier in Australia is not helpful, let alone one supplier that have no idea, are not rider focused and straight out rude

So they only way for me to get the parts I need was to buy them in the US and use a freight forwarder to ship them over here

Should see the new float 34s and float x tomorrow :-)
  • + 3
 I know I'm going to get negative propped on this one but the 34 CTD is a great fork when not ridden hard or when ridden on rolling terrain with moderate bumps so it is likely good for the majority of riders (not the hardcores here on PBike). It fails miserably when ridden hard especially under hard braking into switchbacks.

That being said, at least Fox is willing to admit that they made a mistake and are offering an option to fix the mistake - even if it costs some $$ for those of us with 2013 forks. They could have just said that they made a mistake and that you need to get a 2014 fork if you want the new tuning. That seems to be the norm in the industry instead of standing up and offering a solution.
  • + 1
 I have the 2014's coming to replace my 2013 150mm Talas 32's that i was not happy with
  • + 2
 Kit arrived, shops don't have all the specialty tools.
Fox should've just told me the best bet would've been to send the fork in.
Once the weather gets bad again I'll have to send the fork, and the $35 kit that just arrived, back to Fox for service.
  • + 2
 Ya, Fox botched this one for sure. I placed my order almost 2 weeks ago and nothing had arrived yet so I called Fox today to see what was up. Their service manager had put a hold on the order because the kits need special tools. Unfortunately they hadn't thought to notify the customer (me) about the non-shipment. I was also waiting for other parts that were in the same order.

You lost me with this one Fox. I'm off to buy a Pike to replace my lousy 34.
  • + 1
 Not sure how Fox could've screwed this up twice (first with subpar 2013 forks, second offering a kit we can't do anything with). A handful of suspension shops and Fox themselves are capable of installing these parts. They're useless in our hands so why offer them so openly to consumers? (Well, that was before they stopped shipments like in your case) I was psyched when I saw the kits were for sale, but now I'm just annoyed and disappointed. I wanted to give Fox another chance, too... while a lot of others were saying the service/parts should've been free, I decided to just pay up and get this taken care of. Now I'm out $35+shipping... and that'll be more like $150 when all is said and done sending the fork out and having the parts professionally installed. Looks like I'll be on the train to Pikeville sooner than later.
  • + 1
 Hi, guys. We are sorry that we didn't explain what was needed to install the '14 CTD parts into the damper better. Maybe this can help clarify things:

An optional firm tuning adjustment is available for more aggressive damping settings on 2013 Factory and Performance CTD forks. Details on the tune adjustment:

• Increased low-speed compression damping across the board
• Firmer Climb mode
• More supportive Descend mode
• Available from FOX or authorized service centers


To modify the CTD tune, FOX or an authorized service center will change the following damper components: blowoff spring, blowoff piston, flow divider, compression piston, compression check limiter, and spring perch. Working on a FIT damper requires special service tools and will need to be performed by a FOX authorized service center.

The tune adjustment is available in the U.S. and Canada for $65 through FOX Factory service. This price is lower than what was quoted in the Pinkbike article and includes parts and labor. Please contact FOX or your dealer for local pricing information outside of U.S. and Canada.

In addition to the CTD tune, some 34 FLOAT 160 fork owners may wish to increase the compression ratio of the air spring. This can be accomplished by adding 20cc of FLOAT Fluid to the air chamber.

If anyone has any questions then please call FOX at 1-800FOX-SHOX in the U.S. or go to www.ridefox.com to find the closest service center in your country.
  • + 40
 Any plans on offering a regular low speed compression adjustment (non CTD) option for your 32 and 34 stanchion forks in the future? I would be stoked on a new 34 without ctd.
  • - 2
 We aren't ready to talk about any future products but we certainly appreciate the feedback. Between our enduro racers, test riders and consumers, we'll take all of their feedback into consideration when planning new products.
  • + 4
 The CTD fork that came stock on my Enduro 29er Comp isn't upgradeable with the new check valves. The fork needs a mid-stroke boost but now it seems the only way to resolve this is by replacing the entire cartridge. Given that these new cartridges cost 50% of a new fork I'm tempted just to buy a new fork. Why make a cartridge that can't accept small part upgrades?
  • + 4
 Unfortunately, it sounds like you have an Evolution series fork that uses a different damper than the higher level Factory and Performance series forks that can be updated to the '14 tune. If you did go with a FIT damper (Factory or Performance) then you would also gain the benefits of a sealed damper (very consistent damping, Factory has more adjustments) along with the '14 damping tune.
  • + 11
 My biggest complaint, and why I dont have a fox fork, is the lack of true LSC and HSC adjustments.
  • + 3
 This^^^ I have a 2013 enduro and pretty much miss the old style of compression dampening, likely I will buy a new 2014 fork when they come out but it was exactlly a week after I biught this new bike I hear that "2014 will be even better" and I think wow, you guys know it dives when ridden hard and corrected it. Only a year too late Frown now I get to choose between under or overdampened... not a big fan of the ctd. Why not have the compression adjustablle and THEN have options to adjust it on the fly ? ( I do realize the better models have the adjustment for the trail setting ) flipping levers around when on a ride is rediculous.
  • + 37
 Why on earth are so many fox-forks delivered nearly dry from the factory? (Outer leg oil).
  • - 55
flag FOX-Factory (Jul 8, 2013 at 9:04) (Below Threshold)
 All FOX forks have a specific oil volume for each product. Upon initial inspection it may appear that there is a low amount of oil inside the fork, but oil can coat all the internal parts and in some case it can drip out slowly over a period of time. If you are having specific issues with your fork, please contact your closest international distributor.
  • + 7
 I have purchased three non-OEM Fox 36 forks (2008/2010/2012), and each one was coated in oil within the plastic bag that it shipped in. For the first two purchases, at the first service interval I drained the forks and barely any oil came out. On subsequent service intervals where I had added the required volume of oil, almost all of it drained out, and in volumes very close to factory spec. For the other fork, I serviced the fork immediately after purchasing it, and found little oil in it.

Is it possible that factory torque spec on the nuts at the bottom of each fork leg is too low to create a good seal? Have you considered an o-ring seal?
  • - 5
flag mr-free-ride (Jul 8, 2013 at 11:46) (Below Threshold)
 what fork? could be from being on a plain at higher altitude making the pressure a bit higher it would b like pouting in to much air or having a ridiculously stiff spring but because its a gradual increase and not a impacted it could leak instead of just blowing out
  • + 1
 TALAS 36, all three. Used at 4000' above sea level. I doubt that air travel would be a factor.
  • + 1
 Same thing here as for pinkrobe. I've pulled the legs of new OEM+non OEM Fox forks (F40FIT, 2009/2011 et.c.) and left the forks dripping over night, with little to no signs of oil from the factory. Also tried shaking/moving around the fork a couple of times to make the oil that could be "trapped" (around the spring et.c.) get out, with no luck.

The lower leg oil just is not there. Seriously, why? Too poor after market checkups?
  • - 1
 na probably not maybe if it was a air 32 well i tried ur on ur own with this one fox
  • + 3
 ye c'mon, 4000' is hardly 35,000'!!
  • + 25
 Bryan and double Bill, How did you break into such a niche market for engineering? I now have 2 years of mechanical engineering under my belt with the intention of working in the cycling industry but here in alberta the only job prospects we seem to have shoved down our throats are oil and gas. Is there any sort of internship program you offer in either canada or the united states, or related experience that someone in the bicycle industry would look for or make them stand out over other candidates for a position? Thanks again for the time and information!
  • + 14
 (from Bryan)-All of us have very different background that lead us to our current roles at Fox. For me I got lucky and was offered a position in the engineering department straight out of college. My degree is in physics. I worked for a little over 1 year as an Engineering Technician for Fox and started doing design work initially on small projects and sub-assemblies then eventually transitioned to larger projects and full shocks as I gained experience in the design engineer role. When we look for new candidates design engineering education and enthusiasm for bikes is always a big plus. Experience within the bike industry is also a big plus, but maybe also consider just getting your foot in the door by taking a position that may not be exactly what you want in the long run but allows you to get there as a stepping stone.

(Bill Brown) I've always ridden bikes: bmx, mountain bike, moto. I attended the college of engineering at the University of Florida where I raced XC for four years. After graduating, I worked for an aerospace and defense contractor for 11 years in Florida. There are some great trails in Florida, but it was time to move to a state with more elevation. I applied at FOX in 2010 and was stoked when I received an offer of employment. The best advice I can give you as a student is to maintain a strong GPA. We are always looking for top tier employees. Check our webpage periodically for job openings and send us a resume.

tbe.taleo.net/CH11/ats/careers/jobSearch.jsp?org=FOXRACINGSHOX&cws=1
  • + 3
 @ Bill Brown - Did you ever podium in those 4 years of racing XC?
  • + 2
 In my second season, I won the spring series. I went backwards after that as school studies took priority over training. Good times.
  • + 2
 It kinda looks like Bill but he says it's not him.
  • + 20
 Are there any plans to expand your nationwide service center options or put tools/resources in the hands of local shops for rear shock/seatpost maintenance? From a shop's perspective, we see tighter service interval times coupled with a lot of your suspension having to be returned to California for a somewhat costly repair that includes no margin for dealer time put into the process and inconveniences customers with long wait times during the season for work that in a lot of cases we can handle in house for other manufacturers including RockShox. In situations like here in Jackson, and a lot of other mountain locations across the country, our summers are relatively short (sometimes as short as 4 months), to tell a customer that their OEM product from a bike that we sold them will take upwards of a quarter of their riding season to be returned to them reflects poorly on us as distributors and prompts customer doubts about whether or not they purchased the correct bike from the right dealer.

If Fox is going to take a "service and lube frequently" stance on suspension repair, it would be nice from both a shop's perspective and customer perspective to have more local, timely and in a lot of cases, more affordable options for rear suspension maintenance and repair.
  • - 7
flag FOX-Factory (Jul 8, 2013 at 12:58) (Below Threshold)
 Hi Bngofast, our goal for factory service turnaround is 1-2 days. We are currently working on expanding our service capacity in the US to ensure fast turn around and fast shipping times.
  • + 21
 Why do all fox bushings wear through stanchion finish (especially kash), when the lowers are properly cleaned & rebuilt every 20 hours?
  • - 3
 We have found that with external wipedowns after each ride and regular bath oil changes with FOX fluids, we don't see instances of premature upper tube wear. Environmental conditions may vary, so some riders might need to do more frequent cleaning and servicing than others to maintain performance.
  • + 11
 This is not true. I have inspected a number of fox forks, including some work with a CMM (co-ordinate measuring machine) I happened to have at work, and in all the cases I have looked at, there is a perfect correlation between the ovality of the bushings as inserted (normally from the factory) and the wear lines on the stantions. Frequently, the ovality is visible.
  • + 0
 I've seen someone destroy the lower part of their staunchion tubes in less than 2 weeks after a rebuild, so maintenance is crucial with some Fox forks. Granted they were riding at whistler every day and in the rain alot, but it amazes me how much more lack of maintenance you can get away with on a 888. I suspect it is from higher oil volume and better seals?

Is it ok to use Enduro seals on Kashima forks since the Kashima coating is supposedly more durable than the non-Kashima coating that you have previously said not to use Enduro seals on?
  • + 19
 I ride Whistler almost daily, and I wipe down the exterior just about every lap, but still have substantial wear on both my 2011 kashima 40, and my non-kash spare 40. The wear is so discouraging, that more often than not, I like to run my 2007 888 rc2x, as it performs like a beauty, weighs the same, and only needs to be serviced once every geologic era....
  • + 13
 (Bill Brown) Dear mxlemming - To achieve statistical correlation with a confidence level of 95% requires a minimum sample size of 30 pieces. Was this thoroughness accomplished in your study? The bushings used in FOX forks have oil grooves to promote lubrication. Depending on the probe size used, these oil grooves may lead to inaccurate data as the probe will fall into them. What diameter is your probe? Does your CMM have the capability to do a cylindrical surface scan or does it only create a point cloud? If one or more points taken fall on an oil groove it will effect the measured form of the cylinder. I have not seen this dedication from someone outside the industry before. Impressive initiative.
  • + 6
 Fox, stanchion wear is my biggest gripe. Every Fox fork I have owned showed stanchion wear early in the piece. When I could finally prove that it was a Fox issue, the Aussie distributor replaced the stanchions on warranty. If it is MY fault, then why are they replaced on warranty. There was less than 30 hours use on the fork (your previous service interval on Float 32s. And I don't ride in mud and I regularly cleaned the stanchions and inside the seals using the electrical tape method.

The original Marzocchi orange Z1 went for years of neglect with no stanchion rub. Surely the pinnacle of stanchion/seal interfaces wasn't Back In The Day.
  • + 1
 @ patricdemo9 got the same marz... love it, such a solid fork and it has NEVER given me any issues whatsoever
  • + 13
 @FOX-Factory. Bill Brown makes an excellent point. For a consumer to suggest that the wear marks in worn forks correspond with oval bushings, they'll need a study with 95% certainty. For fox to make claims of Kashima's "extreme durability" and "we don't see instances of premature upper tube wear" they need only say so.
  • + 4
 @mxlemming Do the study. I bet you will come out victorious.
  • + 10
 You do not need a statistical confidence of 95% when there is obvious causality. Nice attempt at a cop out. You certainly don't need 30 pieces when there is a clear kink in the bushes where they are made as an open section, and that kink matches perfectly to a raised wear point in the stantion.

The probe was 3mm diameter. The tool is capable of surface scan, but since I was controlling it manually I created cloud points; many of them. I was not foolish enough to let the oil grooves skew the data. I was able to repeat the result with precision considerably greater than the defect size.

Unfortunately, I have moved to another company, where they have no need for a CMM machine, otherwise I would willingly take measurements again. I did this out of interest, on someone else's fork.
  • + 18
 this may have been asked before so apologies.

But why when you have RS, Marzocchi on a comeback and people like DVO rocking up do Fox seem to want to make it harder and harder for their users to learn about their fork internals ? The support pages seemed to have been completely removed from the fox website, there are literally no details on rear shock servicing anywhere to be found other than users self made guides. And why are some "special tools" so damn expensive ? prime example is the talas 2 ifp tool. £100 last time i could actually find one and its just a football needle with a thread. compare this to the monarch IFP, Sid, marzocchi or other charging tools which are around £10.

With people like DVO and marzocchi trying to get people into playing with their fork internals is it not a bit of a poor decision to make Fox parts a mystery that only certain companies can service ?

Not only that it leads to misinformation, i have been told several things incorrectly from Fox techs in my time which doesnt really fill me with confidence in the product, even tho i appreciate this may well be just so that said company profits from servicing.

Whilst i understand the Apple approach of "if only we touch it we can guarantee it will work as intended" surely this is only putting customers at a disadvantage when it comes to service costs on what are already highly priced parts?

*Please note im not disputing the ride quality of fox products, just personally put off by high initial costs and service costs and "only the magic people" can fix it approach*
  • - 10
flag FOX-Factory (Jul 8, 2013 at 15:12) (Below Threshold)
 Hi jaydmf, Thanks for the feedback. We do make the drawings and service manuals for forks available to dealers. We just finished updating our 2014 drawing catalog; this section of the web does require a login which is available from your distributor. I can't tell from your message if you are at a dealer or not. If you are, drop us or your distributor a line and we can hook you up with the drawings.
  • + 24
 Hi guys,

thanks for replying. Im no dealer. I just like to be able to look after my gear with out breaking the bank. The earlier service manuals were great (actually helped with a friends talas 2 issues), i just find it a bit of a shame that this hasnt been kept up to date and that rear shock guides arent provided.

In comparison RS provide guides to strip down all their products and spare part guides. As a rider thats not scared of opening up my forks/shock i find this a great advantage. Whilst i appreciate working on a fork is not for everyone its a massive consideration for me, and im sure others, on buying a product.

In fact for my latest rear shock purchase i went for an RS monarch on the basis that i knew how easily replacement parts were to source, the cost of most of the parts, i could find the required tools (shock vises) to fix the unit should i need to and i could see the rough tuning id need just by visiting their service pages.

Just as feedback id highly recommend providing such information, as those that want to know it will at least make an informed attempt to service their kit and those that cant be bothered/ dont have time or interest wont even go looking for it.

I know im only one person and you guys have to consider the whole market but just to have the guides and parts lists even if i have to go through 1 disti to get them i think you'd get a lot more people on board.
  • + 9
 Agree^^ fox website needs improvement and needs to share the knowledge. I'm literally scared to take apart my ctd fork and I'm never going to send it to fox for repair simply because they feel I don't have a right to information on the product I purchased. If this continues, the fun factor of fixing my own equipment goes down and will be less likely be a another purchase from fox. Even if the product is better, it's not going to last amongst the mtb community for these exact reasons.
  • + 4
 totally agree on this one. here us out fox!
  • + 2
 I think that everyone would very much appreciate if you provided the service manuals and service parts to the consumer directly. I for one prefer to work on my bikes myself. When making a decision on a new part, I would rather support a company that gives me the ability to do that.
  • + 13
 I have a hybrid air 40 that came on my trek 9.9 and its performance has been awesome. Only problem is that the tolerance seems to be off on the right bushing and is constantly wearing a scour mark in the stanchion. I have been doing more than the regular lower maintenance and rotating the stanxhion to minimize the wear. I sent it back for warranty but got told I needed
paperwork to prove it was getting serviced.
I have been working on my own forks wqith zero concerns for the last 7 yrs so I have no such paperwork. I have a fork that is slowly wearing itself out and there is nothing I can do to fix it? What do I need to do to help get this situation warrantied
  • + 6
 answer please
  • - 29
flag FOX-Factory (Jul 8, 2013 at 11:26) (Below Threshold)
 Hi moolay, without inspecting the fork ourselves, its difficult to provide an accurate answer. Once a tube starts to wear, it will continue. It won't have anything to do with the bushing tolerance. It's worth having a qualified bike shop mechanic take a look at it and offer up a second opinion. I applaud you for getting in there and taking care of your own equipment. Mark
  • + 23
 Incorrect, ovalised bushings will cause massively increased rate of wear.
  • + 12
 What do you consider a qualified bike mechanic? The kid who took your 2 hour course and makes minimum wage? The guy who has to rebuild numerous forks a day and just slams through them without much regard for damage? I have had my fork seals and bushings destroyed by a "qualified bike mechanic".
  • + 3
 Hi fox factory. Of course this problem hasn't fizzled out like this thread. Just a quick mention to see if someone at fox can contact(PM) me directly. Like I said, best fork ever but its durability issue is a huge negative even when I am going beyond your recommended maintenance intervals. As for second opinions, I was informed by a former fox employee out of switzerland that it is a bushing issue. Help please.
  • + 10
 I'm an mechanical engineering student (graduating next year), and I'd love to work in the mountain bike industry, what kind of qualifications and attributes do you look for when hiring new engineers, and what advice would you have for me if I want to have a successful career in this industry? Thanks! Bevan
  • + 3
 Straight out of school, they look for experience using Pro/E as well as good grades, as you might expect. Usually they hire people with experience, so you could always spend a few years working in a different industry but getting CAD experience.
  • + 1
 My question is the same as @bevan25's, except I'm studiing industrial design engineering. Is there anyone in the team with the same qualities?
  • + 2
 Please see Bryan and Bill Brown's reply to Dan-is-the-man.
  • + 3
 (Bill Brown) As a new grad, your greatest attribute will be your GPA. It demonstrates your knowledge of mechanical engineering principles, your ability to multitask and manage your time. We are engineers first and bike enthusiasts second. Our team consists of mechanical engineers, physicist, industrial designers, test engineers, and manufacturing engineers. Check out our webpage periodically for job openings and send in your resume.
tbe.taleo.net/CH11/ats/careers/jobSearch.jsp?org=FOXRACINGSHOX&cws=1
  • + 1
 Thanks Guys, hopefully I will talk to you in a year or two! Bevan
  • + 10
 It has been asked previously but is there any intention of bringing out a 34mm fork with rc2 cartridge or similar? The platform seems ideal but I won't lie ctd puts me off, currently running some 2011 36 floats with rc2 and they are brilliant.
  • + 4
 Hi Willm87, we have discussed this internally and are looking into it. The packaging is much different than a 36 and challenging.
  • + 4
 I really enjoy my rc2 in a 36 but it's a bit over kill for my current ride a 34 rc2 would be awesome
  • + 1
 36 RC2 Rules!
  • + 3
 The RC2 was and is still brilliant. I'm still using my '08 36 VAN RC2 as the need to upgrade has yet to be realized. Leave the CTD for the cheaper low end or mid range models, guys that can't tell the difference between a turn of LSC for turn in or brake dive control. I adjust HS, LS and rebound on almost every ride (depending on conditions and trail type), and usually only a click or two at most from my tuned state.

Fox was always a top pick for it's wide range of adjustments, sad to see the RC2 so scarce on the other models.
If packaging on a 34 is tricky for RC2, just make some 36's then. The little weight difference is worth the trade off in rigidity and performance. Just market it that waySmile

I would personally like to see the RC2 cartridge find it's way into a 140mm 29 Float as I am finally making the 29er switch as I am more focused on XC/Enduro type riding in my age.

Thanks for being brave enough to put yourselves up to this type of public abuse, I can only hope that positive things will come as a result from the feedback, negative or not. Remember, customers who buy your equipment are savvy and require the utmost of performance from your suspension. Please continue to captivate that market.
  • + 10
 Dear Fox

Are you working on making CSU's that do not creak? I had a lyrik for 2 years and not a squeak, Had a Fox 36 for 6 months and the stantions started to creak in the crown.
  • + 1
 I guess not
  • + 1
 I guess they are not looking to fix the biggest flaw in their forks.
  • + 9
 @Fox

what is the reality of "lowers service" intervals for Fox forks

in the past I have stuck to the suggested (and very short time scale) intervals for servicing lowers on all of the Fox forks I have owned (numerous pairs of 32, 36, 40) and rarely found any evidence of dirt ingress, contamination, seal damage or lubrication oil breakdown, and this is living in the UK riding regularly in mud / rain

-I am doing my forks more harm following these strict timescales for lowers servicing (it cannot do the pumper rod threads or fork seals any good to be pulling apart the fork regularly?)

-than if I just regularly clean the exterior of the fork whilst washing the bike, and then apply some dry chain lube or silicon spray to the stanchions (then pumping the fork and wiping excess off with clean rag) to keep the seal lips clean and lubricated? And then following a less frequent "lowers service" routine?

what would you guys at Fox recommend?
  • + 3
 Changing oil is really important in addition to proper external cleaning (to prevent built-up dirt from being forced into the interior of the fork). You are not doing any harm by frequently disassembling your fork (the threads can take it!). Oil breaks down overtime and oxides mix in with the oil, from the parts, that should be cleaned out to maintain optimal performance.
  • + 1
 @FOX-Factory

thanks for the reply, I am just trying to get a handle on service intervals

as a professional bike mechanic (workshop manager) working in a store regularly selling £6,500+ bikes, I am all about doing quality work

of course, we get the JRA customers who do not service their fork or rear shock in 2-3 years and seem surprised at requiring CSU or Air Can replacement during the 1st suspension service after these 2-3 years when their suspension eventually breaks down

but for experienced wrenches like myself, its hard getting a handle on what is actually needed, compared to what the official service intervals actually are!


another question for Fox. What impact do the current (and perhaps over-aggressive) bike cleaning products have on your forks and shocks?

the CSU on my Fox 32 Evo 29'er fork was thankfully replaced FOC by your excellent UK distributor Mojo only 8 months into ownership after the dreaded "braking creak" reared its head

I had an informing conversation with Mojo about this issue, and was told that use of bike cleaning products can leach away the assembly grease used between stanchions and crown during CSU assembly, causing an annoying but non-structural (not safety) clicking noise under heavy pedaling loads or use of the front disc brake

the problem I have is that my muddy bike requires regular washing, and I have never used aggressive cleaning products (only warm soapy water as recommended by Shimano and KMC for their drivetrains).

once the 1 year warranty is void on my Fox fork, I am looking at paying £250+ for a new CSU once the grease leaches out of the CSU like last time? As a professional bike mechanic I cannot face riding a bike that has clicking or creaking noises!

any recommendations for cleaning or servicing that will help promote the durability of the CSU?
  • + 2
 Hey hampsteadbandit, We also recommend washing with mild soapy water. You can also use isopropyl alcohol. Using these cleansers should not have any adverse effect on the CSU. Our service intervals are based on maintaining optimal performance over a long period of time. Our philosophy encourages regular preventative maintenance to prevent more costly service events.
  • + 1
 @Fox-Factory

thanks for the information, I will make sure to stay away from "Muck-Off" and those products in the future
  • + 8
 Are you ever going to make a much lower budget fork as rockshox sell quite a lot of their low end forks? i think that your "budget" forks are very expensive for some people that want a decent fork at a decent price instead of an amazing fork at a quite high price.
  • + 1
 Never say never, but our current focus is on the mid to high-end performance products. We try to cover as many tiers in the market as we can, while staying true to our core values.
  • - 1
 And they are?
  • + 2
 If you are offering high end products, where are the user controlled adjustments?
  • + 1
 On or in the fork.
  • + 7
 When asked "Why were the 2013 CTD forks poor performers" you respond with: "We were responding to feedback from all riders". However, when asked why you don't offer entry level priced forks you respond with: "We focus on mid to high performance products".

How do you reconcile basically designing a line of forks to make riders who are asking for a squishy ride "cause they bought a full-suspension bike" with being a "high performance company"?
  • + 1
 Dang, didn't get this question answered... Must have been my typo in the question. Doh...
  • + 1
 Or the efectiveness of ignoring... I'm sad this was not answered also.
  • + 7
 Will we be seeing a 34 and Float Air shock with adjustable high and low-speed compression, like the RC2/RC4 dampers? CTD seems good, but would be nice to have the full range of adjustment on an enduro fork and shock, the RLC damper is the best I've ever tried and all thats missing is the adjustable high speed and a matching rear shock!
  • - 4
flag FOX-Factory (Jul 8, 2013 at 10:53) (Below Threshold)
 This question has come up a few times. We aren't ready to talk about possible future products but will certainly consider feedback from our enduro athletes, test riders and consusmers.
  • + 7
 Why don't you guys at Fox offer more inexpensive dual crown forks? All that's offered are your 40's, which are top of the line but a fortune. It would be nice to see Fox offer lower quality forks than the Fox 40, but still a quality fork. For example Rockshox offers the Boxxer Rc, the R2C2 and the Boxxer world cup. There all great forks with more manageable prices, would like to see Fox take that approach.
  • + 9
 We do have an option that might interest you. For 2014, we are offering a 40 with a coil spring, hard ano uppers, and open bath R damper.
  • + 3
 Jadon-ceravolo - we've received this feedback often. In MY2013 we introduced a 40R, a coil sprung 40 with an open-bath damper. We carried this model forward into MY2014 and it has benefited from all the advancements in the chassis.
  • + 8
 To: Bill Becker

What makes it so difficult to produce and market an Inverted design? weight? cost? torsional stiffness? ...we all like your inverted dh fork, which makes the Dorado looks gay
  • + 2
 Please see Bill's reply to fr33riding on the same topic. You will also gain valuable insight into his daily beverage preference...
  • + 6
 (Fox - if you're reading this - I'm forewarning you of this question) Do you think that that SRAM owning essentially, all parts that are required for an OEM bike build affects your ability to compete in the market for supply of forks OEM. For example, are SRAM Corp (through Rockshox) leveraging off thier offerings in other parts markets (ie:Truvative/Avid) to squeeze you guys out of the OEM market? Can you discuss how you negotiate OEM packages with bike companies - do you have to team up with Shimano to beat out offers from SRAM? (Lots of questions, but all on the same topic)
  • + 4
 It's certainly something we have to contend with in the OEM business cycle. We focus on our strengths -- suspension testing with the OEM's to help them bring the most out of their bikes. We also work hard to deliver the best suspension performance package each season. This has been our recipe for success and it has served us well.
  • + 8
 Why does the 831 RAD 34 have a 15mm axle and also why is it only for team riders even though they have been riding them for basically a year?
  • + 1
 The 34 841 is based on the 34 chassis with 15mm axle. After working with the riders in our RAD program, our design goal was to balance the stiffness and weight. We've been testing the fork through the RAD program with Brett Rheeder, Cam McCaul and others over the last year and the feedback has been very positive. After the RAD testing and feedback has completed, we will transition to prepare the 34 831 for production.
  • + 3
 And why do the current 32 831's have an rlc damper instead of an rc2 damper? It seems that the ability to tune the fork for high speed hits (common in dirt jumping, gated racing) would be way more important than having lockout.
  • + 2
 Edit: Instead of a ctd damper? I was stuck in 2012...
  • + 4
 Seriously, why make a dirtjumper that isn't a 20mm? I don't get it.
  • - 5
flag Bennyy4x (Jul 8, 2013 at 13:09) (Below Threshold)
 I think the 831 is aimed more at the 4x market where stiffness is key
  • + 2
 First of all, I disagree that it's aimed more towards the 4x market. Second of all, you could still run high pressures and crank the high and low speed damping, which would still make for a very stiff fork, that would also be waaayyyy more adjustable.
  • + 5
 Hi Fox,

Any tip to reduce the stinction of the new fox 40 air ? Also If someone want to buy another rate negative spring where can he find it ?
And something last , can the 40 float be converted to coil ? From where should we get the parts ?

Thanks
  • + 5
 Hi Swthrhs, We are working on higher and lower negative spring kits. I see several forks come over to us at the races that feel sticky due to misalignment. Loosen the crown and axle bolts and re torque them to the spec. Also make sure the hub is the not over size or undersize. It can be converted to a coil but once converted, it can't be changed back to air without changing the upper tube. Mark
  • + 4
 I also have the new 40 air and found the same issue, so I loosened my crown bolts and wiggled my fork with my tire between
my legs to loosen it and then re-torqued it and it felt 100% better. So smooth now! Thanks for the tips!
  • + 2
 The torque spec on the seven crown bolts is 65 in-lb.
  • + 5
 @Fox,
Fox you guys rock, after living in Japan I was able to get my float fully rebuilt by the Fox guys in the Tokyo area for under $200 sent up and back from Okinawa. I have always loved the Fox lineup for front forks, although I did notice that in 100+ degree weather with saltwater rolling down jungle trails they wear quite a bit faster compared to the mountain terrain. I hope to fully test your equipment living in Europe for the next year. Just wanted to say thanks guys for the amazing customer service and hope to beat the crap out of your equipment for another couple years.
-Colt
  • + 3
 That is great to hear, Colt. Have fun in Europe - there is some amazing terrain there.
  • + 4
 I have had new 36 Float forks every year since 2011 (so 3 forks in total) all bought brand new. Each fork, within the firs 6months has developed a creak either at the crown/steerer or at the crown/stanchion. They have been replaced under warranty a total of 5 times for 3 forks. This seems to be a very common occurance, at least where I live (Vancouver, BC). I know several people that work at different shops and all have said that they see forks coming in every week with the same issue.

I am wondering if this is something that you are looking at for future releases - I love the performance but really dislike the creaking - even if it is not dangerous, I am paying over a grand every year for new forks and would prefer they didn't creak.
  • + 7
 I have probably read this before but I need to ask again why you never released an inverted fork?
  • + 7
 We fully developed and tested an inverted DH fork with our racers. The response from all of our racers was that they strongly preferred the conventional fork for its stiffness in cornering and holding the line. We developed axles with 3 different levels of stiffness; in all cases the conventional fork out-performed the inverted fork. We retired this fork from the RAD program. The picture above shows the inverted fork in the new FOX museum in Scotts Valley CA.
  • + 3
 Can I buy the intevert DH fork as a 1 off?
  • + 5
 Sorry, no.
  • + 4
 Can I at least get a free FOX T-shirt to compensate for the bad news? Frown
  • + 3
 By "no" I'm sure you mean... $1,000,000 dollars! (Doctor Evil Voice, for comedic effect)
  • + 1
 The thing is not all of us are pro racers that demand absolute speed and efficiency. Some riders might like the flex in an inverted fork that makes for a more comfortable ride, but still want a fork from Fox(no disrespect manitou)
  • + 1
 1 - not sure why I wrote both $ and dollars... Just read dollars once Razz

2 - Fox make high quality, high performance products. If you want a low performance product don't buy Fox! With regards to your comments on 'more flex' they actually reduced the stiffness of the chassis for the 2014 40s compared to the 2013 and earlier 40s to add a bit of the compliance/comfort you desire. The cost of bringing a fork to market must be HUGE and it doesn't make any sense to bring a substandard (compared to a traditional 40) fork to market, when it has a high risk of being unprofitable - all it would do is compete with the normal 40 and possibly damage Fox's reputation for making high end forks. Finally, a big part of Fox's R&D program is to stick the fork under the some of fastest (and arguably best) riders in the world. If they've already said they prefer the regular 40, they're going to have a hard time testing an inverted model.
  • + 0
 You make a good point, however, I'm not saying they should make a lower quality fork, I'm saying they should make a lower quality fork, I'm saying they should make a more comfortable fork. I'm not sure what that would entail but they shouldn't sacrifice damper technology. I went to Northstar recently(I own a 2010 40) and by the end of the day my hands were killing me. This was most likely because my spring was a bit too heavy but also because the fork is impressively stiff(which no doubt made the bike very fast). I talked to a few people who had a similar problem. I would just like more comfortable high end fork(probably is a simple fix for me)
  • + 4
 @bill becker

1. will you release an inverted fork? is there a project running on that?

2. do you believe that air can substitute effectively coil in dh use? how come you do it in a fork? what about a shock?

3. name 2-3 advice on keeping fork and shock in top notch condition.

4. what is your opinion in electronic suspension?

5. do you believe that carbon eventually will replace some/all parts in suspension forks?

6. what do you drink while working?

7. ever been to greece?

Smile
  • + 5
 1. No, we have no plans on selling an inverted DH fork in the near future. We fully designed and tested a FOX Inverted DH fork, but found our DH racers (Gwin, Gee Atherton, etc...) preferred the stiffness and cornering characteristics of the conventional 40 fork. The 2014 Float 40 was developed and preferred by all of our sponsored racers.

2. Yes, air springs work very well in DH racing with proper tuning and design. As you may have seen, we are currently developing and testing DH Air shocks in our RAD race program.

3. Clean your fork regularly and put a very light film of oil on the Uppertube exterior. Adjust your compression settings for the trails and conditions you are riding that day. Check that your rebound setting is not to slow.

4. I think electronic suspension could be a great advantage and we are looking at in the future.

5. Carbon fiber makes sense on some of the suspension fork parts, but threads, cost and material wear points will make it likely that it is on limited internal parts.

6. Straight up black coffee in the morning and water in the afternoon.

7. I have never been to Greece, but I would like to go there in the near future.
  • + 4
 Regarding #3 - which oil would you recommend?
  • + 14
 Regarding #6, why no beer?
  • + 4
 Bryan Anderson - What's the most technically advanced or challenging problem you've had to face dealing with the Fox Product line? How much of your engineering background have you pulled in, and on a daily basis, how much of the time do you actually get to wear the "design engineer" hat at the company?

Thanks ahead of time, question coming from another Product Design Engineer, curious about the bike industry.
  • + 8
 Probably one of the most difficult problems is noise. Damping components regulate hydraulic flow and have natural vibration frequencies that can be extremely annoying to listen to on a bike. Since our products operate under a wide range of temperature, pressure and oil flow rate it can be very difficult to move the resonant frequencies outside of the audible or operational fluid flow range. It's also very difficult to come up with a mathematical model for this. At certain times of the product development cycle i spend nearly all my time wearing the design engineer hat. Other times of the year i am supporting the production and service teams, marketing, and race department. The variety is one of the things i love about my job.
  • + 3
 Hi, I just received a carbon Bronson with a 34 TALAS, 160 FIT CTD w/Trail Adjust on the front and a FLOAT CTD Boost Valve w/Trail Adjust shock on June 27th. My first rides were practicing for the China Peak Enduro on Saturday the 29th then racing on the 30th. Initially the suspension felt responsive (though I never got full travel out of the front), but as the weekend went on I measured a 5psi increase in the fork, a 1.5psi increase in the shock, decreased travel both front and rear and a "sticky" almost dry feeling in the fork. By the time I got home Sunday night both the fork and shock felt almost locked out. Is this break in period behavior or something? (note: I reduced the pressure in both and reset them to my initial sag settings before riding again).

Last week I took it out for a few more rides and have continuously had to remove pressure from the front in an attempt to get all of the travel. I live in Santa Barbara and ride decently fast, weigh 140# and still can't get the last 1.5" out of my fork. I've gotten to the point where I've reduced the air pressure in the fork to the point where it's starting to feel divey and under sprung.

Additionally the high speed compression damping on the shock feels really rampy/sharp in the beginning of travel when hitting rocks/jumps in the trail. The bike almost feels like a hardtail. It's not that the bike is rebounding quickly after moving through travel, it feels like the bike isn't compressing at all during fast small hits. Also, going off of drops, the rear feels like it has too much high speed rebound damping. To compensate I've had to run almost no low speed rebound (2 clicks on) which makes the bike more bouncy and prone to understeer.

Any suggestions/ideas? I've heard the new negative spring in the fork is too stiff for lighter riders to get full travel, any plans to help those of us who don't weigh 180#?

Thanks~
  • + 0
 FOX:

THIS!
  • + 2
 Tiffers, Thanks for the details on your set up. We'd like some additional information to help you out, so we'll send you a pinkbike message to get to the bottom of it. Stay tuned...
  • + 2
 PM sent. It'll be easier to talk on the phone about this- too many variables to figure out online. That Sierra volcanic dust wasn't being my friend up there either. We'll have to run through some things to find out what's going on. We'll figure it out.
  • + 2
 Perfect, thanks!
  • + 3
 What was the reasoning behind releasing the new 34 forks with a 15mm axle instead of a 20mm?
It seems to me that you missed a trick here....Fox 34 with 20mm - less flexi than 32 -less weight than 36..
Fox 34 with 15mm - less flexi than 32-less weight than 36 but MORE flex....
  • + 3
 Sorry if the question has already been asked but I ride a 2007 enduro still because fankly it's an amazing frame. But every so often I upgrade components to stay current. But it seems that 11/8" forks are becoming harder to find. Do you see fox discontinuing the production of straight 11/8" forks within the next 5 years?
  • + 13
 We do maintain options for service. We don't have a hard cut-off on availability of 1 1/8 tubes. We do try to follow market demand and we do expect the demand for 1 1/8 to "taper" off.
  • + 8
 bu-dmm, tssss
  • + 4
 Why not offer your 34 line up in 150mm with an after market solution to lower to 140mm and keep the 160 in the 36 line? Us everyday trail riders want the stiffness of the 34mm stanchions.
  • - 3
 We looked at offering the 34 at 150mm of travel for aftermarket sales but feedback dictated we kept it at 160mm. It is possible to lower the fork length and travel of the 34 but you'll need to replace the air spring assembly to give it the correct compression ratio.
  • + 3
 @FOX-Factory: I have used pure nitrogen in place of atmosphere in both your forks and shocks and preferred the consistent performance it affords as it is less affected by heat, so my 20th run feels exactly like my 1st. Given that:

1. Is this something you recommend?
2. Do any of your / your RAD team / world cup riders do this?
3. Would (do) you ever pre-charge your products with nitrogen?
4. Are there any considerations to be made regarding product setup/maintenance when using nitrogen?
  • + 7
 Hwulex - What you're benefitting from is the lack of moisture (water vapor) in the gas that is inside your air springs, rather than the difference between N2 and air. The % water content of gas affects its pressure when compressed. At the factory, we use either nitrogen or dry air in all of our product depending on the application.
1. Your not going to damage anything by using Nitrogen instead of air
2. None of our athletes currently run nitrogen in their air springs.
3. All shock IFP (internal floating piston) chambers are charged with Nitrogen.
4. No special considerations to setup when using Nitrogen
  • + 3
 I have a 2013 santa cruz nomad with a 2013 160 fox float and a rear DHX RC4 shock, I usually ride free ride and all mountain terrain, I am 5'5" and weigh about 150. I feel as if my front fork is bucking me around quite a bit, i feel like it isn't absorbing or its not as plush as it should be, then my rear shock makes me feel as if I am riding a hard tail at times, overall I just feel like my bike is not giving me the plush suspension I need. My husband and I are going up to Whistler this weekend and want my bike dialed before we get there, thanks, if Bryan Anderson could answer my question that would be great
  • + 1
 Kswin, have you tried slowing down the rebound of the rear relative to the front?
  • + 3
 Question for brown,

Why do you think that in some cases, Fox forks suffer in terms of durability and robustness compared to some of your competitors? Reflected by your 30 hour service interval Vs. Marzocchi's 3 year unlimited warranty period with no service stipulations?

and this with no apparent loss in performance? (if a little heavier)

I appreciate that fork design is very much a compromise but the difference between your recommendations and thus warranty stipulations and some of your competitors is truly massive.

thanks

Josh
  • + 0
 (Bill Brown) Josh - We are always faced with compromises and in this case the compromise is warranty/service downtime vs. product longevity/customer satisfaction. We want to keep the product on our customer's bike rather than in shipping and our service center. Our service intervals are based on this principal. In the event a durability issue is encountered, we have a world wide distributor/service network to resolve the issue as quickly as possible.
  • + 2
 Josh, that wasn't even a question, that was a back-breaking body slam that exposed the unreliable nature of FOX forks.. You are right, the difference is massive and I will never understand why so many people drink the FOX kool-aid.
  • + 2
 With Marzocchi you don't have that compromise, the product lasts a long time even without the high maintenance issues FOX forks have, you are less likely to have warranty issues, and in the rare case you have a warranty you are covered for much longer. Win, win, win.
  • + 3
 So much time, energy, and R&D goes into making the fastest and the lightest; why don't we see suspension / bike manufacturers release a budget line for those of us just looking to ride? I'd love to see a company bring back something old school and proven, at a really low price point, that will last a long time. I know it will not be the lightest or the most supple, but it would be nice to be affordable. Not all of us can afford a $5k bike, but there has to be a large market for the $2k bike that can take bike park abuse. So what if it is a 40# DH bike, old school pros were very fast on those not too long ago, and last I checked most of us are not even to that level.
  • + 0
 Seriously, answer a question about soufflés but not this?
  • + 3
 When will we be seeing an available 831 on a 34mm chassis? I've seen in for months here and there and was really hoping to see in on your 2014 lineup. I need a new fork and I've been told I can no longer lower the 34s and 36s like I used to.
  • + 1
 Our RAD riders are currently testing this fork. It will most likely be rolled into the next model year.
  • + 3
 I purchased a set of lowers a while back. They are brand new but the bushings inside where the stanchions slide are Black with just (2) slots for oil -- All of my other lowers have had the white coating on the bushings with several slots for oil. I have slide a tube into them and they seem super smooth. Do you know where these Black bushings came from?
  • + 5
 All FOX fork upper and lower bushings have an off-white liner color and 8 oil grooves. I do not know where those black bushings came from, but they're definitely not FOX original equipment.
  • + 3
 Why is there no 20mm tru axle on a Dirt jump/ street fork?

How often should a fork and shock be serviced? I live in Canada and it would be expensive to mail my suspension to the states? I have a 36 Float, 36 Talas, and DHX rc4 and 2

Thanks
  • + 2
 Please see the reply to adamlaycock regarding your 831 question.

Service interval information can be found on our website here - www.ridefox.com/service.php?m=bike&ref=servicehome

Our service center in Canada is Outdoor Gear Canada -
ph +1.514.332.1320
www.ogc.ca
  • + 3
 Don't want to have a moan on hear but this is a question I have been wanting to ask about your forks. I have had regular troubles with creaking CSU's over various modles from 32,36(160&180) and now 34's. The issue has always been resolved very quickly with a new CSU with no questions asked and I can not fault your customer service. But it's just annoying that I have to remove he fork and send it off. I know other manufactors CUS's can creak but Fox ones seam to be a bit more prolific. I would like to know what Fox's views are on the subject, do you just replace a creaky CSU as a good will gesture as the noise is annoying or do you replace them as the part is faulty. I don't know if I am just so honed into the problem now that I am over sensitive to it, should I just try and forget about the noises and just ride or am I right to send them off all the time? The issue has got to the point now that when I look at a new set of forks my eyes start to wonder to other brands. Would Fox ever re design the CSU? I never used to get this problem on older fox forks.
Cheers
Tom
  • + 3
 I have a 08 Scott gambler and a DHX RC4 and was wondering how to set up the LSC and HSC properly?
My local trails have a few rock gardens and big drops/gaps but the trails are mainly smaller flowing jumps with berms, and I weigh 11 stone so I'd like advice on how to setup the shock to cope with both rough rocks/big impacts and smooth berms and flat sections please

Thanks
  • + 1
 Hi Hmason8192, very good question. One of our toughest challenges as tuners is balancing suspension to work well in the two conditions you describe. To set up the suspension to exit smooth berms fast requires more low speed compression. At the same time, adding low speed compression can reduce traction in rough sections or change geometry in flat turns. The important thing is to address the amount of conditions that are giving you trouble in a given DH run.
  • + 3
 Creaking CSUs. I've had 3 already and although our great distributor changed it quickly under warrantee I'd like to know whether you plan on beefing things up a bit in order to solve this problem once an for all. Or is it not solvable?
  • + 1
 Although it can be annoying, a creaking crown does not necessarily indicate a structural issue. All our fork chassis undergo rigorous structural testing before production release. The CSU to crown joint is a highly optimized attachment that is press fit assembly. We continually refine and test alternatives to reduce any field issues with our CSU assembly. However because of the variation in environment and riding conditions the individual riders experience can have some variation.
  • + 2
 Hi, I just received a carbon Bronson with a 34 TALAS, 160 FIT CTD w/Trail Adjust on the front and a FLOAT CTD Boost Valve w/Trail Adjust shock on June 27th. My first rides were practicing for the China Peak Enduro on Saturday the 29th then racing on the 30th. Initially the suspension felt responsive (though I never got full travel out of the front), but as the weekend went on I measured a 5psi increase in the fork, a 1.5psi increase in the shock, decreased travel both front and rear and a "sticky" almost dry feeling in the fork. By the time I got home Sunday night both the fork and shock felt almost locked out. Is this break in period behavior or something? (note: I reduced the pressure in both and reset them to my initial sag settings before riding again).

Last week I took it out for a few more rides and have continuously had to remove pressure from the front in an attempt to get all of the travel. I live in Santa Barbara and ride decently fast, weigh 140# and still can't get the last 1.5" out of my fork. I've gotten to the point where I've reduced the air pressure in the fork to the point where it's starting to feel divey and under sprung.

Additionally the high speed compression damping on the shock feels really rampy/sharp in the beginning of travel when hitting rocks/jumps in the trail. The bike almost feels like a hardtail. It's not that the bike is rebounding quickly after moving through travel, it feels like the bike isn't compressing at all during fast small hits. Also, going off of drops, the rear feels like it has too much high speed rebound damping. To compensate I've had to run almost no low speed rebound (2 clicks on) which makes the bike more bouncy and prone to understeer.

Any suggestions/ideas? I've heard the new negative spring in the fork is too stiff for lighter riders to get full travel, any plans to help those of us who don't weigh 180#?

Thanks~
  • + 2
 My forks always rebound so quick when I first get on the bike, then calm down and settle to what they should be after a few pumps, any ideas on why this is? I've got a BOS cartridge fitted to them if that makes any difference
  • + 3
 Unfortunately, we aren't really be able to comment on a FOX product fitted with a damper from another brand.
  • + 2
 What concerns are there with shortening a shock? Is it simply changing the IFP level & oil? Was wanting to upgrade a 2012 enduro to a heavier duty shock and was wondering if i could swap the one from the enduro evo without increasing the rear travel. Will the propiety specialized adapter screw attach to other fox shocks?
  • + 1
 FOX doesn't recommend modifying the eye-to-eye or travel of a shock.
  • + 2
 Why can't you engineer a seal that works?
I do not mean to be rude but if the forks/shocks need servicing every 30 hours then its gets really expensive for anyone who cannot do this at home. If you can design a seal or lower that either stops all contaminants or has ports (bleeding oil or grease etc) then you will have the market. Other manufacturers should also do this but I only think marzocchi have made forks that can be ridden for over 3 months and they work in all conditions faultless of performance without a service (up to 2007 anyhow).

Stop buying cheap tack from Taiwan and design some well engineered seals and parts so that your products have the value factor.
  • + 4
 (Bill Brown) scottgregorydh - All dynamic seals leak. Engineering dynamic seals is a balance between leak rate, dirt exclusion, pressure sealing, and friction. We have over 30 years of seal experience and work with several industry experts to design and fabricate our seals, most notably SKF - which are engineered and manufactured in Italy.
  • + 2
 Nice reply.

Ok, il ask a more direct question. Will you ever bring into production a fork and rear shock that are not designed for racing but rather manufactured for the customer who prefers "fit and forget". A bit like .....the new phone, the galaxy s4. It's great it does everything but then they bring out an 'active' version that's waterproof, tougher etc. will you be making a tougher, more robust cheaper line up in the future? I can appreciate that you specialise in racing shocks and you may prefer to leave these areas for SRAM to cash in on.

Cheers and keep up the good work.
  • + 2
 Have you been working on a 650b 36 chassis fork? Any discussion (I doubt you'll reveal any plans) about releasing any such forks? If so, I vote for an RC2 damper as opposed to a CTD, but beggars can't be choosers.

(I definitely like your products, and keep up the good work. Sorry if this question has been asked. I did my best to find anything similar but it is a loooong list of questions.)
  • + 1
 I'd also like to know about this. I prefer the 36 platform and 20mm thru axle. Please make a 650b version! thanks
  • + 2
 Mtb'ing has really taken off in Panama. We have a bunch of very nice bikes down here with the majority equipped with your suspension, BUT no service this far down. Costa Rica has a shop but it's very costly to send and you would be off your bike for a good month or two!
Who could I speak with about expanding FOX service to Panama? My partners and I are serious about bikes and would love to able to offer this service to our clients at our new (IMBA built) bike park about to open next week!
  • + 3
 What ever happened to that Ti float that Graves was running back in the day??? there was so much hype and it even made its way on to one of your posters highlighting your fork line up. Why was it scraped?
  • + 1
 At the time, we ran into manufacturing challenges and decided not to product the Float Ti fork. That technology is rapidly evolving and we continue to monitor it for potential future products.
  • + 1
 I heard that it would double the cost of the forks for only 90 grams weight loss, so they decided not to bring it to market. Correct me if I'm wrong though.
  • + 0
 Sounds plausiblle. I'd have to imagine flex would be a huge issue as ideally they look for ways to increase stifness. Ever sit on a ti bike? Fleeeeexy. Smile
  • + 2
 If you were to project out say 5, 10, and 20 years, what do you think will be the most significant changes we'll see in bike shocks, forks, and suspension systems? And in particular, do you see MR fluids and related systems in bicycle suspension products in the relatively near future?
  • + 2
 This question goes to the Engineers Bryan, Bill, and Bill. I am currently a Mechanical Engineering Student with hopes of one day landing a job in the cycling industry designing either suspension, components, or frames. Mountain biking is my passion and I would love to make it part of my career. What would you guys advise is the best way for me to land a job in the industry after I graduate.
  • + 2
 There are a few of these answered above, search for dan-is-the-man
  • + 2
 1. Why does Fox still employ a physically negative coil spring in the air forks?
2. Is "hydrodynamic bushing technology" your marketing name for poor manufacturing tolerances? My RockShox Lryik has no stiction and no bushing play, as opposed to my 2012 Fox 36 Float FiT.
3. Why does my 36 Float with Kashima stanchions have more stiction than my wife's entry level RockShox Recon?
4. How did you guys not catch the bath oil migration any sooner?
5. What were you guys thinking when you released CTD?
6. Why can't Fox bring back the Vanilla? Not all of us are pretentious weight weenies
7. Why does Fox keep doing model years? It's supremely annoying
  • + 2
 FOX - Your competitors have released simpler/cost effective forks for the less complex riding needs such as dirtjumping/skatepark/street (Argyle RC, Circus Expert, Marz DJ). Have you ever considered offering a lower price point fork that holds true to your stiff and rigid FOX construction but the internal contents are of much simpler technology? I, and a lot of other riders involved in this type of riding often are looking for something very simple and stiff, opting for the lower priced fork simply for its simplicity and reliability. I am thinking a fox 831 offered at 90mm of travel and only consisted of coil sprung or something along the same lines of simplicity. I look forward to hearing your response.
  • + 2
 Thanks for the feedback. We are always considering new products for different applications and agree that often times simple is better. We feel that for the dirt jumping application an air spring offers better and more convenient adjustability for riders of all different sizes and the progressive nature of an air spring curve is better suited to slap landings and fast jump transitions than the linear nature of a coil spring. There is simplicity in setup to consider as well as the construction
  • + 3
 90 mils of travel RC2 valving 20 mil thru axel. Coil spring. 500 bucks. Make a fork like this and you will corner the DJ market.
A man can dream cant he?
OK make a kash ima version for a thousand bucks as well Smile
  • + 2
 Exactly, coil sucks for dirtjumping. A cheaper dirtjump fork with a 20mm option would be awesome from you guys. Another market segment I feel is lacking from all the big suspension manufacturers is a slopestyle fork, something 120-130mm with a stiffer/stronger chasis than a simple DJ fork, air sprung, with some adjustability. I've yet to find a good one. I currently run a lowered Marzocchi 55 for slopestyle, but I feel like there's a better option out there.
  • + 2
 @suicidedownhiller

that was the old Rockshox Pike 454 fork...loved that fork, abused the hell out of it on my 2 different Banshee Rampant builds and it never let me down once Smile
  • + 1
 Yep, That's what I had too, not the 454, one model below it. (426 or something??) It was great, til the steertube snapped Razz But yeah, it was by far my favorite, so adjustable, travel and air adjust. Perfect.
  • + 2
 I have a 2013 Fox 34-TALAS-160mm:

1a) Can the Talas Cartridge be upgraded to the new 2014 design?
1b) If so, Is the new cartridge available now for aftermarket purchase?
2) My fork is creaking where the crown meets the stanchion on the non-drive side... I assume I just send in my fork and you guys replace it under warranty?
  • + 2
 Hello ! me again, I would like to know if its possible to get any kind of certification for servicing and tuning your products, I live in Mexico and we only have one place in our country to service our shocks and forks with fox spares, so its very dificult to mantain the forks and shocks properly serviced and rebuilt. I've noticed that fos users are complaining about sending ther shocks to the states or to the only shop in the country that is very far from the rest of the country, so i was wondering if I can take a kind of fox training to do it, now a day I serviced my shocks my self, and is very dificult to find orings, oil and all the spares that actually nobody can get. thanks a lot !
  • + 2
 Pm sent.
  • + 1
 Can you send that PM to me too?
  • + 2
 I ride a Cannondale Jekyll with the FOX Dyad RT2 rear shock. I love the performance and the feel, but after less than a year of riding the shaft would not close down completely, it wouldn't sit flush. I took it into my local bike shop, where I bought the bike, and they sent it in under warranty, as it comes with a one year warranty. I thought that was rad and you guys were pretty prompt about getting it fixed and sent back. I have been out a couple of time since and the problem is coming back a little. The shaft is not closing all the way when in a rest position with no weight on the bike. The shock seems to work great and I can not notice anything wrong when I ride, but I wanted to know if this is or can cause a problem? They are not cheap to replace and I didn't want it to cause any issues. Thanks for your help!
  • + 1
 Mine does this too and I read a thread (on mtbr I think?) that this standard behaviour. My guess is that the negative air spring pre-sags the shock without any rider weight on it. But I'd be interested to hear what the Fox guys have to say.
  • + 2
 It shouldn't cause any problems, but it can be an indication of a problem. To test it try releasing all pressure from the negative air chamber and see of the shaft fully compresses. If it does then pump the negative pressure side until the rubber bumper just starts to lift away. If it doesn't return with the negative pressure fully removed it should be evaluated for warranty or service by an authorized service center.
  • + 1
 When I release the negative pressure it does fully compress, so it sounds like this is normal, which is good news. Thanks for the response.
  • + 1
 Thanks, guys at Fox.

On the topic of the Dyad, can the negative air spring be used to fine-tune the suspension characteristics, or should it always be set as you described in your reply? What are the performance effects of higher and lower negative air with the same positive air setting?
  • + 3
 It can be used for fine tuning but gets a bit complicated to explain. Basically the negative air has its biggest contribution early in the shock stroke. A smaller pressure difference between positive and negative air will make the shock ride softer in the beginning of the stroke, but will require a higher positive pressure to get the correct sag position. A wider pressure difference can get the same sag position with lower positive pressure. It will feel firmer in the initial stroke but allow the shock to bottom a bit easier. If you set pressure as described in the reply above the shock should perform pretty well. If positive and negative pressures get too close to each other the shaft will extend until the force balances and you essentially lose a bit of overall travel.
  • + 2
 2013 CTD was kind of a failure in a lot of our minds, I would like to think you guys would have had a better product for that price. I would have rather you kept the old system and tweaked that. Now that the new stuff came out it seems like a big improvement. but the new pike in my mind has left you guys in second place for the trail/am fork options. No harsh feelings.
  • + 1
 They're offering a kit for $35... see above. I also feel burned about the 2013 model and was eyeing a new Pike, but for $35 I'll try the upgrade first.
  • + 2
 Just wanted to give props to the Fox team for doing this! I've dealt with customer service and it isn't always fun working with the disgruntled customers, especially in a theater-like setting! I'm rocking a 2009 Float and loving it. Thanks for the awesome product!
  • + 1
 Thank you Collin7, you rule!
  • + 2
 Hey there, The only comment or question I have is when will Fox be ready to help dealers service Fox Rear shock dampers. As a senior mechanic at a large shop that sends back many shocks it would be very nice for us to do these services in house. We are prepared to buy what we need, including nitrogen and tools. Please work on getting internal kits and service training. It would be greatly appreciated.
  • + 0
 Your comment has not gone unheard. We regularly get requests for this, but at this time we are not prepared to support rear shock service outside of the FOX factory of Authorized International Distributors.
  • + 2
 I have found a small 1/4 nick in my Kashima coating on my Van RC2. You can feel it with your fingernail. Could you please give me your best tips to remedy the nick? I've heard clear nail polish but I'd like to hear what you guys have to say!
  • + 2
 Filling or covering your scratch is only a temporary fix at best. I wouldn't recommend putting anything on it as your filler could end up coming off eventually and mixing with your oil. Your only real solution would be to replace the upper tube assembly. Replacement parts can be purchased through FOX or an International distributor.
  • + 1
 regarding the same problem (scratches on Kash stanchions) i was told by Fox over the phone to sand down any raised barbs around a nicked area with fine grit sand-paper and if oil loss was noted to replace stanchions. i was quoted $430 b/c both stanchions have to be replaced (i only have scratches on one) why can't i just replace one stanchion?
  • + 2
 The upper tubes and steer tube of our single crown forks are all pressed into the crown one-time only. Individual upper tubes cannot be replaced except on the 40 dual crown forks.
  • + 2
 Hi I ride a 2013 Yeti SB66 carbon with 34's set to 150mm travel direct from Yeti. I mostly ride enduro, jump parks and tame downhill. I weight about 160 with gear. I am really struggling with setup, I normally run my shock and fork a bit higher pressure to take the big hits but I cannot seem to do this without losing most of the small bump capability of the forks and shock. I want to love them (usually a rock shox rider) but my lack of setup knowledge is letting me and you down. Help!
  • + 1
 Had a sb66 for 2 yrs and a big part if the frame design is a stiff top of stroke. So much so that the shock bushings need constant service. I rode mine w a 36 float set at 140mm and it was awesome in front. Good luck
  • + 2
 3 part question...

Firstly (It could be the west coast of Canada distributors) why doesn't Fox stock Ti rear springs to sell directly to customers like Cane Creek and Marz.

Secondly do you plan on updating the DHX rear shock to have a high and low speed rebound similar to a cane creek double barrel or are you content with just the one rebound speed only?

Lastly I have a new kashima DHX RC4 that feels great and has no inconsistencys with dampening or anything, however the first initial bit of stroke when moved through the travel very abruptly/violently makes a squeak.. I'm racing every weekend and don't really have time to send it of to be assessed. Thoughts?

Also I must admit Fox Rear Shox have been the most consistent and durable for me far superior over the vivid coil and airs I've used and repeatedly blown up in the past so thank you!
  • + 3
 I want Fox to stop at my shop and do a tech class or offer one in Watsonville on tuning and rebuilding forks and shoxs! also i want FOX to lower there pricing on there tools so shops can service more in depth in the field
  • + 2
 FOX offers Masters Tech clinics for our dealers through the Appalachian Bicycle Institute (NC), Barnett Bicycle Institute (CO), and the United Bicycle Institute (OR). Contact them directly for pricing and scheduling. We also visit as many dealers as we can and do tech clinics as our outside tech reps travel around the country between races, festivals, media launches, and other events. The next time that you're on the phone with the customer service department (1-800-369-7469 ext 4801) just let them know that you're interested in a clinic and they'll send your shop account details to our outside reps.
  • + 2
 - Are there any images of the die cast tools used in the creation of the fork lowers?
- What Finite software are you guys using, and how close are your actually failures compared to simulated/estimated failures?
- How often are you comparing competitor's products to your own?
- What time of day do animals usually attack the Watsonville facility?
- I've heard that you do binning for the size of the fork bushings, is that only for how they fit into the lowers, or are those matched up with upper crown assemblies as well?
  • + 3
 Rconroy
- Sorry, no images of our production tooling are available. I can tell you the tooling is impressive - several tons of hardened tool steel that's roughly the size of a kitchen oven that fits in a die cast machine that's the size of a school bus.
- For FEA we use Mechanica and Comsol. Models typically take 8+ hours to run.
- We are always monitoring the competitive landscape
- Chubacabarra attacks after midnight.
- Our lower leg assembly goes through a proprietary process to achieve the proper fit between bushing and crown assembly. Lower legs and crown assemblies are interchangeable.
  • + 1
 Are you using Comsol mainly for CFD on the dampers?
  • + 1
 Yes.
  • + 2
 for those of us that have 2013 and older 40's, particularly those who brought 2013 fox 40 before we knew there was a float 40 coming out, be able to retrofit the new technology in the new float 40 to our exisiting pre float 40? Like lower legs and crown/steerer assembly and float spring through the upgrade program or as spares from dealers? i seem to remember reading that the float would be compatible with older 40's.
is this correct?
  • + 1
 The 2014 40FLOAT parts are compatible with older 40s as long as you replace the upper tubes. Spare parts will be available later in the season.
  • + 1
 Have you ever considered something similar to Rock Shox where you print recommended air pressured directly on the leg of the fork? I always find myself wasting time setting up customers bikes because I don't know where to start with a baseline air pressure. Tuning charts for forks (and even rear shocks) would be very useful to get consumers pointed in the right direction. I realize rear shock tuning is very dependent on the frame and suspension design, but for forks it should be pretty standard no matter what bike they're on.
  • + 1
 Hi drew-ross, this is a good subject. The fork isn't as simple as it appears. Yes it is a one to one leverage ratio on the bike but there are other factors involved. Seat height and stem length can change the sag dramatically regardless of rider weight. Sag is the best place to start. 15 - 20%. Bike manufactures also have specific recommendations for there bike.

Mark
  • + 1
 Why does my 2012 fox 40 sound like the spring is banging against the inside of the stanchion when i compress the fork? Please dont say slide the sleve up or down because i have tried that. Fork is mounted to a transition tr450.
  • + 1
 From a previous response: As coil springs compress, they can bow outward at different points along their length. Some springs are super quiet with the shrink-wrap isolator in the middle, while some springs bow in different places and would benefit from having the shrink-wrap closer to one end or another. In any case, you should not use more than the specified length of shrink-wrap on one spring.

In addition, you might try flipping your spring entirely to try to see if the section that is bowing outward might be better located at the bottom around the spring guide.
  • + 1
 Hey, this one's probably for Mark... I'm trying to set up my fork (2010 fox 40... hopefully to be replaced by a float 40 soon though). I have the blue spring which is for riders who weigh 150-180 I believe. I'm 6'2" and I'm around 170 pounds with my riding stuff on. I feel like I've never been able to get a good base setting to dial it it. I'm 18, race Cat 1, and have a medium to aggressive riding style. Any suggestions for compression/rebound settings that would get me in the ballpark where I can fine tune from there?

Thanks!
  • + 1
 Hi GingaCal, The spring is correct for your weight but I do question it for your height because of where your weight and position on the bike might be placed. I would also need to know your damping settings. It wouldn't hurt to try a green springs knowing you can go back if it is too stiff. Mark
  • + 1
 Yeah, a couple of the guys I ride with suggested I move up to a green spring.

So if the spring is on the softer side, would I just use a bit more low speed compression damping to keep it higher in it's travel?
  • + 1
 Hi GingaCal, Yes, adding more low speed compression will help hold the front end up dynamically. Especially on repeated braking bumps. Mark
  • + 1
 Hi there

I have 36 180 float lowered to 170 in my Pivot Firebird. I got all the stuff dialed in pretty well but because im quite heavy guy (108kg) theres serious brake dive. HSC is set to 5 clicks and LSC to 9. If i put more lsc theres not enough sensitivity and ride is way too harsh. Any good ideas?

Thanks
  • - 1
 Hi Syl4r, Adding low speed compression will reduce fork dive in your situation.
  • + 1
 I have a 2013 Fox Talus CTC 160mm (on a 2013 Trek Slash Cool and have recently just had a problem with not getting full travel..believe its called hydro lock when oil is pushed into another part of the fork locking it out before full travel can be reached. I recieved warranty service last week and it is now fixed however what could have caused this issue and how can it be avoided in the future? Does running it in lower travel setting (120mm) with a higher compression rate (trail or climb) have any effect if you experince some hard hits (should you forget to change it before a short decent)?
  • + 2
 That is supposed to be an "eight" not a smilely face with sunglasses
  • + 1
 Without seeing the fork it is hard to say what may have caused the issue. You might check with the service center that took care of it for more info.
  • + 1
 Hi, I have a 2010 Talas 36 RC2 on a Transition Covert V2 and weigh about 170lbs with gear. I ride a mix of Xc/Trail and life-serviced all-mountain/DH.

I've never been completely happy with the small bump performance of the fork and am wondering if you would recommend anything to help with this? I've tried running 0 low speed compression damping, lower air pressure, etc., but at the point where it starts to absorb small bumps the brake dive is overwhelming.

When the fork was under warranty I sent it to OGC. They said it was fine and just rebuilt it with the new seals, which helped a bit, but the small bump vs brake dive problem was still there.

Thanks!
  • + 1
 What air pressure are you currently running? I would recommend higher air pressure to reduce brake dive and less compression damping to have good small bump compliance.
  • + 1
 It seems that my stantions are developing scratches close to the seals, why is that? i thought it may be because i have collected dirt inside my seals and need to change them, if so what is the best way so keep tthe grit out?
  • + 1
 The scratches are due to abrasive dirt being above the seal or in the seal. The best way to prevent wear in the future is after each ride wipe away the dirt with a dry rag or hose off the Uppertubes with low-pressure water hose. If the dirt after the ride dries on the uppertube, it will be driven into the seal cavity. Cleaning after the ride is key!!!
  • + 1
 Can a remote for the CTD be added to front and rear suspension on my 2014 Trek remedy 29? Also will Fox be releasing a 3 cable remote so I could run my suspension front and rear, with a doss seat post CTD all off one remote? thanks guys/gals.
  • + 1
 The fork can be updated with a kit but the shock cannot. Please give us a call at 1-800-FOX-SHOX for fork kit details. No plans to release a three cable single remote at this time.
  • + 1
 What about a two cable remote, for fork and shock? If not, is the remote able to be adapted for two cables?
  • + 1
 Might be over stepping bounds but look for a Scott twin lock lever. You can adjust travel and such to maybe run more than what was intended.
  • + 1
 What are the axle to crown heights for all of your forks? I'm being a bit ambitious here - I understand that's quite the list. I've looked for axle to crown heights on your website but I can't find it. Perhaps it's there and you could just post a link. If not, it might be worth putting this info on the website. Fork rake would be good too, but I might be one a dozen people who'd be interested in that...
  • + 1
 Axle-to-crown heights and fork offset can be found on the User Specification Drawings pages for all forks available by searching for individual 2014 models at: www.ridefox.com/help.php?m=bike&ref=topnav
  • + 1
 Thanks.
  • + 1
 Does the 2013 36 Float O/B R have a compression damping circuit, and is there anything I can do to increase compression damping (tune the shim stack, heavier oil, etc)? The manual recommends 60 PSI for my weight, but I need to run 75 PSI to get a fork that doesn't dive under braking and in corners.
  • + 1
 Unfortunately, there isn't a lot that can be done to the O/B damper. The best way to get better compression damping performance is to upgrade to a Factory FIT RC2 damper.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the response. I'm reasonably satisfied with the performance at the increased air pressure. I asked Suspensionwerx about the RC2 damper cost and they told me it was prohibitively expensive. So I guess I'll stick with what I have Smile
  • + 1
 Hey guys, thanks for being on today! I have the "29" F130 RL Open Bath Damper w/ Lock out and Rebound" (came stock on my 2012 Stumpjumper 29 FSR Comp). I am experiencing a lack of full travel, even when I deflate the air camber to 0 PSI i still have about 1 inch of travel that can't be used as the fork ramps up and stops 1 inch from end. I rebuilt the fork recently and used 165ml of 10w Fox Green in the O/B damper and 30ml on the Spring-side, didn't notice the lack of travel until months later, but that may have been ignorance. 2 questions: Is that the correct oil volume (i could find no info on a f130 in the oil charts) and what air pressure would you recommend for a 190lb rider?

Thanks!!!!
  • + 1
 Hi shredmdp, you rebuilt it with the correct amount of oil. You could be coming up short on travel because there is to much float fluid on top of the air piston. The spec is 5cc. Remove the air pressure and top cap. Remove the float fluid from the chamber and reinstall 5cc.
  • + 1
 Question for BIll Becker. I have a 2013 Fox 32 Factory, I've heard that putting oil in the air chamber can make the spring curve more progressive. Is this true? The fork bottoms too easily now, and I find that I have to go with higher pre-load than recommended, and this negates having good response to small bumps.
  • + 1
 Yes, adding oil to the main air chamber will make the air spring curve more progressive. I suggest adding 5cc at a time. Generally 5-10cc is all that is needed to tune the air spring to your liking.
  • + 1
 Have any of you got degrees in industrial or product design? If so, are the looks of the components generated with the specific aesthetic created or is the overall look driven purely by the function and engineering of the product?
  • + 0
 Since we are an "engineering based company", the styling of our products follow the structural requirements of our products. We do have experienced ID guys here at FOX.
  • + 1
 I have a 2010 RP23 on my Giant Trance X1 (same year) and I blow through all of the travel when I just sit and bounce on the bike unless I'm running 200+PSI which then only gives me maybe 15% Sag and I lose small bump compliance. It's been this way since I bought the bike about a year ago used. I rebuild the shock as per recommendations and have had it looked at and been told there's nothing mechanically wrong with it. Also, there is 0 difference between fully open and propedal even when I have it set to 3.

Anything i should specifically look at?
  • + 1
 I should add I weigh approximately 175lbs with gear
  • + 1
 And the RP23 is the stock shock that came with the sock so the tune etc is for the bike.
  • + 1
 I have an RC4 on my devinci wilson and its got a bit of a flat spot (undamped) in the 1st inch or so of travel, i had a friend a few years ago that had a similar problem with his on a TR450, i was wondering if its just an air bubble developed in there or something? If so are the RC4's similar to service as the previous DHX's? and is it 5wt oil the correct weight to fill it back up with?
  • + 1
 Hi Fox, i have a 2010 f series 32 rl and on the rebound i've noticed it makes a whoohing sound. is this normal? there is no slippage round bushings or any other obvious issues. please advise before i spend £80 on a service Smile . cheers guys!
  • + 1
 It sounds like your fork might need a little love. By your flag ID, I'm guessing your in the UK. It would be best called Mojo Suspension Hoodoo Ltd. » ph +44.1633.615.815 to run through the details.

Here's a link to our worldwide service centers

www.ridefox.com/contact.php?r=worldwide&ref=topnav
  • + 1
 Cheers, it hasn't actually had a thorough service since I bought it Frown thanks for the advice, i'll look into it Smile
  • + 1
 Hi guys- I live in Germany

I just built a new S-works Enduro with a 2013 Kashima Fox Float 34mm 160 factory fork- brand new. It was recently announced that the Fox 2014 version has a far superior cartridge which offers better performance for harder riding. Since I just spent a not insignificant amount of money on it - is it worth spending more on the fork to upgrade it to 2014 spec??

John
  • + 2
 I would ride it first before deciding to change to the "2014 Kit".
  • + 1
 Hey fox guys,

First off I'm not looking to bash your product in anyway, I absolutely love your products. I've ridden many types of suspension set ups and I enjoyed the fox line up the most, currently on a van, last bike was on 40s and a 5.0. I was just wondering why your warranty on your products was how it is. I purchased a brand new 2012 factory 40 last season and put it on my shocker. After about 2 rides from when I had it the lowers were punctured on a ride. I know it happened when riding and your warranty didn't support that, but I just found it odd and possibly defective? it was not a bad crash or anything I dropped my bike and a hole was put right through the left side of the lowers. I tried contacting you guys at the time but never got anything back. If you could pm me on this aspect that would be awesome!

Thanks alot, still loving the products
  • + 1
 Hi,
I have 2012 Fox Float, which came with my bike. I had various problems, from CSU cracking to lame work. Cracking was fixed with new CSU (for some time, and now it's cracking again), lame work was fixed with proper service and replacing one part that was factory problem. The problem that I really want to solve is this www.youtube.com/watch?v=82EnncJ8DXU

My fork has one step, which sounds like spring. It was on service over 50 days in total (about 5 times), whole left side is replaced (after 2 months waiting for that parts to come in LBS) and the problem is still here. Fork is under warranty, but your dealer here obviously have problem with solving this problem.

I have tried Fox from 32 to 40, from 80 to 180 (actually 200, but it rhymes Big Grin ), from 2006 to 2013 CTD and none had this weird sound and step in its trail.
  • + 1
 Also, it's very very hard to achieve full trail even on 35-40% sag, on my usual setup (25-30% sag), its about 5mm below Kashima sign. 120mm of trail Float.
  • + 1
 Hi Mitsuoka, We would like to connect you directly with our Croatian distributor to help you. Our international sales manager will contact you directly via pinkbike message to connect you with the distributor.
  • + 1
 The main problem is that fork was sent to your distributor 5 times, and every time same. They are great but we can't figure that out.
  • + 1
 What CAD program is used for most of the Fox products? I saw that you mentioned Pro/E, but that can't be the only one? My company, SolidBox sells workstations for CAD users and we're all avid mountain bikers, so I'd be interested to hear about the design workflow Fox maintains.
  • + 1
 We use Pro/E throughout FOX.
  • + 1
 I have read that the old(2013) an new 2014 CTD remote options are not combinable due to different wire pull. So is there no way to use the new float X CTD rear shock with the original float 34 fork delivered on my Canyon Strive 9.0 AL race from 2012, using the same remote lever? Would I have to install a new damping unit in the fork?
  • + 1
 2013 and 2014 forks and shocks use the same cable pull. Your 2013 remote will work with a 2014 FLOAT X.
  • + 1
 have you guys ever tested a smaller diameter stanchion DH fork? I loved the performance of my 2012 40, but the feel of the wider set larger diameter stanchions made my bike have a heavy, somewhat lethargic feel in the front end, which made me switch back to a Boxxer. Thanks.
  • + 1
 We're sticking with 40mm, but you might be happy to hear that the new 2014 crowns have been redesigned to give you more "lock-to-lock" clearance on some frames as the lower crown pinch bolts were moved to the front.
  • + 1
 Cool I did have clearance issues with my frame using a zero stack headset, thanks for the reply!
  • + 1
 Hi Guys, got a few questions for you, but let me start by complementing you on the Fox 40 Float... I have just upgraded from a 2010 Boxxer World Cup and the improvement is incredible - I am blown away by the performance of the fork! It seems to offer more small bump sensitivity AND better small bump compliance, I'm not even sure how this is possible, but you've done it!!

I will open with the most important question:
1. Skids or Wheelies?

2. Where is the best place to find the service intervals on my 40 float? How much of the servicing should I do myself (and instructions for the basic servicing) and how much should be done by the UK Fox Service Centre?

3. I am a big fan of Juice Lubes' Fork Juice (click here for more info) to reduce stiction and keep the fork running nice and smooth. Obviously this isn't a substitute for regular servicing, but do you have any views or recommendations on using it? (or a similar "stanchion specific" lubricant)

Thanks!
  • + 1
 1. Well.... according to IMBA's April Fools post (which is worth a read btw), they say wheelie. "Manual, Wheelie or Nose Wheelie to Reduce Impact. One wheel has 50 percent less impact on the trail surface than two.” (devnew.imba.com/news/muddy-trails-april-1)
2. The service intervals are posted here: www.ridefox.com/service.php?m=bike&ref=servicehome
3. We don't recommend any external lube on stanchions. With regular cleaning, you should be good to go.
  • + 1
 fox
when i first became brave enough to tackle my own suspension servicing, i owned a RS Totem solo air. Sram had made some absolutely swell videos to help the DIY guy get wet (oily in this case) and hammer out his own work. i have seen the videos you have made for tuning and such, why not for the people out there getting into doing their own work? as it was said before, qualified shop tech's have ruined parts for some. i was confident enough to do my own work on my rc2 fit 40 and all was fine, but for some a quick vid can save many many head aches.
  • + 2
 Hi primodevil01, We agree 100% and have a plan to release product specific videos and set up videos in the ear future.
  • + 1
 that's fantastic, i hope to see you include a video on servicing the FIT cartridge. thanks for the quality parts and service!
  • + 1
 I've been searching high and low as to what the correct shock tunes for my bike should be and come up with bugger all. Can you help me out and tell me what the ideal tune values should be (Velocity, Rebound, Boost Valve)?

My bike is an 2009 Stumpjumper FSR. The shock is a 2012 RP23 with Adaptive Logic and Kashima (it's high volume, but would I be better with a low volume can?). I weight about 170lbs with gear and I mainly do trail/all mountain riding.

Thanks for any help you can give me guys!
  • + 1
 I just bought a 2014 Van 36 and I love how smooth it is, but it's making a knocking noise from the spring side when I ride it through anything bumpy. I put in the green spring, coated it with slick honey, took out the oil from the spring side and refilled it with 40cc of 10wt. Is this noise normal and something I'm just going to have to live with or is it supposed to be silent? Any tips on quieting it up would be appreciated. Thanks!
  • + 1
 I'm pretty sure it's the coil hitting the inner stanchions but this is the first coil fork I've owned. If I tap firmly on the spring side on the lowers it makes the same noise. Any ideas?
  • + 1
 Did your NEW Green spring have the "heat-shrink" tubing on it? The "heat-shrink" tubing quiets the spring and should be 1.5" from the topcap end of the spring. The "heat-shrink" tubing can be directly purchased from FOX. 1(800)Fox-Shox
  • + 1
 Yes it does, it's all the way at the top. I'll move it down and see how it goes. Any thanks for the reply!
  • + 1
 Air pressure. I've read the PSI recommendations based on my rider weight (with gear)... but find these settings are pretty harsh. I'm running 20% less air (front and rear) and it feels better, and I'm getting the full travel out of my suspension without bottoming out. Some say I should go lower until I do bottom out on occasion.. besides actual PSI recommendations, what setup steps should an enthusiast rider (like myself) go thru? Got any recommendations on an order you would do (i.e. set sag or PSI, then bump up compression/rebounding until a certain point, etc?). Currently on a 2013 Giant Trance X 29er (120mm CTD front rear). THANKS!!!
  • + 1
 There is definitely a method you should be following to help setup any bike. The 2014 owner's manuals guide you through setting up all of your controls starting with sag. I know you're riding a 2013, but the new manuals on the new help site are easier to navigate and have all the info you will need. Check out the manual for your fork at www.ridefox.com/help.php?m=bike&id=32 and your shock at www.ridefox.com/help.php?m=bike&id=68. Start by setting sag, then find rebound, and finally experiment with different compression controls based on your needs (riding style, terrain, etc). The manuals I've linked to go into detail about what to look for when determining your settings.
  • + 1
 Hi, joesrespol, it sounds like you have figured out your ideal setup beyond the basic "set sag and rebound damping" setup. It might be best for you to do some experimentation to learn more about what suspension setup will work best for you. You don't have to get full travel on every ride but it is an easy way to gauge your suspension setup. You could drop a few psi to see how the bike handles and how you like it - and go from there. If you like it then go with it. If not then go back. It is always good to check your max travel achieved but possibly more important is the front and rear wheel balance of the bike in rough conditions and while cornering.

Think of the CTD adjuster as a low-speed compression adjuster- because that is what it is. Run the Climb mode when you want a lot of low-speed compression damping - climbs, sprints, fire roads. The Trail setting has a moderate amount of low-speed compression damping and works best as an all-around tune for varying conditions, going up and down. The Descend mode has a light low-speed damping tune for the best bumps absorption in rugged terrain.
  • + 1
 Hi, I use a Toyota Sienna with the seats removed as a bike hauler. I also load that thing down and use it as a camper for road trips. I'd like to lift it a wee bit as I live up a long, bumpy, steep dirt road and I rub my airdam on some of the potholes. Can I upgrade my minivan with Fox suspension?
  • + 2
 Unfortunately I don't see anything in the application guide for the Sienna. You can try calling our truck division at 1-800-FOX-SHOX, but I'm not sure we'll be able to do anything for that vehicle application.
  • + 1
 I agree, Fox Suspension for minivans would be sweet!
  • + 1
 Oh, and you know about the free beer at Seabright tonight right? MBOSC meeting on the patio at 7:00! :-)
  • + 1
 check out www.gowesty.com sweet FOX suspension for Westfalias. No disrespect to Westfalia community for referring to Westfalias as minivansSmile
  • + 2
 Why i can´t buy a new Fox 40 RC2 (not Float) with Kashima and Hi-Lo Speed Setup in near future? Only Fox 40 R (come on?!?!) - only factory editon for the float? Not everybody loves air-suspension.
  • + 1
 I was going to ask the same question. Why a high end DH fork with only a preload and rebound adjustment?
And does Fox plan on producing a line of forks with preload, rebound, high speed and low speed compression adjustments like the original van 36 and 40's?
  • + 2
 We did two years of testing with Gee Atherton, Aaron Gwin and Justin Leov to ensure that our top athletes were happy with the performance of the 40 Float over the coil 40 so we were confident flipping the switch in production to the '14 40 Float. While the lower weight of the 40 Float is a great benefit, our Race Dept and racers value the tunability of the air spring more. It is possible to easily tune the air spring and air spring compression ratio and we are confident that the '14 40 Float will outperform the '13 40 spring. However if you are still interested in coil, It is possible to convert a 40 Float to a coil system by replacing the air spring with coil internals.
  • + 1
 My rear shock Float RP23 is brand new and is making squelching sounds. I read an article that said that these noises meant something was broken. Do you think it could be wrecked ?
I've only ridden light all mountain trails and only like 3 times.
Thanks
  • + 1
 It would be best if you contacted your local FOX distributor to figure out the noise. Squelching is okay on CB radios but not really ideal on a shock.

Outdoor Gear Canada »
ph +1.514.332.1320
  • + 1
 Thanks
  • + 1
 Hi there!I have RC4 shock which i rebuild myself because in my country we don`t have Fox service center.I ordered all the fluids from MOJO. Can you tell me how deep to insert the IFP.I know that this is a secret but please share it for the bad guys, who repair their Fox shocks at home. My shock is 240mm. Regards
  • + 1
 Any solid fixes yet on the creaking CSU debacle?

I've already had my first Fox 34 Float replaced under warranty for a creaking CSU this winter, second (and current one) is good (knocks on wood). Question is, does the 2 years warranty start over again for the CSU with this new fork?

Cheers
  • + 0
 .... crickets ....
  • + 1
 My question relates to suspension tuning, as I am working on my own suspension designs, it relates to suspension on 1 - 2.3 leverage ratio and rising rate with slight falling rate at end of travel to reduce hash bottoming at end of travel, Is this close to the best set up for frame leverage?
If not What is best set up?
The reason for me building my own frames is that most frames on the market can not be retro fitting with a sealed drive which is my main project
www.pinkbike.com/video/218538
Hope to have new clip soon that does not sound like a bag of spanners
  • + 2
 It might be best if you contacted our OE dept directly to work with them on shock tuning for your chassis design.
  • + 1
 Hi I have Fox Float 36 160mm Performance Series 20mm TS - Standard Spec forks and they are been sticking since new (4 months ago) they stay at about 150mm and the rebound is slow even when it is set fast. I sent them back to je james who supposedly sent them to mojo and they came back exactly the same. I also put them upside down which made them better but did not solve the problem. Any Idea of the course of the problem and how it can be solved thanks
Dominic.
  • + 2
 This sounds unusual. Have you considered contacting Mojo directly? They might be able to help you out if they had more info regarding your issue and any work that was done to your fork.

United Kingdom (atv,bike,moto,snow)
Mojo Suspension Hoodoo Ltd. »
ph +44.1633.615.815
  • + 1
 While Fox has seemingly helped the 2013 CTD forks with some issues, we are skeptical of those fixes. The 2013 forks, specifically the 34 29er 140-150mm forks suffer from harsh small bump compression damping even in the open mode and when trying to compensate with lower air pressure it blows thru travel. Admittedly I have not ridden the same 2014 fork, but by Fox's admission damping rates we're increased to help this. Will this only make the fork harsher? This leads me the the use of the overly complicated negative spring system try to compensate for lack of full travel, but adding to much linearity to the fork? Thanks for answering all of the questions that have been thrown at Fox!
  • + 1
 my DHX RC4 shock body cracked around the compression controls rendering the shock completely unsafe. i've heard of this happening before, is this a common thing and possibly a defect in design? to be more specific, the aluminum that normally holds the clip that holds the whole compression mechinism in has failed. the clip is about to fall out.
  • + 1
 The entire compression valve assembly in my 2013 RC4 literally blew out of my shock, oil and all in the middle of my race run yesterday. Finished the run for a 2nd place but was scary as hell with ZERO compression or rebound dampening. Spoke with FOX warranty today, sending it in tomorrow. Those Ti shock bolts on my V10 are some tough mothers, was bottoming hard on everything.
  • + 1
 @chrispilling: If your shock is under 1 year old and you are the original owner then it may be covered under warranty. Check in with Outdoor Gear Canada » ph +1.514.332.1320 and they can help you out.
  • + 1
 Why do you persist with the CTD damper, when there are many responses to it not working properly? Are there really any real world advantages to having it- a lot of people will disagree and a lot will agree, so why not make both CTD and non CTD damper 34's etc?
  • + 2
 The CTD damper offers great on the fly performance by adjusting the low-speed compression damping with the flick of an adjuster. It offers more usable adjustments on the trail than our previous designs. The Factory CTD damper basically offers three on the fly low-speed compression damping settings with two addition settings to fine tune the Trail damping tune. We should differentiate between the damping system and the tune. Many of the negative comments about CTD are referring to the damping tune and air spring curve rather than the CTD system. For '14, we increased the compression ratio of our air springs and increased the low-speed compression damping of the CTD damper across the board. We are looking into the possibility of offering an RC2 damper in the 34 fork but it isn't as easy as using the 36 cartridge - it requires a new damper design specifically for the 34.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the reply, i would also like to ask what the reasoning behind utilising partially plastic internals for the 40 float was? Many aftermarket compression damper systems (eg avalanche) seem to offer metal internals instead?
  • + 1
 Less expensive and lighter. But definitely not as durable.
  • + 1
 Hello Fox-Factory! As a budding mechanical engineer, currently entering my last semester in college, I'm looking to continue working within the cycling industry. I currently work at my local shop and would love to enter the industry as an engineer. Does Fox ever hire direct out of college? I know your site has an employment section which I have stalked for quiet some time but it always seems to be more advance positions. Any feedback would be so awesome!
  • + 2
 (Bill Brown) It never hurts to send in a resume.
  • + 1
 Question is for a Fox Mechanical Engineer.

I have question on what other possible tuning options there are for a Fox Van 36 180. I am not having much luck getting a good ride form the fork especially at higher speed with increasing bump sizes. I have stiffened the front and rear dampening to compensate for spring rate changes. The limiting factor seems to be lack of enough spring rates from mid stork onwards and a stiffer spring is not an option for either ends. Increasing HSC helps but it is not enough. Is it possible to increase the oil level to increase the progression? Calculations show a low increase in overall air pressure with a 3-4 cu-in increase in oil. Open to suggestions.

Bike: Large 2013 Specialized Enduro Evo Expert
Fork: Fox Van 36 180 – Yellow spring, 6-7 rebound/ LSC 9/HC8, 20% sag
Shock: CCDB 650 lb/in, 30% sag
Height /Weight: 6’3” @ 240 lbs
Riding style: 60% downhill, 40% all mountain @ Intermediate/advanced level
  • + 3
 (Bill Brown) The yellow spring is the highest spring rate we were able to package in the 180. I wouldn't recommend adding bath oil to increase progressivity, the lower leg seals are not designed for this. I would recommend converting your fork to a FLOAT air spring. The FLOAT air spring will give you the progressive tuning you're looking for.
  • + 0
 Hum, fix 1 problem only to create 5 new ones...no thanks. Been an engineer for 20 years and know better. I do appreciate the reply nonetheless.
  • + 1
 @ Fox

I have a 2006 36 Talas R that I upgraded to an RC2 damper. The Talas 1 system does not work properly to adjust the travel. Do you still sell the tool to add air to the IFP for this system? Is there any other cartridge that I could install into this fork? I would like the ability to lower the travel of the fork if a new cartridge were installed.
  • + 1
 We no longer have the TALAS IFP tool in stock. There is currently no TALAS system available that will fit in your fork.
  • + 1
 I ride a 2013 Yeti SB-66c with a Fox CTD rear shock and Fox Float 150 CTD, both came as OE on the bike and both feature Trail Adjust. My questions are 1.) Will the upgraded 2014 internals work with my 150mm travel fork, or will they cause any issues? I ask because it looks like the 2014 Float is available with either 140mm or 160mm of travel and 2.) Are there any differences in the CTD rear shock for 2014 and will an "upgrade" kit be offered?
  • + 1
 If I get the kit you sell to reset my 2013 fit damper to 2014 specs will the absence of the new improved 2014 talas spring cause it to feel significantly different compared to a 2014 fit fork with the new improved talas air spring
also how much would it cost for a 2014 improved talas air spring assembly ?
  • + 1
 The '14 CTD tune will give you a firmer low-speed compression tune across the board. It will be a noticeable difference on the trail even if you keep the '13 spring. I don't know pricing off hand- call 1-800-FOX-SHOX and let the sale person know the fork year and model to get pricing.
  • + 1
 I got a new carbon demo with rc4 and can't seem to get it tuned I do racing and freeride I neeed it to be fast for the first few inches of travel then stiff but not get kicked on jumps im185 lbs I got a 400lbs ti spring wwhat should I set it at to make me faster I didn't like the factory set up it came with
  • + 1
 Hi Johnmciaac, Start with setting your sag at 25-30%. For a supple small bump ride, set your low speed compression adjuster to 12 out. For the bigger hits, set your high speed compression adjuster to 6 out.

Mark
  • + 1
 Hi What is the best fork, shock combo for enduro riding I Ride a commencal meta am I am 17 stone and I find the air shock blows through its travel very easy even after a air spacer being installed and ideas on how to improve my rear shock
  • + 1
 i have a 2011 demo 8 with dhx rc4 none cashima, for about the last 5 months when i sit on it or bounce up and down on the bike the shock makes a kinda of clunk once or twice everytime it compresses. Also theres some oil one the shaft, my shop says it needs to go back to fox..can you tell me whats happening? i know its not the spring.
  • + 1
 Without inspecting your fork myself it would be hard to diagnose. That said, your 2011 is almost surely due for regular service. Sounds like typical wear from use over time, but that's just a guess at this point with the limited info I have. You can contact us directly to discuss your service options or setup an RA for service by calling 1-800-369-7469 ext 4801.
  • + 1
 thank you!
  • + 1
 Looking at getting a new fox 40, and trying to decide between air and coil. 95% of my riding is at Whistler, where they water the breaking bumps. Not racing, at least not competitively. Like that the Air is so light, but worried about it being as good in the chatter and how it will stand up to repetitive park laps. I'm sure you've tested it to destruction. Current frame is a KHS DH 300 and i'm 175lbs and not an overly aggressive rider. Is the Air as good for everyday riders, or are the adjustability/weight savings more relevant to the race crowd? Both a great products, (obviously), just looking for an honest opinion from folks in the know!
  • + 1
 Hi mikethespike, the 40 air is more tunable than a coil spring. It allows you to fine tune the spring rate and the spring curve (progression). It will hold up to the same abuse. Although we use racing to tune and prove out our suspension, every type of rider benefits. The damping settings might end up in different positions for you on the air vs the coil but this is primarily personal preference.

Mark
  • + 1
 Hi FOX. I have recently just got my first fox fork, which is a 2012 Fit RC2 Float 180. The fork performs really great especially compared to the last fork I had, but my question is will FOX ever release a more budget friendly line of forks, similar to other manufacturers? I'm not talking about wal-mart bike forks, I just mean something more reasonably priced. I felt as if (and still do) I can never touch FOX suspension products unless I buy used (which I have, and it can be a mixed bag).
  • + 1
 Would you ever consider installing a GPS system to control suspension units, allowing the perfect fork setting to be available to a rider on different areas of a track? So for example super soft with quick rebound through rock gardens, and stiffer and slower rebound through big jump sections.
  • + 1
 I assume that there is always some degree of compromise when a fork is set up for a track and riders could ride faster in some sections if the settings could be changed depending on where they were on the track. It could be something that the rider could set up as they walked the course.
  • + 1
 lol that's such a sick idea that would cost a lot of money and not work for unknown trails, but at a WC level, that'd be awesome
  • + 1
 Just curious, is it possible a fork, particularly a 40, to overheat and what would it take? (maybe from friction between the stanchions and the seals. Or from the oil moving through the dampening valves for extended periods of time)
  • + 1
 All parts of the fork will increase in temperature during use. The sub-system that sees the greatest increase in temperature is the damper. It's not uncommon to see temperatures in the damper rise 80F. The air spring's temperature will increase 20-30F. The chassis has the benefit of being air cooled while riding, therefore, see the least increase in temperature.
  • + 1
 Hey Guys, trying out a demo 8 for this year. Was hoping you could help me out with spring rate for the rear. Used mainly for racing prefer to sit lower in my travel as I ride fairly smooth. I weight 170 lbs and want to win, so I choose to stick with the fox setup! Thanks guys!
  • + 1
 Fox, on my 9.5 dhx rc4, off a 10 foot jump the compression adjusters blew out the piggyback reservoir breaking part of the reservoir and leaving me out of luck at the bike bike. air pressure was fine. serviced regularly. your tech department said there is nothing to do except send it in and spend 200+ to get it fixed. a 500+ dollar shock and now i will be into it 700 and risk of it happening again. is that the best that can be done? let me know if you want some pics. thanks for any help.
  • + 1
 If you are the original owner and you are within one year from the date of purchase this sounds like something that should be covered under warranty at no charge. You can be assured that with all the development that has gone into the latest version of the RC4 that it is incredibly unlikely that something like this would happen again.
  • + 1
 original owner but its been over a year since the purchase. not good.
  • + 1
 I had the exact same thing happen to the rc4 that came stock on my 2010 demo 8 2. I was pretty stoked when I almost died....and it was nice knowing that Fox had my back and issued a re-call, knowing this batch of rc4's were potentially deadly...............
  • + 1
 Sounds like a pm comp no? This kind of stuff CAN happen in mass production ( no idea what the annual numbers for fox would be ) as with anything mistakes do happen but potentially dangerous situation has happened if due to a products QC issue ( possiblle. ) if I made that shock and that happened I would want to know why.
  • + 1
 The entire compression valve assembly in my 2013 RC4 literally blew out of my shock, oil and all in the middle of my race run yesterday. Finished the run for a 2nd place but was scary as hell with ZERO compression or rebound dampening. Spoke with FOX warranty today, sending it in tomorrow. Those Ti shock bolts on my V10 are some tough mothers, was bottoming hard on everything.
  • + 1
 How benign or otherwise is ring-like mild discolouration (the thickness of a ring is about 3 mm or so) on the stanchion below the rubber seal (not visible during normal operation). It is on left stanchion only. Fork has 150 hrs of riding with regular oil change in the lowers. Thank you!
  • + 1
 Seems like you are taking good care of your fork. The discoloration could just be a color variation from the plating process or it could be early signs of bushing wear on the upper tube. If the fork is holding oil and seals are not wearing prematurely. It shouldn't be a problem. Keep doing what you're doing and monitor it, if you have further questions you can write them down in an email and send a picture to mtbservice@ridefox.com In order to perform a warranty evaluation however, the fork has to be sent in.
  • + 1
 Hey Fox! I got my own workshop in Poland and few questions:
1.why only one service point for each country?
2. How do you choose it and what if existing one is crap (thats what my customers says)
People keep asking me to service they ox forks but i do not have enough info and suport from yo u(not being official service point) I want to do it properly not DIY-style

3. How can i make my customers happy. They don't want to hear about a service point in Warsaw and i can't relly do it for them, exept basic servicing.

Do not get me wrong. I like guys at cult-bikes.com (fox service in poland) but why don't you give people a chance to choose the shop they do the whole bike servicing. Cheers for reply and all the best with your grate products. M
  • + 1
 Hi Milimetr, Thanks for you message. Our international service manager is on vacation (mtbing) so he isn't here to give you details specifically. We will have him send you a message next week when he is back in the office.
  • + 1
 First things first :-D. . Thank you!
  • + 1
 well done for your idea!i own a demo 8 fsr1 2011 which is wearing a fox van rc.i also own a fox rc4 2011. i want to upgrate the shock on my bike but i have a big problem!!!!! the red knob of rebound on the rc4 is not the long one that specialized uses on the van rc for the demo...so i can not put the shock on my bike! i tried to find a soloution throw specialized and fox here i greece but nothing happened...they couldnt find the long knob..so im very disupointed with all that stuff.. can you help me upgrate my bike? thanks for your time!
  • + 1
 hey fox. I currently ride an intense 275 carbine all mountain bike. I have a 160mm ctd fork on the front and ctd rear kashima air shock. I am having trouble finding the balance between not bottoming out the rear shock and still having a real plush feeling going of gnarly rock gardens. Is there another shock that would be recommended or certain tuning suggestions. It is a 6 inch travel bike but I dont care about how it pedals up hill just how it shreds the downhill. I basicly want it to feel like a 6 inch travel dh bike. thanks
  • + 1
 Hi bikemore123, To get a more DH lively feel out of the shock, set your sag at 30-35%, open up rebound a click or two and rid eit in the "D" position.
  • + 1
 do you guys have any setup/tuning tips for your dhx rc4 like the 40?
(ex:http://www.ridefox.com/fox_tech_center/owners_manuals/07/eng/forks/40/40.htm)

ive seen this one (see link below) and it helps a lot, but i was just wondering if theres another tuning/help guide for my rear shock?
(www.ridefox.com/fox_tech_center/owners_manuals/011/Content/Rear_Shocks/DHX_RC4.html)

currently building my operator up right now and i cant wait to try out my suspension! ive always had fox forks on my dj's and liked them, so i cant wait to try this stuff out on my big bike.. keep up the good work!
farm8.staticflickr.com/7416/8728818299_281a7065b4_z.jpg
  • + 1
 Is it possible to shorten a shocks stroke? My understanding is that the IFP level has to be reset based on the eye to eye of the shock. What are the concerns with the length of the shock shaft? Can it bottom if the shock is too much shorter? I am interested in putting a heavier duty shock onto an enduro but want to keep the shorter travel. Was thinking of using the shock of a enduro evo and shortening it if necessary to fit the standard enduro.

-Cheers
  • + 1
 Shortening the travel only by adding a spacer does not require re-setting the IFP. Shortening the eye to eye length of the shock would require a full rebuild by an authorized service center. The concern in doing this would be changing your geometry and linkage to run in a range it is not designed for. You could have interference issues that damage your bike or shock and/or bad performance at the beginning and end of the stroke.
  • + 1
 Why the switch from FIT to CTD? It seems like a dumbed down dampening system with less room for personal adjustment. I dont see the need for a climb trail decend on a dirt jump fork for either... On another note... Am I paying to much for auto insurance? Wink
  • + 2
 It sounds like you are asking about '13 / '14 CTD vs. our '12 RLC or RL damper.

FOX Isolated Technology (FIT) refers to our sealed damping cartridges, which all Factory and Performance forks use.

The Factory CTD Adj damper features three on the fly low-speed compression settings with two addition settings to fine tune the Trail mode. It offers more adjustments on the shock than the previous designs and similar adjustments on the fork with better on the fly access. Between the Trail with fine tune adjustments and the Descend mode, you can achieve the same low-sped damping settings as our previous design with better on the fly access.

Should we change the CTD naming on the 831 to something else? - really, it's just a low-speed compression adjuster.

You probably are paying too much for auto insurance. Try bundling it with renter or home insurance- it helps.
  • + 1
 Fox - How do you deal with specific clients and their pursuit of OEM shocks - is the relationship one sided (ie, Trek says we need this type of shock for our new frame to make our bike respond the way we want) or do you have iterative feedback with the frame designers to fit their needs to existing models?
How do you manage your cross-functionality and interchangeability of parts between years/models of forks/shocks?
  • + 1
 Hi oruwu, I can answer your first question from a testing perspective. It is an iterative process. If t involves a race specific bike model for example, we conduct test session using test riders, team athletes and our engineering team. It works quite well in the end. usually the more time and test session we have, the better it gets. Mark
  • + 1
 I may have missed the boat (this is a great idea btw) but here goes.

Looking at buying a Giant Reign for 2014, well actually it will be a Trance SX Wink and I am thinking for some of the terrain I ride I might be better to upgrade to a 34 over the 32 it will most likely come with.

Are you going to have options for after market forks that will be compatible with Giants Overdrive 2? (1 1/4" to 1.5" steerer)

Thanks!
  • + 1
 Actually all of our 1.5" tapered after market forks will work with the Giant Overdrive 2. You would need new upper headset parts, and a new 1.125" stem.
  • + 1
 Ah oh course. run a reducer....thanks!
  • + 1
 Are you going to offer a coil sprung aggressive 160 or 170 trail fork with a damper that is more plush than what you offer now? Like the pre-FIT VAN36's, ala Mark Weir on a coil sprung Nomad!

Just because your current trend/crop of "pro enduro racers" want the lightest most efficient fork they can survive on in an enduro race does not mean that this is the best or most enjoyable fork to ride for the majority of the riders and racers out there.

Thanks
-A once loyal VAN36 rider, and now quite happy on the Marzocchi 55RC3Ti
  • + 1
 Santa Cruz now has a pair of short-travel bikes (26" and 27.5" wheels) in it's lineup that industry marketing may be calling "trail" bikes but are clearly built to take use as serious as bikes in the 150-160 mm travel category, but only ridden in a different style. Is the Float 32 really the ideal fork, or are suspension manufacturers just a little behind and wating to see how this niche does in terms of sales and visibility?
  • + 1
 Because it seems to fall into the bike shop cliche of selling the customer what you have and not what the customer needs. Should I believe Fox when they say that larger stanchions and CSUs are better for aggressive riding, or should I believe Fox when they say that the 32 mm chassis is perfectly suited to any riding w/ travel under 140 mm?
  • + 1
 @Snifoilhat: Our currently 2014 line has 32 and 34 fork options for 26, 27.5 and 29" wheels to cover most rider/bike needs. Santa Cruz may be putting 32 forks on those bike because they provide the balance of travel, weight and stiffness that they want but you can certainly go with a 34 fork if you are looking for a stiffer chassis.

A '14 34 Talas is a great option for bigger wheeled bikes because the new Talas air spring can be ridden in the short travel or long travel mode. This allows better control of the handlebar height- many 29er riders are using the short travel mode for quicker handling for most riding and then switching to the long travel mode for steep descents.
  • + 1
 You seem fairly secretive when it comes to your future products. How important is this info and what would it mean for FOX sales if competitors found out? You have patent numbers all over your products so surely it is protected?
  • + 1
 [Alicia] Hi BikeBlood, It is true, we are secretive about our products in development. It is true across the spectrum within the bike industry and beyond. We invest a lot every year in new product development. Part of our competitive edge is the technical expertise and important time-to-market. We don't want to enable our competitors with early release of information. Similarly, we don't want to over-commit to our customers on products that are early in development cycle.
  • + 5
 What do you guys think of the "bladder damper" from Rockshox?
  • + 10
 FOX has engineered closed dampers since the original 40 was introduced in 2005. Our FOX Isolated Technology (FIT) has benefited from eight years of racing and production here in our Watsonville, CA facility...imitation is the ultimate form of flattery.
  • + 1
 You guys rock that shox.
  • + 1
 Alot of us are running lowered fox 36 float. it has always been my go to fork as I can easily lower travel to be used for an AM hardtail at 130mm travel. 100mm for my dirtjumper (32 831 is not stiff enough). I've noticed newer floats can only be lowered by 10mm using a shuttle bumber kit. Can something be done to enable us to lower these forks down to 100mm or 130mm.
  • + 2
 You can drop the overall fork length and travel of a 36 fork by changing the spring internals to the '12 Float spring and spacing it down.
  • + 1
 i'm literally about to take a peek inside my 2008 float rs (the 140mm version) which have had no attention since they left the factory... what should i expect? :s though i have to say they have been running very smoothly and have outlasted the frame they came with Smile
  • + 1
 Hi jamieridesbikes, the oil could be dark, blackish and have some water in it. Other than that, change the oil and seals and your fork will last you several more rides.
  • + 1
 You need to do a fork service which is changing the oil bath in the lower leg, wiping out the lower leg seals, clean the foam rings and change the 5cc of Float Fluid in your air spring. You can do the service if you have the tools and FOX oil or have a local bike shop do the service.
  • + 1
 do you think the coating on the stanctions will be ok? i don't think too much grit and so on has got in past the seals, but then i have no way of knowing until i remove the lowers

i presume how to do all this is on your website?
thanks Smile
  • + 1
 Hi guys,

I'm running a DHX 5.0 Air on the back of my 2010 Reign X, which I bought 2nd hand not so long ago (ridden it 4 times) The original owner was an XC rider who wanted to dabble in Dh like riding, but I don't know how long he rode it nor how hard. It was hanging in a LBS for a full year before I bought the frameset from him.

Now - I'm a big lad (220lb, no gear) and I have been running it with max PSI in both the main & piggy back chamber, and the bottom out damper is fully screwed in (no lines showing) but I'm still blowing through all the travel, even on small hits and trips around the parking lot.

Could it just be a case of the shock needing to be "bedded in", or could it be a seal issue? The Pro Pedal works, as does rebound adjustment.

I'm just wondering if it needs a bleed (potentially) or if I am too heavy for the shock itself, and need to either put a smaller air can on, or put additional oil in the chamber (thereby reducing the compressible matter in the chamber itself, giving a more progressive shock)?

The shock itself his the model with the propedal switch (on/off) rather than the propedal dial (1/2/3)
  • + 1
 Hi cptmayhem, tough question. It sounds to us like something is wrong with the shock or tune. Giant had several different versions of the Reign that year. We offered the DHX Air 5.0 in two different eye to eye and travel combos. The reign XO was spec'd with a 7.875 x 2.25, and the Reign O, was spec'd with 7.875 x 2.0. If somebody swapped shocks between the two the compression ratio would be too low. I would recommend sending for a re-build and requesting a smaller air can or conversion to 2.25 travel if it is only a 2.0. Do not use additional oil in the air chamber to reduce volume. It will transfer to the negative air chamber and cause top out problems.
  • + 1
 hi fox factory
I am currently trying to get into downhill/freeride. my local trails have some pretty big drops and jumps. I also go up to ski resorts such as highland and am wondering if a 180 or your fox 40's would be better for me. I way around 160-170 if that helps at all and almost 5-8ish.
it would be great if you could reply to this

Jake
  • + 2
 Depends on the bike. On DH or Free-ride trails, I would suggest a 36 Float or VAN 180 on a 7in travel bike or a 40 on a 8" travel bike. If you are doing strictly downhill only and never climbing on the bike, I would suggest a 40 and full DH bike.
  • + 1
 Hey guys I ride a enduro size l with a fox float fork and a fox Rc2 coil shock I'm 6'2 210 lbs with gear on. I ride aggressive dh type trail riding.(UCSC) I'd like my trail bike to feel closer to confident inspiring feel of my dh bike but still be a OK peddaler. Can you give me some tips on air and spring numbers and compression and rebound tuning to achieve this. Thanks.
  • + 1
 As a general rule, do your testers/ pro riders prefer to have their rebound set-up to ( A) pack down a little bit when going full speed DH, but have good rebound at slow and medium speeds. Or ( B) have the high speed rebound run faster, but the slow and Medium speed rebound be almost too fast?
  • + 1
 Hi Saidrick, good question! It depends on the course and condition. But to generalize, most prefer to have a bit of deep stroke rebound catch to handle hard landings or traction release-catch when corning. In addition, they like it lively at the top of the stroke. Mark
  • + 1
 Fox

I'm having bottom out issues with my rear Fox Float CTD Boostvalve. I'm a larger rider 235 LB full kit and I'm on the aggressive side riding a 2013 Giant Trance x29 Zero. I have been playing with the PSI on the shock and I have it up to 280PSI now. As I'm moving up in PSI i'm loosing small bump compliance as expected but I have yet to find a happy place where I won't go blowing through the last part of the travel. I have been running the shock in trail mode to combat bottoming out too fast but that isn't doing much either. Had the shock seal kit service done a couple week ago just in-case with no change.

I'm on on the wrong equipment? Do I just need to add more air? Do I need volume spacers?
  • + 2
 Hi ryansod, please see response to tylerthegiant. We recommend decreasing the air volume with spacers. More info can be found under our quicktech: rear shocks service page as to what volume spacers are available for the 2013 CTD.

service.foxracingshox.com/consumers/index.htm
  • + 1
 Thank you! I'll have my local shop set me up. Thank you again and keep up the good work the 2014 line up looks sick!!
  • + 2
 Hi ryansod, you are on the right track. adding a volume spacer will address your issue. It will also allow you to keep the pressure lower with the correct 25% sag.
  • + 1
 Hi I have a Fox Van RC rear shock with a 2.80 X 400 lbs steel spring on an Intense SS2. I also own a Fox DHX 5.0 with a 2.80 X 500 lbs steel spring (which needs rebuilding). my question is...is it worth rebulding the DHX 5.0 to replace the Van RC, that is... is the DHX 5.0 a better shock? or should I buy a new rear shock? Also what is the better spring choice for me and my bike 400lbs vs 500lbs, I am 5'10'' tall 185lbs advanced rider
  • + 1
 Hi devanish, Intense will have a spring rate recommendation as a starting point for there specific bike. We have to recommend setting it up by sag. 25-30%. The VAN rc is a great shock. The DHX 5.0 has a boost valve that allows you to adjust the bottom out control and has position sensitive damping. Shock technology advances almost every year and gets a little better.
  • + 1
 Many manufacturers offer their cheaper models with forks and shocks from the evolution line. Can these be upgraded by changing the interiors and if so, what parts need to be changed? How much would it cost approximately, to upgrade a 34 from evolution to factory (apart from kashima coating)? Are there differences on the spring side as well, or are these the same on the complete lineup?
  • + 1
 It is possible to upgrade an Evolution fork to a Factory FIT damper. It would be the cost of the damper. It would be best to contact the nearest service center for pricing:

www.ridefox.com/contact.php?r=worldwide&ref=topnav
  • + 1
 I have a 2013 Santa Cruz Nomad, with a 2013 160 Fox Float and a rear 2013 DHX RC4, My question is on my fork i feel as if it is bucking me around and it isn't absorbing as plush as I would like, then on my rear I feel as if I am riding a hard tail at times, How can I adjust the two for a smoother ride? I am a 5"5' female 150 lbs. I ride freeride and all mountain stuff, and my husband and I are going to Whistler this next week. If Bryan Anderson could answer this question that would be great. THANKS!
  • + 1
 Hi Kswin. Start by setting sag. You will need a helper to do this for the rear shock but the shock should be compressed about 18-20mm, for the fork about 30mm, when sitting static on the bike with your riding gear. Change spring rate or air pressure to get there. Start with compression settings in the middle of the range and take a run. Rebound should be as fast as possible without the sensation of getting bucked off the bike. If i was setting up a nomad to ride at whistler i would probably end up with my fork compression settings light, but with higher than normal air spring pressure. The rear shock compression settings would be firm with a lighter than normal spring. The combination of the two should give the bike a more "slacked" feel like a downhill bike and be more comfortable for the steep and rough terrain - Bryan
  • + 1
 well done for your idea! i own a demo 8 fsr1 2011.i also own a fox rc4 2011.i want to upgrate my bike by changing the shocks but i have a great problem!!!the van rc comes with a long rebound knob...the rc4 comes with short knob...well i tried throw specialized an fox dealers here in greece to find a long knob so i can upgrate my bike using the rc4 but nothing happened...they couldnt find the long rebound knob that i need!!!!can you help me find a solution for my problem????thanks for your time!!!
  • + 1
 It would be best if you contacted our distributor in Greece:
Nikos Maniatopoulos S.A. »
ph +30.2610.993045

They can help you get the long rebound knob needed to fit the Demo 8.
  • + 1
 Hi What is the best fork, shock combo for enduro riding I Ride a commencal meta am I am 17 stone and I find the air shock blows through its travel very easy even after a air spacer being installed and ideas on how to improve my rear shock
  • + 1
 For the shock, it is pretty straightforward: we would recommend the new FLOAT X shock that was designed for all mountain riding. For the fork, there are a few things to consider: Weight vs. stiffness, damper selection, travel adjust.

WEIGHT vs. STIFFNESS: 34 will be the lighter all-mountain option (about 200g lighter), but 36 will be a stiffer option.
DAMPER SELECTION: The 34 chassis has CTD and the 36 comes with RC2. The RC2 gives you more fine tuning, but less adjust-ability on the fly.
TRAVEL ADJUST: The TALAS travel adjust system gives you the option to change the geometry of your ride for climbing or descending.
  • + 1
 I can't run anything with a piggy back so any suggestions
  • + 1
 Is your current shock an evolution, performance or factory?
  • + 1
 Has FOX considered building a fork with the lowers made from Be? The increase in stiffness and weight savings seems like enough to offset the cost and other concerns.

Also, what is the approximate ratio of cawfee to tea drinkers at FOX HQ?
  • + 2
 Well, mtnbkr1, yes we have thought of Be. As it turns out Be is hazardous to machine and verrrrrrrrry expensivo. We have a sample size of 9 people in here. There is only one sicko drinking tea instead of cawfay.
  • + 1
 Dear Fox!
I’ve a specialized demo 8 bike (2011 edition) in which I changed the rear shock from Van RC to DHX RC4 (Kashima). Now, in the demos, there goes a longer rebound screw, and because of this I took the one from the Van RC and I’ve put it into the DHX RC4.
What I did was, I loosened up the screw at the end of that yellow tube (damper?), which made it possible for me to take out the rebound screw and put in the longer one. After I’ve put that in, I screwed it back together and reassembled it.
Now, my problem is that there is no enough rebound. What did I do wrong?
  • + 1
 Hi Gabees, We can't diagnose the problem from the information you've shared. Your local distributor (www.aslibisiklet.com) may be able to give your more information. We only recommend that authorized service centers rebuild shocks.
  • + 1
 I'm not sure if this has been addressed yet or not, but I recently bought a new Ibis Mojo HD with a Fox Float RP23 Kashima w/ propedal. I'm about 195 lbs and find that I blow through the travel in the shock on every ride. I have heard that I need to put in a volume spacer so the shock will be more "progressive" and ramp up a bit more towards the end of the shock travel. Is that something you would suggest aswell? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
  • + 2
 Adding an air volume spacer will increase the compression ratio of the air spring, which will make the air spring ramp up more toward the end of the travel. It is one of the tuning options we offer with our rear shocks and standard procedure to tune the air spring. It sounds like a good option and will help tune the shock more toward your needs.
  • + 1
 " questions please Fox Big Grin

1. Would Fox ever consider building a handlebar remote lever for the TALAS travel adjust? I never use the lock out, but I use the TALAS adjust a lot.

2. On the 2014 34 TALAS CTD Fork. Is it possible to internally alter the short travel setting, without affecting the long travel setting? Ideally I'd like 110/160mm travel. I'm used to the older 3 posiiton 110/130/150mm & like the short travel setting for steep climbs, but love the 150mm for downhill!

really appreciate your time. thanks Smile
  • + 2
 Thanks for the feedback on TALAS use! On the 2014 TALAS you can alter the short travel setting by adding a clip on spacer to the top cap assembly. This will not affect long travel setting. Spacers come in 5mm increments.
  • + 1
 thanks for answering, appreciate it Big Grin
  • + 1
 2012 Rock Mountain Flatline, with a Fox 40 up front, and a RC4 in the rear. Rider weight 170 with gear. Currently at a 450 spring rear, blue up front. One click of preload up front, and two turns in the rear.

Counting clicks from closed (all the way clockwise), can you give me suggestions for LSC/HSC/REBOUND. I ride east coast stuff, loose over hard pack, chunder, rock gardens for miles. In terms of particulars, I'm finding it hard to carry speed over the rock armor trails that are too long to jump over. Rock armor being a trail with large flatish rocks embedded in to the dirt to prevent erosion. If it comes down to it, I'm looking for numbers to go fast, not be comfortable.
  • + 1
 Fox, are there any plans to produce a more budget orientated downhill fork? I can imagine there being a lot of interest in your older technologies/ experience being packaged into a cheaper priced fork, aimed at younger/ entry level riders?
  • + 1
 currently the 40 R is our lowest price point downhill fork and we have no immediate plans at making a lower price point offering.
  • + 1
 Hey guys I have a question I have a new fox 40 rc2 and when I first got it the spring was shaking rapidly on the side with the preload (left side) and I have had it fixed with a marzocchi 888 spring cover and now it sounds good. Is this a normall problem? Thanks, Dylan
  • + 1
 The 40 Coil spring should have approximately 4.75" of "heat-shrink" tubing on the outside of the spring. All fork coil springs buckle as they are being compressed and the "heat-shrink" tubing quiets the spring.
  • + 1
 Mark Fitz/Bryan Anderson, I'm looking for some good tuning advice. 2010 RC4 on a 2010 Intense 951 Medium Frame. Weight 147 pounds full kit. With the bike in 8.5" travel mode, can you provide settings/pressure best suited for East Coast steeps and rocks and alternatively something like LiveWire at NorthStar (smooth dirt with jumps and huge berms)? Currently running 350lb Steel spring, have tried 400lb Ti (too stiff for my weight). Looking for your LSC, HSC, Rebound, and Air Pressure reccomendations as well as any thoughts on spring weight for this specific rig and my weight.
Thanks!
  • + 1
 The triad shock on my stumpjumper keeps leaking air, has been serviced 4 times under warranty now but keep failing. What's the word on warranty replacements in the UK instead of repairs? I appreciate any answer, i love the shock but it is a bit prone to failures and the proprietary linkage means i cannot swap to an RP23.
  • + 0
 That's a tough one because of the specific mounting of the Stumpy. I'm sure you're working with our distributor, Mojo- they will know best.
  • + 1
 Yeah i'm in contact with Mojo who are determined to solve the problem. Thanks for the reply.
  • + 1
 I have a new Santa Cruz TRc with the 32 Float 26 CTD O/C 130 in the frame. I've ridden in 3 times, less than 50 miles total so far. I've cleaned the bike each time I've ridden it (includes a gentle wipe down of the shock exterior), and each time I go out, after I have ridden there is a small amount of oily like liquid collected around the rubber band on the shock itself (It has been dry on all three rides, it can't be water or mud). Is this normal?
  • + 1
 Our forks and shocks were all designed to lubricate themselves by letting a thin film of oil coat the upper tubes and rear shock bodies. Seeing a small amount of lube on your upper tubes or shock body is perfectly normal and not a concern. Make sure to clean off any dirt or trail dust/mud that collects on your fork and shock after each ride to prevent internal contamination.
  • + 1
 perfect, thanks!
  • + 1
 Hi there FOX. I have always had trouble figuring out how to properly dial in my 2010 36 TALAS RC2 on my 2009 Santa Cruz Nomad 2.0. Setting proper sag is always a problem with the TALAS it seems. I want to tune it for enduro and not have to hassle with it anymore. I weigh ~78kg (~173lb) with all my gear on. What settings do you recommend (pressure, rebound, high&low speed compression)?

While we're at it, I might as well ask the same questions about my DHX Air 5.0 that came with the frame.

Thanks guys!
  • + 1
 Surprised i didnt see anyone ask this... why did the name "FOX" come about? also on a side note i have never has a single issue with my 40, been buttery smooth ever since i got it, who knows maybe i have wet dreams when i sleep with my bike. I may have just unlocked the future of stantion lubrication. Razz
  • + 1
 Any reason the stanchions wouldn't be the same length on the same fork? My friend and I both have 2013 Talas 180 set at 70 psi. The kashima part on mine measure 180 on the dot and his come in at 190. Not a huge deal but thought it was a little weird.
  • + 1
 On air forks, it is very common for the travel to settle at different heights when un-weighted. You can measure the same fork multiple times and get slightly different values. The forks are OK.
  • + 1
 Do you guys, have any plans on adding mid stroke support via compression damping or air spring? Your forks are incredibly smooth but to maintain bar height and/or diving there has always been a compromise between heavy compression or high spring rate and this kind of compromise isn't really desired. I've felt 2014 34 float CTD and it was definitely an improvement but still seems to ride lower than your competitors forks. So I guess the question is are there plans to improve neutral ride height and mid stroke support for improved user input/feedback, and confidence (there's nothing worse than the fork diving on the trail for confidence).
  • + 1
 so, I may expand a bit on this. The big concern is definitely with rider input during high, g-out, style loading. Corner, pushing through or off lips, and a bit is under braking riding steeps. I feel the current improvements to the CTD helped out with brake dive, but when really adding some english to the bike on lips, corners, or really any type of intense rider input the suspension
(front or rear) tends to blow through the travel unless the small bump sensitivity is compromised with an over sprung air can.
  • + 1
 Hi Fox Factory, I am a begginer/intermediate downhill rider who weighs 190lbs rides for fun in Eastern Canada. I ride a 2009 Mongoose Boot'r with a Fox DHX 5 shock. I'd like to know if there are some base settings that I could start with on my shock to get it dialled in from. I have settings that feel okay but I really have nothing to compare to and dont know if the feel could be improved. Also, is there an order I should make any changes in. IE: Pro pedel first, then bottom end, then rebound?

I have set the sag and have the correct spring installed.

Thanks
  • + 2
 On a Demo 8 am i suposed to run my fox 40's with the 3cm of Stanton above the top crown? or am i suposed to run it flush with a lower rise? Also will a 2014 air cartridge fit in my 2011 FIT 40's?
  • + 1
 Hi Hawkrider, the important dimension is the top of the lower crown to the top of the uppertube. It needs to be 163mm to avoid the tire contacting the lower crown a bottom out. To upgrade your fork to a 2014 air system, would require a new air and tube assembly. Mark
  • + 1
 I have a dhx rc4 with a 450lbs spring. I ride a 2013 Kona Supreme Operator and weigh 190lbs. I ride a lot up at mammoth mountain what is the best tune for the area, also the shock says tune M on it but it is a large frame does that make a difference?
  • + 1
 The M stands for Medium shim stack. F stands for firm, but few OEs use the firm shim stack. For Mammoth, I would start out with the low and high speed compression adjusters in the middle (LSC at 9 clicks out, HSC at 7 clicks out). On Mammoth's loose shaley terrain, I would think you would need the LSC at 9 to 14 clicks out to hook up for traction.
  • + 1
 I am 140lbs and I have a brand new 36 float rc2, I set to the starting point of 48psi for sag and when I measure it from the top of the dust seal to the o ring I only get 27mm of sag. With 48psi and the bike hanging on a stand the amount of travel from the top of the dust seal to the end of the stanchion is only 150mm. I can pull the lower down but if I let go it gets sucked back up. If I pump more air into the fork it will extend to 165mm. There seems to be some type of negative pressure fighting against the pressure but its stronger than the air spring when it is setup to my weight. Also the HSC seems to not work at all. From full positive to full negative there is hardly any difference. I have 2 other fox forks and when I turn the HSC from full open to full close there is a noticeable difference in the amount of force I need to put on it to compress. I have Emailed the fox service help about it but haven t got a reply yet. I saw this so I thought I would ask here. Thanks.
  • + 1
 I have a new Fox Evolution Series 32 Float w/CTD that came on my Trek Stache. Its a lot of fun but the CTD seems to have 3 options (C:lock out T:work ok but a touch soft D: Blow through the travel.) I have the correct air pressure in the spring leg. What can I do to improve this performance? In the C position there is a bit of a clunk when I squish the fork through a weight shift. Is this normal?
  • + 1
 Hi,

Having a issue with knocking in the left air leg of my 2011 36 rlc. The fork was bought new in late 2012. Carried out a oil change service as advised by mojo, which cured the problem untill I took it for one ride and the knocking is back. Spoke to mojo and they said it won't be the bushings.

Any idea what might get rid of the knocking? Or is this just a common problem with your air forks?

Never had this problem on my 2008 36 van's.

Cheers
  • + 1
 I am currently riding a 2012 Santa Cruz Nickel size Large with a Fox Float air shock. I recently purchased a volume adjuster spacer kit because I wanted more small bump compliance. Here lately I have to bump up the air pressure because I keep bottoming out my suspension. I'm losing a lot of small bump sensitivity because of the pressure i'm running. I weigh 165 lbs and ride aggressive XC trails with rolling hills. Which volume adjuster spacer should I start with? There is a small, medium, or large. Or should I not run any spacers at all?

Thanks!
  • + 1
 Hi,
I have a bike that has a non-tapered 1.5" headtube (29er hardtail), and would it be possible to put a Fox 32 100 with a tapered steerer on my bike using a particular headset or spacer set? I'm pretty sure this wouldn't work, but just making sure!
Thanks
  • + 1
 I read your question incorrectly the first time so I'm trying again...

Yes, you can put a new fork on a bike that has a non-tapered 1.5" head tube. You just need to get a new headset.

The Cane Creek guys are pretty helpful with this sort of thing- here's some info I found on their website and a link to their FAQ:

DO I NEED A TAPERED HEAD TUBE TO USE A TAPERED FORK ON MY BIKE?

In most cases, yes. However; with the introduction of certain models from Cane Creek, tapered forks can be run in two straight head tubes. The classic 1.5” head tube has an inside diameter (ID) of 49.61mm, with use of our ZS49/28.6 TOP assembly, a tapered fork can be used instead of the straight 1.5” that head tube was intended for. With the EC44/40 Bottom assembly, non tapered 1 1/8” head tubes with a 44mm ID can utilize a tapered fork as well.

www.canecreek.com/tech-center/headsets/faq
  • + 1
 sweet. thanks guys, love your stuff!
  • + 1
 Hello my friends! just wondering if you can tell me wich is the best shimstack order for a dhx 5.0 on a scott gambler 2008. I would like to set the rebound and compression shimstack for best performace running 7w oil, 400 coil and a 68kg rider on a 8.5 travel set. 200 psi full open piggyback. thanks a lot.
  • + 1
 Hi guys, i have a van r 36 170mm (in a kona entourage) it's my first fox fork and it's pretty sweet despite it's a basic one. I want to change the original spring because it's to soft for me and i can't find a place with a fair price. Here in my country (Chile) just to take a look at the fork it cost around 80-120 dollars (that's expencive here) so, besides that, there is only ONE guy that can do the service to fox forks in the entire country and it's to damn expencive. All of the bike shops, at least in Santiago, sends the forks to this guy so, what about setting prices or regulate your dealers prices here in south america, especially in Chile? loving how my kona it's working right know. keep up the good work
  • + 1
 Why you not put preset setting off the RC4 to guide the rider in setting the shock like Cane creek and Rock Shock do...
Im riding a rocky flatline and im 260lbs and im cannont find any set-up guide for my Rc4.. Can you help me please??
  • + 1
 Hi yoyo21, Start by setting the adjusters in the middle of there range. Count the total number of clicks, and set them in the middle counting out counterclockwise from closed. For setting up the correct spring rate, set your sag at 25%.
  • + 0
 ok but cant you tell me the number of clic i ave to set in all the ajustement if im start counterclockwise? ex:3 clic low speed compression.
Im riding in east cost in bromont quebec can, and im prefer technical trail (Rocky, roost and loose terrain)
Very appreciated
  • + 1
 I just smashed a freakin rock at Kicking Horse last weekend puncturing the lower leg on my 2011 fox 40 rc2 (fit?), can you just send me a link detailing how to replace the lower leg (oil levels etc) I have tried a few sites out but then I saw this thread, I'm not a mechanic by any stretch but I'm also not a retard either...Thx
  • + 1
 You can get a NEW 40 Lower Leg through our FOX Canadian distributor, OGC. Here is the link to OGC.

www.ogc.ca
  • + 1
 I intend to have Mojo Uk upgrade my 2011 Talas 36/180mm fork to the new 2014 Talas cartridge as soon as the parts become available. I like the idea of being able to tune the full and lowered travel. Less seals/less stiction also sounds beneficial.
Will the current RC2 damper be fully compatible in its current tune?
After switching the Talas lever back to full travel, whilst riding, will the fork elongate back to full travel any quicker than with current Talas? (my wheelies aren't always sustained long enough when breathless on the crest of a hill for my fork to drop fully!! )
Do all Fox staff learn to do wheelies long enough for their Talas forks to drop?
  • + 1
 Do you have a chart available as a guide for selection of the rebound and compression tunes. Specifically taking different frame leverage ratios and rider weights into account so i can be more confident when i purchase an aftermarket fox rear shock. I am about 92kg with all my gear and run the rebound at the slowest setting so the rear doesn't pogo around.
  • + 1
 I have heard rumors that the 2013 fox 34 talas fork is having issue. With pushing threw on the decend mode. Is this true and will that be a warranty issue. Have a new trek slash 9 and I hope this does not happen to mine. Is there anything that I can do to avoid this. Also heard a couple things about the drcv rear shock having problems with the air seals. Thanks
  • + 1
 Dear Fox Shox or whomever I buy things that soak up bumps in the road. Why u no put indention near crown race? Literally makes me hit my head against the wall. When race puller fails..... There should be a plan b. I feel like you don't want me to ever change forks....
  • + 1
 I have a 2010 Fox rp23 shock 140mm travel with a high volume canister. I preformed an air can service a year ago (and several times since) and since the first service my propedal has no distinction between settings or even the on vs off. Any idea as to what is going on? It feels like it is fully open all the time. I just preformed an air sleeve overhaul so I am confused as to why it has affected the compression. The shock still works amazing I would just like to have the pro pedal working again. (especially for when I run my bike on the trainer in the winter)
  • + 1
 150 lbs, trail/all-mountain. 2011 36 float rlc/2010 float rp23 on a dw-link turner 5 spot. what are the ideal settings both front and rear? i know the recommended settings but maybe something a little less generic that you guys might be aware of. i ind the rp23 to be less than ideal. the 36 is plush but dives terribly.
  • + 1
 I'm looking to get a fox dhx rc4 for my 2013 Norco Aurum, is that something I can get right off the shelf and it will work good with my bike or would I be better off getting it tuned specifically for the Aurum? Riding weight is 190lbs and what spring would you suggest?
  • + 1
 The OEM tune is Medium Compression, Medium Rebound which matches the aftermarket shock tuning. 400 lbs/in spring should get you in the ballpark.
  • + 1
 Ok, but the shock on the Aurum is a Van Rc on the Aurum 2. Dhx rc4 doesn't come on any of the Aurums
  • + 1
 My 2010 Talas 36 RC2 doesn't seem to be using all of its travel despite lowering the air pressure and compression settings. It seems be very plush in the first half of its travel but seems to ramp up very fast when compressed past that point, so much that I can only compress it about 4" when using all my weight. Also the Travel adjust feature seems to rebound very slowly when switched from the 100 or 130mm settings back to the 160mm setting. Any ideas as to what may be wrong with it?
  • + 1
 Mine did this, basically no travel after the first 3inches. I never fixed it due to timing, but I once read...now don't hold me too this...that some type of "bladder" had gone bad.
  • + 2
 It sounds like you are probably due for a rebuild. The TALAS system has multiple chambers, and it is possible that some of the fluid from one chamber might have migrated to another chamber that could be compromising your overall travel and travel adjustment. Contact Outdoor Gear Canada our Canadian Distributor for more info.
  • + 2
 Your fork is probably hydrolocked. Oil has traveled into you air spring. And as air compresses, oil doesn't, so when your travel reaches the oil it just stops. You should take it to you local bike shop before sending it in. They should be able to sort it out and probably save you some money.
  • + 1
 Hi Fox,
I always seem to struggle with shock set up and generally find whatever eventually works does not equate to Fox's set up guide.
Can you work to improve your set up guides and explanations? Also, if you were to suggest external set up help,, what would it be? (Please don't tell me forums and google searching).
Thanks
  • + 1
 We are actively working on better ways of explaining setup and improving our website. If you're able to attend a race where one of our tech trailers is working and compete, you can get some one on one setup attention with one of our race technicians. We attend to our sponsored riders as first priority but rarely turn down any racer that needs help, especially with setup and adjustment.
  • + 1
 I enjoy when companies do this. Thank you for your time. I own a 2013 Fox Float 36 and love it. There is one thing about it that bothers me however. I find that when I run a suitable air pressure for my weight (around 65 psi) and a compression setting a find ideal, the fork bottoms much to easy. Running it at a higher psi (70 and above) with added compression seems to resolve this issue, but makes the ride quality less than ideal. Any suggestions?
  • + 3
 Hey Hayden, From reading your comments, I would suggest adding 5cc of Float Fluid to the air chamber and run it at 65 psi. If it still bottoms easily add another 5cc of Float Fluid and still run it at 65 psi.
  • + 3
 Hey FOX, why do I end up sending an expensive FOX rear shock to PUSH to have them make it better?
Still love your products.
Thanks
  • + 1
 Where are the components for your products manufactured, where are your final products assembled, and how is quality monitored for all of the products you guys release? Does every damper get tested or are several assembled for a quality audit is performed?

Operating in an inudstry that sees yearly change of numerous product forms, is it a manufacturing nightmare to keep up product demand on your numerous lines when you have one year to perfect a constantly updating process? What kind of LEAN systems and quality change control programs do you utilize to keep up?

Also, do you guys need a process engineer who also has some experience in electrical engineering within an industrial enviroment and is a little obssessd with mtb's? (crossing fingers, haha prob not likely)
  • + 1
 I have owned many different Fox Float forks (32, 36 160, 36 180, etc), and I have always been able to feel the top out and negative springs that are nested together rubbing. It always seems to happen in the initial part of the compression stroke. Is there any way to stop that from happening?
  • + 1
 We made improvements to the spring system on the longer travel Float forks for 2013. They are retrofittable to prior model years and should address your concerns.
  • + 2
 I ordered a 2014 Fox Talas 180 with a 1 1/8 steerer a couple of weeks back (I expect it soon). Are there truly any strength issues or more creaking issues with non-tapered (I can't help that my frame needs a 1 1/Cool
  • + 1
 We are not aware of any correlation between steerer diameter and creaking. Your new fork will be fine.
  • + 1
 thanks!! Any tuning advice for a 240lb 6'7" tall rider?? hehe
  • + 1
 This is probably the 100th question about an inverted fork. How can you say that an inverted fork is too flexy and unable to hold a line in the rough and unable to be stiff enough in the corners? We all know that motocross uses it and motocross suspension is leaps and bounds ahead of mtn bike suspension. Plus motocross takes way more abuse. I cannot help but think that you guys are not telling the whole story when it comes to inverted forks. Not trying to hate but really just confused.
  • + 1
 Bicycles and Motocross bikes have completely different design constraints. A bicycle rider's body position has a much bigger effect on the vehicle since the rider usually weighs 3 to 5 times less than the vehicle itself. At some point there is a weight penalty in achieving the necessary stiffness that makes the performance benefits of the inverted fork not worth it. Even with a beefy "ground up" inverted fork design, Gee and Gwin felt like they couldn't race it.
  • + 1
 awesome. thanks!
  • + 1
 Thanks for taking my call...long time lurker, first time poster...

...So, what's the skinny on fat?

I'm in AK and I've got a fatbike that could really use a bit o' squish in the summer...there's only about 10,000 of us in this boat...
  • + 1
 Sorry but you'll have to ask the fatbike manufacturers about that one.
  • + 1
 As a producer of amazing suspension products. I have been looking for a new fork and rear shock combo. I ride a 2011 specialized big hit 1 (medium frame) I want to upgrade to a dual crown fork of at least a higher travel fork than the stock one and just a better rear shock. What type of options do I have with fox? I've ridden a fox fork on my other bike and I love it!
  • + 1
 Can't go wrong with a 2014 RC4 and 40!
  • + 1
 I would recommend a 36 Float or TALAS 160 RC2 and a RC4 8.5" length x 2.25" travel shock for the rear.
  • + 1
 Hi Fox, i would like to ask for some help setting up my Fox Van 160 Fit RC2 2012 on my Yeti 575 2010. im 145 pounds and i usually ride all mountain and downhill. just need to know what's the proper rebound, low speed, and high speed compression. my high speed compression knob is also very hard to turn, had been having that problem when i bought the fork. thank you and hoping to hear back.
  • + 2
 Hi mtb-nj, start with your high and low speed compression adjusters in the middle. Count the total number of clicks and count each click counterclockwise from closed (full clockwise). Do the same for rebound. Write it down and make small changes to each, riding the same trail. You are on the lighter side and the stock settings might be on the firm side. If this is the case, I personally prefer this as it allows the rider to push the limits of the suspension.
  • + 3
 Is there any further development in the use of inverted forks for downhill bikes, such as USD (UpSideDown) forks used in Motocross and motorcycles generally
  • + 1
 See our reply to sweet-bike:

We fully developed and tested an inverted DH fork with our racers. The response from all of our racers was that they strongly preferred the conventional fork for its stiffness in cornering and holding the line. We developed axles with 3 different levels of stiffness; in all cases the conventional fork out-performed the inverted fork. We retired this fork from the RAD program. The picture above shows the inverted fork in the new FOX museum in Scotts Valley CA.
  • + 1
 i have a yeti sb66 with a kash rp23 and i am unable to turn the 123 dial, how does this work and when should it turn, also at 100kg with a 50mm stem what sort of ompression and psi should i run?
  • + 1
 The 123 dial should lift and turn, then drop back into place. Please check our manual archive for specific directions on how to use the adjuster and basic tuning setup.

www.ridefox.com/fox_tech_center/owners_manuals/012/Content/Rear_Shocks/2012FLOATfactory.html
  • + 5
 why does my brand new kashima flake off?
  • + 1
 Hi warganicc, if you are having this happen to your Fox suspension, please take it to a dealer to look at and help you. Or call us and we will work through it with you.
  • + 1
 Hi. I am brazilian and I bought a Yeti ASR 5C 1 year ago. I am very disappointed with my rear suspension (Fox RP23) because I can't tuning my bike and the rear has a bad comportment in the trail, mainly in the flat and little climbs. I am thinking to exchange my bike by Santa Cruz Tallboy. What do you tell me about what do I need to do to left my bike real aggressive?
Thanks in advance and sorry about my terrible english.
Sincerely, Luiz
  • + 1
 what were you thinking when you designed the kona exclusive 160mm 32 fork? Its really light but with that much travel you can really tell the flex. And where would you go upgrading from that? For the same kadabra bike, ideally without loosing the light weight?
  • + 1
 FOX never made a 32mm 160 travel fork. What model Kona is this? The longest travel 32mm fork FOX sells is a 150.
  • + 1
 kona abracadabra 2010. It was kona OEM fork.
  • + 1
 In fact it is 150mm but still its a bit long for 32s?

What would you upgrade to from this? With intention of keeping the lightness
  • + 1
 @Fox

With the growing popularity of high volume air shocks (Vivid Air, Void, DB Air and Swinger) are there any plans from fox to produce a shock that also has the super high volume and "linear" spring rate to compete? Or do you plan on only sticking to a beefed up enduro platform for downhill?
  • + 1
 We just launched the '14 Float X CTD Adj rear shock for more aggressive trail riding. With enduro events taking off, we are working with our athletes to see where that takes us- some of the enduro events basically run downhill courses.

In addition, the Race Dept is exploring the use of an air shock for downhill applications. Pinkbike spotted it at Fort Bill:

www.pinkbike.com/news/Prototype-Fox-Air-DH-Shock-Fort-William-World-Cup-2013.html
  • + 1
 Alicia...Is it true you moved over recently from the high tech capitol of the world, Silicon Valley? What are you thoughts on the competing work environs. More riding? better coffee? are you going for the all mountain title at Dville? Who dresses better? Are bike nerds any better or worse or different than, well, real nerds?...how about sharing some gossip.
  • + 1
 [Alicia] Hey, seems like you got some insider information there, but hey, we did say to ask us "anything".... Riding in Santa Cruz county is killer compared to the old silicon valley gig. The coffee is way better too. I am not ready to clean up at Downieville, but I am amused by recently nabbing QOM on the Strava segment "Pain in the Fartbox". Bike nerds vs. real nerds? It is just a different kind of weird. The real nerds used to wear white sock exposing flood-level pants. Here, the B.O. is a little worse after lunch.
  • + 1
 1) I bought a 2012 DHX RC4 Kashima on the web (crc). Which is the setting of this one ? I have a Lapierre DH 2012 (pendbox technology), how can I have the Lapierre's setting ?
2) I always have oil mark on the rod after a ride (unlike my previous 2012 DHX RC2), is it normal ?
3) Do you have predefined tunings according to bike/weight/... ? (Lapierre DH 2012 / 62kg (137lbs) / spring of 350) / meduim level of riding)
  • + 2
 1st of all, it is not uncommon to see an oil mark on the shaft. Unless there is a change in damping performance or excessive oil leaking from the shock it is most likely fine. For 2012, We developed a custom OE tune RC4 for LaPierre. There's no way of knowing what tune came in the shock you bought (unless it came from the same model year La Pierre bike). As far as settings go it often comes down to personal preference. When tuning suspension we always start with a sag measurement to get the correct spring rate and put the adjuster knobs in the middle of the setting range. If you can't find a setting you like, or the adjusters are at the extreme ends (fully closed or open) You can send the shock to your nearest service center to have the main piston re-valved to the original OE spec.
  • + 1
 Hi Fox team, I'm a really light weight guy, 133lbs. Using a steel purple spring in my 2011 Fox 40s, however whatever I do to the fork, it always feels rough when cycling through it's travel. Always kept my service intervals on time.
On the flipside, I try my friend's fork with a blue Ti spring and his 40 feels nice and supple, hitting the bumps feels much more rounded off compared to the "jagged edge" feeling of my fork.
Does that mean the "correct spring for rider weight" isn't necessarily all that for all cases?
  • + 1
 No, it sounds like you have the right spring. We would suggest looking at your low and high speed compression damping and consider running it out 16 on low speed and out 16 on high speed. That would be a good base setup to start from. A lighter rider may take lighter compression settings.
  • + 1
 Unless the spring is very unbalanced for the rider weight, it alone does not usually contribute to a "jagged edge" feeling or what we refer to as harshness when hitting bumps. Try backing off high and or low speed compression. For lighter spring rates, rebound can also contribute to this if it is set too slow the fork will "pack down"-ride deeper in the travel and feel harsh.
  • + 1
 Thankyou for the help, really appreciate this. Will give it a try!
  • + 1
 FOX-Factory, thanks for the advice, 16+ 16 as a base setup really worked for me.Just fine tuning the rear RC4 to match the front, but seems to be a gradual success. Cheers again!
  • + 1
 My DHX Air 5 shock is at a pretty high pressure in the main chamber and full in the boost valve and it is set to have a high bottom-out resistance but I'm still bottoming my shock out on relatively small drops and jumps however the current set up doesn't really soak up much and the shock feels as if it isn't really doing much through rough sections. Any suggestions to improve the shock's function? Cheers
  • + 1
 I've recently just bought the 2014 40 Float, and am finding that it feels numb (I can't really feel what my front tire doing). Is this something that I'll just have to play with, with my Low Speed compression damping and high speed compression damping? I've set both up in the middle, and keep on playing with it. Any guidance will help (I'm 230lbs, PSI is set at 70, which is 30% sag. Love the gnar in Whistler).
Cheers!
  • + 1
 30% sag is alot on the fork. We would recommend more in the 15-20% range for starters. Turning in the low speed compression will help support the front end but the first step is getting the pressure right.
  • + 2
 15-20% sag is interesting considering the type of fork...can you explain why the sag percentage is so small compared to other forks.
  • + 1
 I would love to hear why to, but too bad it was only a day thing. Wonder if my rear is supposed to be 15-20% with the DHX RC2..... and which way is "Turning in my Low Speed"???
  • + 1
 consider this for compression...righty tighty left loosey....turn it right it gets stiffer turn it left it goes softer.
  • + 1
 I ride a Santa Cruz Nomad now with DHX 5 air shock and 36 talas. Looking to build up another very similar this summer. Is the new Float X shock comparable in abilities, or should I keep my, or re-spec a DHX 5 Air? I'm 6'1 240lb and ride everything on this bike from xc loops with the wife to jumps and drops and gnar rock gardens with the boys.
  • + 1
 The new Float X is the perfect choice for your ride. It offers improved heat management, lighter weight, better oil flow for increased control, more on-the-fly adjustment, and a remote compatible option.
  • + 2
 Hi Tekko. I rode my v1.5 Nomad with DHX 5 for 5 years. Last fall I put an RP23 on it in Downieville for a run. Then, I demoed a Nomad carbon with CTD (set to trail). The difference was noticeable. The old bike with the RP23 felt very much like the carbon bike with the new shock.. well, much more so than the old bike with DHX Air. It felt like there was more travel. I think the DHX went too far into travel too easily and would stay in the midstroke more.. But if I added air, it would start to feel a little harsh..

Like the pros suggested: Yes, get the new shock for the new bike.. But, in the mean time, I'd suggest selling the DHX air and getting an RP23. If you buy a used shock, it won't be that much of a price difference, but you'll feel the improvement. It would be worth the $100 or so price difference. Or, just get the Float X and put your old shock back on when you sell it. Either way, you'll be stoked.
  • + 1
 On your forks 30 hour service interval, is that primarily for changing out the lower bath oil and cleaning the seals/wipers? And how often should I look into replacing and re-greasing the O-rings in the air sleeve, if at all? Riding a Float DRCV 32
  • + 1
 Service intervals for our forks and shocks can be found here: www.ridefox.com/service.php?m=bike&ref=topnavservice

30 hours is the bath oil service recommendation for forks. Air sleeve maintenance should also be done at that same 30 hour interval and that includes replacement rather than just cleaning of the air seals. You will need one additional o-ring that does not come as part of the standard air sleeve rebuild kit. The standard air seal kit is part number 803-00-142. The additional o-ring for DRCV shocks is part number 029-08-093.
  • + 1
 I'm in the market for a new fork, I've had some trouble deciding sofar between what brand to go for. I've decided if you can solve my riddle I will remain a loyal customer. FYI rockshox and Marz have been slow to respond to me asking them. This is your chance

Two men are found dead in a room, there is a table and 53 Bicycles on the floor. What happened to the men?
  • + 1
 They died!
  • + 2
 One of them was cheating at cards...
  • + 1
 I have a 2012 sx trail that I upgraded to rc2 and rc4. Do you guys have basic settings for rough bike park trails with roots and drops. I can set it for flowy trails but having a tough time setting for the above. I weigh 160 and run a 400# spring.
Thanks for your time
  • + 2
 Hi tvsmts, Yep, that's one of the biggest challenges. Getting it dialed for both conditions. At the World Cup level when a course has both conditions, such as Leogang, we set up the suspension on the firm side specific for the flow sections (which is stiff for efficiency) and the riders compensate in the rough sections with there conditioning. root setups will be much different tan drops. If you set it up specific for drops, it will not work very well in most other conditions.

Mark
  • + 1
 My Question: Why wouldn't you help me upgrage from a Fox Talas 32 150mm 1.5-steerer to a Fox Float 34 160 1.5-steerer?

You force me to go to the competition for a stiffer fork...
My stock Jekyll came with a 2012 32 Talas 150 and when I called Fox to purchase another fork which would suit m needs better (at a higher price point no less) I was told that you wouldn't help get into a 1.5 steerer fork?

Cannondale told me that I must call you and you just turned me away... Why not get a 1-1/8 steerer & a reducer you ask?
Ok well here it is...
Why would I?
The bike was engineered with a 1.5 headset, & when I asked Cannondale if using a reduvpcer would void my waranty shold something happen they said "Yes it definiately could! Anytime you stray from the engineered spec you could be giving up your right to a warranty repair."

Ok so you make the product for another model Jekyll but I am nit allowed to purchase it ANYWHERE.
I prefer to ride Fox but seems that Fox prefer I ride something else?

Best regards'
-Mike
  • + 1
 If you like to have your fork or shock Rebuild or custom tuning options go to mtbsuspensionexperts.com Most suspension jobs are completed within 5 business days after arrival at our shop. Our goal is to get you riding again as soon as possible.
  • + 1
 QUESTION: why in Poland (38 millions people couintry in middle of EU) there is only one distributor and official service?? This monopoly situation causes sick situations like lack of aviailablility of spare parts (distributor doesn`t sell it) and high service prices.
  • + 1
 We have only one distributor/service center representing FOX in each country in which we distribute our products.
  • + 2
 My wife is exactly the type of rider who really appreciates the 2013 CTD forks (small, light, cautious). Will the 2014 internals upgrade be a take-away for her, or will it still offer positive improvements?
  • + 1
 Hi burnben, both model years of CTD will work for her. She will appreciate the on the fly adjustment of both.
  • + 1
 My bike is a banshee rampant with a fox rp2 165mmx38mm,i need to route the rear brake hose through the shock mount.Does the shock require letting the air out of it before removing it,also is there a specific way of doing this or is it a straight forward job,thanks
  • + 1
 I have a 2012 40. (Purchased new) Upon initial installation after changing the spring I would have a rattle noise while riding. I tried repositioning the shrink tubing on the spring many times, but to no avail. Also put previous spring in and produced same noise. I put a small piece of shrink tubing from different spring at the top and the noise stopped. Is this a suitable fix, and have you come across this before?
  • + 1
 As coil springs compress, they can bow outward at different points along their length. Some springs are super quiet with the shrink-wrap isolator in the middle, while some springs bow in different places and would benefit from having the shrink-wrap closer to one end or another. In any case, you should not use more than the specified length of shrink-wrap on one spring.
  • + 1
 I rode a very rough trail last week with deep "pockets" all over, and I found my fork diving a lot. I've always had my fork at 45 psi and never had any problems with it until that time. I must've OTB'd about 3 times actually. Could it be that 45psi is actually too low for me, or do I just need some more LSC?

I have a 2010 36 TALAS with 45psi of air and one click of LSC. I weigh about 150 lbs fully loaded.
  • + 1
 I have a 32mm CTD on a Trek Remedy that just *feels* like its not stiff enough for true all mountain trails (drops, hops, boulders ,etc). I want to upgrade to a 34mm, but is it going to give me a substantially stiffer feel? BTW, kudos for not needing a new oil seal for almost 3500miles. Just replaced and good as new.
  • + 2
 Absolutely, the 34 will feel stiffer and raise the front end geometry a little. Should be a great upgrade for the drops, hops, and boulders. Thanks for the kudos, good to hear positive service stories once in a while.
  • + 1
 I'm a big guy(6'-1" 230lb) and I'm having a tough time setting up my 40 float. I'm running 30% sag at 95psi. I love a firm feeling setup but can't seem to find that sweet spot. I also have a 2013 36 float on my Ibis mojo hd that is perfect. Any tuning advice would be great. The 40 is on a 2012 Santa Cruz V10. Thanks again.
  • + 1
 when pumping up shocks or forks, unscrewing the pump, how much air pressure is lost, is there a recommended value to over inflate to get the actual pressure you want in your shock/fork? Trial & error? Or is there a chart for each product?
  • + 3
 The air noise that you hear is air pressure being released from the shock pump. A properly working pump will not allow any air release from the shock or fork itself because the shrader valve is closed before the shock pump is disengaged. When you put the pump back on the shock or fork, the air pressure must fill the shock pump to register on the gauge. Filling the shock pump increases the air volume, which decreases the air pressure - so it seems as though the shock or fork has lost air. Pumps may vary by a few psi so we recommend using the same pump every time so you get a consistent air pressure setting.
  • + 2
 No pressure is lost when you unscrew the Air Pump from the shock or fork. You will lose air pressure when you re-attach the pump to the shock or fork.
  • + 1
 @FOX guys and gals:

about DH fork suspension, is it advisable to change fork oil weights in the cartridge to adjust damping?
if ever can you help me what will be the effect to low/hi speed compression and rebound.. pros and con of using thicker than stock and thinner than stock... "please and thank you"s..
  • + 2
 Hi pauch, changing the oil weight will make a very little difference. What difference it does make effects low speed damping. Mark
  • + 2
 We don't recommend this. Our damper internals (seals, bladder, valving) are designed to work with our damping fluid. To achieve different damping forces outside the range of the adjusters requires revalving.

Oil viscosity has the greatest impact on the low speed orifice circuits (rebound and compression). The viscosity of the oil effects when flow chokes at the orifice. Once flow at the orifice chokes the valves on the piston open (controlling damping at the higher shaft speeds). The thinner the fluid the higher the shaft speed required to achieve choke flow at the orifice and vice versa. Valves are relatively unaffected by oil viscosity. Another aspect to consider is fade. As oil temperature increases it gets thinner. Typically, the viscosity of a thinner oil is more stable over temperature and, therefore, less susceptible to fade.
  • + 1
 thanks that clears up alot of things... well better getting it back to stock hehehehe thanks again..
  • + 1
 3 questions:
Mainly for Bryan Anderson I guess. Will fox ever design an open bath style fork? All my open bath zokeys required servicing about 1 every 12 months. I liked this for UK riding. Don't get me wrong my Fox forks are waaay lighter and perform great but the current designs are not that hot for UK (Scotland) riders in terms of servicing life.
2: I read that I should do an air can service on my rear float every 15 hours. I like to do the odd 24 hour race - Is it ok to do this now and again on my float shock?
3: I have a new Fox Evolution Series 32 Float w/CTD that came on my Trek Stache. Its a lot of fun but the CTD seems to have 3 options (C:lock out T:work ok but a touch soft D: Blow through the travel.) I have the correct air pressure in the spring leg. What can I do to improve this performance? In the C position there is a bit of a clunk when I squish the fork through a weight shift. Is this normal?
  • + 1
 My gf has an 2012 Trance 2 XW w/ a Float 32 fork and Float R shock with medium tuning. She is 110 w/ gear and below the tuning threshold for both. I swapped out the oil in the fork for 2.5wt and that helped on both compression and rebound. As far as the frame shock, the rebound is full out (fastest setting) and at the minimum pressure. It is unresponsive to all but the biggest bumps. Do you have light tuned Floats? Do I have to send this in for a custom tune? Seems like an XS bike should have had the proper tuned shocks for a light rider from the factory.
  • + 1
 hello fox long time fan! ive always wanted fox shox on everything i have. i have a 2012 santa cruz heckler. it has a float rl in the rear.
i have to keep it a lil hard so it wont bottom out as easy. do to it being a single pivot it spikes at the end of the travel. any tuning tips
like valve, new piston, more fluid ect? just want it to ramp up more at the end and have more small bump compliance. thank you guys very much. hope get more of your guys product some day. hoping to get shocks for my jeep some day!
  • + 2
 Sounds like an air volume adjustment might be what you need. Decreasing the air volume with a clip in volume spacer will give the spring curve progression to prevent hard bottom out while allowing lower pressure at ride height. Check out our quick tech page here for more info.

service.foxracingshox.com/consumers/Content/Service/QuickTech/FloatAirSpringSpacerProc.htm
  • + 1
 @ Fox, I just installed the new SKF seals on my 36 float 160, and I have two questions. First, why are the new seals so much more expensive than the old ones? Second, I seem to be getting more dirt buildup on the top of the dust wipers, there seems to be a physical gap, very tiny, but still more than the old seals. Picture here if helpful: www.pinkbike.com/photo/9814848
  • + 1
 The gap you see is actually the chamfer that leads into the dirt exclusion lip.
  • + 1
 Are you planning to ever launch more forks for street/dirt/park cause it wold be so cool if there would be a fox on 36 mm chassis with 80-120 mm travel and with a "FOX"level reliability in strenght and performance?sry for bad english somewhere mby
  • + 1
 What would be your recommend settings for a 2013 carbon SC Nomad w/ Push linkage

Weight is 205 with gear

What would you say for the settings for 180 Talas and for dhx rc4 (also what spring rate) I feel like the bike sits lower with the new link but seems to be in the range for sag (currently have a 450 spring on it)

Hi compression, low compression, bottom out psi etc...

I dig how well its set up now except for braking bumps (still feels a bit harsh through those sections)

Thanks for doing this q&a btw
  • + 1
 do you sell a shock smiler too my dhx 5.0 9.5 x 3in stroke i have a newer karpiel disco frame but your cartridge is too big too fit in my linkage i want a newer shock but i need the dhx 5.0 cartridge dimension a external cartridge would work too one with a braided line any ides a list of compatible shocks would be great thank you i have been running your shocks since 2003 and they just keep working
  • + 1
 Our records show that bike originally shipped with a Vanilla RC, which is a product that we discontinued when we released the DHX line in 2005. It sounds like you've uprgraded to a DHX 5.0 that fits. We currently offer the similarly named Van RC in the aftermarket that is a little larger than the original "Vanilla RC" but should easily fit in the same packaging envelope as the DHX 5.0.
  • + 1
 the vanilla rc is the original for the older discos but the new frames do run the bigger shock they made limited numbers of them from 08 too 2011 so the dhx 5.0 is the correct shock for the newer discos they changed the linkage around its dhx 5.0 x 9.5 x 3.00 and the proper spring weight for a 180lb rider is 350lb spring if you wanted to use that for your records i have both frames the 2003 frame uses a 8.75 x 2.5 with a 550 too 600 lb for a 180lb rider i was looking at the van rc i just wanted more adjustments for the bike it is a high end race frame that loves too go mach speeds if you check my profile i have pics of my bike on it
  • + 1
 Don't know if this question thing is over yet, but I'm approx 150, 5'10, ride an 2011 SX trail and I have the stock RC Shock on the back, like to ride it a little stiffer than normal. (At the moment I'm riding with a 450 pound spring) As well as the 2011 van 180 on the front. Adjustment advice? Spring Advice? Thanks guys!
  • + 1
 Hi Fox!! I recently fell in love with your products when i felt a 2012 40, which had no stiction and amazing small bump, better than anything I had felt before. So I went ahead and bought the mini 40, the VAN 160mm for my trek slash. I weigh 135, and I was wondering if I should switch to the extra soft spring from the regular soft spring. Im not the most aggressive rider, and I only go through about 2/3 of the travel on it no matter how hard I shred it on the trail. I also have both the low and high speed compression set all the way to 0.
What would you AMAZING people recommend for the coil and general trail compression settings for a person of my weight?

Also, what is you favorite coffe bean for espresso? Mine is Verve which is roasted in Santa Cruz. Smile
  • + 1
 Hello,

I often go on races with a very qualified fork preper from "Novyparts" I've had the last two Fox 40s and the last 2012 I was disapointed on how it reacted on the first few months, it's been serviced by pro in the south of France and the result was almost there. It has now been a year, three services later.

When I gave my fork to "Novyparts" it just blew my mind, the fork was reacting faster, more sensitive, and didn't plunge when I was hitting 15m gaps, I've been racing for some time only seconds away from podiums and this season I wish I got it preped earlier.

Why is it that your forks NEVER seem to work as on Pro or Semi Pro videos ? And no it's not just the speed, I hope there are plans for some FOX dialing kits for enhancement of the Hydraulics
  • + 1
 Fox Engineers: any comments regarding the high volume piston modification for Float/Talas models? Push Tuning offer this service but the DIY piston rod shortening looks pretty straightforward.

I currently have a 2011 Float 36 R 160mm on my AM bike and at 80kg am struggling to use more than 120mm of the travel at 65psi. If I drop to about 40psi but then I use all of it but the brake-dive is intolerable. I've got some heavier oil on its way to try to slow down the compression so I can hopefully run low pressure with less dive but the next step might be to shorten the air piston rod to make things more linear and hopefully use more travel at higher pressures. I guess you'll say to avoid this but the forks are out of their warranty period and the procedure seems OK. Could you recommend how much to shorten it by? 10-30mm seems to be the consensus, and if the result isn't good then I could always just add more Float Fluid in the air chamber to reduce the volume again, right? I might think of an RC2 damper conversion next year but cash won't allow that right now!

Thanks.
  • + 1
 We can't recommend that you modify your fox products even though it is out of the warranty period. We can't give you a recommendation for how short to cut the rod.
  • + 2
 I nicked 20mm off a F120 shaft. Really brought the fork to life for my purposes. Results will vary.
  • + 1
 set up for a devinci wilson carbon for somebody that doesnt rides very smooth but fast Big Grin ?
im 90 kg im currently using a 300 Ti RCS spring on my RC4(2012 non kashima)..
And concerning forks..I work on a bike shop and we have a lot of fox forks that even brand new need to be serviced directly because they just dont work... happens with some shocks too... you forks used to be very high quality..too bad the quality is not fully there anymore..
  • - 1
 Suspension Center in Switzerland will be able to help you
  • + 1
 ahahahahhahahahahahhahahhahahahhahahh awesome answer!
  • + 1
 Dear Fox,
Since your forks are fairly expensive and seem to wear through quickly without proper maintenance, what do you recommend as the best way to properly maintain your fork? I live in the Northwest and it rains a lot here; I ride at least 5 times a week generally in the rain during the winter and occasionally in the summer. Assuming those conditions, what should I do to service my fork and how often should I service it to protect it as long as possible?
Thank You
  • + 1
 We recommend that you clean the exterior of your fork and shock after every ride with a soft cloth and mild detergent or isopropyl alcohol. This is incredibly important so the product doesn't have an opportunity to ingest excessive contamination. Riding in the wet or dry/dusty conditions might push you outside of our regular 30 hour oil change interval. I would recommend carefully inspecting your fork during your first scheduled bath oil change to see if you are a rider in an environment that would need more frequent service than our standard recommendation.
  • + 1
 Hey Fox,
I just bought a brand spankin new Specialized Carve Pro which came with one of your CTD forks. Unfortunately for me, after purchasing it and putting some hours on it, I have found that my fork, is actually not as great as i thought it would be, and a feature that had sounded great in the shop (CTD) is actually a total burden to the performance of my fork.
I have heard you are a company that stands behind your product, so please enlighten me as to what steps I should take to get the xc trail performance that I want from my Fox product.

Thanks for your time eh!
  • + 1
 What performance issues are you having?
  • + 1
 Fox,
I love your products! Really don't know what to say just let you know that i'm a big Fox fan!
just suspension as it is is just cool Smile technique, 1.000.000 ways of tuning, fork oil smells sweet, and it's a precise job Smile

3
  • + 2
 Thanks a million. Shox need love too.
  • + 1
 Hi Fox,
I recently came across some PUSH "reducers" for my Fox RP23 DRCV SHOCK.... they are supposed to reduce the bottoming out while allowing the rider to use a softer setting, or simply add less pressure to the shock. My question is, are they safe to install and use without causing any damage ? . Since my shock is very restricted to Trek it's are very hard to come by products that are FOX/DRCV(trek) related I don't really know what to think. Also Lower the prices ha just kidding, thanks for putting that amount of thought and tech into the products.
  • + 1
 Also one of the O rings that comes with the Float rebuild, doesn't fit my shock Frown it always breaks when I close it
  • + 1
 Spacers are safe to install. Please carefully follow the instructions to avoid blocking the plunger rod.
I assume you're referring to the main air sleeve o-ring? If you're using a standard FLOAT rebuild kit the main air sleeve o-ring is not compatible with DRCV. You'll need FOX P/N 029-08-093, which is not part of the kit.
  • + 1
 I have read that the new CTD remote lever is not combinable with the first generation CTD remote forks and shocks? So is there no way of comining, for example, a first gen float 34(original on Canyon Strive 9.0AL race) with the new float X rear shock, using the same remote lever?
  • + 1
 To achieve proper lever force with the MY2014 shorter throw lever we reduced the spring rate of the return spring in the fork damper. The new remote will work with MY2013 CTD fork damper, but the lever force will be higher than designed and may be objectionable to some users. There is also an option to purchase the MY2013 remote that will also work with a FLOAT X.
  • + 1
 Hi there FOX.

I have a set of 2010 FOX 40 RC2s, (and love them BTW :-) ) but I have a slight issue with them. The lower nut on the spring side doesn't want to tighten up. After doing an oil change, seal change etc, everything goes back together nicely, but when I go to tighten that nut, it snugs up a little bit, and then the bolt starts turning with it at about 20 inch lbs. I know that I'm not cross threading, so why would the bolt turn with the nut? So far, it has not been an issue, (no oil leaking etc.) but since you guys are the people that manufactured it, I figured I might as well ask you!

Thanks,

Matt
  • + 1
 If the plunger shaft is spinning when you try to tighten the bottom nut, you should try compressing the fork with the spring installed while tightening. The spring should help bind up the assembly and stop the shaft from spinning so you can torque the bottom nut to the full 50 in-lb. Make sure that all your parts are clean and that you're using a new crush washer every time.
  • + 1
 With various after market services available why doesn't fox just put these improvements Into its production shocks giving us better out of the box performance.
I know body weight and leverages can't be accounted for but lower friction parts or improved speed sensitive dampers could be implemented in a stock tune.

Why is only the middle spring rate ti for forks?

Is fox still looking at USD forks for the future?
  • + 1
 Hi,
I'm 13 years old and race DH. I only weigh 103lbs but I ride pretty aggressive. I had an RC4 8.75 x 2.75 and ran a 250 x 2.8 spring but it only gave me about 20% sag on my Specialized Status. So, I ended up switching to a RS Vivid Air. When will you guys have a DH air shock or make a lighter spring for Groms?
  • + 1
 To be honest fox products preform well but who wants to pay that much for s fork that is going to wear out and need hundreds of pounds spent on them, we no u can produce a product that preforms and last over time. Stop being greedy and make a product that Lasts, not everyone want to service there fork after every ride.
  • + 1
 Hi fox.

Im currently running a drcv rp3 on my trek slash 9. My pro pedal dosnt seem to work. In fact it has never worked since i bought the bike(7 weeks ago)

Iv contacted my fox service center and he told my thats just the way the drcv is. Surly thats not correct, is it? there is no difference in stiffness from off to pro pedal fully on. Its killing me on the climbs and bottoming out on the descents

Look forward to your reply
Kyle
  • + 1
 I have a 2011 36 160 float. It has been great but recently had it serviced (new seals and oil). Now it feels terrible. Does not use all the travel. When the rebound is on lower settings it make a thud noise when the wheel is lifted off the ground. The shop that serviced the fork went back through and put oil in at proper levels a second time and everything is together seemingly correct. Fork has low hours and just want it to be back to normal again any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
  • + 1
 Hi Csmitty, the thud noise you are hearing can happen when the pressure is set high and the rebound is full open (counterclockwise) or close to it. Reset your pressure at 20% sag and your rebound in the middle of the range.
  • + 1
 Hi Fox,
I recently purchased a Fox CTD 34 for my bike, but you guys have updated the internals and i think it is the right move. But i cant help wondering why don't you guys offer the upgrade with a special price for customers which already owns the previous product so that it will not cost so much to the consumer?
Can i install a CTD remote onto the Float X CTD and Fox 34 Talas 29er Fork? Is there any special care for kashima coating?
  • + 0
 Yes, you can install a 2014 CTD remote with a Float X and 34 TALAS 29er. As for special care on Kashima parts, wipe down the fork with a dry rag or wash with mild soap water solution.
  • + 1
 why does fox as a company make it so difficult for a shop to service your forks other than dust wipers. My current issue with fox is the lack of support to the bike shop when compared to sram. It seems to me that if a fox fork has issues other than old dirty dust wipers we have to send it back to you leaving the customer bike-less for the weeks or months it takes to get the shock or fork back. For me as a mechanic it gets annoying that i could fix a fork or shock if the parts were available to an authorized dealer. Rockshox has made it clear and simple that all of there forks are serviceable by getting the parts through a major distributor like quality. I am not bashing you guys at all, just trying to get answers. cheers.
  • + 3
 Fork parts are available to all users including authorized dealers. Any shop can purchase any tools, seals, parts, or complete replacement damper systems to do just about any service job on most FOX forks. For warranty issues, we need the opportunity to see the products so we can learn from the issues and fix them at no charge.
  • + 1
 Hi, once again questions regarding the inverted 40: have you considered an arch unit similar to the CTA unit found on the DVO Emerald? Do you think pro-riders would have found a positive difference in the fork's stiffness, if such a unit has been put on the fork?
  • + 1
 I weight 150 lbs. and would like to know how i should adjust my suspension. I ride rocky, somewhat steep terrain with booters, mostly at windrock in oliver springs, Tenn. in the rear i have a 2010/2011 fox dhx rc4 with stock 400x3.25 steel spring. In the front i have a 2012 fox 40 with fit cartridge and titanium medium spring. I would like to know how some of you adjust suspension for optimal performance. Thanks!
  • + 1
 Why didn't I heed the warnings and avoid fox 2013 crp. My new enduros float 34 was broken out of the box, not even one ride on it. The shop says the rebound cartridge is faulty. Brand new expensive junk that I can't ride. First and last fox products for me and probably a trip to consumer affairs in Australia. Screw you guys for shipping this. Specialized, why did you bolt this on.
  • + 1
 ive got one why are they so expensive for a sticker from a riders point of view company's like your self are meant to help out with costing I know you guys need to make profit and money ect but I run argyle rtcs and they run just as nice if not nicer than the 36 and look at the price difference for the younger people within mtb your asking a lot for people to buy forks from you and loosing your self a lot of business to company's like rock shox that make them cheaper and just as good
  • + 1
 Hi Fox: I have a 2011 Giant Glory with a Fox DHX RC4 rear shock. I weigh 63kg and am quite smooth on the bike. I'm currently running a 450X2.80 coil with all the compression and bottom out settings on 0. Should I get a lighter coil and use my shock's settings or stick with the 450 as it has worked for me time and again. Thanks!
  • + 2
 A 400 or 450 lbs/in spring fall within the range of your weight. There are a number of set up variables that can change which combo will deliver you the desired sag.

A general sag recommendation on the rear would be 25-30% but please consult Giant's recommendation.

Generally speaking, a firmer spring set up with lighter damping will provide a more lively/snappy feel while a lighter spring with more damping (assuming you don't push it too far) will provide a softer more planted feel. Experimenting with different set ups can be a great learning experience and we do it with our athletes all the time. The right set up is up to you and which best meets your needs and riding style.