Field Test: Trek Remedy 9.9

Dec 6, 2018
by Mike Levy  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Trek Remedy 9.9

"This is one of the few 150mm bikes that I'd be happy to do huge days on."

Words by Mike Levy, photography by Trevor Lyden



Trek's Remedy platform was first introduced way back in 2008, and since then it's been their ready-for-anything all-mountain machine with enough travel to get you out of trouble, but not enough to keep you from wanting to pedal it thousands of feet up into the alpine. That rings true for the latest version, too, and while the 2019 Remedy sure looks similar to its predecessors, it sports some noteworthy changes in the geometry and suspension departments.

The Remedy's rear wheel travel still sits at 150mm, with 160mm on tap up front from a Fox Factory 36 Float fork with the impressive GRIP2 damper. It's also rolling on 27.5'' hoops and high-volume 2.6'' rubber, making it one of the few rigs in the Field Test that isn't on big wheels. There's even enough room for a 2.8'' wide tire on the back of the Remedy, but those who prefer 29ers should look at the enduro-focused Slash.

Remedy 9.9 Details

Travel: 150mm
Wheel size: 27.5''
Frame construction: carbon fiber
Head angle: 65.5 / 66-degrees
Chainstay length: 435mm
Sizes: 15.5, 17.5, 18.5, 19.5, 21.5''
Weight: 29.1 lb (13.2 kg)
Price: $6,999 USD
More info: www.trekbikes.com
Trek’s 'Knock Block' headset has a built-in stop to keep the fork from spinning around and hitting the downtube, a downtube that’s in the way because they say that frame rigidity is increased if it runs straight from the headtube to the bottom bracket. Another detail is the Mino Link pivot hardware that joins the rocker link and seatstays; you can rotate the hardware to change the head angle by half a degree and the bottom bracket height by 7mm.

On to the numbers. Compared to the previous version, the new Remedy gets half a notch taken off the head-tube angle to sit at 65.5-degrees in the slackest setting, and a 1-degree steeper seat angle.

At the back end, Trek has stuck with their Active Braking Pivot suspension. The rear pivot rotates concentrically around the axle, with them saying that it’s designed to “keep the rear suspension working while braking.” But while ABP is still around, the shock’s lower mount is no longer on an extension off the front of the chainstays. Instead, it’s bolted to the front triangle and not floating. The reasoning comes back to rigidity, again, with this layout said to offer improved numbers over the Full Floater that they've touted since 2008.




Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden
Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden


Climbing

Pretty much all of these enduro-ish type things pedal well enough to satisfy most people's needs, but do they really feel like a proper trail bike on the ascents? Hell no, but the 2019 Remedy comes close. Despite that praise, it isn't because of its ho-hum pedaling manners that are topped by plenty of other bikes of similar travel. I even hit the pedal-assist crutch lever a few times, something that kills a tiny piece of me everytime I do it.

But while the efficiency is average-ish, the Remedy's climbing manners are, in general, very impressive. A lot of other 150mm bikes are heavily skewed towards the descent, but the blacked-out Trek delivers easy-to-live-with handling on the most technical of climbs. By that, I mean that the climbs are noticeably easier when aboard the Remedy than when riding the other 150mm-ish bikes in the test stable.

Relatively speaking, it's easy to get the Remedy around the tightest of switchbacks, and it was rare to run out of real estate or be forced to dab. All of the traction is there, too, with the 2.6'' wide Bontrager SE4 tires impressing in the ultra-loose late-summer conditions to the wet roots and slick dirt that came later in the Field Test. It's not exactly a dainty gazelle at a smidge over 29 pounds, but the apparently Air Wolf-themed Trek feels pretty quick. In fact, if it were possible, I might guess that I was aboard a trail bike in a blind test.


Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden

Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden
Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden


Descending

Look elsewhere if you want an enduro rig that's eager to turn descents into Mexican-style boxing matches; the Remedy is far more of a tactician's bike than other 150mm-travel machines. Sure, with that much suspension you're going to get a hall pass on a lot of terrain, no matter what, but the Trek definitely responds best to a rider who knows the benefits of being smooth and choosing the best lines. The flip-side is that it's lacking that 'Get outta my way' presence that the new Bronson or SB150 have, although neither of those can match the Remedy in the agility department.

The Remedy's suspension feels a lot like past versions, with it leaning more towards an active ride instead of firming up from chain loads. This can be a good thing when it comes to traction, of course. There are deeper feeling 150mm layouts and shock combos, no doubt about that, but Trek seems to have worked-in more support that helps keep the bike up in its travel.

And speaking of handling, the Remedy really underlines the gap between an enduro bike and what I'd call an all-mountain bike. The SB150 is certainly the former, and I'd argue that the new Bronson leans more towards that side of the fence as well. While the Remedy is still a very, very capable bike, a less daring rider descending nasty, scary trails will go faster when he's aboard the big Yeti or a Slash. It's only on the roughest or steepest sections where those two will pull ahead, and I suspect that the Remedy closes the gap anytime things are nearer to horizontal, especially for the more average among us.

The Remedy ain't for the Four Loko slamming, Pit Viper wearing endur-bro who rides and acts like every day on the bike is an enduro race and fancies himself too fast to bother using a damn landing. No, the Remedy is a thinking rider's 150mm-travel bike that's happy on rowdy trails and that you'll be happy to be on during an all-day epic. I can't say that about many other 150mm-travel bikes.


Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden

Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden


Pros

+ Versatile, well-rounded package
+ Impressive suspension performance
+ More of a long-legged trail bike than a bruiser
Cons

- Knock Block is silly
- Run of the mill pedaling manners
- More of a long-legged trail bike than a bruiser



353 Comments

  • + 363
 Before these comments get to long I want to post my appreciation for these reviews. Some criticisms and nit picking here and there, but overall great job and I look forward to each one.
  • + 123
 Thanks, stoked you're into them Smile
  • + 18
 I definitely agree. It is great to see some of the most popular new bikes being put up against each other! Love the content. I don't understand much of the criticism that PB reviewers get..
  • + 25
 I'm particularly excited by the lack of fear to say that many of them are not that great, which makes my wallet feel a little less twitchy.
  • + 5
 Same here. I'm not in the market for any of these bikes but I'm still enjoying the videos.
  • + 11
 @mikelevy: Just curious on what you think makes a race bike. You've mentioned that none of the bikes reviewed so far would be good for racing. Is it wheelsize or wheelbase or some overall feel that is not well represented by any individual number? Comparing this (not a race bike) to the Slash (a race bike) the travel is the same and the geo numbers are almost the same except a bit longer reach on the Remedy and a bit longer wheelbase on the Slash.

Regardless, I think there is a huge market for these non-race mountain bikes (whatever we call them now).

enjoying this review style. The videos are very good. (Watched the Bronson one several times just to see Alex smash those corners!)
  • + 15
 I would appreciate the same types of reviews and videos for bikes of much lesser cost.

A field test of bikes under CAD $3,500 (USD $2,600) would be ideal.
  • + 5
 Agreed, this is my favorite bike content on the internet at the moment. Nice job guys, you are talented writers.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Thanks Mike! Does this have the strange shock length that the older slash model had preventing you from using any other shock then the one is comes with?
  • - 5
flag bohns1 (Dec 5, 2018 at 12:35) (Below Threshold)
 @gdharries: Hey boy! We only Dentist steeds round these parts, Ya heard!
  • + 23
 @gdharries: Stay tuned - we have a more budget-friendly test segment coming too.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: I'm totally hooked on these field tests! I think they're the best thing out there right now.
  • + 1
 +1 to the praise. These are just top-notch, production values, writing and all. Thanks!
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: Field Test reviews are all time! Possibly even better than the advent calendar giveaways Smile When is the man RC debuting in one?
  • + 2
 @jarrod801: It is running a 230 x 57.5 shock so 2.5 mm different than what most companies offer, though Fox, Rockshox, CaneCreek, Formula, and pretty much all the other big guys are offering multiple options for the Trek OEM spacing. I've also seen people successfully run that 2.5 mm longer eye to eye on Trek's full suspension bikes.
  • + 2
 @ctwheeler: It's not the eye to eye that is the problem 230mm is the eye to eye, and there are plenty of makes at that size. The 57.5mm stroke is the problem, but going up to 60mm, the most common 230mm shock stroke, does "work" but I wager the end of stroke suspension kinematics would be different. Don't think it would hurt to experiment and try out.
  • + 10
 @Climbtech: Geo, suspension action, tires, etc.. I know loads of people who love their Slash for everyday riding, and that's great. Same goes for the Remedy, too. But a degree here, an extra 10mm there, and all of a sudden one bike is pretty different from the other. I couldn't care less if a less skilled rider prefers the Slash on the smoothest terrain in the world, or if the Remedy wins EWS races, but the differences between the two bikes mean that one is better suited to a certain job than the other Smile
  • + 9
 @BenPea: Noted! I feel like we've been saying the same things in our older-style, longform reviews, but I think it's much more prominent when we're standing in front of a camera saying it. Shorter and more to the point.
  • + 6
 @gdharries: We'll be doing more of these in the future. There are a ton more bikes from Field Test #1 still to come up, including some less expensive bikes as well.
  • + 3
 @gdharries: I think a lot of their 'findings' can apply to the cheaper models of the bike, a remedy 8 will ride similar to the 9.9
  • + 4
 @iMountainBike: Thanks! RC's are coming up soon.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: so, which of them were not that great? I don't remember reading a review saying the bike tested was mediocre.
  • + 6
 @mikelevy: I agree, knock block is terrible. But I have a workaround, Trek gives you a very safe distance between the top cap of the fork and the down tube on full lock. A couple minutes with a Dremel and the knock block limits and you can get a few more degrees of steering out of this bike, which is very handy. Having said that, the idea that I have to get a Dremel out to FIX my 10,000$ bike is ridiculous. You didn't touch on it in the video( I haven't read the review yet), The control freak cable routing in Treks Straight shot down tube is one of the most frustrating things I've ever fought with. I love trek bikes, I've ridden many of them, and I am very seriously considering a Remedy as my bike for this season. But Trek and most of the bike industry need to follow suit with Santa Cruz and get there internal cable routing sorted out. End of Rant.

Two of the three bikes I am looking at for spring are being covered in your reviews, I'm finding your insights very helpful.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: me too, thanx!!
  • + 1
 @Climbtech: great question, was wondering the same
  • + 6
 @gdharries: Agreed, most guys I ride with are in the $1500-$3000 price range. I enjoy all these reviews but love the budget ones as well. Like the Marin Hawk Hill.
  • + 0
 @mikelevy: but you can't have something that's both a pro and a con.
  • + 0
 @bookem13: it's called a magnet. Try using one. Easy peasy.
  • + 2
 @bookem13: what if they supply the Dremel? Have bikes always had this problem of levers hitting the TT or is it a short-HT issue that has come around with bigger wheels?
  • + 1
 @f00bar: Stumpy's a bit disappointing going up. Kona's a bit twitchy going down at speed, which for a 153 mm 29er isn't great. Remedy: "Run of the mill pedaling manners", despite being "long-legged rather than a bruiser".

Also, Levy sees the need to use the climb switch as a drawback and believes this should not be a requirement on this kind of bike. I'll take his word for it, even if it doesn't bother me on my bike (which has 170mm-ish out back, is old and worth very little, so I have nothing to grumble about and have low expectations).

At these prices and at this stage of bike evolution, these bikes need to nail what they're looking to do.
  • + 2
 @T-woot:
I don't think that's what he's referring to. There's a hole in the downtube which requires you to insert a zip tie to go over the cables (3 of them) and then come out so you can cinch it tight.

I've done it myself and it's a PITA. And no magnet can help plus the space is tiny.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: It's not the Lever that would hit, its the top of the crown, hitting the underside of the downtube in a crash, or as @mikelevy said, in a tight tech turn the bars not turning enough to make the maneuver.
  • + 1
 @CavemanGypsy72: You're absolutely right and that's exactly what I meant. Either way, speaking from experience when I say that the 210 x 55 DPX2 works wonders on the Fuel EX and the 230 x 60 X2 works equally well on the Slash.
  • + 1
 @T-woot: I wish it were that easy, I really do. I had to fashion a hook out of a spoke and catch all the cables with it then hold it in place while I threaded a pre-curved zip tie in and then very carefully grab it with tiny needle nose pliers. I wouldn't say its impossible, but it sure isn't quick and easy. the hole you have to work in is small, trying to get tools in there and thread a zip tie, just plain sucks. As for using a magnet....a zip tie isn't magnetic, so you're not pulling it around the cables inside that way. The cables and housing are all in part made with some metal inside them( maybe not a hydro line from a reverb), as soon as you have a magnet near them they get pulled around and in the situation where the cables are all run and you just need to tie them down so they are quiet, it doesn't help.
  • + 3
 @BenPea: Sure I can. It's a pro for some and a con for others, and listing it that way makes it obvious.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: dammit, you're one step ahead.
  • + 2
 @bookem13: Good idea on the modification - it's something that I would do for sure Smile
  • + 1
 @mikelevy, I'm really liking these reviews and appreciate the photos of the bikes under ful compression! Thanks!
  • + 0
 @bookem13: I have a 2019 remedy 9.9. currently my 5th remedy. Using a magnet or Park's magnet driven internal routing tool makes internal routing incredibly easy. Not sure how you guys are having a hard time. Control freak is easy.
  • + 1
 @T-woot: I work as a tech in a Trek retailer and have done internal cable jobs a tonne. Control freak is easily the worse cable management I’ve had to work with. Tiny ports may look tidy, but fishing around for cables inside the frame can take long frustrating hours even with the Park kit magnet. A good example of good internal routing is Pivot or Norco.
  • + 1
 @m47h13u: You're doing it wrong somehow.
  • + 2
 @FisherFreerider: of course I suck as a mechanic because Trek would never engineer something like internal routing with tiny ports on giant hollow tubes. Somehow though, on some other brands I don’t even have to use tools to do it. Must be that I’ve been doing it wrong all this time and not crap design.
  • + 1
 @m47h13u: I've never had enough problems to get all internet mad about it...
  • + 2
 @T-woot: getting the cables down the tube is easy enough, and yes a magnet helps plenty. but getting them wrapped in the middle zip tie to hold them from rattling around is my complaint. no amount of magnets or park cable routing guides will help.
  • + 74
 @mikelevy : " I even hit the pedal-assist crutch lever a few times, something that kills a tiny piece of me everytime I do it. "

Why?
Because you're a purist?
Why is dropper lever for downs a great idea while proposal lever for ups a terrible one?
  • + 12
 "...I mean that the climbs are noticeably easier when aboard the Remedy than when riding the other 150mm-ish bikes in the test stable."

Is this because @mikelevy "even hit the pedal-assist crutch lever"? (aka the bit of tech designed for exactly this purpose). Maybe that lever should be used more frequently on climbs since that's what it's there for. I'm not sure why we expect bikes to climb and descend perfectly when we're not properly using the components we so desperately require.
  • + 1
 This.
I always think "then go ride a steel rigid 26"!" Those knobs are there for a reason and not using them is silly.
  • + 2
 HAHA right! Or fork out a ton of cash and get live valve active suspension. Ya im ok with reaching down sometimes.
  • + 7
 @es7ebanlv: IMO an enduro bike should pedal well when fully unlocked.. During enduro races you will have to pedal, there likely will be uphill bits in stages and you will not be reaching for a lockout during these moments. I agree with Levy for this reason
  • + 1
 Yeah, that was a cringey comment from Mike Levy, for sure
  • + 35
 @pakleni @grntnckl @es7ebanlv @Rstetina @Ryanrobinson1984

Because the bikes shouldn't need a cheater switch, that's why. I get it - the switch is easy to hit and instantly makes every bike efficient. That's a pretty cool trick.

Okay, so every single bike has a pedal-assist switch that firms them all up so now they're all efficient and there's not much to say about it. But just imagine how well our bikes would pedal if those dumb switches were never invented? The switches are a crutch for designs that have forfeited the ability to pedal efficiently in favor of active suspension, which is just fine for a lot of people. But bikes can be better; there are long-travel rigs that don't need dumb climb switches, with the big Polygon and any full-suspension Mondraker coming to mind, among others. There are tradeoffs, no doubt about that, but a lever that keeps your suspension from working isn't a solution. It's a crutch. I want my 150mm to pedal relatively well while remaining completely active and open.

Also, we shouldn't need expensive electronics to get it done.
  • + 1
 @Ryanrobinson1984: Thinking about ditching the Norco ehhh?
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: what does @KNOLLYBIKES have to say about efficient/climb switch combination ?
  • + 1
 @gnarnaimo: True of the climb sections on an Enduro timed stage, they will be relatively short though and so there should be no need to flip ones' shock switch to Pedal Mode. On the between stage Enduro climbs though, well a different story and Ride Open, Flipped to Pedal, or Walk as it floats ones boat.

I find my Slash pedals well Open or Flipped to Pedal. The Penske tech rear shock works well for me, it just needed volume spacers to firm up end of stroke on it although it never bottomed out with a thud or anything. My way of being sure I can take large hits with it when I need with peace of mind. Coming from a Hardtail XC bike to the Slash - I have been very happy and much prefer the Slash on the technical climbs (better traction, easier steering and less float in the front wheel).
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: This is the statement of the year, if not longer. I am stoked to read this, because its so true. Bike geometry can and should be used overcome peddle bob, without gadgets and lock out switches. Just get on your bike and ride.
  • + 2
 @chadgmail: All that really needs to be said is your last sentence.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: other reviews I’ve seen your settings to be soft or minimal LSC so it won’t be a angel flying to heaven?
Other brands climb better but lack the tracking early in travel
Pros & cons with design
  • + 2
 I think people like Leavy and myself know that well designed suspension does not need a lever. It is also one less thing to forget before descending again. @es7ebanlv:
  • + 4
 @dsmdan18: so we all should ride only the bikes with dw-link like suspension?
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: so there’s the biggest design challenge for mountain bike suspension layout in your thoughts here. Do you think that Mondraker and Polygon have gotten the closest so far? This subject deserves its own article. I don’t necessarily disagree with you, I want a bike that pedals like an Ibis and descends like an Evil. Best solution I have is a remote, after years of fighting it, it turns out to be a better solution. So, who is going to release a proper trail bike that’s so convinced of their pedaling platform they won’t even offer a switch? Are we all so trained to think we need them?
  • + 9
 @mikelevy: The problem is that good climbing manners come from high levels of anti squat (and a stiff compression tune), which has to geometrically lead to high levels of pedal feedback. And yes, with multi link systems you can tune the AS to be higher in the natural sag position, but it'll still mean you get more kickback and less effective suspension over rough terrain and a harder time (and more chain stress?) on drops. I've tried some "efficient climbers" recently and felt pretty beaten up on rocks, roots, drops. I'd argue that for an enduro race bike, using the cheater switch for the climbs, in exchange for plush descents is the right thing to do. If only they'd paint the damn switch fluoro pink so I didn't keep leaving it on for the descents...
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: more maybe the switch/lever should be called "rough descend mode." I think a climb switch is great if you want traction on the descents. I read the Mondraker review and to me it sounded like a bad design; a 150 mm or more travel bike that has harsh feeling suspension but pedals great. Get a shorter travel bike if that's what you want.
  • + 2
 @Lagr1980: I have the new Fugitive here for testing as well - it's an impressive climber.
  • + 4
 @chadgmail: Exactly! Crutches stifle innovation. We'd have better bikes without the lever.
  • + 2
 @pakleni: dw-link bikes have a history of climbing well through anti-squat, and I've been a fan of them for that reason. Is it the best solution? I'm not sure. That big Polygon was insanely efficient, too.
  • + 3
 @plume: Hhhmm, I think that Polygon and Mondraker do it really, really well in the 150mm-ish travel bracket - they're the best pedaling AM bikes on the market that I've ridden. The Mondraker suffers a bit on the tiny, high-speed impacts - it's a little rough, relatively speaking - which is the flip side of it all. But yes, I'd agree with you.

I remember how well that Fuji M-Link 150mm bike pedaled, too. WAY too linear, but they nailed it as well on the efficiency. Sounds like a good op-ed subject.
  • + 2
 @mountainsofsussex: Agree 100% with you. That Foxy is the perfect example of that, too, but I still prefer that type of performance. I think that the new (and funny looking) Polygons do it the best right now.
  • + 1
 @thejake: Yup, that's the trade-off. For me, I prefer that but I can see why others wouldn't. That 150mm Foxy was still more forgiving under power than any 130mm bike, but yes, relatively speaking, it's not as forgiving as the Stumpy, Bronson, or Remedy.

They're all so different in their own way, which is the rad part.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy:with a 32t ring, is goes from 19% to 76% antisquat across cassette range.... that would scare off the people looking for an "efficient bike" wouldnt it ? The truth is, they are unbeatable technical climbers, fun as hell at DH, just different philosophy that might not suit enduro racing. DH racing may be.. fun bikes for sure.. I Rode a Warden for 2 years...
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: Yeah, it's certainly not the most efficient - it feels kinda on par-ish with the Remedy, if I had to guess. But Knolly has always made bikes that are incredible technical climbers, no doubt because there's traction there from the suspension.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: Sounds like an idea for an article. Round up the likes of Tantrum Cycles and some of the smaller brands and test them along side some of the big brands.
  • + 45
 These are so much better than the bible of bike videos...please do them more often!
  • + 7
 yeah, ever since vernon left bible bike, it became unwatchable.
  • + 1
 I'm there for Ferrentino comedy/antics/handlebar moustache... But that's just me.
  • + 43
 The fork flex on these drop tests is eye opening to me
  • + 5
 I did not notice till your comment, but yes crazy flex and that is a fox 36. Imagine a 34 now.
  • + 15
 @Snowsed341: Fox 32 SC rider here, shivering in the fetal position thinking about what my fork was doing in Bentonville/Pisgah/Steamboat this summer...
  • + 24
 @davidccoleman: You're alive with unbroken wrists or ankles, so fork was working properly.
  • + 6
 Besides casing a double, this huck to flat test puts more stress on the fork than it would usually see from normal riding. I wouldn't worry about it unless hucking to flat is you preferred style of riding... though it doesn't look like any of these riders are heavy weights, i would love/hate to see what Rude could do to a fork in a similar event.

Either way, just another reason to practice riding smooth
  • + 1
 Where are you seeing this? I can't tell from the photo...
  • + 5
 @skelldify: its in the video.
  • + 1
 @davidccoleman: yeah really makes you wonder about flex now. Can always move to a 34.
  • + 0
 The lack of frame strength increases the head angle and imparts a much larger splay load and I suspect the headset has something to do with it as well - it looks like a combination of factors.
  • + 4
 Hence Weagle's latest project...
  • + 1
 The flex on DH forks when that other site does it's hucks to flat at WCDH tracks is worse - you wouldn't think 40's would bend like that.
  • + 0
 @Clarkeh: well, there's a longer lever arm and more mass. Telescoping forks suck for lots of reasons. Vorsprung has a great video explaining how we all ended up riding on them anyway.
  • + 0
 that's just umm, lateral compression, for umm, more comfort... yeah...
  • + 2
 Isn't flex good? It's a piece of the bike moving, not you. It's not a bad thing.
  • + 1
 Yes it looked almost as if the whole bike was bending at the head tube...
  • + 1
 @Adamrideshisbike: The upper and lower parts of the fork need to slide past each other--bending the fork interferes with that.
  • + 0
 You might be missing the fact that he's landing from that huck with the brakes on. Realistically you'll never be in that scenario on a trail unless you severely fuck up. The wheel stays in the same spot as the bike continues forward, the fork flexes inwards towards the down tube before springing back. Landing with the brakes on is making this look way worse than you'll ever see on the trail. And some flex is good.
  • + 1
 @Soilsledding: All of the tested bikes, and both Lyriks and 36's, are doing it to similar degrees, check it out.
  • + 1
 bah, i did not expect that, i thought it flexes upwards and not in a way backwards that makes me cringe. I want to thank all my previous bikes i put a dualcrown on eventhough it was not permitted, could have gone wrong.
  • + 1
 @tjcombs: Can't get my head around the idea of landing with the brakes on.
  • + 0
 @BenPea: there are scenarios -be it in Dh racing or in hucking- where you have to do this (or at least brake while the fork still compresses). I remember a couple of steep austrian Dh races with 1.5 meter drops in very steep terrain -no way you make the next corner with not braking while landing. other than in the test your front wheel would not stop though.
  • + 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: with the rear brake, I can see it being an option and I might even do it myself unconsciously, I don't know. But with the front, I'm pretty sure I brake a split second after the drop rather than before, because how do you know how hard to pull the brake if you don't know how much grip there's going to be when your tyre hits the dirt? Also it must add to the force your arms and neck need to withstand on arrival. Sounds a bit hazardous to me. I might try it and see what happens.
  • + 0
 @BenPea: not something you wanna do when you have the choice and of course you go over the drop as slowly as possible but with brakes open. but i recall very well that you had to brake as soon as you touched the ground -not really a nice feeling and it did not always work but i just wanted to say even for that manuever there is a place. (as it was very steep the impact from the drop alone was not that big, the rearbrake did not do much either)
  • + 1
 @BenPea:

Landing with the brakes slightly on? Sure. Brakes on enough that you lock up both wheels on the landing? I hope not..

Edit - I was only observing what I saw in the fork testing video, not making a recommendation.
  • + 16
 Thanks for another great review! Trust you will provide the Pinkbike crowd with an XLS table at the end of all the reviews with an overview of a score of 1-5 for each category (climbing, descending, agility, plow through effect etc), for easy comparison purposes?
  • + 35
 I'm not a real big fan of ratings but there will be some sort of wrap-up article for sure.
  • + 40
 We'll also be releasing discussion videos to compare and contrast the bikes.
  • + 4
 I'd prefer .xlsx but I'll take what I can get. I'm an Excel nerd so maybe I'll try my hand at making one...it will be loaded with VLOOKUPs though.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: the thing is that figures speak loud and clear for those who already spend too much of their life staring at a screen.
  • + 9
 @underhawk: pff, vlookups are for excel newbs. index matching is where its at. Wink
  • + 2
 @brianpark Awesome! I think that's what most of us want out of this!
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I'm with you. You can't put feelings in numbers.
  • + 1
 Would be nice to get some sort of chart (for example with climbing ability on one axis and descending ability on the other) and then to plot each bike along the chart.
  • + 3
 @mikelevy: isn’t comparing/rating these bikes against each other what this is all about. Would definitely look forward to a wrap up at the end with each reviewers favourite for each catergory and why.
  • + 1
 @bcmrider: index mapping?
  • + 2
 @mikelevy: I would also like to see a table, but a really detailed one (E.g. climbing would have multiple categories such as technical, fireroad, steep etc. Descending would be broken out in to cornering, rough stuff, steep, mellow flowetc)). I would like to see the rankings based on the other bikes so the best bike gets a 1, second best gets a 2 etc. Then at the end, people can look at the categories most important to them and see which bike best fits their desired purpose. It's not a "this bike is the best" ranking - rather a "this bike is what you're looking for" ranking. BTW, really enjoying the series.
  • + 1
 What about an OLAP Cube?
  • + 1
 @angelofverdun: nerd. And i thought cubes where a SQL construct, not something you could build in flat files like spreadsheets.
  • + 1
 @underhawk: Use index match instead and your file size will shrink massively.
  • + 9
 I disagree about the knock block being silly. If there was an aftermarket headset out there that offered this feature somehow I would be a customer. So many times I've crashed and my bars have spun around kinking or even ripping brake lines out. It's cheap insurance imo.
  • + 48
 Until you knock block so hard it cracks your frame... Ive seen several.
  • + 11
 I have a knock-block bike, and I agree - I think it's a decent idea. After you ride it for a while, you don't even think about it being there. You can bump into every now and then on the trail, but it's pretty rare and only when you're probably doing something sketchy anyway. If you switch back and forth between bikes - like say, people doing a field test - then the knock block might be annoying - but for those of us with basically only 1 main bike, it's a non-issue.
  • + 6
 I'm in the same boat. I think Knock Block is a great invention. Cable tidyness can be vastly improved by this invention and that satisfies my OCD.
  • + 9
 It's called the Acros Block Lock (not to be confused with the Knock Block or Cock Block).
  • + 0
 I thinks Knock Block is silly. (Tmackstab, not meaning to diss you. If it solves a problem you have that's great!)
If it were available as an aftermarket part, I'd say why not. But really, requiring proprietary headset parts just for the sake of frame rigidity is just a marketing gimmick. I do NOT feel that the straight shot downtube is noticeably stiffer than a regular downtube – the Knock Block Fuel Ex is not noticeably stiffer than the previous 2016 frame. But now the headsets use a flimsy propriertary part, and restrict the movement of the handlebar. I wish Trek would just give up on straight shot, and offer Knock Block as an add-on for those who want it.
  • + 4
 @Lankycrank: Ok I see what were getting hung up on. I should clarify what I mean. Forget about Trek and Knock Block and all that stuff. How about if someone made a headset that prevented your bars from spinning around in a crash? Like a DH bike only a trail bike and still have more steering than a dual crown fork. You personally may have never had an issue with lines ripping out or anything like that but it does happen. Why wouldn't you want that insurance?
  • + 4
 @Tmackstab: Again from the guy above, Acros Block Lock headset does this. It has been out since 2009. That's almost a decade. It hasn't caught on which means this really isn't much of a problem.
  • + 2
 Actually like the knock block idea. I set my bike up with few to no spacers and bars can spin and scratch the frame.
  • + 1
 @raditude: Yup I saw. I'll be checking out those headsets for sure!
  • + 16
 I have a 2018 Remedy, and there are only two times the Knock Block annoys me: (1) when the bike is in my car (which is a lot, because that's how I transport it); and (2) when I'm goofing around with trial-sy sorts of moves and want to turn the bar 90 degrees (it only allows about 75 degrees).

For regular trail riding it's a non-issue.
  • + 1
 @Tmackstab: Thanks, yes, I agree – as an aftermarket feature it makes sense. I never had any lines rip, so I guess that's my bias, and I'm also a tall guy and I use plenty of spacers so my bars don't actually touch the top tube. Guess that's my bias :-)
  • + 6
 @Lankycrank: I'm 6'4" myself. The bars not hitting the top tube is all the more reason to run it imo. I think what I've learned here today is that commenting on Pinkbike can take years off your life and one should think long and hard before doing so lol.
  • + 1
 @Tmackstab: Can't/won't comment on the knockblock but if you experience your cables and hoses being damaged from the bars spinning around in a crash, I'd say you may need to cut your hoses a bit longer next time. I prefer to leave them long enough to rotate at least 270deg. And leave the clamp of the brakes loose enough for them to rotate a little when they receive a knock.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Yeah now I do an X-up in the work stand and cut to length. It sure would be nice to have super short cables though, so much cleaner.
  • + 1
 @Lankycrank: but then you would have 2 completely different speced frames? Like you said, Knock block isnt just in the headset, but also consists of a straight down tube into the head tube - for rigidity. Without the knock block headset and padding on the down tube the fork would just smash into the frame. So you cant make it optional. Or you could make it so its not a stiff, straight down tube into the head tube, but then whats the point if you dont have the added rigidity which was the main reason in first place.
  • - 5
flag tripleultrasuperboostplusplus (Dec 5, 2018 at 14:46) (Below Threshold)
 I had a 2019 Remedy loaner for a week. The Knock Block was an instant deal-breaker. My actual FIRST TURN at the end of the driveway was locked out! Two on-trail moves, plus every attempt at a track stand was also blocked before I turned in the bike. YMMV, but as a past Remedy owner, I am not a Trek player until they fix that limitation.
  • + 5
 @tripleultrasuperboostplusplus: That's insane...sorry but how the h*#l did you manage that? I've had KB on two different Treks and its never bothered me once, and I track stand all the time at the trailhead.
  • + 1
 f*ck knock blocks! i like the feeling of squeezing my quads between the top tube and handle bar while doing an otb. it's so... intense.
  • + 1
 @Nathan6209:

"I track stand all the time at the trailhead."

Im curious, why?
  • + 3
 @Flowcheckers: one word: Holeshot
  • + 1
 @Tmackstab: KOMs don't count if you roll into them.
  • + 1
 @Tmackstab: ah, good point.
  • + 1
 @xxsurlyxx: Had wicked crash on mine to the point where the knock block shifted and the crown hit the frame protector.

@Tmackstab I agree and once the rubber hit the dirt I never thought about the KB again.
  • + 8
 I've ridden the 2019 Fuel Ex and loved it, a really sporty trail bike with deep travel and a ton of traction, and this new Remedy sounds like a beefier version of just that. Cracking bikes these, even if they do come in boring colours. p.s. fox 36 fleeeeex
  • + 7
 The Fuel's evolution has been interesting. I was more a fan of the bike when it was 120mm front/rear and a bit more sporty feeling. This version of the Remedy is impressive, though.
  • + 8
 @mikelevy: in my short riding experience with 2018 Remedy, it is a great do it all bike. You can put Ikons or XR2 on and it will work great for Down Country. Put some 2-ply knobby meat on the wheels and it can do some laps in the park.

"Remedy is a bike that bridges Enduro and Down Country, two most elite disciplines of mountain biking adressed in one bike"
  • + 4
 @mikelevy: I own a '16 Fuel EX9 with the 130mm fork and after riding the 18 version, I'd agree with you. For the same reason, if I bought a 2019 Remedy, I'd want to swap out those 2.6 tyres for something less balloon like and more responsive. We seem hell bent on muting the trail and in the process (no pun intended) we're losing something. Then again, it depends where you ride.
  • + 2
 @stacky00: Trek especially are a brand that focus on the smoothest ride possible, it's kinda their style.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: really enjoying this field test. If you can speculate, do you think 2020 will see the fuel ex continue to evolve in the direction it has? Will it get a little slacker HA steeper ST and drop full-floater like the new remedy, maybe come with a 140mm fork? Or will it stay about the same? If you had to chose between the fuel or new Remedy as you one and only bike which would you choose or which do you think has a wider range of use?
  • + 2
 Boring colours? part of the reason I bought my '17 fuel ex was because it was complete murdered out black
  • + 6
 Trek doesn't consider the Remedy to be an Enduro bike, so why do you? It's not their race bike, it's their fun all-mountain bike. Why not just call it what it is rather than disguise it as a "less burly, more fun Enduro bike"??
  • + 14
 I didn't even realize there was a distinction between "enduro" and "all-mountain".
  • + 72
 What if we just call it a mountain bike? Would that work?
  • + 30
 Martin Maes won the EWS on a 150mm rear travel 27.5in wheeled bike. I think that qualifies it enough.
  • - 8
flag jwestenhoff (Dec 5, 2018 at 10:47) (Below Threshold)
 @tbmaddux: Bikes that can actually race Enduro in a serious way are actually pretty different. A proper Enduro course will be DH-level gnarly, just over a longer day. That requires a lot of travel and a pretty slack bike, much more squish than is fun to pedal around otherwise in my opinion. Enduro bikes are stuff like the YT Capra, Trek Slash, etc. The Remedy or a Pivot Switchblade are much more "all mountain"; they're not race bikes.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 5, 2018 at 10:47) (Below Threshold)
 It depends, If I was to race Enduro I would pick Remedy. Slash is a cow. It is more of a park/ mini DH bike than Enduro racing thingy. You need to plan your lines further ahead on Slash, especially with DH tyres, otherwise you end up missing corners and plowing all over the place. Oh yeah it plows, it's just that why in the first place? My experience of Remedy was just like guys in the test say, it is easy to put it wherever you want. My friends can shred the hell out of Remedy, doesn't seem to hold them back. If you want a bike that will keep you sharp get Remedy, if you want impunity, just plow through anything, take Slash. Even Spec Enduro 29 feels more nimble than Slash. Slash is... BIG.

As you usual I will take the opportunity to suck Bontragers balls for the great tyres.
  • + 3
 Because people wouldn't be coming to PB as much.

I'm starting to believe all mountain bikes are the same anyways. Just come to PB for the pretty pictures and to b*tch about people calling my bike a dentist bike.
  • + 4
 @jwestenhoff: Jared Graves raced on the ST Stumpy...
  • + 6
 @mikekazimer: That's what we're all saying. PB is pushing the nomenclature narrative
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I wouldnt call the Slash a cow. Been on mine for a year and its pretty damn nimblr for having big wheels 2.6 wide tires. The north shore doesnt really lend to just plowing. Lots of times being precise and nimble is something i have to do and the Slash does a great job.

For sure you are correct in saying it can absolutley out plow the remedy but I wouldnt go as far as to say its a Cow. Mooooooooooo
  • + 4
 The reviewer is just trying to highlight the bikes riding characteristics. From the review it's clear that if you are after a bike that excels in the steepest gnarliest trails then there are other bikes that are better than the Remedy. For those after a bike that can ride the gnarly stuff, but excel on more average trail and long rides then the Remedy may be a great option.

Also, I don't think "enduro" racing actually has to be all gnarly trails. It's simply ride up the trail untimed and then time the downhill portion (gnarly or not). To me it should be more all encompassing than just long WC level dh tracks.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 5, 2018 at 11:11) (Below Threshold)
 @TheBearDen: what I experienced was being ridden by the bike a bit, instead of riding the bike. When I seung my leg over different E29s I didn’t get that feeling, at least not to such extent. If I was to grt a Slash I’d get one size smaller than recommended for my height.
  • + 10
 @WAKIdesigns: you talk some shite sometimes
  • + 0
 @IllestT: sorry, that was just my experience with these bikes.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: but...but...but...WHICH mountain??
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I would agree with you about the sizing. Its not a long feeling cockpit when seated, but once seat is down and out of the way things do feel longer so yes ,Trying the two sizes closest to what you would normally ride is probably a good idea.

I'll agree its not like riding a pony around in a circle at the circus, its more of a steed that if you let it will take off on you but once you adapt and put some time on it you learn that it can be a very much "do everything" kinda bike.

and let me tell yah, those new SE5 tires in 2.6, OH BABY!
  • + 1
 It is obvious you can't ride it properly without knowing the exact bike category it is. Haha. This is an Enduro-ish quasi-All Mountain bike. Now feel free to rip it.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: no, definitely not.
  • + 1
 RR raced his sb5c 125mm rear 170mm front
  • + 5
 @chyu: yeah that bike was dope... oooh too faaar!
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I enjoyed it.
  • + 1
 @TheBearDen: If WAKIdesigns is calling the Slash a Cow, does this mean it should be very popular with the Swiss riders out there??? Wink

@ WAKIdesigns: you do know the updated Slash comes on 2.4 botranger rubber and you can run it high which gives it plenty of pop, right?? Not just a Plow Cow. Big Grin
  • + 2
 @TheBearDen: "and let me tell yah, those new SE5 tires in 2.6, OH BABY!"

How are those tyres TheBearDen??
I stayed with the SE4 2.4 out back but put a XR5 2.6 up front. Finding them a good pedal combo but a little loose if the trail is also very loose. Also, what psi are you running them f/r?

Just wondering what psi people run with the bontrager carbon rims.
  • + 1
 @gnarterrorist: Id say just run SE5 front and rear. The XR sidewalls I find a little unsupportive and a little thin the SE models are muuuuch better. The SE4 is definitely faster rolling than the SE5 but the SE5 just has heeps of traction and actually rolls faster then many tires with similar tread profile.

In the summer I run between 27 & 29 rear and between 25 and 26 up front. In the wet season I run 24 rear and 22 front. I weight 190lbs
  • + 0
 @gnarterrorist: I never said Slash is a bad bike. To me it just feels to close to a DH bike, too big for anything that is not a DH track. Sure many Enduro comps are like that but Remedy with Lyrik just gets the job done. Maybe the shock on Remedy is meh but it can be remedied. Ooooh nooo I didn’t.

Also if I had SE4 or SE5s on Slash in proper mountains I would shred them to pieces in a matter of a few rides on that bike.it asks for DD casings with insert for the back
  • + 6
 Don’t get the rant about fork flexing. If it doesn’t flex, it’ll break. I designed propperly, it‘ll flex for years without breaking. Ever saw passenger airplane wing tips flexing during landing? Looks terrible, but makes sense.
  • + 2
 Exactly. All these people alarmed about flex don't know how everything around them flexes as part of normal operation: forks, bike frames, car chassis, air-frames, etc., etc. Flexing is necessary.

Now, I ride a 36 because it flexes less than a 34 (let's not even talk about 32's - noodle city), so it provides better control. But that doesn't mean it doesn't flex at all - that would be impossible.
  • + 2
 All of the bikes' forks, both Lyriks and 36's, have flexed a lot in these videos, so obviously it's not an issue. I think what draws the comments--or at least my comments--is that it flexes a lot more than I had pictured. If you imagined a 36 bending this much, congratulations. Some of us are surprised and entertained by it.
  • + 9
 Very first time I rode a knock block Remedy I smashed straight into it. Then kept doing it. Surprisingly annoying I found.
  • + 11
 Agreed. The bike as a whole is top notch... it doesn't need gimmicks or weird stuff.
  • + 8
 @mikelevy: I for one enjoy the fact that I havent ripped any cables out after the bike goes cartwheeling down the mountain on its own. Canyon is doing something almost exactly the same as knock block and no one seems to be bothered by it, its a little strange...

Everyone has different personal experiences, I get that, but in the 3 years I have been on Trek bikes, not once have I found it to be a hinderance.... but hey thats just me Smile

I'd rather spend more time bitching about the Control freak cable routing and the stupid little hole in the bottom of the frame you have to have surgical precision to run a zap strap through to cinch the cables down... lol thats what grinds my gears!
  • + 1
 @TheBearDen: don’t get down on a bike you obviously love. Its working for you and that’s all that counts.
  • + 2
 @iqbal-achieve: Oh don't worry I love my bike. But as a mechanic who works on these bikes a lot... the cable management design they use is shit.

Theres always things that can be improved on every bike... on the trek's its the cable management thats all.

We just having conversation thats all.
  • + 1
 @TheBearDen: forgive me. I understand exactly what you’re saying.
...cable management design has been wank ever since somebody decided it was a good idea to put them inside the frame. And now...
“oh please not this again”
YES. BUT NOOO. It’s f*cking stupid. STUPID. Stupid. Stupids. Just like knock block. Solves nothing: creates problems.
And - the only reason it happened is because brands were striving for some ‘exclusivity’, and hence proprietary SHIT. Shiiiiiiit. Now we’re so far down the rabbit hole (internal anal cable hole) it seems there is no way we can get back to the real f*cking world where things make some kind of sense, i.e clip the cables to the bike. For. f*cks. Sake.
What a load of waaaaaaaaaaank
  • + 2
 I have never bumped in to my knockblock in 2 years.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: would it stop you buying the bike?
  • + 0
 @robdbank: it has me, if that means anything. Lovely playful bike that’s just really well rounded but a stupid thing on it that stops the bars from going as far as I want.
  • + 1
 @iqbal-achieve: object permanence is hard, I know. No need to worry though, the cables are still.
  • + 4
 @TheBearDen: You rip cables out often? I mean, I've done it, but that last time might have been in 2001 or something. I'm not familiar with the Canyon version but if it offers the same turning radius as the Trek, I'd probably not be a fan.

I guess my thing is this: Trek says they made the downtube straight to make for a stiffer frame, which puts it in the way of the fork crown. That's where the Knock Block comes in, to keep the two from hitting. But I'm going to guess that no one out there is going to feel that the '19 Remedy's front triangle is more rigid than the pre-Knock Block version. Incremental improvements and all that, but I can guarantee that the old frame was more than rigid enough and that Knock Block will go away in a few years time.
  • + 2
 @robdbank: Yes, which is a shame because the bike is great.
  • + 3
 The most annoying thing I have found about the knock block is that it makes it super awkward to get the bike on and off my NS rack. Sounds trivial I know, but I truly is a pain in the ass.
  • + 1
 I don't notice the knock block on my bike, ride all the same trails as the video often. I think if I don't notice any drawbacks and my bike is stiffer (which I'll never be able to notice unless I get a remedy without it to compare) that's a good thing not a bad thing
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: before Knock Block yeah man. You blow it on a steep line and have that bar do the death spin during a crash I have ripped dropper cables, slammed brakes into top tubes all that good stuff. Im happy for you that you have had great luck since 2001... Not all of us can fit under that umbrella but if a free spot comes up... Let me kmow! Haha

Also, below is a photo of the ugly version of knock block like technology Canyon uses on the Neuron and I also believe on their bigger travel bikes as well.

ep1.pinkbike.org/p3pb16589647/p3pb16589647.jpg
  • + 1
 @Skooks: u should be more worried about the rubber coated hooks rubbing your headtube area. Happens on my slash and brother inlaws pivot mach 5.5

Some NS racks seem to have a little more clearance for whatever reason but yeah... Vertical tray style bike racks will be in my future. Haha
  • + 4
 I just don't understand how people are hitting the knock block. I ride a remedy and never hit it. The only way you'd hit it is if you're trying to turn 180 degrees as super low speed....
  • + 0
 @Justmatthew: don’t you do manoeuvres of the tekkers variety or perhaps tricks and/ or cunning stunts?
  • + 2
 PS apologies everyone who has read my outburst. Apparently I was very angry at internal cables last night.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: It will go away, I´ve knocked mine too
  • + 1
 @iqbal-achieve: Not really, i'm 35 now and my back hurts. I do wheelies and manuals, that's it.
  • + 2
 @Justmatthew: those are the best two trickywickies
  • + 2
 @TheBearDen: You're right, it'd certainly stop that from happening. I guess the issue I take is the whole "We made the frame stiffer but now you need this steering-limiting headset thingy,'' when no one is going to notice the improvement in rigidity.

If it had been: "Hey, we have this thing that can keep you from ripping your cables out. You can use it or take it out,'' and the fork crown wouldn't hit the downtube when you removed it. Then I'd be okay with it.
  • + 1
 @patricioescobar: Hopefully!
  • + 2
 It's like your date brings his/her little brother. It annoys you at first. But you will get used to it.
  • + 4
 The only few good things about Knock Block is it should help prevent the bar ends from stabbing you in the stomach in a crash. The other is you can have a very tidy cockpit and cables since you don't need to have excess cables for the bar to spin 180 degrees like all other bikes.
  • + 5
 Or it might just stop the bar just at the perfect moment to jab you in the jewels
  • + 4
 I have a 2019 remedy. I have never noticed the knock block out on the trail.
I don’t get why it’s compared to 29er enduro bikes. Trek clearly states that the slash fulfills that role.
  • + 4
 I say the same thing: "There's even enough room for a 2.8'' wide tire on the back of the Remedy, but those who prefer 29ers should look at the enduro-focused Slash."
  • + 3
 So, my 2016 fuel ex full on dentist version 9.9 (size large) is just over 25 lbs with the same Bonty carbon wheel in 29". The fork is a 34, and it's "only" 120mm of travel, but . . .where's the extra 4 lbs come from? I'm just another "used to be fast-ish" old guy that can now buy the expensive bikes I'd drool over when wrenching in a shop and no matter how you slice it, weight matters. A 150 travel machine is where I'm looking for my 50th birthday gift to myself, and a 36 (or a pike) makes a world of difference when things get blurry yet it seems all of these are in the 28.5 to 30 lb range. What makes 'em so heavy? Yes, I know I shouldn't complain about it amongst those of you who are riding heavier bikes up the same hills, but I truly don't see where the differences are . . .anyone know??
  • + 3
 36 fork, longer frame, tires are heavy!!!
  • + 1
 I'd guess that extra 4 lbs (spread among the frame, fork, etc) is what makes parts not break when Pinkbike jumps to flat over a Mini. The more travel the bike has, the easier it handles impacts, and the more likely that some reviewer will jump it over Mike Levy's Mini. (But @celedonio has a good point about the tires too.)
  • + 1
 the 2016 Fuel EX 9.9 def came with DT wheels and XTR 11 speed, to start
  • + 1
 @Dedward2: Sorry - should've said I just got the frame and built it with xx1, XT brakes, 'spensive Enve bar and stem, etc. Same wheels and tires as this bike . . .a 36 might be 450 g heavier, but thats a pound, not four . . .
  • + 3
 Now trek just needs to shorten the seat tube length on the size XL - its 52cm which makes all the difference when you're 6'2 w/ short legs and prefer riding XL bikes. I have to run a little weenie 125mm post on bikes like that, but on things like the stumpy and pivot mach 5.5, the ST length is only 49cm, which is purrrrfect.
  • + 8
 Perfect for tall guys with short legs, but not for tall guys with long legs. I need the opposite.
  • + 3
 @gdharries: Me too ! I'm 6'2 also and use a 170mm dropper on my 52cm XL Remedy29 with room for more...
  • + 2
 Agreed and I don't understand what the advantage of a tall seat tube is. I'm also 6'2" with short legs, and tall seat tubes ruled out a lot of bikes/brands when I was shopping for a new bike. Ended up with a Tallboy, a big reason was the 48 cm seat tube on XL.
  • + 2
 I'm the other way around. I could run a 150mm dropper on a 52 cm seat tube and still have 10 cm of post to the collar.
  • + 2
 @gdharries: What about short guys with long legs and short guys with short legs?
  • + 2
 The one thing I've decided after watching these videos is I want to see @mikevy without a shirt on. What's the rear of that piece creeping up aroind his collar? (Having said my sarcastic comment I'm enjoying this series. Looking forward to the yetis).
  • + 6
 Can't do X-up's with the Knock Block.
  • + 6
 I can't do my triple barspins Frown
  • + 5
 Anybody else immediately scrolling to the huck to flat picture, then the comments on these?
  • + 6
 HERE FOR THE FORK FLEX SLOW-MO!
  • + 2
 Me too.
  • + 2
 I replaced my 2016 Remedy with a Transition Scout because of Knock Block. I've been a Trek guy forever, but they lost me with Knock Block. Great bike otherwise. Oh yeah, while I'm griping, quit it with the proprietary shocks, Trek. They might be marginally better, but when they go bad, repairs are tough.
  • + 2
 For those that doubt the Enduro capabilities of this bike let me say this; (I own Slash and Remedy 201Cool a lot of the Enduro tracks locally and on the EWS need an agile bike with better climbing abilities and that´s where the Remedy comes in. In sheer plow cow situations the Slash is better, but the so called "enduro trails" only have short plow/rock sections, the rest has it all, climbs, tight curves, etc.... If you look at the pros many are running the lesser monster truck bike for many races. I´d reckon both bikes will do well on a balanced Enduro race. If one would run both bikes at the same comp, times will be the same overall, Slash winning some, Remedy others, at the end it would be tight.
  • + 2
 I've been riding the Remedy since it's inception in 2008 -- I've considered the Fuel and the Slash but i always come back to the Remedy. There's no doubt that Trek has made some great advances with this bike since the early days. The latest Remedy is an awesome bike. In my opinion it's the perfect one-bike-quiver if you like climbing and descending -- it might not be the fastest at either, but it sure excels at doing both. I live in Whistler where the trails are technical and steep and the local riders tend to ride long and difficult days and I'm never far behind on this bike!
  • + 1
 It's a killer Sea to Sky trail bike for sure.
  • + 2
 Solid review. I feel the same about my remedy. It's one of few bikes that you could call a true all rounder. While it doesn't necessarily excel at anything in particular, I don't think this is bad, because it fills that "one-bike" niche for me really well.
  • + 2
 If you read between the lines -what Mike is saying is that its a really nice bike with a fatal show stopper. Great review but I would love to hear Daniel's impression of the knock block to see if he hates it as much as Mike. I can say if Overlord Levy does not like it - I certainly would not even consider getting it.
  • + 1
 Ha! Dan didn't take as much issue with it, I think. @danielsapp ?
  • + 1
 It didn't bother me while riding, however, having to use a specific stem or a spacer with it to make it compatible with other stems is less than ideal. I wouldn't call it a deal breaker, just an annoyance.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: Guys thanks for responding! I think you will see the theme throughout these reviews and comments - when you're spending this much money for a bike there should be no annoyances that you cannot deal with by simply swapping a part. As an example the Yeti 150 you've just reviewed, it sounds like all you need is an inheritance and new tires. I think you would drive me nuts to know that you could not replace that annoying knock block. I would just by something else......
  • + 1
 I bought a 2019 Remedy in September and can’t be more delighted with it. Read the review in BIKE looked at what other options I could consider and went for it at my local dealer.
It’s become my remedy for a depression I headed into and I’m riding again!
  • + 1
 Don‘t really know what these 150mm bikes are for. Rode last year‘s Remedy: Uphill not great (maybe the wheels), downhill ok. 2019 Bronson was was better in getting down. But my ride is a nomad with light wheels (Newmen) and X2 with CS: why would I need a Bronson?
Personal Take: 160/150: neither uphill nor downhill beast
  • + 4
 No... They're a compromise between both. That's the point
  • + 1
 Enjoying the reviews guys... what I would like to hear from you is what bike do you have in your garage and take out daily? And why do you prefer it? You guys get to test quite a few over a year and we still have a bike that is 3 years old... mine is an enduro 29 2016.
  • + 1
 I've been on the Unno A TON over the fall - the review is written and will go up soon. The '16 Enduro 29 is still a great bike; it's super capable. I still have that Mondraker Foxy test bike in the stable and I think that'd be my go-to rig for a lot of Squamish riding.
  • + 1
 Maybe I missed a comment but how are the prices so different between this bike and the Specialized in the other recent review video? I just watched the review videos of this and the Specialized back to back and there is a $2500 price difference between these high end bikes that are both all carbon fiber.
  • + 1
 I have been riding a specialized status for the past 4 years, picked up my remedy 8 last Friday and loving it so far, only had 2 rides so far so time will tell how well it holds up to abuse my status got, haven't had to change my riding style to suit the bike but still breaking her in and to scared to wreck her
  • + 1
 I didn't realize that rockshox is making the re aktiv thru shock instead of Fox now.

How did you like the feel of the shock overall? If you were going to comment on it individually.

Recently I had my fox re aktiv serviced with updating valving/ hoping it makes a big difference in the feel next season.
  • + 1
 I have a 2018 Remedy and would 100% agree with the review.
The bike acts as a beefed up trail bike. Plenty of fun in the air and easy to whip the bike around. I think people get caught up with wanting the fastest race bike but most people don’t have the terrain to really make the bike work well. Fast enduro race bikes need essentially down hill tracks to get them to come alive. The enduro races around me are raced on mellower trails with the occasional down track as that’s all that’s available. My thoughts anyway.
  • + 3
 Its weird cause its like you guys knock it on not being burly enough but its not trying to be. It seems like a great trail bike which is what most of us are riding anyway.
  • + 1
 Hope it didn't come off as knocking it for not being burlier - the Slash is that bike. It's both a pro and a con, depending on what you're looking for. The intention wasn't to knock it, but rather to just state how the bike rides Smile
  • + 4
 Thank you for talking about how it handles turns climbing and descending in this review.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy Could you add the geometry chart for each bike to the article. I noticed in this one there was no mention of the reach like there has been in the other videos. Thanks
  • + 2
 Good point. We were trying to make these reviews a lot more compact than the silly novels I write all the time. We'll either include a geo chart or at least upload one and link to the photo from here on it. Thanks!
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Thanks
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I’ve enjoyed these reviews a ton but love the long-form novels as well! The more info the better for all the PB nerds. I also have a ‘17 Trek Fuel that I just picked up and it’s awesome. I have nowhere near the same gripes about the knock block: you must be cutting lines with a 90 degree bar angle.
  • + 4
 New shock likes to 'go deep'... Giggity giggity.
  • + 0
 Despite all of the competing bike brands in the market, and vastness of bike models being offered, most of them just look the same. And thanks to FSR patent being void, situation has got even worse in last 2 years. Literally, all non-short-link frames look the same. Such a pity.
  • + 1
 Hang on, wasn't Air-wolf grey and white? What has this bike got to do with Charlse Henry Moffets finest creation. The firm would have something to say I think. Shame on you sir.
  • + 1
 It was matte black with a white-ish underbelly so it was harder to spot from below. What a great TV show but I can't go back and re-watch it because I bet it's actually terrible haha
  • + 0
 The Treck has a more active suspension than the Bronson so it does not climb quite as well. But the Bronson is better at DH because it has a firmer suspension. I would prefer the more active suspension for DH. The rear of the bike sits a bit lower which slacks the HT angle. Makes for a more stable bike when it gets steep.
  • + 0
 Every time I notice the price of those kind of mtbs I ask myself if I would spend this amount of money even if I would be rich. Crashing happens so often and these bikes are so fragile that I would not enjoy my ride. A motocross bike keeps its value a lot more for example. You really need to crash a lot to ruin it catastrophically. Destroying a mtb bike frame is relatively easy even on a small jump gone wrong. Not to mention that a scratched Kashima shock that costs a fortune is nearly impossible to resell as used. Going from a 2000 to a 7000 dollars bike doesn't give 3 times and half more fun. It gives you just a small percentage of advantage in terms of grams and shock performance, and just really skilled riders can appreciate this tech advantage.
  • + 1
 Maby you should crash less?
  • + 2
 @mikelevy what do you think of the 2.6 tires that are becoming increasingly commonplace on trail bikes these days? Do you prefer the standard 2.3-2.5”?
  • + 2
 Yeah, I'm not a big fan of these high-volume tires. For me, the limit is 2.6'' especially when they're trying to make these things weigh less than 1,000-grams. That's trouble. My perfect tire is a high-volume 2.35'' tire with a nice round casing that's predictable and a 900-ish gram weight. They can cut, but I just don't want to push around 1,300-gram tractor rubber.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I feel you on that one. Come spring time ill be ditching the stock 2.6" tires on my pivot mach 5.5 and trying some of the 2.4" - 2.5" Maxxis WT tires instead. 0.1" doesnt sound like a lot, but the tires are definitely significantly less voluminous, which i suspect will have a noticeable effect on handling.
  • + 1
 what mean test stable? Is it like when its ruff climbing or normal climbing « By that, I mean that the climbs are noticeably easier when aboard the Remedy than when riding the other 150mm-ish bikes in the test stable. »
  • + 2
 Still waiting for propain, dartmoor, mongoose, polygon, marin, etc etc etc...
Would that possible?
  • + 1
 I would be interested to know if the 2019, revamped rear suspension design is any better/major differences between the previous suspension design?
  • + 2
 P.S. These reviews, and the format you've chosen is setting the bar for what bike reviews should be. Thank you!
  • + 1
 Thanks! They'll be a lot more in the future.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: Still waiting for the aggressive hard trail shoot out...... Smile
  • + 1
 Bottom out test: shock is at about half travel... something is not right here. Is this personal preference? Does it need to be like this? etc.
  • + 2
 Thorough job. I enjoy the 7 min videos that accompany all the technical content.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy what position was the mino link set at? I have the difference between the two settings on the Slash and Fuel to be quite noticeable...
  • + 1
 oops noticed the difference between the two settings...
  • + 1
 Looks like a fun bike. Might be just the remedy I need for my under-fueled riding sessions. I might need to wait until they slash the price a bit though.
  • + 1
 Nah, just take it out of your money stache. You need a procaliber ride like this.
  • + 1
 Your Ticket for fun
  • + 2
 yet another bike company that really pushed itself in the paint scheme department.
  • + 6
 I would rather have them keep it simple/subtle and even sort of bland, rather than going crazy with the graphics and stamping their name everywhere.
  • + 2
 There are two choices in each model: one bright, one dull.
  • + 2
 I would love to see this test with longer travel bikes! it would be sick to see canyons torque vs the yt capra ect...
  • + 17
 You bet. We have the Scott Ransom, Devinci Spartan, Yeti SB150, and Pivot Firebird on the way.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer: hopefully when you're Yeti review comes out you guys will stay transparent about the rear tri, reading user reviews it seems like Yeti have an issue throughout the new line up from the sb100-sb150 and some frames are being sent back for warranty.
Tire size,rear tri flex,si and shock bushing issue have brought up by users.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: loving these tests...
  • + 2
 @eeeasy: Since it's a short term test I doubt they'll have any issues in the amount of time that they're testing the bikes.
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: But no Mega.....such a shame
  • + 1
 @mikelevy: I own the 2018 mega 275 and wouldn't trade it for the world!
  • + 2
 Did I miss what size you rode? Compared to something like the Patrol, the medium (17.5) seems pretty cramped.
  • + 0
 Treks are great. Until you wear out the ABP on 5 chainstays. Can't fault Trek's warranty for the first 4. But at the fifth their 'Lifetime Warranty' on a 2018 bike wasnt lifetime
  • + 1
 any plan to review the mega 275? no one seems to include that bike on these types of test. 290 on the bible, and just media camp reviews. @mikelevy
  • + 2
 Show the drop where you land the suspension compression on each of the bikes.
  • + 5
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/16603731. We used the same ramp, but without the car in the way.
  • + 2
 Great reviews guys. This gives me an idea of what it might feel like without being able to ride it.
  • + 2
 Knock Block IS FAR FROM SILLY!!!! I think its great and never do I have any issues going up technical trails.
  • - 2
 Hi there! I'm testing out to make a instagram-like page on here maybe. I don't know if people will enjoy, if not, I'll just move on. However, yes, I'm trying to get attention I admit, even though you can just check out quickly, and leave a follow if you are interested in a pinkbike page. :3

Hope I didn't waste your time, or the comment section.
  • + 0
 I generally enjoy these vids, but the Chris Akrigg video from yesterday makes it just a few minutes of bullshitting. With that said, it is decent content.
  • + 1
 Let's do a poll pinkbike. How many of the same users will respond to all of these reviews.
  • + 1
 Imagine crashing the the bar doesnt move out the was and smashes your genitals because of the Knock-block... Ouch
  • + 1
 Rode a Remedy this summer and immediately took the knock block out its not hard lol. Doesnt even hit the frame.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy @mikekazimer
Which bike out of the Remedy, Bronson & Stumpjumper gave you the least amount of fatigue?
  • + 2
 Incredible how much the fork flexes during the huck to flat
  • + 1
 I see a lot of hate for the knock block but the weakness of this bike are the tires! Fast rolling with no protection or grip
  • + 3
 Levy hates 2.8
  • + 1
 He isn't heavy enough to appreciate it, or perhaps not aware enough to recognize how well it works for large riders.
  • + 2
 Huh? Im 215 and anytime I’ve ridden anything 2.6 or bigger they are like rolling on a floppy bendy imprecise noodle, everytime you push hard into a corner they squirm @JohanG:
  • + 1
 I'm certainly not a big fan, but they have their place.
  • + 1
 @Carruthers: You just needed wider rims or cushcore.
  • + 1
 Knocking the knock block kinda seems like a low blow, which it’s actually supposed to prevent. Back to the drawing board.
  • + 1
 I love how the front and rear tri lines stay in line during compression.
  • + 1
 Can you compare this to the turner rfx?
  • + 1
 These are becoming redundant, let’s move on to E-Bikes!
  • + 1
 Knock Block is mobile phones' notch.
  • + 1
 Anyone here actually own one?
  • + 1
 Visually looks the same? As opposed to orally looks or what?
  • + 1
 How does this bike compare to the turner rfx?
  • - 1
 KNOCK BLOCK??!! Just get a properly designed bike which handelbars can turn as long as the cables allow without the fork hitting the frame.
  • - 1
 THIS!
no X-ups = fail
  • + 1
 it sounds like the block is the only knock on this bike
  • + 1
 Calm down on the creatine, those calf muscles are getting a little yoked.
  • + 1
 Was that size large beeing tested?
  • + 1
 Mexican boxers boycotting pinkbike in 3. 2...
  • + 1
 The mismatched rotors really bothered me.
  • + 3
 Yeah, me too. One was badly bent in shipping so I had to replace it on short notice.
  • + 1
 Great..no BS reviews Boyz!
  • + 1
 Knock block is a total cock block on technical climbs.
  • + 2
 is that a gx cassette?
  • + 1
 Enough about the bike. Where can I get one of those bottles?
  • + 1
 Wow the only non 29r cleared switchbacks w ease. Mind blowing!
  • + 1
 I love this review format! Thanks Pinkbike
  • + 1
 Sacrifice haha
  • + 1
 I kinda want this bike
  • + 1
 pretty bike
  • + 1
 Air-wolf!
  • + 1
 I, as well came here for the Airwolf reference
  • + 1
 sick
  • + 1
 CONS, can't X-up
  • + 0
 Looks like a session
  • - 1
 Does the knock block mean I can't barspin on it?
  • + 1
 Guess...
  • + 0
 Looks too Sessiony
  • - 3
 These reviews are so hip and cool..you guys are so silly.
  • - 3
 Can someone tell me what is wrong with all Fox 36 products? Why they flex more then Lil Pump?! Is this "normal"?
  • + 1
 Everything flexes like that. It's supposed to.
  • + 1
 how does this compare to the turner rfx?
  • - 1
 Con: Not a 26"
  • + 2
 Stepping into dangerous territory there aren’t you buddy. Wink
  • + 6
 @MTBingSpartan: I just miss my remedy 26". it was 27lbs and contained no carbon. It was a great bike.
  • + 2
 it is when you stick 26 inch wheels in it
  • - 1
 Evil offering please
  • - 2
 I'd really love to see a Canfield Brothers Balance in the mix.
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