Pinkbike Poll: How Much Do Race Results Affect Your Bike Purchases?

Aug 28, 2020
by Dan Roberts  

This weekend sees the return of the global racing season as we may recognise it.

Global may be a bit of a stretch, and the W in EWS might not be getting fully represented out in Zermatt, with many of the top athletes unable or choosing not to attend, but it's a nice piece of what we used to call normality in these turbulent times.

Winning a World Cup DH, XC or EWS event takes a whole myriad of things to come together, from rider to support crew, fitness training to mental preparation and logistics to the bike itself. That last piece of the puzzle being our point of interest for this Friday's poll.


While it cannot take all the credit for producing results, the bike is definitely one important piece of the puzzle and often can lead to a rider feeling at one with the bike under them and enabling entering "the zone" just that bit easier, where brain function actually reduces and the body and mind simply react.

Having attended races over the years, it was easy to spot certain trends in bike choice amongst the teams. Perhaps in WC XC and DH there was a more clear trend of bike choice following the previous season's victors. Of late, the amount of Scott Sparks and Commencal Supremes on show come practice was notably higher than other brands given their repeated success and share of the limelight over the previous race seasons. In years past, was the rise in Demo's out there due to it being a relatively new bike, or was the success of a certain American fuelling the sales?

But does that trend extend outside of the racing elite, even if they are privateers, and into the buying public? Do you look to what bikes are winning in their respective disciplines to guide your purchases?

Kate Courtney attacked part way through but ultimately couldn t hold on in the final lap.


How much do World Cup XC race results affect your bike purchases?




How much do EWS race results affect your bike purchases?




How much do World Cup DH race results affect your bike purchases?




223 Comments

  • 287 8
 Ha, as a Director of Marketing (not in the mtb industry but psychology is psychology), you forgot a choice:

- Not at all, the race results mean nothing to me, yet seeing a bike (or a brand) winning, especially multiple times and/or across multiple disciplines, has a direct subconscious effect on my buying preferences and habits... for a myriad of reasons.

The saying "Win on Sunday, sell on Monday" wasn't just made up.
  • 67 1
 Personally i forget what bike most riders are on most the time anyways, but the biggest example i ever saw of this effect was 2013 when Steve Smith was on fire. Devinci Wilsons popped up on local trails faster than other other bike I've seen.
  • 40 2
 As a marketing person IN the mtb industry: Yes, this.
  • 20 0
 I still feel confident in my answer knowing that the top result a 2015 Process 134 probably got is my tie for a KOM once
  • 153 2
 @islandforlife exactly. The question could just as easily be "How much does marketing affect your bike purchase?" Answer- "I think I'm a rational consumer who weighs pros and cons objectively and chooses products at the lowest price possible to maximize my utility, but as an evolved monkey I actually just acquire whatever I perceive will make me more likable in my tribe."
  • 4 0
 wow, maybe i evolved from cats then.
  • 17 0
 Iron Horse Sunday
  • 7 0
 Respectfully think that was more true back when race results were in magazines and that was the source of info. That’s less the case now with YouTube and such...
  • 13 1
 Its the rider, not the bike. Something you cant sell.
  • 21 0
 Definitely, brand recognition is a thing.

I watched a LOT of Motocross/Supercross as a kid. My favorite riders were Jeff Stanton, Jean-Michel Bayle, and Jeremy McGrath. All of them rode for the Honda Factory team.

And I won't pretend that I didn't have some pride in the fact that my Dads XR was the same brand.


Now that I'm older, I find that I try not to care which bikes do/do not win (again, its mostly rider). I will admit that I DO feel better about a brand if I've seen/heard about them before. Particularly if they have won.

IE, I don't own a Nukeproof, but seeing that its a multi-EWS winning bike brand, does make me feel better about them (compared to say... Viathon, another "house" owned brand).

Mostly giving some support to the fact that they have designed it well enough to survive the rigors of racing, and also the engineering has been serious enough to try to be competitive.
  • 6 2
 How about "I don't follow racing, but I might be influenced by people who do".
  • 3 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: just described humanity. Consume it a way that makes others envy my consumption.
  • 10 0
 None of the bikes I've owned in at least a decade come from a brand who is on the podium of any racing that I follow. So I am sticking with the "Not at all, the race results mean nothing to me."
  • 3 0
 @juicebanger:

Fearon had a 134 for local enduros. revolutionmtb.com.au/pro-bike-check-connor-fearons-kona-process-134

I'm sure he won a few on it.
  • 14 0
 I tend to run the other way. The more of a brand I see the less I want it. I'm almost always rooting for the smaller boutique brands.
  • 10 0
 Where are the choices for-I buy the same bike as the fastest local Strava Ripper? And, I buy used bikes from dentists?
  • 2 0
 Yeah that's the option I was looking for. I own 2x Santa Cruz's in small part because I like the Syndicate and their enduro team. Mostly it's because my LBS carries them and I liked them when I was demoing bikes.
  • 3 23
flag davemud (Aug 28, 2020 at 16:05) (Below Threshold)
 Ha, so you are the liar directing all of the liars that spew the bullshit for your company. Excellent. Only idiots would base a purchase on race results. Its the rider not the bike pal.
  • 4 20
flag davemud (Aug 28, 2020 at 16:06) (Below Threshold)
 @lostlunchbox: riden by sheep being led to the slaughter at the till. lol.
  • 3 12
flag davemud (Aug 28, 2020 at 16:09) (Below Threshold)
 @juicebanger: because titles in completely unregulated, unsanctioned and unverifiable "races" are so relevant in the real world. I could claim every KOM on my commute to work... until someone straps their bike to their car and goes for a drive, or paces behind a motorcycle or car or...
  • 10 0
 IMO a bigger driver of sales than race results is perceived coolness/status, that explains why people lust after Transition but you barely see any Nukeproof.
  • 1 0
 @lostlunchbox: also its after they redesigned the Wilson with Weagle and created an awesome looking, well performing bike. Putting a winning canadian on it to fuel the hype definitely helped!
  • 2 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: Or more attractive to a potential mate.
  • 3 0
 I don’t ride nowhere near what racers are doing. I don’t even ride the same type of trails. When I watch races I more interested by the human skills than the material they use. It’s the same with skiers snowboard, I couldn’t name any of the brand that sponsor them.
  • 3 0
 Me not liking UCI or caring about races means I couldn't care less what the winning bike is.
  • 6 0
 @lostlunchbox: admit I bought a DeVinci because of Steve and it was made in Canada (aluminium Troy). Honestly since then I have never bought another bike based on rider or pro-circuit racing not because of bad experience but I just don’t give a damn about that anymore. #longlivechainsaw
  • 4 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: please sell me more Felt
  • 2 0
 Bias is bias. Conscious or subconscious.
  • 2 0
 If I was a team owner and I kept seeing a rider win Id want to buy them.
  • 1 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: Yes, and no. But mostly yes. If you're not manufacturing the thing yourself, you're pretty much at the will of the seller. Whether you like it, or not. That's where, "knowledge is power" comes into play.
  • 2 1
 @TEAM-ROBOT: can't believe you just casually dropped the T word
  • 4 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: it’s not even worth claiming to be objective about it. Bikes are such complex products. Assuming you even had the data, to know the marginal effect of a x% increase in anti-squat alone, multiply it by the vector of other variable attributes of a bike, repeat the process for each attribute of the vector, and then for every set of conditions possible, on every kind of terrain. You end up with a mathematically intractable system of partial differential equations. So we rely on whatever non-noisy signal we can to give us the illusion of objective decision making. The worst thing economics has exported to the world is its misguided belief in computationally limitless rationality.
  • 1 0
 @Hayek: I can think of other bad things economics has exported, and we might have a spirited debate about which is the worst. But I agree with your assessment of the bike-buying decision-making problem.
  • 1 0
 This guy gets it. Thank you. We are consciously aware of the minority of our drives to spend money and time.
  • 1 0
 Money. That affects how I select/buy my bike
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I bought my first Yeti last year and had wanted a Yeti since around 1989. I guess I wanted one because Tomac rode one and he was the best. So although I didn't look at recent race results to pick my current bike, race results from over 30 years ago will have influenced me.
  • 103 0
 Better question: How much does color affect your purchase?

I would like to think it doesn't for me, but I sure do have a purple problem.
  • 58 0
 a lot. It might not matter on a cheaper bike, but if I'm paying $4k+ for a bicycle it better damn well look cool.
  • 28 1
 It doesn't. As long as there's murdered black as an option
  • 74 0
 a purple problem? You are gripping it too hard.
  • 10 0
 @dthomp325: Agreed. When you spend so much on something I think its completely fair to care how it looks.
  • 6 0
 The purple addiction is real man. Glad to see I’m not the only one struggling
  • 4 0
 Seriously! What is it about purple??? (Cosmic eggplant Druid in my garage)
  • 2 0
 Definitely this!
I love purple but haven’t got a purple bike yet Frown someday.
I’ve typed with the idea of having a bike repainted, but haven’t braved it yet.
I fell in love with the revel ranger Johnnie green jeans, so that will do me for the next wee while Smile
  • 4 0
 @mtbikemccoy: same here cosmic eggplant is addictive
  • 2 0
 @ybsurf: I want one too!
  • 2 0
 Good looking bikes with great color schemes make me want to ride more.
  • 76 1
 I don’t buy bikes based off of race results. But I do pay attention to racers and what they run. For example, if the factory specialized guys are not running specialized tires... maybe that is a good indication to stay clear of those.
  • 3 0
 Yep same as you. I also look at trends for tires/components as well so if all the Maxxis riders are running the same tread pattern there is usually a good reason for it.
  • 2 8
flag lognar (Aug 28, 2020 at 13:42) (Below Threshold)
 Or it means that specialized isn't making sizes that the pros need... ortherwise they'd likely be in violation of their contracts
  • 5 4
 or that the race team has a different title tire sponsor. but yes, steer clear of Spesh tires! lol
  • 3 1
 @lognar: how do you know what’s in there contracts ?
  • 4 0
 only 30s slower on a minion but 30.1s slower on butcher, i get you f**k that brand only buying maxxis from now on
  • 3 0
 Especially when you notice everyone who isn’t using their sponsors tire is riding Maxxis (I could be wrong but I don’t ever recall seeing anything other than Maxxis with a sharpied out logo).
  • 3 6
 I've often heard that spec tires are the only thing they are ok at
  • 7 0
 I second that. I buy the bike I can afford, not the bike that wins. Tires on the other hand, I ride what wins.
  • 3 0
 Same.

Mostly because racers (when not contractually bound), tend to gravitate to the best for the use, or what is most reliable. And usually (because they are full time, and way better than me), I can learn something from why they chose it.

Like, I bet DT Swiss sold a lot of EX471's after gwin rode a whole race on just the rim, and it didn't break. And for good reason. People could see what kind of use they could survive.

And, on the flip side. Connor Fearons Kona Process 153 race bike (not the new Process X), has different rear triangle/longer chainstays than the regular bike. Leading me to think that my own Kona Process 153 short chainstays (425mm on a 29'er, and I'm 6'1"), are not conducive to a stable/neutral handling bike.
  • 3 0
 @alexisfire: didnt jared graves have tire problems all the time when he went from maxxis to spesh tires..
  • 3 0
 @i-ride-things: considering most riders I hear trying specialized tires have problems with them, I would guess Jared Graves would too.
  • 5 0
 @Daledenton: A few years ago when it seemed like it was raining every week the "magic Mary' was dubbed the most blacked out tire on the circuit
  • 3 0
 Agree 100%
Also stoped me buying e13 carbon cranks
  • 4 0
 @alexisfire: From my experience, Specialized sidewalls are made of butter, and the tread from dried Weetabix. It's not very confidence inspiring...
  • 1 2
 @Matt115lamb: I don't... but I can infer. Initially when the demo 29 came out Specialized wasn't making a 29DH tire so the boys were running maxxis rubber up front. Now spec has a 29" DH tire, and now the boys are running that tire.
  • 1 0
 @lognar: Who are “The boys”? Finn only runs Maxxis. Loic runs a variety of tires, most of which aren’t Specialized. Cody Kelley runs Maxxis.
  • 1 0
 Specialized tyres are okay. Just okay. Have some on my hardtail. And they’re perfect for general trail mooching. My other bikes have maxxis because they’re better tyres and the bikes/trails justify them. I’d say Loic can tel the difference too.
  • 1 0
 Then again, racers might be looking for totally different qualities than i do.
For instance, most Enduro racers run downhill-tyres in the softest possible rubber. Thats cool, but i don't need DH tyres for my weight and riding style (=slow) and i don't have the fitness of a professional athlete to pedal such sticky monstrosities up the mountain.

And DH racers run shock pressures far above anything i would ever run, because in don't hit boulders the size of doghouses at mach 11.
  • 70 4
 My thought are that it's 95% rider and 5% bike. These guys and gals can shred with any modern bike.
  • 2 2
 so true
  • 3 3
 99 and 1%
  • 3 1
 Are you referring to Gwyn and YT???
  • 19 1
 @Normalfanofolk: the fallacy is that you're lumping all these racers into one bucket and all the bikes into another. That isnt true in the least. while the bike matters less than the rider, at the pinnacle of the sport, it's about the *unit*, the bike AND the rider in sync. So given that, the bike matters to each individual a lot more than you want to beleive.
  • 5 0
 @conoat: Agree with you on that. How many top racers have switched brands and seen a drop off in results?? Most of us will enjoy riding any of the bike designs. I wonder if suspension tuning is more important than the frame??
  • 4 0
 I think a bike that doesn’t get along with the rider can really effect results. Look at brook macdonald and how his results changed when he went to gt and then he was podiuming when he got back on mondraker. Obviously injuries and other things can play a big role too but if you don’t get along with your bike it’s hard to beat every other pro who is getting along with their bike.
  • 2 9
flag J-Gordon (Aug 28, 2020 at 14:03) (Below Threshold)
 @Daledenton: Yeah but that's just because GT makes horrible bikes and always will
  • 1 2
 you're off by about 5% but point taken
  • 4 0
 @J-Gordon: Gee didn't seem to think so. He was fast as f*ck on GT
  • 1 0
 @Sprockingcrail: how many injuries ago was that?
  • 2 0
 @J-Gordon:

Yeah but they can't suck thaaaat bad right? Force has lackluster reviews at best but Martin Maes wins.
  • 1 0
 Indeed. Was fun to see Finn crushing it recently on his stumpjumper. Less travel than much of the competition in those crankworx enduros and a coil on that linear frame.

Interesting bc I tried that bike (albeit a weak setup at a demo event) and didn't jive with it. Both the geo and the rear kinematic (funny bc I'm a previous stumpy owner).
  • 1 0
 In general I agree with that. In one of the recent Dialed episodes, though, Jordi mentioned that he didn't think that Gwin would get along with a high pivot idler bike like the Commencal Supreme. And there's a podcast where Eliot Jackson interviews Brook MacDonald where MacDonald freely admitted that he didn't get along with any of the GT bikes and said that he didn't think they were that good. So I'd say that it's 99% rider/1% bike IF the rider gets along with the bike. If they don't then you can't expect good results.
  • 2 1
 @PAmtbiker: I’d love to see the bike Gwin couldn’t crush on...
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: d2yn9m4p3q9iyv.cloudfront.net/intense/2020/m29-elite/thumbs/1000/f2964.jpeg


Haha, I couldn't resist!!

@PAmtbiker I think that is a fair stat, but in WC DH, that 1% can be the difference between winning, and being outside the top 10. It's nuts to think that sometimes the top 10 is separated by 2 seconds or less.
  • 2 1
 When Enduros are decided by less then a second after two days of racing . . . . The bike makes a huge difference!
  • 1 0
 @truehipster: how? Are the top riders on the same bike?
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: when he 1st switched to specialized struggled with that bike. And with intense
  • 2 0
 @truehipster: Or it could mean it makes no difference at all... I'm in the camp that believes you have to be comfortable on your bike and like it, because that's required for confident riding... so it's very important but not really in an objective way. I do think some of this comfort is enhanced by an objectively superior design, and all else being equal it could make a difference. OTOH, I think many or most would agree if EWS or WC riders were given random bikes setup competently for them, that it would have little effect on where a rider is going to place.
  • 1 0
 Even a Huffy!
  • 2 0
 It's more like 99.9 % and 0.1% and only if this poor bicycle has its chain on. I buy bike based on look, colour, reviews and of course, geometry numbers, but never because someone won something riding it. And let's not forget the price. I never buy overpriced things, however in this industry you rarely have this choice.
  • 1 0
 @davec113: I have seen it. .lets take your local brand (yeti) one of the top suspension designs for racing. With a properly valved shock and fork you don't think it's good for a second on a gnarly 5 minute stage over a suspension design that's a few years old? True that only a few riders can push a bike hard enough to utilize it!
  • 1 0
 90% rider 9% mechanic 1% bike.
  • 1 0
 @leon-forfar: Yup! He had to have them completely redesign the bike and I'm not sure how much it helped. Still a top 10 rider most days but every time he tries to push for a win there's a big crash. Race wins might be worth going back to YT for.
  • 1 0
 @Daledenton: Keep in mind that switching teams is much more than just switching bikes. I would postulate that team infrastructure, mindset and "chemistry" between riders, mechanics and support staff is much more important than the bike itself.
  • 58 0
 I respect a brand that puts money into a race team.
  • 1 0
 That's a great point, something I hadn't thought of. Well said!
  • 1 0
 Respect yes, but that does that mean you buy their bike when they win?
  • 5 0
 @rlucky82: No, but I've shopped Commençal pretty hard. They are definitely on my short list for my next bike. Same with Santa Cruz. I respect the brand because I know they have a pedigree. Having a race team factors into my purchase more than a specific win on a specific bike.
  • 45 0
 I cherry pick the race results that reinforce the bike buying decisions that I've already made.
  • 19 0
 I prefer when my friends have race winning bikes. Then they don't have excuses. I just need to make sure I'm not the one on the race winning bike...
  • 18 1
 You are all a bunch of liars.

Race winning bikes aren't just bought by people who want to win their local races. Race winning brands earn reputations for making high quality bikes, for having good geometry, a good suspension platform, a good overall product. You might not be instantly aware of the connection to racing but it's there.

I own a Commencal and I can't begin to tell you how many people who know very little actual information about the bikes see my rig and say "those are supposed to be really good bikes."
  • 4 0
 you make a point
  • 4 0
 I would like to introduce you to my friends at Yeti bikes.
  • 1 0
 I don't buy that in this general form. If anything, racing reinforces how little the bike matters, because successful riders stay successful no matter what brand they are on and the top riders are on vastly different bikes.
  • 1 0
 By the way I was correlating the quality comment and Yeti rear triangles still exploding consistently after almost a decade of known issues. They're selling great though. Good for them I suppose!
  • 19 0
 If the bike hasn't proven itself by dominating on the world stage, how am I supposed to KOM my local trails?
  • 12 0
 Sometimes it is the other way around - I'm pretty sure Kate Courtney switched to Scott because she saw how many KOMs I got on my Spark RC.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: son of a nutcracker. I mean you are a model. So it must be true.
  • 11 0
 I think that the top level bikes have quite similar capabilities, and the top guys could win on many different bikes. It doesn't affect my purchase decision in any way. I look at the geometry chart, price and components.
  • 14 2
 Price price price and price
  • 8 0
 Price does affect it too
  • 3 0
 Did someone say price already? Yeah, that is a factor for sure.
  • 3 0
 yup, I can't say I knew of any wins on the brands of the bikes I have bought but I know that the price and the value were there. But winning on technology such as sealant based tubeless vs UST, single rings, bigger wheels, through axles, dropper posts, etc has had more influence on my purchases.
  • 5 0
 This . My complete mega was 1000 cheaper than the frame from big S. That's a big deal.
  • 5 0
 Palmer made sales sore for at the time micro brand Intense (and their bikes truly were miles ahead of most others)
he did the same for Specialized sales where traditionally didn't, Same with Gwin on YT and Amaury on Commencal.....it works regardless of this poll's results. Haha
  • 8 0
 "I only buy bikes that have multiple water bottle mounts, this to me is the very definition of winning."
  • 4 0
 Race results are somewhat important but who the brand chooses to represent them and how that team portrays the brand is what I’m looking at. For example teams like Rocky Mountain Enduro make me want to be part of that brand whether they win or not.
  • 6 0
 I don't drive a NASCAR, Formula 1, nor Monster Truck inspired vehicle either, but they're interesting to hear about.
  • 2 0
 Totally agree - though WRC and touring car racing have influenced me a bit (probably because I can actually drive a car that's close-ish to the one being raced). Bikes, on the other hand, are human powered (and balanced and all the other body English that goes in), and when I throw a leg over his mega I still know I'm not Sam Hill (I blame video games for my belief I could lay down a competitive time on the Nordschleif or Laguna Seca).
  • 1 0
 @endurendo: I've had my love affairs with M3s and AMGs too (glad I survived). I wish I could be on a $10k enduro specials, and I wish I could buy my way to health and skills to ride like Sam Hill too. Next reincarnation maybe.
  • 3 1
 The thing with two wheels (both powered and unpowered) is that you can go out and buy machinery that's 95% the same if you have the means, and they're also well within the means of a much larger proportion of the population than say a car built with F1 tech.

Though I don't know what a car built with NASCAR tech would look like. A Conestoga wagon?
  • 3 0
 These bikes are all about exposure. Its like car companies having a "halo" car. You see something like an R8 it has the audi badge, you recognize it, admire it and even though you know you'll never own an R8 you may still be interested in Audi. Same with WC/EWS race bikes, they are built for brand exposure (you see Loic on specialized or Amaury on Commencal and associate those them with the brand).There is also product development and testing which then trickles down into the lower level bikes.
  • 3 0
 pfft - I drive an S7 by choice, not because I have too many people to fit in an R8...and can't afford it. *sobs*
  • 3 0
 So, as someone who has worked in action sports sales & marketing, this is a bit funny. It’s also a tough question. Whoever said “race results don’t affect purchases but seeing the same bikes on the podium over multiple disciplines does have an effect on consumers” is probably. Too nuanced an answer for a 15 second poll and definitely far too nuanced for the package Pinkbike uses these polls to make that then gets sent to potential/current/former advertisers.

Racing is only one factor in driving consumer demand. Distribution, advertising (which IS NOT racing), video content and media strategy, etc, are all non-product related factors that go into it. These things, plus a ton of others, are what factor into “brand”.

The actual physical product (the bike, in this case), plus price and value, are still by far and away critical to consumers. Coming at it from my point of view, it seems bike companies often forget this part of it nearly completely, other than making sure the prices are outrageous. As for the “brand” aspect, it’s easier to name companies that do it well (there’s like 3) than those who don’t.
  • 1 0
 honest question, who do you think does 'brand' well and why?
  • 1 0
 @ismasan: Having bikes that consistently end up on podiums is definitely a way to have quality associated with your brand. If you're a small niche manufacturer it doesn't matter but for a larger company it'd be silly not to spend money to have the top athletes be on your bikes.

Presence in the market place also really matters. For your average consumer buying in the mid tier they often will have only 1 or two bike stores to choose from. Can basically guarantee to see Trek, Giant, Norco, Specialized and Santa Cruz, at least in Canada.
  • 4 0
 In my 50 plus years on this earth what I have witnessed is .... The masses buy what they are told to buy. Smart people that know what they want are the extreme minority & get completely ignored by marketing.
  • 3 0
 I want a brand to prove it has the design and engineering chops to make a race capable bike. And my brand awareness is heavily influenced by racing, although more by team representation and philosophy than results. But I do NOT want a race bike. A pair of race planks are not the best tool for me to enjoy a weekend ski, an F1 car is not the best tool for me to enjoy a Sunday drive or a track day event, and I would instantly kill myself if I tried to throw a leg over a motogp bike. The best tool for me to enjoy my riding is a bike sized and setup for how and where I ride and that is not at EWS or DH venues or pace.
  • 2 0
 Given that Mondraker was a really new presence in the US and I had never seen anyone riding one out on the trails or the parks, I admit their race results did add some confidence to the purchase. But it was just confidence, not a foundational factor.
  • 2 0
 While generally I would say I don't care too much, if I were to buy a DH bike it would have to be a Commencal. And not just because Amaury is rad, but because so many riders are able to perform at a very high level on it. That would indicate to me that it suits a wide range of styles and is relatively easy to setup.
  • 3 0
 Another problem is the vast majority of mountain bikers buy "trail" category of mountain bikes. And unfortunately those bikes are not used in any of the race formats. Its either XC, Enduro or DH bikes.
  • 2 0
 I buy more based on Company than rider. I try to keep my purchases centered around how a Company treats their customers and the same goes with my LBS. I am ‘voting’ in a way, with my wallet or at least that is what I am trying to do
  • 2 0
 I like to see their setups. Tire choices, bar choices, stack height and all the stuff that usually tweaked that has nothing to do with the actual frame. Most the of top 20 riders could post respectable times on about any brand. Sam Hill would rock it on a Yeti, santa cruz, Yt what ever.
  • 2 0
 If you use Chain Reaction for anything it's hard not to know that Nukeproof exists, but without knowing any more it's all too easy to dismiss them as being nothing but a house brand. Sam Hill's success on the Mega made me pay attention - it's obviously not holding him back. I might buy one in future, I might not, but I don't think I'd have considered one otherwise. So in that narrow example, race results factor into the decision.

However the Nukeproof gear I do currently own was bought based on price and reviews (both online and from friends) and I rate it.
  • 1 0
 I would love to demo one. Definitely wouldn't care about the brand if it weren't for Sam.
  • 2 0
 When Steve Smith was riding for Cove, the most popular bike at the Whistler Bike Park was the Cove Shocker. When he moved to Devinci, the most popular bike in the park was the Wilson. Cove doesn't make bikes anymore, and you don't see too many people on the Wilson now.
  • 2 0
 I'm old so many may not know who I'm talking about. I watched Roland Green dominate the XCO in the late 90's/ early 2000's. He was the first person to win a XCO world championship on a full suspension bike, That bike was a Trek Fuel. I went out and bought one ASAP and rode that thing into the ground. I watched him beat Lance Armstrong at Mt. Snow VT soon after Lance won his first Tour. He crushed him!
  • 1 0
 Roland Green was a force in his prime
  • 5 0
 I avoid emulating riders who make their ride end as quickly as possible.
  • 2 1
 Obviously we don’t care about race results, that’s the wrong angle. We do care about things like the field test which are reflective to some substantial degree of the top quality engineering that puts teams in position to win races... without the latter, you don’t win customer NOR races.
  • 1 0
 A lot of these results are the rider but riders also get to influence the bikes design and that is what peaks my interest. I can say that commencal does best in a straight line with no brakes but the brake jack is too much for me.
  • 1 0
 I ride for fun, I'm not good enough or motivated enough to be competitive, and I want to support brands who are good people making good products. I really don't care if they even have a race team at all, much less care about race results.
  • 1 0
 Few race the trail, light enduro bikes that I want to ride most of the time. Nor are the best DH bike necessarily the most fun park bikes. User reviewers by similar fun, group ride seeking riders matter the most to me, as does durability, and how much the company stands behind their warranty (e.g. Santa Cruz).
  • 1 0
 Top level race results are now determined by whether or not the rider is French, not by skill or bike technology. I think there was a rule change last year. I don't think it's a race results thing... but I am a lot more likely to buy a bike if I see a moustached guy wearing a beret and chugging a bottle of red wine in any way associated with that bike.
  • 2 0
 France for the wiiiiiiiiiiiiinn ! OH LA LA !
  • 2 0
 Along with the price, Gwin on YT definitely tipped the scales to give them a try. I know it's mostly the rider when it comes to racing, but the commitment a brand has to do the best they can also speaks volumes IMO.
  • 2 1
 Racers have a full service team around them, changing bearings, rims, and servicing suspension before each race, I don’t.

Pinkbike reviewers ride a bike occasionally for three months, and call it a test. I ride 3-4 times a week all year, year in and year out.

Our preferences are quite different, I want something that lasts with minimal service, is hardy and durable, and is easily services when needed. I seek my advice elsewhere.

I ride Nicolai
  • 2 0
 Find reviewers I trust like Kyle Warner on ridemtb channel or hardtailparty, b1ker on YouTube to have a direct impact on what I decide to purchase. As am riding for fun, health and no interest in doing races.
  • 3 0
 I was going to spend a fortune on a bike. Wanted a bike brand that got top results. Could not open Scrib to see results, bought a sports car instead.
  • 1 0
 I follow the races and racers and bad results from a previously stable rider can put me off. But as a crazy tall guy my options are usually limited to 2-3 bikes that ride like I want and will fit so the odds of the stars aligning have always been pretty slim... that being said it did feel good when I picked up a new Supreme 29er just before Commencal started sweeping the circuit with it.
  • 1 0
 Race results and marketing don't really affect my purchases much, but good reviews affect my purchases more. When I buy other products online, the first things I look at is price and reviews. However, it is not easy to find good unbiased reviews.
  • 1 0
 I had Kona when Barel won. Later Santa Cruz for years. Recently thinking of Commensal and "no, race result does not affect my decision" hahahaha. I am totally bought and I do not care. I like my idols and want to have similar bike.
  • 1 0
 Well, when I started to consider of buying DH bike - first thing I've done was to look at modern bikes people use in championships. Yeah, I knew almist every world-known manufacture produce some, but still - to see them all. Then, championships weren't important anymore, I just started to look through specs, prices,...
  • 1 0
 MTB is often a local market. Consumers buy something they are familiar with. I reckon what the local ripper ride at your trailhead has as much impact than wc results. Brands really often do the best on their local turf, Transition in PNW, Yeti in Colorado, intense in So-cal, De Vinci in Canada. WC result without local presence won't have a big impact. You also often have the outliers, somebody than just wants to buy something exotic to give him some coolness in his area!
  • 1 0
 I think we're all smart enough to realize that buying a 10.000$ Scott Spark (unfortunately) won't make us ride as fast as Nino Schurter.
For shopping, personally I'm paying much more attention to reviews and comparison tests. Those are much more likely to affect my purchasing decisions.
  • 1 0
 Race results themselves ? Maybe if I was racing.
But it's more the technology linked to the wining race bike that may influence my choice.
For instance, if I were racing DH, seeing how the Supreme DH has a high pivot, I'm thinking this could make the difference between losing the rear or not in an off-camber curve as the wheelbase extends contrary to a normal pivot.
I also always felt my 2013 Giant Reign felt too long on the ups and too short of the downs, so I've been curious about the whole longer lower slacker thing since the beginning, and though most brands are making longer bikes now, I'd like a Nicolai, but they're not racing.
  • 2 1
 videos of people having fun and jibbing about are far more important. If I was relying on race results for my living wage, maybe I would care about past race results... but I would starve if I counted on my race earnings.
  • 2 2
 As customers we are probably loyal to a brand whereas a pro rider really doesn't care what he / she rides as long as he / she is riding and racing, and collecting a fat cheque, if they cared about or wanted to ride what they think is THE BIKE then they would still be privateers.
  • 4 0
 as long as there are no water bottle mounts I'm sold
  • 3 0
 I do pay attention to what Rims and Tires they are running for durability.... but frames, nah
  • 2 0
 I watch brands that have a strong presence in races. Not necessarily results but I definitely stray towards brands that are represented.
  • 1 0
 It surprised that it took the UCI to allow road disk brakes in cyclocross for Shimano and SRAM to develop hydraulic road disc groups considering that 99% of people buying road bikes will never enter a race under UCI rules
  • 1 0
 The arricle has a winning/buying focus, what about when a top rider DNFs, I'm sure mechanicals affect peoples buying intentions. Minnars horror season couldn't of helped ENVE sales.
  • 1 0
 But I guess it's something to take in consideration when the market is so open of choices. I mean: when I see Sam Hill riding like a thunder on a 5k nukeproof mega I think that a 12k yeti is not necessary to get fun
  • 2 0
 I pay more attention to bikes where multiple mid pack riders seem to suddenly take it to the next level. Such as Mondraker in the DH scene a few years ago...
  • 3 0
 Fact of the matter is price affects 90% of bike purchase's, not race results
  • 4 0
 Not at all, but I won't buy a bike that I see break on tv
  • 1 0
 My current bike is an abortion of parts I liked at random. "Looks good, and I can afford it, we'll slapper on there". "Looks bad, we won't slapper on there". Lol. "The sweet science".
  • 1 0
 PS; I'm laughing at how big of a fail this pole is failing. "Win on Sunday, fail on Monday, because, mah not caring". Steve Peat won the world title on this. I went around the block twelve times on this, and liked the colour, and did a sick jump, like waaabam, so..........................
  • 1 0
 I’ve worked in marketing for 10 years. And I’m the worlds biggest sucker for win on Sunday. No shame. Building up a demo mullet, with an SB150 on the side for enduro thrashing. No shame (or money).
  • 1 0
 Wheres the "race results mean nothing to me, I find a few options that work for my riding area and then scroll PB Buy/Sell for months looking for those bikes until I find what I consider to be a steal of a deal"
  • 2 0
 Its kind of like if I know the bike is capable of winning under someone else, then at least I know I can't use the bike as an excuse Wink
  • 1 0
 What the local store has and can support is more important to me than race results. The athletes in the top 20 could all switch bikes and still be in the same position on most days.
  • 1 0
 This is a great idea for a PinkBike poll. These data can be weighed against actual bike purchase / race data to show us how limited our conscious awareness is in terms of choosing bikes.
  • 4 1
 Fun bikes rarely equates to race bikes...
  • 1 0
 I think it's also important when a rider switches to a new team/bike and stops getting as good results, e.g. when Gwin went to intense it definately put my off intense bikes
  • 2 0
 Why there's no option for "I don't give a s**t at all, because it's all about fun" ???
  • 2 0
 I admit, I bought a Yeti SB66c back in 2013 based largely on Jared Graves’ World Champs run.
  • 2 0
 No care about the bikes, do care about the tires that are blacked out but the best for those conditions.
  • 1 0
 The bike they are on makes little difference as they are so heavily customised. Its not like you can go and buy what they race
  • 2 0
 In 1998 I purchased a GT after view HANS REY on TV, since then all my bikes (except 2 i think) were GT's... Now I have 4!!
  • 1 0
 He still rips!! Followed him down nelson trail in sequoia forest of ca. Nailed all the tech and launched off 6 foot deadfall to flat
  • 2 0
 So if the polygon xquarone won both DH races and every EWS race, everybody would buy that as their steed?.. I doubt it!
  • 1 0
 haha... bunch of people lying... 'racing don't matter to me... it's how hard they celebrate the win that matters!' then I buy their bike in secret...
  • 2 0
 I don't pay attention to races, but any bike I buy must make it at least halfway up the impossible climb.
  • 2 0
 Why buy a bike that is race winning when I'm not. That way it makes sense for be to blame the bike.
  • 1 0
 It’s actually kinda stoopid to buy s bike because it was used successfully in a race because any bike ridden in that race are within +/- 5%.
  • 3 0
 I bought a Chromag this year so...zero?
  • 1 0
 Not gonna lie, watching Amaury and Myriam Nicole tear it up on the Commencal Supreme, I made sure my next FS purchase was a High Pivot Point trail bike.
  • 1 0
 We stay loyal to what brands work well and avoid whatever brands have let us down. I couldn’t tell you which bike brands won any of the major races last year.
  • 1 0
 30 years later, people are still buying Yetis because of the race team and cult that JP created. - Of course not only because of that, they're also decent bikes.. ;-)
  • 1 0
 Never bought a bike for recent race results, but I really find myself lusting for some legendary early 00s oldschool worldcup iron.
  • 1 0
 I ride a banshee rune. And my next bike will probably be a banshee too. Now tell me that my choice was influenced by race results
  • 1 0
 I get that. Currently riding banshee, feel the same. When was the last time they won anything?
  • 1 0
 Price is the reason for one bike over the other, what one person thinks of a bike has little to do with anything , different height, weight, riding abilities,
  • 3 0
 Zero....I dont race
  • 1 0
 As a long armed/bodied 6ft 2 person I need long bikes, I go on geo, then deals, what is good value.
  • 1 0
 Moreso for parts.

Also, can we do this poll but with people that actually race?
  • 1 0
 Main thing is banger edits ala commencal for ex. Lifestyle marketing works better than racing...majority dont race.
  • 2 0
 The Commie Supreme has "won" alot of hearts.
  • 1 0
 Commencal is doing a lot of things right lately. Not only with their race teams, but with frame design and bike specs. 21 Meta AM and TR are good examples imo
  • 1 0
 Based on these results I guess there is no use in sponsoring racers anymore....
  • 2 0
 They still race mountain bikes?
  • 1 0
 Last 2, maybe 3 bikes I’ve bought, the manufacturer doesn’t have a race team.
  • 1 0
 The mid 30s, never raced once in their life, out of shape riding a steel 29+ hardtail series informs all my bike choices.
  • 1 0
 I would say not at all, but I have a 2011 Nukeproof Mega that still gets me about.
So I saw the future Big Grin
  • 1 0
 If I was honest, my bike choice comes down to what bike I find sexy. If it looks hot I'll overlook other things.
  • 1 0
 I look at race results from 10 years ago, because that's all I can afford...
  • 1 0
 I dont care what bike wins, it has zero effect on my purchases. But I LOVE all racing.
  • 1 0
 No hero worship, not a fanboy.
  • 1 0
 GT and Nukeproof....winning riders with almost no US sales.
  • 1 0
 GT has no one to blame but themselves for that one.
  • 1 0
 If race bikes were in my budget...
  • 1 0
 F1 car racing influences my car purchase decisions more.
  • 1 0
 How about I ride the brand my buddy has a bro deal with.
  • 2 1
 Bikes with a whole bunch of purple parts makes me wanna barf
  • 1 0
 Seeing a lot more Supreme DH's out and about now!
  • 1 0
 Industry: sees results and pulls all racing sponsership
  • 1 0
 The question is basically, "How stupid are you?".
  • 2 4
 Ha, so many people so confident that what they see on pros bikes has zero effect on them. I suppose it's what their friends have on their bikes that matter more.
  • 1 0
 I still want a Sunday.
  • 1 0
 Same

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