Pinkbike Poll: Are Your Local Trails Challenging Enough?

Jun 26, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  
Ibis HD5

“Stop dumbing down the trails!” It's a common refrain, and one that pops up every time a tricky root disappears, or a chunky flat corner turns into a smooth berm. Trail maintenance is a balancing act, and sometimes an overzealous builder or trail organization takes things too far, resulting in a sterile highway instead of an engaging bit of singletrack.

In an ideal world, your local riding area would have trails for everyone, from beginners to pros: Smoother, easily navigated trails without a ton of elevation change for those just getting their feet wet, more difficult but still very manageable options that appeal to almost everyone, as well as a range of even more challenging options for advanced riders. It can be a tricky blend to achieve – expert riders feel left out if they only see new flow trails being built, just like beginners can feel excluded if there aren't any options for safe progression. Topography plays a part too - if you're surrounded by pancake flat terrain it's unlikely your local trails are going to offer as many challenging options as somewhere like Whistler or Champéry.

If you are lucky enough to live somewhere that meets all of your dream trail requirements, don't forget to support your local trail builders - they're the ones toiling away in the pouring rain and freezing cold so you can feast on freshly crafted dirt masterpieces. If you're unhappy with the current situation in your zone, it may be time to pick up a shovel, or at the very least get involved with your local trail organization to see what opportunities there are for improvement.

It can be hard to find locations that have a really well-rounded selection of trails, everything from relatively flat singletrack squiggles to steep, scary lines that are only doable by a select few, which brings us to this week's poll questions.


Are there enough challenging descending trails where you live?



Are there enough challenging climbing trails where you live?



What features do you wish you could see added to your local trail network's descending trails?

Select all that apply



Posted In:
Stories Polls



340 Comments

  • 164 1
 I live in BC. No complaints.
  • 25 0
 Same. If I don’t like it here (Kamloops) I don’t think I’d be happy anywhere.
  • 13 0
 As a dad her in North Vancouver, i find there are many trails for me but very few for beginners or intermediate. I cant seem to find any for my 7 YO other than Bobsled/ Roadside attraction or Circuit 8. (any locals who know others please PM me)

Would like to see a push for more XC/intermediate and beginner trails. Maybe add on to Circuit 8 as I would think that building a shallow sloped trail on Fromme etc... may be to difficult.
  • 9 1
 @fabwizard: cbc is chill
  • 8 0
 @fabwizard: Bert Flynn Park in Port Moody is your best bet.
  • 3 0
 @fabwizard: On lower Fromme, both Pennzoil and Lower Expresso are pretty accessible. On Seymour, Empress bypass and High School League.

If you'd like to venture further out, Bert Flinn Park in Port Moody has lots of easy trails with small features to try. Always see parents with kids there.
  • 5 0
 @fabwizard: Have you tried the new Empress Bypass we rebuilt last year, Fab?

also try High School League, and Richard Juryn? There's also a bunch of trails across Lilloett Road from RJ.
  • 5 3
 B'ham here. Available features directed my job search. Can't complain though the #pavegalbraith stickers sometimes make my eyes roll back in my head.
  • 7 0
 @pcledrew:
We are missing technical climbing trails. Lot of climbing trails but very few that require significant technical skills.
  • 4 0
 @CaMKii: Is this applicable to my SO too? I also find North Shore is more tech than Okanagan trails, we have dry and loose trails.
  • 4 0
 @fabwizard: Thornhill in maple ridge would be perfect. Fun trails for all skill levels, but nothing really challenging or steep. There is also a couple of jump trails there which are rad.
  • 3 0
 @fabwizard: 7th Secret has been smoothed out, there are b lines around the stunts so with your supervision your 7 yo could ride most of it. Oh yeah, You would have to tow him or her up!
  • 4 0
 @makripper: haven’t ridden CBC this year but last year it was definitely not chill.
  • 18 1
 Anyone who’s ever traveled to BC will instantly become disenchanted with their home trails...
  • 8 0
 @kingbike2: I ride 7th quite a bit. unfortunately, my guy is still on 20 inch wheels and the steep armoured switch backs are a bit much.

Towing not an issue, he is a mountain goat and a great technical climber for his age/size/bike. We did 4 laps in a row of bobsled non stop the other day. He is the energizer bunny.
  • 2 0
 @leon-forfar: been meaning to head out there. funny, i grew up there but have not ridden thorn hill since the 80s, well before these trails. I remember bombing the trails above thorn hill hall, and the north side decommissioned logging roads.
  • 3 1
 Kelowna central Okanagan is the best!
  • 1 0
 @cooperquinn-wy: the trails across Lillooet road still have no bikes signs in a couple places off the mainline gravel.
  • 8 0
 Squamish here, pretty much utopia.
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: Thornhill or Bert Flynn are great for kids/beginners
  • 1 0
 @WhatAboutBob: Rodeo is a good start but a few more like that would be welcomed.
  • 1 0
 @taouin: was there on Mon for the first time, some great jump/flow trails rode feel the love in West Kelowna
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: The Richard Djuryn trail just past Cap College is a really nice circuit to ride. You can do multiple loops there and it is fun for every skill level.
  • 1 0
 @WhatAboutBob: You are correct, we are. There are a couple smaller ones around, but nothing serious. I would like more of these as well.
  • 4 4
 @makripper: CBC is not chill! You're obviously an advanced or expert rider who's out of touch with what a beginner or intermediate rider is capable of. Please do not reccomend cbc for a green or blue rider. They could hurt themselves
  • 2 0
 @ThunderChunk: I've taken blue riders down it before. Its fine. Its easy to break down the sections
  • 1 0
 I live in Nebraska........flow? what...... my local trails have NO flow NO long decent and impossible climbs just not fun at all.
  • 2 0
 season length?
  • 1 0
 @makripper: you are right an adult or even teen can be brought down 7th but there is no way for it to be fun for a kid on 20 inch wheels which was how this thread was started.

There have been a bunch of great suggestions and we now have a few ideas where to try.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard:

The Okanagan has amazing trails for people just starting out. I agree with tho with there not being much around our area. If you get the chance to bring your kid out of town you’ll have a blast
  • 2 0
 @ThunderChunk: CBC is currently very chill because the challenging sections (stunts mostly) have been decommissioned or rotted out. It is not steep. Honestly it is not worth riding IMO.
  • 1 0
 @gramboh: I think it's easy for a black but my point was not to reccomend it for beginners or intermediates. There are some very techy lines with high consequence. I think 7th, corkscrew, pingu and pangor are some good trails for an intermediate rider to get on first before cbc.
  • 1 0
 After my first trip to BC I didn’t ride for at least week when I got home and I live in area that most would be stoked to live due to its great mountain biking...@unrooted:
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: If you do not mind a short drive the Bert Flynn area in Coquitlam is fantastic for a 7 year old.
A great area to learn some mild tec on, with flowy sections to keep the fun factor high with out the pucker factor.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: I agree. My daughter and I have been riding Burnaby and Bert Flynn. She likes Bert Flynn. We live in Coquitlam so both are close. I'm thinking we'll give Thornhill a try. The climb isn't too tough and the downs are fun but not too hard. It's surprising how what we experienced riders don't even think about that is supper hard for beginners.
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: my kid started doing 7th when he was 6. 20” wheels no problem. Lots of patience and coaching, constantly redoing different sections, just worked away till he could pretty much clean. No tow either! Expresso is also a favorite. Pingu/Pangor is Doable if you hit Seymour.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: so true.
Usually after a trip in BC, you return home and you feel depressed for a while.
And I'm living in the south east of France, definitely not the worst region to ride in the world.
Usually the depression fades away when winter is here, when it's still sunny and amazing to ride at home and you know it's cold and so wet in BC.
  • 1 0
 @hpman83: this has nothing to do with mountain biking but my wife and I are looking forward to visiting southern France when travel returns to normal.
  • 1 0
 @taouin: I spent half a year riding Kelowna and surrounding areas and bike parks, really impressed by both variety and quality. Rose valley was amazing!
Scheming for a way to get back there or somewhere else in BC to live and ride.
  • 3 0
 @hpman83: But in BC we have the best of all worlds in the winter;
In the morning we can kayak in the rain, then in the afternoon we can mountain bike in the rain, and in the evening we can ski in the rain : )
  • 1 0
 @hpman83: You live in a super nice region for sure. I spent a January in Nice road riding a couple of years ago and it was the best trip I have ever done. I would happily spend my winters there.
  • 80 4
 I can't believe people don't like flat corners!
  • 143 1
 There once was a biker called Hill
Who nailed flat turns with great skill
The berms go away
To learn how to slay
Foot out, flat out and pray *

*ok so it's not a true Limerick but Eddy Lear was a nutter anyway so I'm sure he'd approve.
  • 13 0
 I can't believe it either! Also what about off camber corners?
  • 28 1
 I don't think the issue is that people don't like flat corners so much as most people are probably riding in areas that already have plenty of them. Outside of bike parks, they're probably the most common feature on that list.
  • 9 4
 I'm sitting home with a broken shoulder from a crash on a flat corner. Boo to flat corners.
  • 4 0
 Shore-ners aren't for everyone.
  • 12 0
 all corners are flat or off camber when every trail in your trail system but the bike park was built for hikers.
  • 38 0
 @Kitejumping: Your hikers are too slow. On the Shore our hikers pin it. Before bermed corners were built we would lose about 30 hikers per year from them going too hot into corners. Some of them have never been found.
  • 5 0
 @rrolly: that idea could make for a hilarious IFHT edit.
  • 3 2
 I voted for flat corners. Where I live, the trails are all very flowy. That's because once natural trails all get the berm treatment by some trail builders who think the more berms the better. It gets quiet boring if you ask me, especially in mellow terrain.
  • 3 0
 Its not that I don’t like them. I just have plenty????
  • 2 0
 @Kitejumping: then when you ask the town if you can build trails they say they must be hiker oriented...
  • 1 0
 @Alexmdmtb: and the cycle continues.
  • 2 0
 @Kitejumping: yep... The town only allowing hiking oriented trails, then the hikers complain about mountain bikers, then the mountain bikers complain about the trails, the mountain bikers add features to the trail, the trail becomes a mountain biking trail, the hikers complain more and someone gets hurt and mountain biking isn't allowed.
  • 1 0
 @dlxah: bike parks are common?!?!?! Wjere do you live? Clearly not in northern california
  • 53 1
 It's funny how so many people ride 160+ slacked out enduro tanks yet the trails are starting to resemble manicured bike parks. Just doesn't make sense to me.
  • 10 0
 The ive gone back to a Trail bike for that very reason.
  • 3 1
 @jase111171: same. stepped down to a 130/150 bike and trails are exciting again. Made me realize how lazy I was being with line choice.
  • 23 1
 This is why mini-Enduro was proposed. So people can still self-identify as EndurBros even when they don’t need an actual Enduro bike. Because “trail” and “all mountain” are dirty words to a Bro.
  • 13 2
 @skierdud89: and the new breed of shorter travel trail bikes with great geo,makes for a better ride experience,where the only thing holding folk back is the riders skill level.95% of folk are overbiked and under skilled.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I live near Santa Cruz and everything can pretty much be ridden with a trail bike (120-150mm) easily. However, trails around here are not very technical at all.
  • 4 0
 CX bikes, 700x35 tires, and mtb bars, it's the future.
  • 2 0
 @Kitejumping: 2.4 tires on 130/150 travel MTBs with drop adventure bars are the future.
  • 36 0
 What if I told you that someone else's bike choice does not affect you at all
  • 1 0
 @jase111171: True! Most around Las Vegas riding 160mm bikes on XC trails.
  • 4 0
 @jase111171: Yep. I just switched to a '20 Optic from a '19 Patrol. It is without question the faster bike 90% of the time. I am enjoying climbing again. But it's a relatively unforgiving little beast. Was reminded today quite harshly there's 140mm (not 170) up front. The rear end is fantastic and precise. I think this bike will force me to improve. ????????
  • 4 0
 @jubilee55: suspension products now are so good,compared to a few year ago,don't need all the travel,we though we needed.If you only have the one bike,an AM bike(or enduro as they call it now)is the way to go,for uplift days etc.But if you can afford 2 bikes a trail bike and DH is all I need personally.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: UC doesn't have technical riding? Are you a pro?
  • 1 0
 So true
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy:
I wouldn't recommend you ride Fir Trail at Corte De Madera, UCSC to highway 9, or Ridge Trail/ Brail at Soquel Demo Forest aggressively, on anything less than a enduro bike.

Even on an "easy" descent like Wilder Ranch, I feel like I'm faster on a bigger bike where I never reach the bike's limits and feel squirrelly.
  • 2 0
 @Glory831Guy: @iliveonnitro Sounds like you guys need to get out of your bubble to see how gnarly trails can really get and still be rideable. UC and Braille are fun trails but pretty much blue rated trails anywhere else, perhaps single black diamond, but that is a stretch. Of course you can be faster at those trails with a longer travel bike, but it is not necessary. I have ridden all those trails on shorter travel trail bikes and longer travel bikes. Braille is fastest for me on lighter mid-travel 140mm travel bike because of the short pedal sprints at the bottom.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: Braille is an easy trail, even with all the features. Nothing legal around here is that challenging. There's a bunch of trails I don't think you've discovered, though. Sure, there's harder out there, but we're not all looking to huck off a cliff at Rampage.
  • 1 0
 @iliveonnitro: Yeah, I have done a lot of off the map riding in the entire Bay Area. I probably know the big majority of spots. Some are decent, but still nothing like out of the area. Even SoCal has some more technical trails. I heard SLO has a lot of technical trails too, but never ridden there.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: I rode the SLO ones. Definitely tech, including a spot i walked. Not much steep that challenges UC, but it's a different kind of difficult.

There's a trail at N* that's pretty damn hard. I think it was in EWS 2? years ago. Can't remember the name, but the drop, followed by the rock garden that leaves no room for error, is a bit terrifying.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy:
Don't get me wrong, I'm actually looking for an XC bike for all the easy trails around here. I'll probably never do any 'downcountry' riding on it though. I have too much mechanical sympathy to pull that off. I tend to plow through technical sections, and overjump stuff to flat which is probably why I feel the need for extra travel
  • 58 15
 My local trails would be more enjoyable without e bikes......I’ll get my coat
  • 20 1
 My only MAJOR problem with e bikes is when they come flying up around a blind corner. Been run off the trail a few times now because you just aren't expecting it.
  • 7 95
flag mcozzy (Jun 26, 2020 at 12:49) (Below Threshold)
 Us ebikers think the same about those still on snail bikes.
  • 10 1
 @skierdud89: yep, same here.
  • 7 9
 @mcozzy: "SNAIL BIKES"! This should be the lead comment. It sounds nicer than "Luddite Bike" too.
  • 20 2
 @mcozzy: then u motorcyclists should build your own trails.
  • 3 10
flag Geochemistry (Jun 26, 2020 at 22:20) (Below Threshold)
 @brentkratz: I do. Uphill. Loose rock. Loose sand. Perfect eMTB challenges. But we'll share with luddite bikers too.
  • 5 3
 Ebikes have some good merits and I'm sure they are a blast to ride. The problem is the overuse of trails. Trails that used to be technical now have wide fast lines beat into them. Places that only fit, dedicated riders ride now have people doing multiple laps on heavy bikes. This has happened when only a small portion of riders are on ebikes. Most the trails in my area are illegal for all bikes and if not for respect of the trails I would buy a dual sport before a $6000 ebike. I would love to see trails for specific bikes but I don't see the support (money and infrastructure) for it.
  • 8 6
 @brentkratz: true that. Never seen a ebiker digging. Dont earn their turns either way
  • 5 0
 @yeti-monster: many of our trail builders around here ride ebikes. Helps them get heavier equipment into the backcountry (here = seattle and washington state area)
  • 3 3
 @mikeSC: What's the difference between a 180 lb rider on a 30 lb bike and a 160 lb rider on a 50 lb bike? Luddite logic.
  • 3 2
 @Geochemistry: Like I said, multiple laps compared to one.
  • 8 2
 @Geochemistry: maybe it's just in the UK but most of the guys on ebikes are a fair bit more than 160lbs...
  • 1 0
 @Geochemistry: 160lb ebike riders are a rarity. The majority are still people who don't have the fitness to do 4hrs on an analog bike. More loops = more wear.
  • 40 0
 Front range of Colorado (Denver area) has lots of great riding, however, we are seriously behind the times in terms of directional, bike only trails with features. We got raw, rocky trails all over.. not a jump trail in the area worth anything and user conflict continues to grow as population has boomed.. yet almost zero new trail...

I go to Canada every year for something different.. missing traveling right now...
  • 6 0
 Cheers. Somewhat similar down here in CO Springs. You really gotta pedal (I'm talking 10+ miles of constant uphill) to get to more remote stuff and enjoy without concern of hikers.

Still, I am thankful to live in an area where there are so many open spaces and options. Still have yet to explore the whole Front Range!
  • 8 0
 Utah hates directional bike trails too... pretty good with jump trails but the only way to get a directional DH trail is to make it so steep you can't ride up it. Even then I find hikers slogging up things now and again.
  • 19 0
 The only bike only downhill trail that I'm aware of in the entire CO front range is Lower Long Horn at White Ranch and that was only made bike only downhill in the last couple years. After that you have to head out to Floyd Hill on i70. Its fucking nuts to me that with the explosion in the CO population and the increased popularity of the sport that we have had so very little trail expansion in the front range. But i guess it also makes sense since IMBA is based in Boulder and they do fuck all for trail expansion. Its all defense from them.
  • 13 0
 Good news! JCOS just announced that Enchanted Forest and the Gut at Apex are gonna be downhill bike only on even days starting in September!
  • 2 0
 @reindeln: That's gonna be scary. It needs to be DH/Bike only all the time (which won't happen) or multi-directional multi-user all the time. It won't take long 'til a hiker gets nuked - that's the only reason Longhorn has been mostly successful. Thanks for the info though!
  • 2 0
 @freestyIAM: I agree, it's ridiculous. Things are getting much better but years ago we had local orgs helping USFS build questionable trails and supported some horrific policies wrt types of trails, trail building standards, and much more. While the rest of the country built bike specific trails we built more multi-use garbage. We mt bikers have to take some responsibility, although these policies were pretty much entrenched when I started mt biking. There are some good social trails, but we need more official bike-only trails for all ability levels.
  • 5 0
 Floyd Hill is a little ways up I70, but it has a dedicated downhill, bike only trail. The lower portion is a pretty nice jump line. The upper portion is a web of crossing lines with rocks, drops, berms, and smaller jumps. The main line should be rideable by an intermediate rider, but there are some fairly large features too.
  • 2 1
 Directional trails should be used more. Not all trails can be directional (up and back trails), but it really helps to avoid conflicts. I think directions should switch on different days of the week. I have ridden some trail systems with directional trails different days of the week and it works.
  • 2 0
 @bschleenbaker: come visit Cedar! We’ve been working on a good batch of directional DH trails. There aren’t a ton quite yet, but enough for a day or two of riding.
  • 2 0
 @reindeln: And so starts a management nightmare...
  • 2 2
 @tacklingdummy: Betasso is a great example of a directional trail system.
  • 4 0
 @rocky-mtn-gman: here's hoping for big signage telling hikers they're liable to get nuked on odd days.
  • 2 0
 It’s not Front Range technically but BlackJack in Buffalo Creek trail is very, very technical and directional.
  • 3 0
 @davec113: living in Golden I get weirded out when I am jealous of trail systems in places like Pittsburgh, but it still happens.
  • 3 0
 @Paddock22: anything east of the Divide is technically the front range.
  • 2 1
 @freestyIAM: There are lots of land ownership issues (i.e. the El Dorado Canyon to Nederland connector). Additionally, the hiking/enviormental groups are well funded, well organized and vocal. I think for impactful trail expansion you need the entire community behind MTB, not just a singular group. Not saying IMBA is blameless here but it's hard to be aggressive when everything you do ends up in litigation.

Even in places like Moab, trails end up in court, which tie things up for years and cost thousands of dollars. The "Big Burrito" trail (now called Falcon Flow) took like 5 years to get sorted out and 6 months to build. Luckily, they persevered and I heard its awesome!

moabtimes.com/2016/04/14/27155213-suwa-appeal-halts-plans-for-big-burrito-non-motorized-trail-in-sand-flats-area
  • 3 0
 Front range as a whole has practically no directional trails and despite there being plenty of big rock formations to use as rolls or drops the trail builders do everything they can to go around them, its really frustrating. Lots of areas that they could incorporate into the existing trail systems to create awesome little slick rock areas like in Fruita/Sedona/Moab, but they just dont.
  • 3 0
 We have tons of awesome legal dirt jumps in the city bike parks and every one of them is in a field that gets strong cross winds.
  • 2 0
 @whambat: Well I'll be damned...learn something new everyday.
  • 6 0
 When people say sarcastically "DoNt CoME To COlorAdo iT SucKs Here"... Its ironically true in terms of front range biking. Sure there is epic big mountain riding along with resorts but Jeffco open space is ran by a guy who has literally said he doesn't like bikers. The whole mtb community is very unhappy. Its depressing how far behind the times we are compared to other mtb destinations in the country and not being able to do anything about it. Besides building illegal trails.
  • 5 0
 @jb247708: the fiasco with the Giddyup cancellation pretty much exemplifies the asinine management by JCOS.
  • 1 0
 @jb247708: I’ve been told by BCOS folks that they don’t want more bikers visiting here, so there’s no incentive to build more/difficult trails. One of the park rangers told me that older hikers complain the loudest, so they typically get what they want.

But there are super fun trails if you explore a little bit. Smile
  • 1 1
 Same with Tahoe. Such a lack of MTB only or directional trails. The local trail steward even tried it with some signage during the early days of covid lockdown to try to limit interaction and exposure amongst trail users. One day later many of the signs were knocked over and damaged. People suck.
  • 1 0
 This, Floyd Hill is the only option in the front range outside of going to Trestle or Keystone@Helium89:
  • 1 0
 @Wildeman21: definitely planning on it.
  • 27 1
 After riding in Bellingham and other PNW areas the past few summers, I've come to the conclusion that most of Utah trail networks are joke. I find it hilarious that IMBA labels Park city as a "Gold-level riding destination" when a trail network as simple as Darrington, WA blows it out of the water.

If you're from Utah and you want to see better trails in Park City. Reach out to Mountain trail foundation and tell them you're sick of seeing machine-cut flow trails be put in every year.

While you're at it, ask them about the $5k the spent on food expenses in 2018, $12K in travel, $22K in office expenses, $22k in rent, and how they only got three lame trials with over $850K donated to them in 2018.

projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/870514223/01_2020_prefixes_84-90%2F870514223_201812_990_2020012117046267
  • 4 0
 I grew up in Utah and now live in Oregon, and it is remarkable how much better the riding could be in Utah. It's not that it's bad, but given the terrain, it could be SO much better. I'm back in Utah visiting right now and kinda just want to get back home to the trails in Oregon. Oh well!
  • 5 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: It's crazy driving around the cottonwoods, or anywhere on the Wasatch front and seeing so much potential here is sad. I'm grateful for what we currently have but wish we could legally build what the majority prefers rather than catering to the "average rider".
  • 7 0
 I've comunicated exactly that many times. The easy stuff is good and plentiful. Without a variety of advanced stuff though, the Gold rating is a joke. You would never go to a ski area that was 90% green 9% intermediate and 1% advanced. I was told it was mostly due to access to good hotels and stuff like that.
  • 6 0
 @Howieday91 Someone had to be That Guy and explicitly expose the reality of trails in Park City and most of Utah. Smile
  • 10 1
 It seems like American trail building right now is very dominated by machine-cut flow trails; almost all the officially sanctioned trails or reroutes I've seen go in the last 5 years have been that way.

I think it's trail organizations' risk management and appealing to the beginners and masses. Steep technical trails are seen as unsustainable (which they sometimes are, but not always) and dangerous (which I think is bogus, way more likely to break something or hit another user ripping berms at 20mph than hopping around working your way through techy stuff).

Hopefully the pendulum will swing back, otherwise all the trails will be the same anywhere you go.
  • 7 0
 @jwestenhoff: ain’t like that at all up here in the PNW. We have flow, tech, steeps, you name it. Check it out sometime!
  • 11 0
 I've never ridden Park City, but I have to say that Moab did meet and exceed my expectations. I spent 6 days riding and didn't run out of really fun trails. The Whole Enchilada, Gemeni Bridges, even the easy stuff was fun and a really nice change to riding in the steep, deep and wet mountains of North Vancouver and Squamish. The whole Moab experience camping out is pretty cool, such a contrast to BC.
  • 3 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I’ve done some riding in Oregon (Ashland and Oakridge) and the trails are nice but they don’t have the same level of tech we have here in the Bay Area (specifically Santa Cruz for forest tech). I haven’t made it to the upper northern part or Wa yet but I’m thinking they may be a greener version of my home trails to check out.
  • 2 0
 @Jesse221: ya, I’ve never ridden in the Bay Area. Lucky for me I’m unashamed in my love for berms and jumps. I’m fine with steeps and tech, but it’s never my first pick. So Oregon is treating me well. I lived in a Phoenix for 10 years and had my fill of tech for a while.
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Agreed. I lived in Ogden for several years before moving back to Seattle. Northern UT is fun but has soooooo much more potential. Powder and Snowbasin could easily be stellar mtb resorts if they wanted.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Moab is in its own world. Northern UT has the potential to be a top destination with terrain that sits nicely between PNW mountains and red rock desert.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: definitely something to be said for visiting trails in a completely different climate. I lived in Phoenix for 10 years and much prefer Oregon, but Phoenix trails are really fun for some variety in the winter time.

Re: Utah, I tend to think of southern Utah as separate from Northern. Same state but totally different terrain. Moab is cool for sure. St. George, (Virgin, Hurricane, etc. has really cool terrain but not that many good trails.) northern Utah has great terrain to but so many trails are just multi-use hiking trails. It could be so much better.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: shh, hush now, we don't have any trails in Southern Oregon, stop messing with these fine folks...
  • 1 0
 @Jesse221: Amen to the bay. If there's one nice thing about land management policies that are so overwhelmingly anti-mtb, it's that riders are forced to create the majority of our own trails, and while most everything has to be built illegally and poached- whether it's forest, or sketchy dry gnar- we got the goods because of it. And there is a damn good reason to own a 160+mm rig if you know the region and get at it.
  • 1 0
 @frenchlinesandfrenchfries: Is see what you did there mr. P. Let’s ride sometime
  • 3 0
 It is astounding. But Mountain Trails and Vail and Alterra don't really care what a bunch of dirtbag, pedal up for free, won't buy a $35 sandwich group of MTBers actually think. Not when you got East Coaster, second home money on the line.
  • 19 1
 Unpopular opinion: I live in the alps, and it sucks.

The trail/bike culture is very different here than it is in North America or even GB.
We have just as many riders, and we have lots of trails. But they're not meant for biking. Yes, they are challenging, go up to every peak with beautiful view and are even taken care of by the state/county and you are (mostly) allowed to ride them. But they have man-made stairs everywhere, thight switchbacks everywhere and both the farmers and hikers don't like seeing you on these trails – even being a very respectful rider.

So, as a more gravity oriented rider, you would love to have some places that you can go fast without scaring/killing hikers, build jumps, berms etc.

Two reasons why this is impossible around here:
– To build these trails, you have to work with the authorities and all different land owners (a whole track can be 5+ farmers). One of the later will always say no. (Thanks to anyone who had the nerves to fight for trails!)
– We have no «no dig no ride» mentality here. Everyone expects the authorities to build trails ("they build hiking trails, therefore should build biking trails as well")

And before anyone says "but you have bikeparks in Switzerland" – yes, but they're just in tourism areas, built by the ski resort (and every city has like one public bike trail). We have no such things as trail networks like in BC – but we do have the mountains for it. We do not have that much space, but that shouldn't be the issue. How can we get there?

also: Please, fellow Swiss/French/Italian/Austrian/German riders, correct me if I‘m wrong. I'm wondering how you see it.
  • 7 0
 Interesting. We are lucky in North America to have lots of public land, trails crossing multiple private properties are a real pain to get to happen (although they do happen with enough patience and hard work).
  • 3 0
 It’s better to ask for forgiveness than ask for permission in these circumstances.

youtu.be/Z4sMratf31k
  • 5 0
 I've travelled to Switzerland 5x with Sharon to write about trails. You're right in many ways. The trails are not really for bikes so you have to possess pretty good technical skills to enjoy them. Of course you have wonderful infrastructure to get around and to get to alpine

Then you have easier flow-style trails which are purpose built for biking.

But you don't have the sheer variety of BC or WA for example. I can think of no place (closest I could think of is perhaps Zermatt) with the density of trails of even a medium BC city.

And you are right. It's the building culture. Here in BC we were lucky to have so many building and riding. And through sheer neglect and inaction the authorities let us do that.

I can see why does not happen in CH for example. There are too many people and too many landowners. But at least you are not Austria where there is literally contempt for bikers.
  • 3 0
 Here in the southwest of Germany it‘s not so much the lack of people wanting to do the trailwork that stops trails from happening (a lot of unsanctioned builds happen that are often not very sustainable because of the population density rake&ride is the only way not to get caught building).
It‘s the long fight with officials. There are lots of examples where people dedicate their free time for three years trying to get permission to build and maintain a 2km trail completely with volunteers, only to have one person changing their mind at the end and cancelling the whole thing for no apparent reason when everything seems to be clear.
  • 1 0
 In my area (,Perugia, central Italy) we ride mostly on very old trails, opened many years ago by huntsmen, firewood harvesters and the like. They are narrow, steep and twisty, and often cross challenging rock outcroppings. Land is mostly private, and the policy here is: Do not exaggerate. You can trim the overgrowth, add some berm, dig water drainages... but you can not tear the woods apart to build a 3km jump line.
That said, I think we are lucky, because landowners are quite tolerant, and often we bikers get thanked by huntsmen and other users for doing trail mainteinance.
  • 4 0
 I know what you mean. I recently moved to a different location in Switzerland. I had to start all over again with finding trails. Nothing is indicated, so you have to search for the right kind of hiking trails that are fun to ride with a bike. And when you find one, you have to pray that there is some sort of rideable access road / path to the top, so that you don’t have to push your bike up all the way. But I’m still not complaining, since you are officially allowed to ride wherever you want, which is not the case in other places (e.g. Schwarzwald’s 2 meter rule...), and Finale is only 5 hours by car...
  • 1 0
 Really wonder what area in switzerland you are talking about...?
  • 1 0
 Dude, riding in the alps is unreal. Admitadly, there are little to no trail centres like in the UK and what there is needs to be found and can be pretty gnarly but when you find the good stuff it's pretty much unparalleled. Do agree though, could do a lot more with what they've got and bike culture, especially in the German speaking part has plenty of room to improve.
  • 2 0
 I moved to Austria from the UK in January and my MTB experience so far have been interesting... Three observations:

1. The trails I've ridden are natural and technical, similar to the more challenging parts of the Lake District. Steep with copious roots and rocks and really exposed in places.
2. I've yet to see much evidence of the trail pixies, trails are not adapted for bikes. Outside bike parks, I've taken a survival over speed approach to descending and I can't see that changing.
3. There's a genuine antipathy between landowners and MTBers that's rooted in the law. I've been warned multiple times by locals about angry farmers, everyone has a story about a run-in.


Considering the legal issues, as I understand them (MTBing is illegal on most trails outside bike parks) it's easy to see why there isn't a building culture here.
  • 13 0
 I live in the PNW near Seattle. No complaints with access to some of the best riding areas on earth with BC right up to north. Tiger, Raging, Tokul, Ollalie, Leavenworth, Roslyn, Duthie, Cap Forest, Duthie Backcountry, Darrington, Chuckanut, Galbraith and then all the riding areas in the Van/Squamish/whistler area. We are so lucky.
  • 2 0
 Yup. Insanely lucky.
  • 2 0
 yep, part of why i moved here
  • 1 0
 Shington rules the mouintain bike world! WE GOT IT ALL!
  • 2 0
 And you haven't even mentioned all of the epic back country riding within a 2 hour radius.
  • 13 2
 Alberta has an awesome mix of beginner to tech gnar DH tacks, and a huge variety of XC trails both in the front range of the rockies and both big cities. But according to pinkbike, Alberta doesn't exist in the MTB world, despite its origins in Calgary. Stick to BC, nothing to see here Smile
  • 7 2
 I think Alberta has fine riding, it just pales in comparison to the absolutely world class riding in BC.

There's what, maybe 6 trail networks in Alberta: Crowsnest, Kananaskis/Bragg, Canmore, Jasper, and Edmonton. I have lived in Edmonton, Canmore, Crowsnest, and Bragg, and have ridden all the trail networks...There's only a handful of trails that I really remember as outstanding are the Razor's edge (best trail in Alberta imo) and School of Rock in Crowsnest.
  • 3 5
 @theconorcons: ya ya ya we get it, BC good, Alberta bad. Trust me we've all heard it 1000x, its pretty much impossible to say anything good about Alberta without a British Columbian saying "OH YEA, WELL BC IS BETTER BECAUSE____" . its like that annoying guy at a party that can't hear a story without needing to tell his own, so much cooler version

no one is saying the riding in AB is better than BC, would just be nice to get some recognition for the great riding we have over here
  • 3 0
 @theconorcons: interesting that you don't mention Big Bear and Buck50 in Crowsnest. Also when is the last time you went to Moose Mountain/ Prairie. What about Baseline Mountain west of Rocky Mountain House?
What about Nordegg???
Also there are a few but some trails in Banff as well.
  • 1 0
 @jerome: I last lived in CNP in 2017, I don't think Buck50 had been built then. It sounds very cool! I rode Big Bear as well, but don't remember it at all. Last time I rode Moose was via a free heli-drop in 2016 (long story)! How is it these days? I didn't overly enjoy it back then, and rode it semi-regularly. I lived in Nordegg for a summer and thought the riding was mostly a waste of time. Baseline looks and sounds really cool though!
  • 1 0
 @arrowheadrush: I grew up in Edmonton, believe me I feel where you are coming from. The fact is just that the riding in Alberta is NOT great, and to claim it is is disingenuous. I think Alberta definitely punches above its weight given the terrain limitations, but its just a fact that when your area is 90% prairies, you're not going to get much recognition in the Mountain bike world.
  • 12 0
 I love my local trails but there's a serious lack of intermediate to advanced drops and jumps to practice on before heading to the bike park.
  • 3 2
 your bike park doesn't have anything intermediate?
  • 5 0
 @lognar: It does, but I'd like to be able to practice intermediate stuff locally to be more comfortable at the park. I think that would help me advance to bigger (still not huge, I have to be at work on Monday) stuff at Bailey MTB Park and Beech Mountain.
  • 13 2
 @wmoody54: May I recommend a spade, a mattock, some mates and a crate of beer? A couple of days and you'll have whatever you want to ride ready to rip.
  • 2 0
 @Linkpin: I ought to. The local trails are State and County Parks so you can't really work there without the proper permission though.
  • 1 0
 @wmoody54: I'm with you on adding more public progression. I'm currently in Maine and pretty much every jump line around me is A) Illegal and B) Huge risk/reward factor. Then you go to places like the PNW where like 75% of the public trails have skills park sections with progression drops and jumps and you wonder whats the hold up with your local MBA.
  • 9 0
 Living in the Netherlands below sea level where riding up a dirt belt or descending from from a dyke is the best we can get. I,m born here, but if there ever will be an international justice system living here should be the mountainbikers community service.
  • 8 0
 I live in Bellingham, WA. We have it good here. One area that could be improved is beginner trails, but we have a wide variety of everything else. Thank you to all the awesome trail builders out here. Your work is appreciated!
  • 2 1
 Agreed, I moved away for a few years and found out everywhere else in the US kinda sucks. Good to be back and see more trails, pumptracks and jump lines being added.
  • 3 0
 We are hogging all the beginner trails in Park City.
  • 4 0
 Keystone, Pick up sticks, mama bear, simple green, mole trap, candy, intestine, papa bear, oly, pony express, pigs, lost giants, son of sam, wallace and grommet, intestine, bandito, wonderland, cedar dust green, brown pow climb, lost lake trail, pine and cedar, arroyo, two dollar If I were to teach someone how to ride there's tons of options
  • 1 0
 @nw-rhb: Better not come up to Northern VT, real shit riding up here...
  • 2 0
 @ipedalhard: For real, I have 2 buddies that are a month into riding and they just can't get enough of galbraith. It's got something for everyone
  • 8 0
 Southern Ontario is all owned land, mostly divided into farming properties. This, and the mostly flat terrain makes for trails that try to squeeze the most singletrack distance from the small plot of land they occupy. Constant ups and downs and trails that twist back on each other to make the best of the space available. It would honestly be nice to ride a trail that actually goes somewhere rather than simply popping out a few feet from it's entrance.
  • 3 0
 This is the northern Virginia region around DC... 2 mile strip of land somehow gets turned into a 17 mile trail... hats off to the creativity of the builders but it'd be nice not to cross the same bridge on three "different" legs of the trail.
  • 3 0
 They don’t call it On-Terrible for nothing haha. It’s all tight XC trails here and it’s just endless loops.
  • 12 0
 I'm in Florida, what are climbs and descents?
  • 12 0
 You know, headwinds and tailwinds....
  • 2 0
 @stevemokan: Ahhh now I understand!
  • 7 0
 I've travelled to a lot of places in the world to ride and to write about riding. Nothing comes close to the density AND variety of Southern BC. Nothing

Even smaller towns in Northern and Central BC have more trails and more variety than some traditionally touted destinations.

The only explanation I can think of for this is the self_ help culture of the BC bike communities. We get some government help but to be frank, they mostly get in the way ( and yes, sanctioned, inclusive, permission blah blah...). BC biking and more importantly, trailbuilding and trailwork culture is like an insidious addiction. One I've had for decades.

Edit- Moab, Bellingham come closest
  • 4 0
 But when it does come to government led trail building, Evergreen MTB Alliance is setting a pretty good example in WA.
  • 3 0
 @crsimmons: that is such a progressive exception and one that hopefully can set the standard. It's been impressive beyond words what has happened under Evergreen.

Also TrailMix in Moab has been consistently superior
  • 7 0
 More trails could be a good start. There is 1 good trail, 16km from my house that is private property, and I have to pay to entry. Thats the good part. The bad part, there is active armed robery for the bikes.
  • 6 0
 Vancouver BC and having ridden the North Shore since the 80's I can say it's generally a lot better than it was since there is more flow, better trail construction so less unsustainable mud, and you are less likely to die. And you can readily go to Squamish, Whistler, Vancouver Island, the Valley and beyond.
  • 6 0
 Alberta - If you can ride all of Moose Mountain, you can ride anywhere! Or Razors Edge, Cox Hill, and Baseline, etc. Lots of sweet riding and tons of beginner and intermediate trails in Canmore and West Bragg. I think its a really great area... no, its not BC, but it stands to be among the top in Canada.
  • 9 1
 Illinois reporting in - this is one of the more depressing polls I've seen.
  • 4 0
 Central/North VT is pretty good. lots of trails systems, tech for days, and lots of cool new flow trails constantly getting built. Lots of DH parks, too. Only complaint is its hard to find big jumps outside of Killington that are close, although you can always drive ~2.5 hours to Highland or Thunder. I moved to DC for a few months last year and basically everything was worse, made me appreciate the home trails much more.
  • 5 1
 99% of trails here are multi-use Forest Service trails. Conflict is growing every year...local bike group pushing for more but Feds move slow and generally not intersted in creating bike specific trails.
  • 5 0
 When i lived in Bozeman i couldn't believe how small the trail network was. Most of what we rode wasn't sanctioned & would get ripped down.
Glad to see some stuff like copper is at least happening out there.
  • 1 0
 @wompom: rich city people moving here want to fish not bike I guess. So much state land that’s more or less abandoned that could easily be converted to more copper city style stuff.
  • 4 1
 Boston/eastern New England has really good beginner-friendly dirt roads and easy, mixed-use singletrack but not much in the way of progression for drops and rollers (Lynn Woods is sketchy as all hell and I'm not going near there on less than 130mm of travel again). We've got it really good for techy, rooty, rocky punchy climbs but pretty lacking for fire road climbs with big descents. This is a topographic issue more than anything.

My biggest issue with the area is the mixed-use nature of most of the trails - I love seeing other people out on the trails, but the people that go for walks with headphones in, people with their dogs off-leash, and the sheer number of people out and about during normal waking hours makes it really hard to get a good ride in with some higher speeds or interrupted climbs.

There's a huge elitist mentality around here too. Plenty of people around here seem to have the ability to drop 5 figures on a bike but won't reciprocate a wave or a head nod on trail. For whatever reason, fat bike guys are the best to shoot the shit with. They don't give a damn about what they look like, how fast they're going, or setting PRs - they just wanna ride bikes, which I think a lot of people in this sport seem to have lost the desire to do.
  • 1 0
 That's why I go to NH and VT a lot to ride ..much bigger descents with the same type of terrain as Mass!
  • 1 0
 Bike parks are quite epic out here too!
  • 2 0
 Go to Vietnam, Wompatuck, and Pine Hills. They all have decent intermediate jumps and drops for you to progress on.
  • 1 0
 North of Lynn on the North Shore has fantastic stuff. Same topo challenge, but there’s a great mix of technical and fun stuff.
  • 2 0
 Also, give Lynn a chance. Keep riding it. It’ll make you a stronger all-around rider. Yes, it’s hard, but overcoming the challenges there is mega rewarding.
  • 1 0
 @drpheta: Vietnam is a ton of fun, you’re right. The features area of Wompy is way too sketchy for me at my comfort level now. Haven’t checked out pine hills - next on the list.

I think more than anything I need to find a good mentor to tow me into places and push me a bit. All in good time though ????????
  • 3 0
 Living in Santiago Oriente has it's perks! I have everything from a 20 minute trail 3 minutes from my house to full day andes pacifico circuits at 15 minutes by car to the base, and several nearby bike parks with almost every kind of trail there is. There aren't many wooden features though, but I never liked those anyways.
  • 3 0
 Squamish. We're finally getting really jumps (Slippery Salmon, Miki's Magic, Hot Tuna) and its great! We've got climb trails for days, and natural tech I never even want to attempt.

Slippery Salmon is my new favorite because its gnarly enough that you cant really just roll/case everything and/or let your toddlers just frolic on blind landings.
  • 4 1
 In the Okanagan we need more fun beginner trails. That is probably the biggest barrier to entry at the moment. People are interested and excited to try biking, they head out and get discouraged by how hard the intermediate and advanced trails are. Let's open the sport up to everyone and every ability.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: Pentictons mice trails are 80% intermediate) beginner.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: didn't mean to tag u bro
  • 2 0
 Campbell area in penticton seemed pretty beginerish to me, the hardest trail in the network was a blue... you want more beginner than this , or more of this ?
  • 1 0
 @Acid11: yeah Campbell is chill.
  • 1 0
 Can’t disagree more, having lived in Whistler Pemberton, the Lower mainland, Golden, and the Okanagan, and ridden Nelson, Rossland, Kamloops, Lilloett etc I think the Okanagan has hands down the most accessible trail network for newer riders than probably anywhere else in the province. From rail trail, to Ellison park. To lower smith creek, to lower Crawford, Kal park, Rose valley all have trails that you could crush on an entry level hardtail.
  • 4 0
 Even if you can ride all your trails, you can always ride them faster! Besides if you live in BC there are always trails you can't do.
  • 3 1
 It’s the opposite here, I wouldn’t mind some more flow. Every trail is feels like a contest of who can build the most awkward line, my stuff included. Probably to do with the fact we don’t have much elevation to play with and a lot of rocks and roots.
  • 4 0
 We are the king of Jankey trails here in Flagstaff. If the mountain is not on fire you will find a trail with a tree in the apex.
  • 1 0
 I used to have my wife shuttle me with my chainsaw and I would clear out little sections every now and again. Always a tree around a fast and steep corner, but I still loved riding in flag.
  • 6 0
 Vancouver Island, enough said.
  • 3 0
 How about "my local trails are plenty fun but the longest climb is about two minutes and the longest descent is about 45 seconds?" Can't really participate in this poll properly.
  • 2 0
 It is a "Grass is always greener" argument. Maybe we just get spoiled with what we have access to. I live in Durango and have some of the best singletrack in the world available out my front door... but doesn't mean I don't dream about the features found in BC or slickrock of Moab, etc. Grateful for what I have, but would be more grateful if we could legally build what the people want.
  • 1 0
 Also in Durango. Agreed. We’re not wanting for anything. The riding is so good. But we could use a modern eye for revamping disused trails and expansion of new trails. But as I said. It’s so good there is nothing to complain about.
  • 2 1
 The grass doesn't get any greener than in parts of BC. Literally, its temperate rainforest. When I moved out here I saw colours of green I had never seen before in real life.
  • 7 1
 You BC inhabitants are a lucky bunch.-
  • 2 0
 I'm a crappy rider with no downhill skills... like none. It's depressing to think about. Hell, I'm not even fit or particularly skilled uphill. Damn... Anyway, I have no idea what real mountain bikers would think of the Pocatello Idaho area, but I'm sure happy. Add long as I'm not thinking about how much I suck at my favorite sport/hobby that is.
  • 1 0
 There are cool trails there
  • 1 0
 Pocatello has some really fun riding, with great backcountry potential for big rides. Maybe not a lot of bike parkish type trails, but a bit of everything else. They should start biking on Pebble Creek.
  • 4 0
 the solution to the shitty colorado trails is to move in a northwest diagonal direction until you hit canada. joking, but kind of not.
  • 3 0
 Here in good ‘ol Kitsap County, Washington more trails are removed and features destroyed then built. There seems to be a war against mounting biking unless it’s a fun-for-everyone safe trail.
  • 3 0
 Central coast of California, most everything is crazy rocky and technical. I actually wish we had some more mellow flowy trails around here for days you don’t want your fillings shaken out.
  • 1 0
 Montaña de Oro? Super flowy IMHO
  • 4 0
 Southern California: lots of trails, probably more than ten thousand riders from San Diego to Los Angeles, and zero (0) legal trails with advanced difficulty.
  • 3 0
 Not sure what you consider to be advanced difficulty, but have you been to Rocky Peak? The landscape is gorgeous and unique, and the trails are no joke. People get helivaced out of there like every weekend. Check out The Grudge, Skanks, Dirty Bird, Lower G, Resurrection, or Stage Coach. It's starting to get pretty blown out this time of year but still a lot of fun.
  • 2 0
 Seriously. Everything fun for the intermediate or advanced rider is unsanctioned. The local groups do their best, but it's generally a compromise with various user groups and land owners.
  • 1 0
 @dlxah: Rocky peak is great, but the 'sanctioned trails' there are just Chumash and Hummingbird (unless I'm wrong). All truly advanced trails in SoCal are in some kind of precarious access position.
  • 1 0
 @ianmp: As far as I know, all of the trails in that area are legal. I've been riding there pretty regularly for 4 years now and haven't seen any signage prohibiting mountain biking or heard of anybody receiving warnings or citations.
  • 1 0
 I live in Ventura county and I think I’m pretty lucky with the amount of riding that I have around me. I’m just a beginner but I have been exposed to enough trails to know I have a lot to work up too. I do wish there was a few well kept flow jump lines around.

Edit: I’m dumb. I forgot my local org just built a few jump lines with wooden features in a local park. I saw them with a big front loader doing work on it during quarantine. I’ll have to check that out when it re opens
  • 3 1
 Reno/Tahoe here: definitely can’t complain but I would say that there are certain areas that need to see dh only or directional trails. Also a handful of unsanctioned trails pretty much are the only trails offering jumps and features (at least on the north/east shore and in Truckee. TAMBA and BLTS are working their butt off but I think they should push to get some grants for full time trail crews.
  • 2 0
 At least around Truckee, most trails are not explicitly directional trails, but there’s usually a climbing trail and/or forest service road that most people use
  • 1 0
 Shit...meant to upvote, but hit the wrong button. Sorry 'bout that @mmarkey21. I'm with you!
  • 2 0
 I moved from Terlingua, Texas to Reno/Sparks, Nevada for the available public lands to enjoy. I knew Tahoe and the Lost Sierra were nearby, but I spend more time on the fantastic Peavine Mountain trail system and exploring/building pirate trails in the Pah Rah mountains out my back door. Literally a half-mile of neighborhood roads to get to wildlands.
  • 2 1
 Peavine is great for what it is - easy access before/after work rides when the days are short but I definitely wouldn’t say fantastic. Lost Sierra and Tahoe are what makes the mtbing here worthwhile.

Also, lots of cultural sites in the Pah Rahs, best to not dig randomly without doing your due diligence first.
  • 2 0
 Moved back to the Reno-Carson area for the trails, well worth it, plenty to ride at all levels and more on the way. Good vibes to the folks who live in the path of the Stead Fire, drove by it this afternoon, high winds are gonna wreck havoc.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: it isn’t bad but take away Tahoe and it’s average for the western US.

Are you talking about the Poeville Fire? We were watching from the balcony yesterday. Huge bummer, looks like most of the Total Recall, Colpo, Mahogany trails burned and some folks unfortunately lost their houses. No bueno.
  • 2 0
 Would like to see correlation studies between perceived rider level and opinions on what sort of trails are needed. I’m wondering if all the intermediate riders want more drops and jumps, and advanced riders want more tech?
Also wondering if this poll is really showing what I think it it: that most riders on here are intermediate.
  • 2 0
 I'm in Rhode Island and honestly, we've got it pretty good here. Some small trail networks with Enduro/AM terrain, big XC areas, and 2 fantastic bike parks within 2h driving distance (Highland, Thunder) ... and most ESC race venues are less than 4h away. Good riding community too.
  • 2 0
 South Wales. That's official stuff which is perfectly ok, but all the good stuff is hacked out of bits of forestry commission land with all the good and bad that entails. The main downside is that because it's built by the people who want to ride it is that it's either bonkers stuff built by teenagers with no sense of danger, local pros looking too challenge themselves or people with time on their hands. There's really good trails, but they're not sustainable and there's a bit gap in skill level required for a lot stuff. There's nothing much really to transition you from trail center to of piste riding without a big skill jump and then at the top end there's hard trails and completely insane trails with nothing in between . I can't complain though, you can squeeze a lot into any given ride because there hills are fairly small and it brings you to a decent level as a rider, which means you're well prepared if you go abroad to the Alps. My main gripe is probably a lack of variety - if you don't like it steep and rooty then you're shit out of luck.
  • 1 0
 100% agree with you. I do a lot riding in STH Wales and it's generally excellent but the gap (often literally) between the trail centres and the off piste is pretty big one. Obviously the answer is "dig your own trails" but as I don't live near any riding spots it's hard to get involved with any of the building scene and to know how to do so without upsetting any of the stakeholders.
  • 2 0
 Western Australia, the main thing we lack is big hills, 350m vertical is about the most you'll get and even then not all in one hit a bit of flat and slight uphill. Having said that if on unsanctioned trails heaps of tech, not much in the way of flow/jump trails if that is your thing, although more being built.
  • 1 0
 Pea gravel dude! Scares the sh!t out of me every time I visit.
  • 1 0
 @subwaypanda: Yes indeed, slippery stuff! Not so bad when it's as wet as it is now Smile
  • 2 0
 Based on what's happening near me I get the strong impression that people nowadays prefer speed over anything else from a trail. Challenging corners are getting built up and bermed, logs & roots removed and sometimes new lines cleared which miss them out completely. I'm not sure if it's due to an unwillingness to get better/upskill, or chasing that KOM or whether they all just want to "send it".
  • 1 0
 Trails in WI are getting better, but I am yet to find anything challenging. Their idea of a black diamond is a smooth blue run with a skinny, maybe one jump or drop if you are lucky. Some places are starting to build bigger lines, but most are poorly built and have no flow.
  • 1 0
 I'm in Alaska. We have a few awesome EPIC trails, but the local trails for midweek riding could use some new trails with greater technical difficulty. Too much flow, not enough gnar. Lots of roots, not enough rocks, and yet I know there are rocky areas in the locale...perhaps in time we'll get some good technical trails.
  • 1 0
 I moved from Mexico to Oklahoma City 10 years ago and it pretty challenging getting to the trails n now I live in South Florida and there’s great trails but not enough variety. The guys here are working miracles with what we have but compare to Mexico or Oklahoma where pretty much every road is can be a trail there’s isn’t much we can do due to the lack of elevation. Hopefully when those dump centers reach the max altitude they’ll let us build some trails!!
  • 1 0
 My local trails are all natural, but aren't challenging due to the sandy nature of the terrain. My local-ish trails (10km) are also all natural but there are some rockgardens and other more interesting features. My not-local-but-not-too-far-away trails(30km) have jumps and drops to entertain almost every skill level.
  • 2 0
 No bike specific trails. All are shared multidirectional with horse and hikers, even though they have their own. Mtb is still last on the last on the list. The best trails are all illegal in the bay area...
  • 1 0
 I like living in bend because I've got everything. Bike park, flowing down country trails, 300+ square miles of single track in the area, plus, everything else is within there hours. Ashland to the south by three hours, Oakridge by 2 hours, hood river to the north by three hours, Sandy ridge the same. Not to mention black rock, alsea falls, ugh... I love living in central Oregon.
  • 2 0
 Bend is so so so XC
  • 1 0
 I’m a decent jumper, and I’ve come to enjoy jumps a lot now that I live in an area without the elevation for great technical trails. More than with trails, however, the larger jumps are constantly at risk of destruction by park rangers and city officials. I’ve lost plenty of great trails, but it’s never been as devastating as the threat to these single jumps that sometimes took years to build.
  • 1 0
 From north england, lots of potential, too many hiker only areas. Lived in Tahoe for a good while now and so lucky! Endless choice. All sorts of technical trails and flow trails. New trails every year, old trails getting rediscovered. Most turn to silt by the middle of summer though. Not a long drive to many other stella areas too. Just time and age against me!
  • 1 0
 Newp not even. Local trail centre is a 'family friendly ' forrest centre with overly sanitized flat, gravel trails. Thing is, it used to be a great area for fast flowing loamy single track left over from Moto enduro events so thier braking bumps were worn into our pump an jump sections. Over the years the Forrestry have brought in contractors to build terrible lines with zero flow, taken out the lumps bumps an roots an replaced them track surface an way too much loose gravel, then, the local volunteer club do thier best to rework this crap into a disable line... two or three times... an even then it's the best of a bad situation
  • 1 0
 One the biggest issues I see at the local level is the perception that "dangerous" = "challenging". We've got challenging terrain, and the occasional big features or drop, but they are so sketchy. Part of the reason I don't do some of these features isn't because I don't think I have the skills to do them, it's because you could die if you don't do it right. We also don't have progression - it's little jumps to big drop and rock rolls that are huge (with narrow trees at the bottom).

Our local group build a flat-land bike park at a local park and its really popular, but I don't find it all useful for learning big rock rolls and big drops into steeps.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for doing this. It does seem there is interest in technical, natural trails. I started to believe the only thing people ride is flow. I moved and when I went back to where I really started mtn biking, all the technical trails had been rerouted and converted to "flow" trails. There were a lot of trails before, and many flow, so I was super confused why everything needed to be dumbed down. Mtn bikes have been around awhile and people cleaned "technical" trails decades ago. Bikes have only gotten better. Keep the mix. Oh, and yes, they've been at it here too. There's always an excuse. I'll add one more thing. I've noticed people travel to ride "gnar" stuff but often ignore what they have in their own backyard. Ride your bike.
  • 1 0
 Try living on the Big Island of Hawaii, home of rooty rocky, NO jumps, NO drops trail because the mass mtb riders here are XC glamor riders who are scared of having two wheels in the air. LOL! Heck we don't even have berms. Just lotsa xc roads and a half dozen technical rocky rooty trails.
  • 1 0
 Seems like there is not much love for trails in Ontario Canada. We do have a lot of techy gnarly trails and a very active riding scene, with tons of trail networks all around. Definitely lacking in the vertical department. But thanks to the Canadian Shield you don't have to climb much and still get to enjoy rocky features.
  • 1 0
 I live in PA and ride mostly there and WV. Honestly plenty of advanced, technical rocky trails. I'm probably in the minority here, but I wish there were more flow trails with features like jumps n drops. The trails in WV have a bit more variety of the rocky technical stuff and natural drops. But there's hardly any flow trails full of jumps and features local to me. Mostly XC stuff. Say what you will about those kinds of trails but theyre fun af to ride.
  • 1 0
 Just started riding this year in Newfoundland. Spent my teens in the dirt jumps and skate parks of Winnipeg until an injury turned me off from biking for 13 years. I decided this is the year to get back into it and I've been met with some spectacular and well maintained trails, taking full advantage of our abundance of rocks, roots and topography, with bridges over the really sloppy stuff. Smooth, flowy, bermy trails are scarce, but so is compactable inorganic dirt to build them. Hats off to the trail builders, hopefully I can find the time next year to pitch in myself.
  • 2 0
 After riding BC, nothing is near steep-enough where I live! Partially limited by terrain, but partially limited by us not utilized steep zones for trail-building!
  • 2 0
 My answer on the DH side would have been very different a month ago. Now, Missouri is getting the gnarliest descents in the Midwest!
  • 1 0
 Local trails are fun, def not challenging in any sense here. Have my own build in the woods and some others that aren't on the "trail networks" of local trails for that.

Most of those involve fire Rd climbs though.
  • 2 2
 I live near Santa Cruz. The weather is great and can pretty much ride all year. However contrary to popular belief, the trails here are pretty average at best. Only a handful of trails that are a little technical and spicy, but they are probably considered blue trails in BC. Lots of fire roads and boring double track, but the upside is there is fair amount of trails within a 45-60 min drive.
  • 3 1
 This is absolutely right, there’s nothing challenging or worth riding out here. Save your money, stay in The Valley and ride amazing trails like Henry Coe and Santa Theresa there. No one should come to Santa Cruz.
  • 1 1
 @DeepWoods831: ST is not bad for technical trails. I ride there a ton. Coe is vast and challenging, but not technical. Looks like you came out just to show your SC locals only vs Valley attitude. Sorry, but I've ridden everywhere in Santa Cruz probably more than you. Wink
  • 3 0
 I love Pisgah. Also windrock and Beech Mtn isn’t far away so I’m happy with what I have.
  • 2 0
 The Salt Lake region is a "dirt roadie" paradise. We even have an area aptly named Carpet Canyon since most of the rocks and technical sections have been removed.
  • 1 0
 I've lived in SLC for 7 years and this is so so true. Unfortunately, I've become quite disenchanted w/ the place that originally made me fall in with MTB. As skills and desires progressed, and I've traveled more, I find there is very little aggressive riding. Maybe 3 trails in park city worth a 6" bike. Honeycomb and American Fork also worthy.
  • 1 0
 Lucky to have a local riding area with mountain bike specific, directional trails with a bit of everything except for technical climbing, and we are working on that right now. Oregon is awesome for mountain bikes!
  • 1 0
 Best town in OR to live in for mtbing?
  • 1 0
 @mmarkey21: 1)Hood River 2)Bend 3)Sandy
  • 2 0
 @mmarkey21: nowhere in Oregon has it all. You got to be on the move to get the goods.
  • 1 0
 @mmarkey21: CRUX and 10 Barrel
  • 1 0
 @mmarkey21: I would put Ashland ahead of Bend for sure. Oakridge... probably don’t want to live there but it’s a great spot to be close enough to visit.
  • 1 0
 @mmarkey21: Oakridge for the trails and....meth. But those trails are so good!
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Lets not forget Blackrock
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Good to know! Planning a little OR trip soon. Only have 5 days so definitely hitting Oakridge but juggling between Ashland, Bend, and potentially Hood River. Hood River adds a bit of drive time though so not sure if it’s “worth” it. Bend would be good for the lady though so might just make it happen regardless.
  • 1 0
 i wish i had no complaints but i actually do. brazil could have bigger mountains but it dont thanks to nature's will. but i also wonder... are mountains and earthquakes up for trades these days? hahah
  • 1 0
 Utah has some Ok riding and it seems to be good enough. If you don't like your trails buy a shovel and pick. You can simply just add features. Trail work is very rewarding.
  • 1 0
 WORCA and certain private citizens are doing a phenomenal job of building and maintaining all sorts of trails. Pea gravel highways, winch and plummet trails, old school jank, flow, steep and gnarly, can’t complain.
  • 1 0
 Northern UT is a dirt roadie paradise. Don't let the economic development and marketing fool you...Park City is for 120 travel bikes. Maybe 3 trails within an hour or SLC with proper tech DH. It's all groomer BS
  • 1 0
 I'm from kamloops but end up spending my weekends in Merritt to ride the tech at iron mountain. Even the super secret super hard hush hush trail is easier than a lot of stuff on maps from Vancouver and Pemberton.
  • 4 0
 I built what i like
  • 1 0
 not enough jumps and drops in the state of nh outside the bike parks IMO. especially where I live in southern nh. not enough dedicated uphill/downhill trails in general.
  • 1 0
 I work in southern NH too and it is surprisingly tame down here. Highland helps but it's an hour away. I liked Bear Brook a lot when I went there for doing some big miles - Hurricane in North Conway may be more your speed if you don't mind driving a little bit.
  • 1 0
 Drummer I think is pretty good. But yes, gotta drive a bit more for the bigger descents. No matter what, consider yourself lucky compared to where I used to live...Iowa.
  • 2 0
 North Conway is starting to invest in mtb infrastructure. It’s gonna get real good there.
  • 1 0
 @sjma: Ft Rock?
  • 1 0
 I live right next to an area that Curtis Keene and his crew are constantly working on trails. Massive props to him and the boys! #allthelaps
  • 2 0
 Feel sorry for Dutchmen, Danish, flat lands inhabitants. Nevertheless they can play curling or petanque.
  • 1 0
 Finale Ligure here. I slowly learned to ride some of the gnarly ones with reasonable success, but at least 3 trails here have sections that are impossible for me.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, Bellingham... Please don't move here.
  • 1 0
 Oops already am..
  • 1 0
 SF Bay Area has some awesome, challenging trails. They’re just mostly illegal. Also don’t get caught building a trail or jump or they’ll take your life savings
  • 1 0
 Pretty fortunate to have tons of tech trails and numerous bike parks in the new england area, but do like going to Quebec and Wales once a year to mix things up.
  • 1 0
 anything thats off road with a corner is challenging enough for anyone depending on how fast you are going, my local trails are definitely fun enough though
  • 1 0
 I live in Melbourne, and all the trails anywhere near me are poorly build, badly maintained and never fun enough compared to the rest of the world.
  • 1 0
 i have an aggressive hard tail , orange p7 and a banshee legend dh bike , i love the hardtail for trail riding it keeps you on your toes for sure
  • 2 0
 Tweed Valley here, occasionally I yearn for bike park shits n giggles but mostly just in love with the place as it is.
  • 1 0
 Aye one of the best things about living in northern England is that the Tweed valley is only a couple of hours away. I think I heard they were going to build a jump line near the DH runs at inners?
  • 1 0
 @johnnyboy11000: We have Make or Brake, not heard about anything else going in but then I've not been down there since Feb ;(
  • 1 0
 @sourmix: it could be that, it's been even longer since I've been. I think it was one of the Adrenaline uplift guys saying they were thinking of making one of the push ups / traverses into a jump line.
  • 1 0
 My local bike park is Windrock, so I’m not exactly wanting for steep dh trails, but most of the other stuff in the area is tame xc trails.
  • 1 0
 Fifteen years living in Oak Ridge, moved West in 2014 and won’t ever go back. Windrock ain’t nothing compared to the what we got out West. Move if you can!
  • 1 0
 Eastern Sierras, we could use more XC and trails that aren’t snow covered in winter.

It could be worse, bu then I wouldn’t live where the trails suck.
  • 1 0
 Long Island is flat but we make it work with creative lines for climbing. Tons of flow and more techy trails being built.
  • 1 0
 Where I live you the only terrain is farmland. You could ride the trails in your sleep and they would still be easy.
  • 3 1
 No, the local trail group is dumbing everything down.
  • 2 0
 What was the definition of 'local'?
  • 1 0
 Northamptonshire, England... Flat as a pancake and bugger all interesting to ride.
  • 1 0
 There are no trails here in Laguna Beach. And the weather sucks year round.
  • 2 1
 Looking at you Arkansas. The land of dirt highways at -5% grade. Pedal pedal pedal case
  • 2 0
 I live in chicago, FUK YOU ALL!
  • 2 0
 Does Palos hills still exist? Haha. Gotta be a joke.
  • 1 0
 Turning a flat corner into a berm is one thing, but turning a rock garden into a highway is a completely different thing.
  • 1 0
 Growing up in America I was taught to make fun of mild mannered Canadians...until I rode their trails...
  • 1 0
 I have everything from flow trails to raw natural, tech xc to burly DH riding in my area. We are spoiled here. Smile
  • 1 0
 The Netherlands loosely translates to 'Low/flat lands' so you can guess my answer...
  • 1 0
 Descending? Uphill? You need hills for that, mountains even. Its flat as a pancake where I love...
  • 1 0
 Nope, that's why I'm moving to PNW
  • 4 0
 I move to southwest CO just so i could have better riding, best thing I've done in my adult life
  • 2 0
 winner winner! this dude knows what's up.
  • 10 13
 The problem is the dam fun police. Everything seems to be on the table except for a 51 year old man having fun on his bicycle. That seems to offend people. Heroin, not offensive. All variations of sexuality, not offensive. Burning cop cars, not offensive. 51 year old man build a jump, holy shit call the fun police. . .
  • 20 2
 It must be hard to be so oppressed. Thoughts and prayers.
  • 1 0
 Feeling smug, yours, Whistler resident.
  • 1 0
 I live in BC. I'm positive I can only clear like 10% of the trails here.
  • 1 0
 My back yard is Pisgah, so I am coved.
  • 1 0
 I only have blue and red XC trails near me and a pump track.
  • 1 0
 I live in northern NM, honestly no real complaints here.
  • 1 0
 No.
  • 1 1
 Stainburn is my local. That's techy enough, thank you very much.
  • 3 5
 CT has the WORST trails in the us for sure.
  • 1 0
 A steady diet of trap rock and roots make you stronger.
  • 9 0
 I'd strongly disagree - those are my old stomping grounds, and there were lots of fun techy trails out there.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: absolutely. We even have some flow now at Cowles too.
  • 2 1
 have to disagree there. not epic but can be a lot of fun
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: depending on how long it’s been, there’s a bunch of new stuff.
  • 1 0
 Lol have you ever been anywhere else. It’s so bad over here. Especially Fairfield county. @mikekazimer:
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: definitely no fun to be had at Trumbull, Wilton Woods, Mianus etc
  • 1 0
 I don't know about Fairfield county, but there are lots of good options north of Hartford area, not a ton of vertical but plenty of tech and gnar with punchy short climbs/descents and funky manmade features here and there. Moved here from CO 2 years ago, thought my riding days were all but over, but can honestly say I ride more than ever now, my riding skills have improved with all the techy stuff her, and I've got a smile on my face every time I go out. Could do without the mosquitoes...
  • 1 0
 Trumbull has a few fun features but that’s is. Very poorly built trails in Wilton and Greenwich @DHhack:
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: so where do you like to go? If you say Rockland I might die of laughter!
  • 1 0
 Lmao creek in NJ @DHhack:
  • 1 1
 Rock land is trash @DHhack:
  • 2 0
 @freeridejerk888: season pass at Thunder Wink
  • 2 0
 Hell yeah. Love the place. If they fixed that god awful lift it would make it way better @DHhack:

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