First Look: Shimano XTR Di2 Electric Shifting

May 30, 2014
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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Shimano Di2 parts
Shimano photo

Today, Shimano officially released the mountain bike industry’s best-known secret. Di2 electric shifting for XTR has been anticipated since the Di2 first appeared on its Dura-Ace road racing transmissions over five years ago. Why cycling’s dominant drivetrain maker waited half a decade to adapt its push-button shifting system to its premier off-road component group will be self-evident the moment PB commenters begin to weigh in on this news release. Shimano won’t be surprised.


Shimano XTR Di2 2015
  Shimano XTR Di2 M9050 rear derailleurs are powered by a servo motor housed in the module behind the mech. The waterproof module is tucked out of harm's way. Irmo Keizer photo


ProTour road racers and their doppelgängers who visit retail establishments to purchase matching bikes and kits are traditionally the most reluctant members of the cycling community to commit to new technology. Before Shimano released Dura-Ace Di2, extensive testing had proven without a doubt that Di2 shifted better than its cable-actuated brother and that it was more reliable, more stable in adverse conditions, more ergonomic, and easier to operate. Shimano also knew that, in spite of Di2’s measurable improvements, there would be massive pushback against any sort of electric shifting from established know-it-alls in the elite road community. Testing trials, however, proved that, once riders had become accustomed to Di2, they wouldn’t want anything less, so Shimano waited the naysayers out. Five years and three Tour de France wins later, Dura-Ace Di2 has proven to be everything that Shimano claimed it would be and more.

Trek Factory Racing with Dan McConnel s bike 2015
  Dan McConnel's race bike, being fitted with Shimano XTR Di2 M9050 at the Trek Factory Racing pits immediately after the World Cup XC race in Nove Mesto. Irmo Keizer photo


Widespread acceptance of Dura-Ace Di2 is Shimano’s assurance that its new eleven-speed XTR M9050 Di2 drivetrain will overcome the inevitable resistance it will receive from mountain bikers. Di2’s electronics are now well understood by retailers and mechanics. Bike shops and cross-over roadies who are sold on Di2 will become entry points for electric XTR into the mountain bike market, and it’s a given that Shimano-sponsored cross-country racers will be sporting push-button shifting for the remainder of the 2014 World Cup season. In short, Shimano’s timing could not have been better.


XTR M9050 Di2 Overview

Di2’s digital electronic shifting moves the derailleurs in much the same way as a mechanical system does – overshifting slightly to ensure a speedy gear change and then centering the derailleur over the intended sprocket to eliminate chain rub. Where mechanical derailleurs are yanked around by a cable that is controlled by a rather complicated shifting device which metes out or takes up its length, Di2’s derailleurs are programmed to remember where each cog or chainring is and when asked, the derailleur simply drives the chain exactly where it needs to be to make the shift. The Di2 rear derailleur communicates with the Di2 front mech, so it can automatically compensate for chain angle when the system is in the cross-over gears – a mechanical system can’t do that. Select Synchronized mode and Di2 will make sequential shifts, operating both the front and the rear derailleurs, by pushing only one button on the right-side shift module. In recovery mode, Di2 can readjust itself and resume normal shifting after a crash or impact has compromised its original settings.

Shimano XTR Di2 2015
  Earlier this year, Shimano invited us to ride prototype XTR Di2 at their Irvine, California, headquarters. The thumb-operated shift paddles felt crisp, with a little movement and a reassuring click. Shimano says that they engineered both features to provide feedback to the rider. The small handlebar display indicates gear selection, battery life and which shifting mode the rider has chosen. It is also used to adjust the derailleurs. Greg Lambert photo


How Di2 Works: Shimano’s Di2 system drives the front and rear derailleurs with powerful digital-proportional servo motors. The servo mechanisms are built into the derailleurs and each contains its own micro-processor, so if one part fails, the others can continue to function. The sealed and waterproof electronic components are connected by a single “E-Tube” wire that conducts power from a centralized rechargeable battery and communicates signals from the Firebolt shift buttons. A small, handlebar-mounted display indicates battery life gear selection and your choice of shifting mode. Shimano’s Di2 system is intended to serve professional athletes in all conditions, and its near-instant shifts require powerful motors which draw heavily upon the battery, so Di2 is designed to hibernate between actions. When a shift is called for, Di2 turns on, remembers which cog and chainring the transmission was in, shifts to the next gear and then shuts down. Hibernation greatly extends Di2’s battery life. Most owners enjoy months of riding between charges. More importantly, you never have to turn the system off. Just pull the bike off its peg and ride, the same way you’d treat a bike with a cable-operated derailleur system.

Shimano XTR Di2 2015
  The XTR Di2 front derailleur is claimed to produce over 20-percent more shifting force than a human develops using a mechanical shifter. The prototype three-by Di2 drivetrain we test rode illustrates the exaggerated profiling that Shimano uses to ensure instant shifting response. Production chainrings use carbon fiber shifting aids. Holding down the shift paddle in Synchronized mode could shift across the 33-speed transmission in about 45 seconds. Greg Lambert photo


Based upon M9000 components: Shimano’s XTR M9050 Di2 front and rear derailleurs are exactly the same in operation and configuration as the mechanical M9000 items, with the exception of their servo-motor modules. The Di2 system is designed to sync with all of Shimano’s new 11-speed components, including single, double and triple chainring cranksets. As expected, M9050 requires the same Sil-Tech HG 11 chain that the mechanical XTR group uses, as well as the new 11 x 40, M9000 cassette. Basically then, the XTR M9050 Kit constitutes an electronic front and rear derailleur, a pair of Firebolt shifters, a handlebar-mount system display, a battery module, an E-tube wiring kit and a battery charger/computer interface device.

How much will Di2 cost? No MSRP has been set at this time, but it will be pricey. Shimano officials state that the up-charge for electronic shifting will be about the same for XTR as it has been for its Dura-Ace road ensemble. Expect to pay 40-percent more than the cost of the mechanical M9000 version, which also has yet to be priced by Shimano.

How much weight does Di2 add? Because cables and housings are steel, they weigh more than most would give credit. Mechanical shift levers are also weighty. Because of Di2’s wiring is lightweight, and the fact that the Firebolt shift button assemblies are 36 to 136 grams lighter (you only need one Di2 shift module to run both derailleurs – more on that later) the two-by Di2 drivetrain weighs the same as its mechanical M9000 brother, in most cases, however, Di2 is slightly heavier. The weights of Di2 M9050’s key components are as follows:


Irmo Keizer photo


Di2 M9050 Component Weights:

• Front derailleur (D-type): 115 grams
• Rear derailleur (GS): 289 grams
• System display: 30 grams
• Shift switch: 64 grams
• Battery Module: 51 grams

How Di2 Components stack up against Mechanical M9000 XTR:

• Front derailleur: M9050 is 5 grams lighter
• Rear Derailleur: M9050 is 68 grams heavier
• Shift lever: M9050 is 36 grams lighter (if you just use one, it is 136 grams lighter)
• Battery Module: 51 grams (extra item)
• System display: 30 grams (extra item)

Learn more about the mechanical XTR M9000 in PB's First-Look article


Di2 Special Powers

Reportedly, Di2 M9050 owners can use Shimano-supplied software to modify the speed that the system shifts and reprogram functions of the Firebolt shift paddles. For example; you could program the left side paddles to downshift and the right-side paddles to upshift, with the upper buttons operating the front derailleur and the lower ones, controlling the rear changer. What is more likely, though, is that owners will want to program the sequence in Synchronized mode to customize where the front derailleur kicks in for the double shift. Two pre-programmed shift modes are built into the system. One for high-speed work that keeps the chain on the larger chainring until the rear derailleur reaches the second largest cog in the cassette before it shuffles down to the small chainring, and another mode, which favors climbing, that shuffles to the smaller front sprocket earlier in the sequence to eliminate the distraction of the double shift while suffering is taking place.

Another Di2 exclusive is that the system will continue shifting as long as you hold down the shift paddle. That means you can get from one side of the cassette to the other with a single push of a button – or in Synchronized mode, you can sequence through every gear selection in one direction just by holding the button down. Di2 knows where the overlapping gears hide and will automatically skip them as it progresses through the available ranges.

Shimano Di2 XTR
  The Di2 M9050 battery can be hidden in the frame's seat tube or mounted alongside a bottle cage. This demo prototype was also equipped with Fox iCD remote lockout suspension, which is designed to plug into Shimano's Di2 E-tube wiring system. Greg Lambert photo


Of course, you can shift Di2 conventionally too, and traditionalists who prefer a front derailleur may opt for a Firebolt shifter on the right and left side of the bars, but anyone who has adapted to a one-by transmission will no doubt, opt for Syncro mode and do away with the left shifter altogether. The display allows you to toggle back and forth from normal to Synchro modes, so you always have the option. While we are on the subject of one-by versus multiple-chainring drivetrains, Shimano’s sequential shifting option, may offer the best of both worlds – one shift module on the right handlebar, like SRAM XX1, but with the extended gearing range of a two-by configuration, and the added benefit of the front derailleur playing a second role as a chain guide.


Video: Shimano XTR Di2 Shifting in Synchronized Mode






XTR Di2 Firebolt Shifters

Because Di2 Firebolt shift modules are essentially electric switches, Shimano was able to engineer the them to be far more ergonomic than its mechanical XTR trigger shifters could have been made. The contoured and textured paddles rotate concentric to the handlebar and are positioned to match where an average rider’s thumbs would normally rest. The paddles are individually adjustable and the module can be rotated around the handlebar, so there is a perfect fit for every rider. Firebolt shifters take up very little real estate on the handlebar, and they should be compatible with every brake lever made.

Shimano XTR Di2 2015
Shimano photo

In addition to controlling Shimano’s XTR Di2 shifting, Firebolt shift modules can also operate Fox Racing Shox iCD remote lockout suspension system, and there are hushed conversations that a Di2-compatible dropper seatpost control is in the works. Fox partnered with Shimano to use its E-Tube wire and processing technology for iCD and the possibility that the left shift module could be programmed to simultaneously drop the saddle and open up the suspension could be a huge side benefit to Di2.


Shimano photo


XTR M9050 Di2 Rear Derailleur

Unless you noticed the M9050’s servo motor tucked behind the derailleur, you may easily mistake the Di2 mech for the mechanical item. The E-tube wire traces the same path as the M9000’s cable housing does and it enters the mech’ in about the same spot. The drive module is angled inwards and behind the derailleur body to keep it safe from harm and its internal processor communicates the derailleur’s position with the front changer and the display module each time a shift is called for.

Unlike a cable actuated mech, there is no return spring in the XTR Di2 derailleur – the servo motor drives it in both directions. Because of this, if the Di2 electronics should fail, or if the battery gives up the ghost, it will stay in the last gear selection it was in – and the mech can also be shifted by hand to line up anywhere in the cassette. This means that you can comfortably ride out of any situation without being forced to suffer in an impossible gear combination. Shimano will offer the M9050 Di2 rear derailleur in a medium or long-cage version for use with its eleven-speed cassettes only. The medium cage version is reported to weigh 298 grams.



Shimano photo

XTR M9050 Di2 Front Derailleur

Shimano already owns the rainbow jersey for front derailleur performance, but if its claims are true, the new XTR Di2 changer will raise that bar significantly. The M9000 front derailleur chassis that the Di2 version is built upon has a monstrously stiff cage that forces the chain against a barrage of lifting ramps and pins that bristle from the back of the middle and large chainrings. Shimano says that the motor-driven cage pushes over 20-percent harder than the mechanical version – which we can believe after riding the prototypes earlier this year. XTR Di2 front shifting is more instant that elegant. Push the shift paddle and “crunch,” it’s done. There is no time lag when the Di2 changer is shifting under power either.

Shimano shortened the cage to clear big tires and reconfigured it to keep its shifting action the same regardless of chain angle, which is always changing when the transmission is mounted to a dual-suspension bike. As mentioned, the mech’s Di2 processor keeps in touch with the position of the rear derailleur and when it hears that the chain is nearing the outer extremes of the cassette cogs, the front derailleur automatically trims right or left to ensure there is no chain rubbing in the cross-over gear selections. Like the rear mech, if the Di2 system fails, it also stays in place. Accessory mounts are available that adapt the XRT Di2 changer to high and low clamp-type frames, or high and low-type direct mount applications. In the lighter direct-mount configuration, the XTR Di2 derailleur is reported to weigh 115 grams.



Shimano photo

XTR SC-M9050 Display

XTR Di2’s small handlebar-mounted LCD display reads out the gear you have selected, remaining battery life, and which shifting mode is being used. Of course, if you are actually riding on the dirt, the chances of being able to read that information on the fly are slim. More importantly, the display is where the derailleurs are remotely adjusted, a convenient port from which to charge the battery, and where the user would add functionality, like plugging in the E-tube connections for Fox suspension controls. Three extra E-tube ports are included for accessories. The display also has an audible warning that signals when the front derailleur will be switching chainrings in each of the two pre-programmed Synchronized modes. Claimed weight for the display is 30 grams.


XTR Di2 Battery System

The cylindrical lithium-ion Di2 battery that Shimano chose for XTR is designed to slip into a seat tube, where the E-tube wires would be routed internally to their respective components. The SM-BTC1 case that comes with the system is used to mount the long, slim battery alongside a water bottle, or to a pair of bottle mounts anywhere it will fit on the frame. The nature of Di2’s single-wire system allows any component to be plugged into any available port, and as long as everything is connected, the system will power up and shifting commands will be communicated correctly. Six ports sprout from the battery, which shortens the distance necessary to connect to the derailleurs and, if called for, to an electronically controlled shock. The battery can be charged directly, or through a port in the display. Weight is reported to be only 51 grams.

Shimano XTR Di2 2015
Shimano photo



First Impressions:

Shimano’s addition of Di2 shifting to its premier off-road racing drivetrain was a given. Now that XTR M9050 exists, there is no doubt that it will be popping up everywhere that mountain bikes are sold for ten thousand dollars or more. The effortless and instant shifts that Di2 has proven to deliver will be an easy sell for cross-country racers, but the application makes even more sense for downhill and enduro competition, where its one-touch shifting could ease the workload of negotiating technical terrain at mach speeds – and where its expandable E-tube system could be used to make mid-course suspension or saddle adjustments. Most riders, however, will perceive and probably reject XTR Di2 as a luxury item, and its expected retail cost is assurance that it will remain so for the near future. Shimano has not yet posted the MSRP of XTR Di2, but all indications tell us that it will be the most expensive drivetrain that the mountain bike world has been served to date. That said: when Dura-Ace Di2 was released a bit more than five years ago, it was the most expensive road ensemble of its time, but its indisputable benefits eventually led to its acceptance. Presently, Shimano offers electric shifting at three price points on the road and we can expect a similar progression for the mountain bike version.

Speaking purely about the ramifications of Shimano’s XTR Di2 as it applies to its most conspicuous competitor, SRAM’s XX1 ensemble, we’d have to take a wait and see attitude. It’s safe to say that both SRAM and Shimano’s top component groups will be reliable performers. Both are priced stratospherically beyond the reach of rank and file riders, so the game hinges on ideology alone. At this level, your purchase can affect the future, like investing in the stock market. Do you subscribe to SRAM’s simpler-is-better idea, and pop for a proven-but-maybe-dated mechanical one-by drivetrain; or do you throw in for Shimano’s scientific approach and purchase a new, yet-to-be-accepted, shift-by-wire transmission? In the end, a relatively small group of enthusiastic investors will decide the fates of these divergent technologies.

As far as riding impressions go, I had the opportunity to ride rough prototypes of XTR Di2 at Shimano’s headquarters in Irvine, California, and the system was very promising. I was most impressed by the synchronized, sequential shifting feature, which I believe will become its key selling point to retail customers. I also have extensive experience riding Dura-Ace Di2 and have tested one of the custom Di2 mountain bike conversions made by Fairwheel Bikes in Tucson, Arizona. There is no arguing that Di2 electric shifting is better than its mechanical predecessor – it is – and there is no arguing that Di2 will gain acceptance among the elite riders that it was designed to impress – it will. The only question worth considering at this point is how Shimano’s decision to manufacture an XTR version of Di2 will affect the landscape of mountain bike technology in the coming years. - RC

401 Comments

  • + 169
 Nice work, although most people on here won't like it - it's a significant (positive) step up in bike technology.

To all the haters, remember those who said they wouldn't buy a dropper when they first came out 'incase it broke and I was miles from home', well yeah look how that turned out
  • + 81
 Not sure this will turn out the same way, the advantage of a dropper over a static seat post is much larger than the advantage of electric shifting to mechanical shifting (or so I would believe).
  • + 21
 As with droppers, it's probably good to wait a bit to see how reliable it is and let companies work out the kinks.
  • + 20
 They will soon be releasing an Electric dropper as well.
  • + 33
 Reliability is pretty well proven by the Dura Ace group, IMO. As they said, it'll be a racers-only thing for the most part, but everyone I know who's ridden DA Di2 is in love with it. And using it to control suspension and droppers could be pretty disruptive tech too. Also... just fantasize for a moment about how clean a Di2 mtb cockpit would be. You could have one controller for everything.
  • + 17
 Looking forward to being able to hold down one of the paddles and yell "BRAAAAAAAAAAAAPT"

I know a few people (James Lobegeiger) will be losing their shit over this!
  • + 128
 What's a front derailleur?
  • + 13
 Next up, Electric Brakes
  • + 4
 Yeah, everyone here is always complaining about how many wires/cables are in the cockpit of modern bikes with dropper post, remote lockouts, and 2x drivetrains, having one controller for everything would seem like a dream come true. I am curious, though, about how the software mapping would work for the (inevitable) future electronic dropper post and the current Fox iCD lockout. Is there any info on how that integration will work?
  • + 17
 As a hater, I say "useless"
  • + 72
 "Sorry guys, I cant ride today. The alternator went out on my S-Works." Wink
  • + 33
 No wireless bluetooth shifting? GTFO shimano!
  • + 21
 Or Facebook / strava connection so no one that cares about you can see how many times you shifted in a ride
  • + 32
 Hell, I remember when suspension forks were considered a fad and it was spewed that no respectable xc racer would use one because of the weight penalty.

I'd like to see some sort of small dyno built into the BB to keep a continuous trickle charge going to the battery, but besides that E-XTR is so fu$king sweet!
  • + 6
 Finally I can consider putting back a 2nd chainring upfront and getting rid of unwanted cassette weight on the back. Of course, it'll be another 5 years before this gets affordable for me :/
  • - 10
 Why would people be focused on reliability anyways? I think the main topic of discussion would be that it has a friggen battery life... that means it could run out and boom, no more shifting. All to change something that works perfectly fine without batteries. Or is there some kind of backup plan for this that I'm not catching?
  • + 2
 Love this Wink Bout time!
  • + 7
 It's not a battle between simple 1X11 SRAM XX1 and Shimano Electric.
You can still go Shimano Electric 1X10.

How long is the battery life and how often does it need to be charged?
  • + 2
 I would honestly jump on a single control solution for electronic dropper post and rear shock compression far more quickly than electronic shifting. I could see myself running an electronic left pod for that, with a mechanical pod on the right, weight penalty be damned.
  • + 37
 Road group battery life is 600-1500 miles per charge. 600 is just for really cold weather though, it's more like 1000 miles. Plus there's a battery indicator and warnings, so if it runs out on you you're either doing a 1000 mile ride or you're too dumb/lazy to plug it in for about 2 months.
  • - 18
 Useless
  • + 1
 People do a thing called bike tours so this electronic shifting would not be ideal but that's a small minority. Those are some impressive numbers. Now I wonder how long the condition of the battery lasts? All batteries lose their ability to hold a charge down the line. (trying to be devil's advocate here because a battery is just one more expensive piece of equipment that will eventually have to be replaced)
  • + 19
 Well I guess I better get ready to sell another organ...
  • + 5
 @scott-townes I'm not saying that it'd be ideal for touring for other reasons (first iteration of a product being a biggy, reliability is king for tourers) The battery should last for a significant tour, and they're light enough you could carry a spare or two. additionally, should be trivial to charge this via a solar panel, or even set up a panel to be constantly feeding it juice. I'd say the battery is the smallest problem.
  • + 3
 I 100% agree with "groughunter"^, plus I have money and I love to ride. Not sure if this is for me yet but "forward" is "usually" better and so I must admit that Im quite interested.
  • + 6
 My initial reaction was "why?" to the idea of electronic shifting. But as I'm cleaning off my bike from a muddy ride last night, I think electronic shifting could have real benefits in wet regions where mech cables get nasty in a ride or two and your shifting starts to suck in short order. I "should" replace my cables monthly, but I do it maybe three times a year (5mm full length housing helps). It also seems like 11 speed is fairly pointless with this system, might as well have 9 or 10 speed. But at least we will have the option to run it 1x11 (in a few years when it trickles to XT).

Great to see a battle between SRAM and Shimano right now for the future of shifting. Good for the sport. Now let's see some trickling down.
  • - 2
 groghunter- Well that's why I pointed out that bike tour-ers are a small minority of mtbing so in the grand scheme of things, it doesn't really matter but I thought it was worth mentioning because that is a situation where this system would create issues. Yeah you could rig up a solar charger/carry a spare or two but that means you're spending more time and money on something that never needed to be electronic in the first place. I guess the reason I'm poking at this system is because I don't see the point in it. If it's not broke, don't fix it and adding more parts means more chances for those parts to fail. That's how I view it anyways.
  • + 6
 @scott townes for the current Di2 battery:

"The Di2 battery lasts from between 600 to 1,500 miles between charges. You can expect that lots of shifting in cold, cold weather will result in shorter battery life, but we've found that 1,000 miles is an average interval. There is no "charge memory" in the battery, so you can recharge it as often as you like, though Shimano recommends once a week or so if you're a daily rider. The battery can go 300 charge cycles at 100% integrity; charging once a week means almost six years."

Can't see the bike touring crowd ever opting for electronic shifting (half those guys are still using downtube/bar end shifters), but even if they did, I'm sure on their 1000 mile tour they could camp somewhere near a power outlet for a night, or rig up a charging system out of one of those backcountry fold-up solar panels. Or just carry an extra battery.
  • + 5
 I don't care how much it costs, I want it. Will I buy it? No, I'm still on 9s Saint, X9 and Deore for my bikes. That and I don't take xc seriously enough to justify Di2. I'm glad to see this on the market above all, it's seriously cool!
  • + 25
 shimano should perfect a gearbox instead
  • + 2
 I have a solar panel that charges my phone for when I work in the field nowhere near a power outlet, why not do the same for your shifters? Sunlight is available just about everywhere worldwide, replacement shifter-cables are not.
  • - 2
 are solar panels available just about everywhere worldwide?
  • + 4
 Can I get the weather on that thing? Porn? I'll wait til they can link my suspension settings, shifting and steering to my iPhone so i can ride with my twitter hanging out!
  • + 3
 It sounds like the battery lasts about as long as my brake pads. Meaning, it wouldn't be a bigger problem than replacing pads when they get worn.
  • + 0
 ^ No, but it's another problem to deal with that costs money and time, non-the-less. I guess neither of those things are much of a concern to a few people on this site it seems. To each their own.
  • + 10
 @scott-townes

I have been working for the UK's leading road bike store, and we are the largest retailer in the UK of Di2 custom builds. We rarely get any problems related to the battery life of the system - it will literally run 1000km+ without a charge

Once the power gets low, the front mech stops working, and then you have another 100km of rear mech operation

you have to be pretty dumb to get a totally flat battery Wink
  • + 2
 Maybe, just like the dropper though, time will tell wont it? Could be the next thing, or biopace/ubrakes/dual control, etc. I will keep fly-by-cable on my rigs and be a late adopter on this round.
  • + 10
 "another problem to deal with that costs money and time"

You mean like trim adjustments? Cable and housing swaps? Missed shifts? Cuz plugging your bike in once a month after a ride is WAY less time than that, and it performs better.
  • + 2
 i think what scott-townes is getting @ is the difference between having to be connected as opposed to engaged with the mechanical simplicity of a bike. ..i think. it's probably the same reason any single speed mtb, bmx is still fun to ride. nothing against any of this. as long as it doesn't take the rider out of the riding. like i said...gearbox! hehe
  • + 1
 It's easier to plug in a battery than to swap out cables and housings and readjusting your derailleur every once in a while.
  • + 4
 No, scott-townes, it's not that "a few people on this site" don't understand your concerns, it's that you're completely blowing out of proportion how big those concerns are, even when several people have been patient enough to explain why they aren't. just like a bunch of other people did about suspension forks, rear shocks, disc brakes, hydraulic disc brakes (oh, boy, are the parallels there ever telling,) carbon fiber parts, and pretty much every other big change in bike parts. Shimano recognizes the inherent challenges of electronic drive trains, and has had 5+ years to mitigate them. I'm pretty sure your arguments aren't something they've never considered before.
  • + 0
 I don't like the idea of using the earths resources to make shifting gears on my mountain bike easier.
  • + 5
 WTF!? Where do you think the aluminum, steel and plastic in your current system comes from? Heck, etubes need to be replaced less often, making them more green than cables!
  • + 0
 This is obviously the candidate for most debated topic for June. Early Reviews, Final Reviews, Tech Tips let both sides make their best points and we'll sit back and judge with little to no knowledge or facts with which to do so, only my money...Who wants to help me? As if you had a choiceSmile
  • + 3
 Shit as hell. There should be at least an option of regaining energy from braking. There is only heat from this in most vehicles, except hybrid cars, so why don't they put some genious device in front hub to take electricity from braking as well as the battery away from the bike or at least time 0.1 the size. Wireless connections should also be better then this cablelogy there. Who cares about the tv info? I don't need to know what gear I am in, and that there is a battery on my bike. Electronic controlled brakes, suspension, pants and some haker can stop you in the middle of A-line. I still won't buy it anyway. I think I will start to gather the oldschool parts to have something really good in the future.
  • + 11
 Trinity is running fair trade organic tires and a bamboo frame stuck together with pine sap. His cables are made from hemp fibers and his housing is dandelion stems. Zero evironmental impact; if you leave it outside long enough it'll just turn to compost.
  • + 10
 I used to think that mountain biking was something that got me away from my computer, in the future it looks like that will change.
  • + 9
 IMO electronics do not belong on mountainbikes at all. Keep it simple
  • + 3
 It's cool, but it's not for me. I'm not saying it's not a good thing, I just wouldn't spend the extra money for just more things that can go wrong. In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with my bike. It could be better, but I enjoy it. And that's what matters most. Maybe for racers it will help, but for me and a lot of guys, it's not needed, cool, but not needed.
  • + 1
 Titanium, carbon composite, and ceramic are not simple, but this is the right direction of improving the existing technology instead changing it. To be honest electronics on something so "simple" and mechanical like a derailleur is just ridiculous. It is like a laptop to controll digging spade. Why not magnetic power field to move a chain around. Oh! Wait a minute.. a chain. This is like thousants years old invention.

Maybe it has already been invented somewhere and I don't know about it, but I would rather find a different invention presented on the news.
Hello Shimano !
My dream is about MAGNETIC BEARING without any friction. Two rings of a bearing in my hub that don't touch each other. There is a tiny, but really stable gap filled with magnetic field produced by e.g. neodymium magnets. How about this? I am really serious about it. Magnetic field can exist without electricity, and this would make my effort to move my body on my bike even more effective. Clean human power only. No batteries.
  • + 2
 @lukachadwick I agree with you 100% couldn't have said it any better
  • + 8
 Can I just point out something... If you really think about your life as a whole, mountain biking as a whole - why do your ride your bike, what makes your bike a good or bad bike - if you zoom out just a bit, then you may get the privilleage to realize that complaining about how unreliable and not smooth pulled wires and hosing are, is really, really making you into a total sissie. It's like complaining on a TV remote, that you need one that is more comfortable to hold in your hand, or complaining on a shipping company that they take 2 more days than they should to bring you something from the other side of the planet. Go get it yourself for 5$ you spoiled whiny prick. Di2 - whether it is for roadies or MTB is incredibly stupid. It is a complicated, super costly solution to a non existing problem. Some ideas are so stupid that only a nerd can find them attractive.
  • + 3
 ahhhh, that's the Waki I know and love
  • + 1
 @wakidesigns. It's actually less complicated. You set it up and it never goes out of tune again.
  • + 0
 Andrew- you mean, it will readjust itself after your bike tips and hits the ground with the derailleur, or you hit the stone, or drag a bit of grass with the cage and bend or twist it a bit? It is 11 speed, really tight spacing, ever imperfection will be felt more. It is not as if the previous mechs from XTR, XX or X0 were not more expensive than it is worth, but adding technology and inevitably bumping up price of a hanging contraption is just silly. I dont even want to mention the very nature of shifting in MTB, why would someone want it so precise. As if readjusting a normal rear mech was any trouble.
  • + 1
 @WAKI "Di2 - whether it is for roadies or MTB is incredibly stupid. It is a complicated, super costly solution to a non existing problem. Some ideas are so stupid that only a nerd can find them attractive."

But WAKI, how are big manufacturing companies suppose to make more money if they can't reinvent the wheel, or in this case the drive train...
  • - 3
 We are not complaining about parts of bikes, nor feeling unhappy becasue of some minor malfunctions, being normal aspects of life of every cyclist. We are complaining about companies that change their products more and more dramatically and more and more often, so that we are just forced to buy their ideas even if some of us don't like them. We all got used to 9speed systems and there is already 10speed, 11speed, electronic speed. In the time of the changes I haven't even used three 8 speed chains I bought earlier. I don't even need 9speed system, 8 is barely needed. Sram listened and introduced 7speed but with narrow chains. We already got used to 26" wheels for over 20years (!) and suddenly in last few years it was introduced all wrong. It was suddenly 29" that was the peak of everything and now it is not even 29", it is 27.5". In last two years! So all we knew about 26" for 25years is trash now, and all we know about cables to shift gears is trash, because it is electronics now. We threw away gear indicators in our cable shifters long time ago to be introduced to this beautifull golden display of interface to show us.. gear chosen and battery life. Now how brilliant is that? We are not even complaining about producers trying their best to improve the equipment or their sells, but we are complaining about producers who are starting to treat as like fools and experiment on us. We are complaining about producers who force us to buy things we don't need because they don't sell the old versions anymore. So if you bought Sram XX shifter yesterday, you are now looking at your shiny box like it was a museum of wrong past. Off course if you don't like the new shifter, you don't buy it. It is your choice. Hell not! There won't be old shifters soon. Look at Giant's 26" trail bikes for a good example. I don't like to complain anytime. I would like to ride in peace, and don't worry about producers preparing this whole circus.
  • + 1
 @waki you're talking about rider error lol. And do you know how much a machine shop machines cost? People have to get paid man. Starting at designers to factory workers to distributors to media marketers to everyone that works in the industry to bring you what you are riding. If you don't like it go do it yourself. If you're not doing it yourself, keep it to yourself lol.
  • + 2
 Battery operated Wireless brakes coming too ??
  • + 1
 simple mountain bikes for sure, I like cars that way too, the old ones with just the good ol motor and your feet is just awesome where as the cars these days with all the electronics in them just doesn't have the same feel
  • + 2
 I like electronic shifting. electronic controlled suspension however is a bit too far. it one thing to replace a wire with a servo but actually having programmable control over your shock is too far.
  • + 0
 They've been doing it in motorcycles for god knows how long. Electric suspension can be really handy in a race environment and even if the battery does die on you it still acts as normal suspension and can still be used without any hassle. Just makes it look ugly IMO.
  • + 0
 I can see the benefits of electric suspension but the question is where to stop adding electronics. I think gears are fine because they are still controlled by you. if you have anything automatic then na, I cannot like that
  • + 1
 Yay now my 8speed derailleur will drop down from $25 to $18 the next time I break one. Aren't Di2 $573 at chain Reaction and $834 everywhere else? Probably cost $1100 at a LBS store here in Perth. If I'm spending that much I'd get an essentially indestructible Pinion.
  • + 0
 jedrzeja: No one is forcing you to buy anything. 7 and 8 speed components are still available. You don't have to upgrade to the latest greatest if you don't want to. That's just being silly.
  • + 0
 You are partially right, but the gist is in size of this very part. I can buy alivio 8 speed system, but it is the end of it. I suppose there will be accera only in the next year. 15 years ago I was using 8 speed XTR, so it is quite clear and not so silly. I would be glad if there was a small amount of old parts that were good, still available in Shimano like the legendary stx rc, if anybody remembers it. I am not a dinosaur but I hardly use 8 gears. I can buy 10speed system and throw away some cogs, but it is much more expensive and does not improve that much. wingnutbert: It is not only about gears and chains. I am afraid that there will be no 26" parts available very soon. This way the second hand trading will diminish to the size of a half of last years. That is done on purpose, but I want to believe it is not the main reason. When I look at electonic shifting I am seriously scarred that there will be no cables soon. I don't mind cables, I change it once a year maybe, so compare this to charging a battery? All the wires, displays. I don't need this, like I don't need an expensive ultra narrow chain. It is not that I can't buy it, I just don't feel it is worth it. If you see a candy worth 50dollars it is expensive, even if you have money to buy it. If you see a yacht costing 10000dollars it is cheap even if you don't have the money to buy it. There are two main companies making shifters. It is Shimano and Sram. I am sure it is not enough. This way they can do what they want and we will still buy their products because there is no other choice. This is all what my fuss is about Nothing more.
  • + 0
 ..or how about this? I don't listen to the latest music productions. I mostly prefer classic rock. What if there was no older music than five years or so? I am sure there would be more people fussing like me. I am only surprised I am the only one here questioning this story. Cost of progress is hard to describe, but I don't believe that every new part is better than the old one. This is always experimenting. Some 20 years old devices are just perfect in every way to suit some jobs and they could be used for next 50 years, but the truth is nobody wants a client that buys something for 50 years. Chains wear out after a year in most cases. So after a year I cannot buy last years chain becasue it is just not there. Chain is only an example. This situation can be seen in cars, tv's, and all other devices. It is just wrong and I do not accept it. Instead improving something that is good, they introduce something completely different that would probably last one tenth of the time. I don't know how to clear this point more. Even if pushing the progress hard there should always be a backup plan. It was always like this in history. The speed of progress should not be too fast. What if they cut out cables for good starting from next month and all the new wire technology went completely wrong?
  • + 1
 Dude @jedrzeja you can still buy 8 speed chains bro, you're all good lol
  • + 0
 Because dude, if you are riding 8 speed mec, and Di2 mec, and you're still wanting the 8 speed mec, you're not riding to the degree where you need clutch dampened chain retention. If your not worried about dripping your chain at 30mph while sprinting on the downhill section, why complain about something that is needed in the level of the sport right now? Go out, ride your bike, and have fun man!
  • + 0
 Pray the batteries never go out for those!
  • + 0
 ^ that was meant for the electric brake joke...grrr
  • - 1
 bla bla bla ride cantilevers if you dont like technology bla bla bla bla. Planes are flown by electronics so it must be good for them. So ti must be better for bikes too bal bla bla bklab bla argument 2 bal bal bla bla argument 54 bl bla
  • + 2
 ride whatever, wherever, whenever. human nature vs mother nature. you lose. always. electronically or not. go ride.
  • + 1
 So nice to discuss with you all. Thank you. I've learnt more today.
  • + 1
 I still have a bike with stx rc brakes, I can say that was the best piece of equipment I ever get, it's incredible how good it is, even compared to mechanical disc brakes.
[Reply]
  • + 45
 For me it's not enough. I want this shit to connect to google glas, with some eye-controlled system what we know from the photo industry. If i looking the uphill, it'll measure and switch, if i'll looking the tree, it'll brakes... An so, but this is Waki's territory.
  • + 10
 no need for basic riding skills - autopilot mode is ON
  • + 19
 WHERE IS WAKI???
  • + 2
 Shimano has a wireless module (dfly) that lets it converse with a cycling computer over ant+, Im sure some hardware hacker could re-interface it with google glass
  • + 0
 Rolls royce has gps enabled transmissions that select the gear based on the terrain youre on, so why not this too? That would be so rad!
  • + 2
 RR - for rich 80 year old goofs who have lost most cognitive functions, awesome yes yes. for MTB where beyond being a wobbly noob on training wheels, you are supposed to have developed skill, timing, judgement, and riding ability. FAIL
  • + 5
 All you haters should ride cantilevers, this is progress innovation! This will totaly trickle down to Deore!
  • + 7
 WAKI isn't the hero pinkbike deserves, but he's the one it needs right now...
  • - 1
 @L0rdTOm comment of the year +1
  • + 1
 @WAKI, will eventually, I've heard tell that 105 is getting di2 in 2015
  • + 2
 105 is going 11s, unlikely to go Di2 though this early.
  • + 4
 11spd is announced, The rumors are that 105 Di2 will be announced next year
  • + 2
 And what do the rumours say about the price increase/decrease?
  • + 0
 I'm wincing at the thought of its weight...
  • + 1
 105 is 11 speed mechanical but also an option of STI shifters with hydraulic brake Master Cylinder and hydraulic calipers, so you can run a more affordable mechanical shift / hydraulic disc brake system on a road bike

before this, they could only package the Master Cylinder with the more expensive Di2 in the STI
  • + 1
 I just checked the price of a Di2 Ultegra rear mech vs "normal" Ultegra one... they may as well trickle it down to Altus, it will still be cheaper to buy XX1
[Reply]
  • + 32
 I hate the idea of electronics on my mountain bike. BUT I love the idea of crisper more intelligent shifting.

The front derailleur trims its cage based on what gear the rear derailleur is in; that is so very cool!
  • + 15
 I'm with you on the electronics but in the area of crisper, more intelligent shifting I would have been happier to see a reasonably light, well functioning gearbox and be done with derailleurs all together.
  • + 10
 I SO agree on that one.
(About the gearbox)
  • + 3
 I'm with you. Not a fan of electronics, but definitely less of a fan of all the work and money I have to put into my drivetrain to keep it working half as well at this probably does.
  • + 1
 Give me on that is reasonably light and can stand up to mountain biking and I am all in. I'd love to be done with derailleurs. I just rode a bike with the Nuvinchi 360 that is the kind of shifting I want turn grip infinite change if that where light and stood up to pedal pounders like me, I'd give my left nut.
  • + 2
 To say that electronics is 'required' for a self trimming front derailleur is conveniently forgetting some history.
"Sun Tour Symmetric shifters were an esoteric piece of early 1980s Japanese engineering. They could be mounted on frames with a single downtube shifter braze-on (like some of the Shimano AX components took) or with a supplied clamp-on belt. They are unique because shifting the rear derailleur automatically trims the front via a cam mechanism.[Sheldon regarded the design as flawed, but opinions differ -- John Allen] The video below, from N. Keith Duncan, shows the operation of this shift lever." www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyR9Sezf1PM&feature=player_embedded
  • + 1
 @andrewsolutions - 1) That's a very cool piece of info. Thanks for sharing! 2) I checked the whole article and all the comments again. No one said electronics was required for trimming, just that is is a very nice feature.

I love my bike to be quiet while I ride and the chain nicking a front derailleur has always annoyed me. Not that a $3000 dollar full XTR Di2 groupset will end up on my bike anytime soon, but cool Smile

Plus the crispness of having the motor precisely over derail and then set in the right position, that will be great.
  • + 1
 andrewsolutions' comment got me looking at old SunTour stuff, check this front electronic triple out: www.youtube.com/watch?v=stCbRXWdSEo
  • + 2
 @burnbern I had to check the whole article again to make sure I wasn't crazy! "The Di2 rear derailleur communicates with the Di2 front mech, so it can automatically compensate for chain angle when the system is in the cross-over gears – a mechanical system can’t do that." Under XTR M9050 Di2 Overview

Don't think I'll be springing for it either, 1x doesn't need trim Smile
  • + 1
 You Canadians are lucky trim is readily available for a fee where you live here you have to go to Nevada for paid trim. Seriously though I hate chain rub on the front DR and that is a pretty sweet feature.
[Reply]
  • + 19
 i would never use any electrical bike parts my self but its nice to see some intresting progresion it the bike world, makes a change from everyone arguing about wheels and enduro,you dont have to buy or use it , be grateful companies are making advances.
  • - 2
 Now lets remind the Shimano airlines revolution. Compressed air instead cables. Now where is it?
Meanwhile who likes drive-by-wire system over mechanical one in car industry?
Cables, spokes, bearings, cranks these have been always in bikes. This would be over 100 years, so electronics maybe usefull in 2112.
[Reply]
  • + 18
 "Why cycling’s dominant drivetrain maker waited half a decade to adapt its push-button shifting system to its premier off-road component group will be self-evident the moment PB commenters begin to weigh in on this news release. "

Loved this!
  • + 14
 Unfortunately, a lot of them just look at the pictures and will point out incorrect ideas or ask questions answered in the article.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 Just imagine if they had invested all that time and money into making a lightweight, wide range, sealed, zero maintenance gearbox instead. A product designed for MTBs specifically, rather than hand me down technology from the road like we always seem to get.

We could have had something amazing. Its about time SRAM and Shimano thought about MTB gearing from the ground up, dropped the derailleur cash cow and looked at gearboxes.

I think SRAMs approach is capturing the current mood of most bikers currently. Simpler is better and 1*11 is the closest we have currently
  • + 4
 Actually just realized something: the market screaming for electronic shifting is: gearboxes. The single biggest complaint about them is that they all tend to need a grip shift, because of the two cable /single shifter needed. electronic can do away with all that, just have a servo (mounted inside the transmission case, and therefore protected) hooked up to an electronic shifter. The more I think about it, the more likely I think it is that gearboxes will go mainstream only when they integrate electronic shifting.
  • + 2
 I was just about to post the same thing until I saw this. I've been saying this to my riding buddies for a long time - Shimano needs to employ the gearbox equivalent of whoever designed the double barrel shock to create a gearbox that has electronic shifting. The mechanism would be totally protected and there would probably be room for the battery in there as well. Ditch the electronic display and just make a smartphone app for doing the set up if you want to integrate shocks and dropper posts. In the meantime it would be nice if Shimano could just release 10 speed 11-40 cassette.
  • + 1
 alfine di2 has been a thing for a while... so the tech is already there, just needs to be build without a freewheel into a planetary BB... (let hubs do the freewheeling and save weight on the system)
  • + 3
 I think the biggest thing slowing down gearboxes is packaging... Where are you going to put an off the shelf unit. The thing with derailleurs is they can be mounted to any frame with the corresponding mount points.
  • + 0
 Incorrect to say gear boxes would or could ever be "zero" maintenance. Gears=friction= maintenance.
  • + 3
 You pinkbike guys seem to know everything about gearboxes and how they should work, why don't you just make one? If it's as simple as, mounting a servo inside a hub, making it lightweight with a wide range, sealed bearing and zero maintenance, you could just make one yourself!

When Chris Hilton (Sram drivetrain designer) came to NZ someone asked him the question why don't you make a gearbox, he responded: "There are 16 different variations of Sram XX to cater for different frame designs/specifications. If bike companies can't agree on a standard way to mount a normal drivetrain to their bikes, imagine how difficult it would be to get them to all change their frame designs to cater for this one gearbox hub that SRAM would make."
  • + 2
 ...Why can't they make 16 different versions of the gearbox? why can derailleurs have 16 different versions, but gearboxes can't? for that matter, You probably wouldn't need 16 versions: if the mounting standard is different, make brackets for each mounting standard? even then, there probably wouldn't be 16 versions. Don't get me wrong, the bicycle industry is one of worst when it comes to creating "standards" that only one company uses (industry really needs a strong trade group like the IEEE is to telecom to start pushing standards) but that sounds more like a bullshit PR response, that really means "we don't want to deal with making gearboxes right now, as our current business is profitable, and a gearbox means starting from scratch instead of iterating on past designs."
  • + 1
 A derailleur and roller chain simply cannot be beat as to efficiency. A gearbox will take several percent of an already inefficient human motor's power.

Everyone wants to go faster, not slower.

Throw on a belt drive if you want go even slower yet ;p
[Reply]
  • + 11
 "...Where mechanical derailleurs are yanked around by a cable that is controlled by a rather complicated shifting device" This made me LOL. Thank you for always pushing the bar but this time I am not biting. I will stick with my complicated shifting device.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 Good for shimano for making this, there is definitely an application for electronic shifting, but if in 5 years I cant find a decent cable actuated derailleur I am going to make a time machine and ax those fuckers.
  • + 11
 Well, you didn't axe them, so it's safe to say that in five years you can buy a decent cable actuated shifter, or time travel won't be invented in your life time.
  • + 5
 or you're in the wrong bubble of the multiverse
  • + 1
 in some parallel universe, Waki's She-man-oh ideas are coming to fruition. maybe we're in that now! #mindblown
[Reply]
  • + 12
 I appreciate all those improvements and new technology but I and my wallet will still follow the "keep it simple" philosophy hahahha
  • + 6
 This is technically simpler than cable actuated derailleurs. Mechanically speaking.
  • + 4
 crash and destroy bar mounted interface = $$$. yay simple
  • + 11
 "Mechanically speaking" a servo motor is simpler than a spring loaded parallelogram actuated by a cable?
  • + 1
 Single speed rigid fixed gear rider?
  • + 2
 Gnarbar, the road bike Di2 shifters are barely more than their mechanical counterparts, I wouldn't expect these to be overly expensive compared to XTR mech. triggers, and I wouldn't expect them to be any more fragile either.
  • + 0
 This screen should be at least 10" to be able to see anything in mtb conditions. 10" screen and HBO controlled remotely. Give me a break.
[Reply]
  • + 10
 reverse psychology for marketing.. super classy. telling people the product won't be accepted so those who want to feel unique will be inclined to speak out in its support and others who feel they need to contradict information will be deterred from "hating" bc their points have already been made.

nice try but that shit doesn't fly on the internet. your product will get tossed around like a beach ball at a nickleback concert no matter how you present it.
[Reply]
  • + 8
 I would be interested in electronics on a bike if they reduced the amount of equipment I currently have and made things simpler. But this system makes everything more complicated.

My current set up has one cable that runs from the right shifter to the rear derailleur. This thing seems to have millions of cables going everywhere, a front derailleur the size of Jupiter and a seat tube suppository that would scare even the most hardened pornstar. And why do we need a screen to tell us what gear we're in?

I'd buy a wireless shifter and derailleur combo with a tiny battery. The battery wouldn't need to last months on end. If its easy to pop out and can be charged in the car, it need only last a couple of days.
[Reply]
  • + 12
 This new drive train technology sure is electrifying!
  • + 10
 I thought it was shocking
  • + 8
 It really is moving up a gear
  • + 6
 Innovation like this really shifts the market
  • + 6
 I can't see many people making the switch.
  • + 13
 I'm going to keep my ion this, wait and see watt they charge. Principally I node it's a good idea.
  • + 7
 I'm going to blow a fuse if I don't see a gearbox soon
  • - 8
 seriously guys, how much time does it take to write this kind of comments ???
  • + 5
 A reVOLTingly small amount of time.
  • + 7
 So much resistance...
  • - 4
 yous guys are punny
  • + 4
 A lot of people are derailed over this.
  • + 4
 perhaps they need to shift their mindset...
  • + 4
 They can't, they're a few cogs short of a cassette...
  • + 1
 I want my shift free of charge
[Reply]
  • + 5
 In Shimano mechanical systems, required thumb/finger effort to make a shift up the cassette gets bigger the tighter your clutch spring is. I've had to decrease clutch tension (sacrificing chain retention confidence) on my wife's bike to make it easier for her small hands to upshift. With electronic, you could make the clutch super tight (quiet, confident chain retention) without effecting lever feel or required lever force. AWESOME.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 I love the idea, clean with no cables, crisp consistent shifting. The only thing that bothers me is the thought of how much that rear derailleur will cost to replace after it gets ripped off by a rock or root. Considering its probably the most vulnerable component on the bike a $500 derailleur will be a wallet killer. Thats why I'll invest in a xo/saint shifter but spec a x9 or Zee derailleur so I don't cry when it gets kidnapped and beaten by a rock.
  • + 1
 ^amen to this
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Let's cut through the bullshit... Good idea, maybe! Expensive, oh yeah! Are most of us going to purchase this, No! Who's it for? The Rich and famous? Who can afford to rip one off on that unseen rock... I think most will be stick with the Magic thumb...low maintenance and free of charge!
[Reply]
  • + 7
 all we need now is a fucking robot to ride the bike for us whle we sit at home and wait for it to come back from the trail so we can upload its footage.......... NOT!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 The simple mechanics of a bicycle made the understanding of it attainable at a young age. From that young age Ive tinkered, broken, and finally fixed and learned about a bike. When you need a computer and software to do this you take away from the simplicity of the bicycle machine. Like cars, there are advantages to having all the newest gizmos and computer controls but when it doesn't work and you take it in you are paying through the noes. Keep it simple.
  • - 1
 ...yeah and just who exactly is going to fix it when it goes tits-up ? ... not going to be anyone local or cheap is it ?
  • - 2
 Who said it is "needed" or required? It is an option for those with the money and desire to have it. There are notable changes and real advantages (with some disadvantages too since there is no free lunch) that make this a worthy option. Stop hating it because you don't understand, don't want it, or can't afford it.

I will bet you are using hydro disc brakes, 10 speed, suspension, etc. All of these and more were questioned with the same stupidity we see displayed in predictable PB hater style.

Change is scary sometimes and it takes some more time to adjust than others.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 For those who are commenting about the battery before reading the article:

"Di2 is designed to hibernate between actions. When a shift is called for, Di2 turns on, remembers which cog and chainring the transmission was in, shifts to the next gear and then shuts down. Hibernation greatly extends Di2’s battery life. Most owners enjoy months of riding between charges."

"Unlike a cable actuated mech, there is no return spring in the XTR Di2 derailleur – the servo motor drives it in both directions. Because of this, if the Di2 electronics should fail, or if the battery gives up the ghost, it will stay in the last gear selection it was in – and the mech can also be shifted by hand to line up anywhere in the cassette. This means that you can comfortably ride out of any situation without being force to suffer in an impossible gear combination."
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Maybe all the suspension and gearing on a bicycle should be conntrolled via barinvawes with electrodes sticthed on the scalp ... hm, wait, what would bicyle do if in the middle of the trail someone suddenly starts to think about boobs?
  • + 9
 Well if you ride boobbars...
  • + 10
 Obviously it would get stiff and lockout....unless you swing for the other team.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Ive come to the conclusion that no one on PB really reads full articles... lots of comments about "how long the battery last" it says clearly " Most owners enjoy months of riding between charges", therefore if your stoner ass can remember to charge the battery after a week of riding i cant see battery life being a problem. And as for Reliability, I'm pretty sure the YEARS worth of testing and wins in the Tour De France proves its quite reliable. Plus i'm fairly confident that if one was to shit out on you shimano would replace the failed unit without question. So in the end, I say f*ck yeah to this system cant wait to hop on a test bike and give it a shot.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 An excellent idea, but like Sram's 1 x 11, I can't help but think this is simply flogging a dead horse. Imagine a system where once the gears have been set up, you can just forget about them apart from a service every few thousand miles, sounds awesome right and it is, and its called internal gears. No fragile bits hanging from precarious places on your bike, no stripping the gears down after nearly every winter ride (as long as the system is well sealed of course), no skipping gears just because your bike has some mud on it, being able to shift without pedalling (very useful when downhilling), and the down side of such a system, weight and I would of previously said cost but having looked at the prices of Sram's 1 x 11 system I don't think that argument applies anymore. So to sum up and avoid going on a rant, f*ck external gears!!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Honestly, I like the idea, but gear cables really aren't that much faff and don't break very often either.
If a version comes in at a decent price poiny I'll be tempted, but untill then I'll be sticking to cables =]
[Reply]
  • + 2
 "all indications tell us that it will be the most expensive drivetrain that the mountain bike world has been served to date" -- all the people who complain about how bikes are too expensive are going to have a field day when they release the MSRP
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I just keep shaking my head at that 22-40 lowest gear. Who needs that? Who is that for?
But at least we have an explanation for the smaller range of the cassette in XTR - they wanted this one shifter concept REALLY BADLY for Di2.
Good work Shimano, you now make a whole drivetrain system exclusively for dentists and doctors.
  • + 3
 What about the electronic engineers, investment sharks, big shot real estate, bigwig executives and lawyers?
  • + 2
 Don't forget those of us who drive crappy cars (or don't even own a car), live in the poor area of town, live off bread and Ramen Noodles and work long hours so we can buy this stuff because we love cycling so much...
[Reply]
  • + 2
 My Shimano 600 combo lasted me 32 years and 35000km. 3x cog and chains. Regular basic maintenance only. Shifting quality is still superb. Some say better than today's top gear. Today a Shimano drivetrain is worn after a few thousand km. Sram derailleurs wear even faster. I swap2 - 3,derailleurs per year, no crashes. Now look at the 7 lever and switches on a handlebar, ridiculous.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 REgardless of the validity of electronic shifts, I have to say this: Shimano engineers have made an absolutely beautiful rear derailleur. That thing is a sculpture.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I see a lot of naysayers here. But Di2 is just an option. Shimano provides so many other options at different price levels. If Di2 is not your cup of tea, then just don't buy it. You don"t have to diss it. If component manufacturers didn't pursue constant development, we'd still be riding 3 x 8 drivetrains with cantilever brakes.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 I actually really want this. Just the RD and shifter though. Shifting is probably the thing on mountain bikes that still could stand the most improvement.
[Reply]
  • + 4
 Someday, someone is going to design a mechanism that makes derailleurs and chains a thing of the past. Electronic servo motors + derailleurs is like lipstick + pigs.
  • + 1
 When is some day? Sooner than someday we will have enough electronic crap on a bike where a group set costs more than my XC and DH rigs would bring in the classifieds. I guess if I sold all my bikes and cleaned out my savings I could almost afford this. Nahh I will just ride my decade old Big Hit and Rush and sell the Trec 9.8 I never ride.
  • + 2
 Shimano Alfine Di2 and Gates carbon belt drive.
  • + 1
 if someone BB mounted an alfine and took the freewheel out of it, you have an 11 speed electronic gearbox, or go like zerode do and just mount one in a high pivot...
  • + 1
 I read a little about the alfine efficiency and no thanks.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Innovation is rarely a bad thing. Shimano would not be releasing this if it did not work.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Part of me wants this though I hate 11 speed chains. Another part of me wants a single speed hard tail with mechanical disks and carbon rims so I can just ride my bike and not take into the shop or fiddle with the darn thing anymore. I guess if you can afford it you may never have to tune a derailleur again!! (happy dance) This is progress and while it may never trickle down to wally world crap at least shimano is innovating. I hope those slick front cogs trickle down to the lowly mech and cable realm.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Even though I dont like the idea of a battery on my mountian bike, in years to come I (we all) hope they develop a kinetic energy recovery device that will allow this to never run out of juice. I certainly will not use this concept until they do but it is a rarity that development goes backwards. This is a great start to something good.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm sure I'll get neg propped for this, but I don't want to ride with the kind of people who would want this. I ride my bike to get away from everyday life and technology. One thing I was happy about when switching from dirt bikes to mountain bikes was the simplicity of everything. Maintaining cables and derailleurs is not that difficult, neither is shifting. I guess I may feel this way because I ride for fun and I'm not an "elite" rider.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 This seams like it would fit the road biking world a little better then Mt Biking. Why would you do electronic shifting instead of just doing a 1x10 or 1x11 setup? I thought we solved the left and right shifter issue when we moved to 1x setups.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The only part of this whole thing I would actually buy is the 11-40 cassette. But I think it's cool to explore new technology. I think we saw a lot of value from Shimano Airlines. But maybe that's not the point. It's an engineering exercise.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It would be funny if the IMBA enforced their statement below and made bikes with Di2 illegal on MTB trails.

The International Mountain Biking Association (IMBA), the largest organization representing mountain bikers to land managers and policy makers says, “Mountain biking is human-powered, and using any power source to assist or replace muscle power means that the activity isn’t mountain biking and requires different management strategies. Therefore, trails that are not managed for motorized use should not be open for bikes that feature any kind of non-human power source.”
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Think about you re at the start of the most important race in your life ! Well you won't have the risk of your stupid cable breaking on ya at first pedal stroke! I'm all for it and if you look at prices of full saint or a electronic ultegra you will choose pretty quick which one you're gonna buy
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Reading about this makes me think about automotive market. The technology is there to make them electric and perform great bit theres a dark side keeping us on petrol. Sure we have technology to bring all shifting to bottom bracket but it just makes things too durable and not profitable so we juat make an ancient derailleur electric and we will keep the jumpbucks happy!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Just for those who wonder... The front shifting performance (for those who run fr. der's) is enough of a reason for Di2. The battery lasts months. Unless your too lazy one day every few months to charge it don't buy it. Otherwise it has exceeded all of my expectations. But I still will never own a electronic bike until it's standard. Which will happen. Then I am still happy with the quickest shifting system known to man. Otherwise. It's completely un-needed but happily welcomed.
  • + 2
 You make so much sense I have no idea what you're talking about.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The only thing I hate about the new Shimano Di2 is the price. Possibly 40% more then the price of the new XTR drivetrain and we don't even know how much that is yet but we know it will be pricy.

This new electronic drivetrain is as always something for the elite. The people who ride to win races and fill their homes with trophies. It's also for those who are bloody rich and could careless about price.

I love it so far but I'd love to see a video demonstration (not just some nice fancy riders shredding)

I guess maybe in a decade or two I'll be able to demo one myself.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 To everyone who posted concerns about battery life: I've been riding a Di2 equipped road bike for over a year. I average 100 -200 miles a week, Little bit less in winter. Since buying the bike in July 2013, I have charged my Di2 battery 3 times, and only because I was nervous. I have never seen a 'low batt' indicator. A Shimano rep told me that the target battery life was 'about the mileage of a Grand Tour' (1,500+miles) I'm more concerned about crash recovery mode on a mtn bike, or the damage a tree could do, or a severed wire.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 If it's all electronically controlled, why isn't it compatible with 9 and 10spd cassettes? It's just a slightly different shift map.
  • + 1
 The rear derailleur is the control center, and the RD is an m9000 RD that is motor actuated, you cant run an 11spd rd with 10spd cassette in the first place.
  • + 3
 If the thicker 9/10sp chain could run through the derrailleur, I dont see why it couldn't be re-mapped to a 9 or 10sp cassette
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Does it come with wifi connectivity? Will it interfere with my electronic suspension? Can I run it on my e-bike? Is it micro-engineered? I'm really not interested in putting any parts on my bike that aren't micro-engineered.

Jesus. I'm gonna go ride my bike. It's all analog though, hope it doesn't offend anybody.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 fuck electricity not on my bike!!! i think, there is something like a tech overkill.... a bike should be reliable and simple......not everything that makes riding easier or pros faster is a good thing i really like shimano... but this fail makes me want to buy xx1 ......just to show shimano my middle finger
  • + 1
 the day i dont know any more how my bike works........ shall be the day when i loose interest in the spirit of mtb
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Interested in this for the wife. She does not have enough leg strength yet for XX1, and hates managing the front ring in combination with the rear. When I rear that they will have an automatic front ring mode, where it chooses your front ring for you.... I'm interested in getting this on her bike!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 so if you smash your derailleur to pieces on a big@$$ rock, or for some reason you crash and wreck your shifter display... do you just buy that piece or the whole set? or you rip your "wire" cables apart? i wonder how to fix this on the mountain with just a simple tool?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 While I have no doubt that this XTR Di2 will work absolutely great, I have a feeling that 2015 XTR will mainly appear on short travel XC/Marathon bikes and "lycra scene". Like I have said before, I think Shimano should design a new 1X specific drivetrain for longer travel trail/enduro bikes to compete with SRAM's strong 1X offerings. I know that the new XTR has 1x option, but I think it's a lackluster. So currently I think they have a hole in their product line between XTR and Saint...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I finally have a viable alternative to my Rapid Rise derailleur... Mechanical stuff has built-in feel and touch that we regulate through our own senses and feedback loops. Electric stuff just continues to suck the soul and touch out of our mechanical adventures. In cars, ABS brakes, stability control systems and automatic transmissions have turned driving into a non-sensory experience. Safer for the masses for sure, but I have always preferred to do my own modulation of throttle, brake, clutch and steering wheel - especially in snow. I am not against innovation, progress and advancement in principle, but I do see our senses getting numb.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So would the next edition Shimano has planned be; to install a tension sensor into the BB so it could be tuned to make all the shifts you need to keep your cadence constant whatever the terrain you are on? Like automatic shifting? Wireless?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Of the many aspects of biking that has drawn me in, the mechanical nature of the beast has proven to be the most satisfying. I enjoy working on by bikes. I enjoy understanding why they are pieced together the way they are. Not to say that this product is impossible to work on (and not to infer that I'm a tech Luddite) but I will always prefer working on something if it lacks software. Indeed, so does your local wrench.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Why in the hell would I want electronics, batteries, and something heavier on my bike ?
Am I missing something here ?
  • + 2
 saving money by not purchasing more crap
  • + 1
 Di2 Durace weighs less than mechanical Durace,
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I understand the benefits bought by electronic components such as shocks and shifters etc. and how they can help boost the performance of the professional and every day rider.

Having said this I think that electronic shifting should remain something that's associated with road cycling as I think that if bike components become more and more automated over time, it begins to take away the values of mountain biking that appeal to me (i.e. riding a bike that may not be perfect and has technical "flaws" or a less accurate and slower shift (when compared to this) and being able to enjoy myself and get away from all the computers and screens of everyday life).

Now i'm aware that that probably made no sense as i just rambled through that but that's my opinion and shouldn't be taken as "stupid" by others.
  • + 1
 god that makes literally no sense at all
  • + 1
 So having a drivetrain that doesn't always work is one of the values of MTB? IMO this is nothing like being around my screen at work.... if anything it means I'd never have to pause trailside or pre-ride to adjust my cables, miss shifts out on the trail, re-run cables, etc. If I had the money laying around and somehow blew up my whole drivetrain I'd go for it. More trail time, better performance.
  • + 1
 completely f**ked up trying to get my opinion across. Forget everything I said about drivetrains etc..

I just don't want 'computers' on my bike. Big Grin
  • + 1
 I want reliable gears that work perfectly and require minimal input from me, like my modern brakes, suspension, etc. I couldnt care less how they make this happen.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 When ever I am bored I just find a Pinkbike tech article and read the comments section. Priceless! Thanks for the laughs once again!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I love innovation.

I'd be in for a cable to my rear shock with multiple compression settings but this is simply too expensive for aggressive riding.

A Di2 Dura Ace RD is $700!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Wait, 45 seconds to shift through the entire 3x11 range in sequential mode? From the video, there are only 15 distinct gear combos in 3x mode which means a shift takes 3 seconds? That sounds terrible.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 It was meant to be. I more than pleased with the idea of electronics taking control of our suspensions but I don't see the point. Maybe it works better in muddy conditions though. If so then why the hell not? But as a bike mechanic I've never been convinced by electronic transmissions. Yet I'm more than pleased to use it on frames with a bad internal cable routing -Trek fyi Big Grin . I tried the dura ace 11sp di2 on my roadie and I went back to a mechanical campy chorus 11sp ...

It'd be reliable since it's a Shimano product, but for that price I'll go with a XX1 any day!
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I can't wait for someone to retrofit a short cage on there and run it on their DH/slopestyle bike.
  • + 1
 Haha exactly what I thought! You can still shift from your bars and do barspins and tailwhips
[Reply]
  • + 0
 "The XTR Di2 front derailleur is claimed to produce over 20-percent more shifting force than a human develops using a mechanical shifter" .... really, well come the day my thumb stops being able to produce enough power to shift my chain form one ring to the next I think it'll be time to take up stamp collecting !!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I'm not sure road racers would shift as often as XC so they're probably not comparable. If a cable snaps can you just replace the cable, or do you have the replace the whole thing? Does it work underwater?
  • + 1
 When was the last time you (or anybody) rode a bike completely submerged?!? Did you use a snorkel, or scuba gear?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Yeah great,.. if only they could focus there powers for good instead of evil and get on with electronic x11 speed gearbox and be done with it.. Traditional "road bike" tech will never get any batter than what it is today.. Rear mech whatever speed is the V Brakes of 2014... now available electronic = G.A.Y.
[Reply]
  • + 5
 Lame. Keep it simple
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Great to see advancements in bike tech.... approaching the line though... Anyone know when the XTR electric crank-set is due out? I'm getting old.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Since the battery holds a charge so long, how about a very small solar trickle charger to keep it topped off?
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Yeah yeah the Di2 stuff is cool and all...But I want to see more pictures of that PRO stem and those chain rings!
  • + 1
 Got some here, might upload soon Wink
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Lest we forget that this was a real thing: www.mtbtr.com/uploads/524Z3.JPG
  • + 2
 Almost like a proof of concept. Digital servos, battery chemistry and controller circuitry at that time were in the stone age, big leaps were needed.
  • + 1
 @alexsin, So what's your point. Failed ideas of the past mean failures for similar ideas in the future.

I sure wish you would travel back in time and tell that to Thomas Edison so he stops wasting his time on that ridiculous "light bulb" idea.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Technology is always great but personally I would be limiting the electronic part of my bike to an electronic dropper post if that time comes.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 I dont wanna live on this planet anymore...
  • + 0
 Then get off.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I can't wait till this trickles down to XT. On another note, I can't wait till we have Di2 gearboxes.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Let's hope Shimano don't take ages making an affordable version like SRAM are doing with XX1.

Deore Di2 anyone?
[Reply]
  • + 3
 It is pretty sweet how it handles both the front and back in one press
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Who cares? Wake me up when they have wireless electronic shifting. Then you will have my attention.
  • + 3
 SRAM has debuted wireless shifting in the road bike world. Won't be long.
  • + 1
 He'll yea. When it's wireless it will be worth getting excited about
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Road biking? Hell yeah!
XC/Enduro/Downhill? No thank you!
Would break after few falls or just from impacts on landings/drops/heavy rockgardens.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Why do we need this again? Your still thumb shifting anyway!!! Agh!!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I hate it when new stuff comes out. Everyone cries rather than just saying "that's cool" they see more negatives than a positive. Usually.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Really cool idea and if I had the money I'd love to have it. But, why don't the big manufacturers (SRAM and Shimano) put all this R&D money into a gearbox type system?!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 first impression: for those not intelligent enough to manage their shifting
  • + 0
 but gearing is complex and we should make MTB as simple as possible so that even more simpletons can access the sport. dumb down = moar sales
  • + 2
 Yeah, those idiots like Cadel Evans and Mark Cavendish. Those klutzes have no clue how to shift.... It's for people who want insanely good shift performance and great reliability. Because that's what Di2 has provided so far. Do some reading.
  • + 1
 i bet i the first time i see this system on my trails it will be on some joey's bike from NYC, or worse, a Masshole
[Reply]
  • + 2
 First ride I'd rip the cord out and i'd be a couple hundred bucks out.
  • + 1
 or tear the rear mech off on a rock :/ I'm sticking with midrange mechs for this reason alone!!!
  • + 0
 Wait 12 months for wireless coming.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Guys wait up! I'm not charging!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The Shimano Di2 XTR is state of the art bicycle technology and as usual Shimano do it best.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 throw a mercury/level switch in there and you have an automatic transmission!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 It is the future. Hook this up to a cadence computer and let it go full auto after selecting upshift and downshift cadence values!
  • + 1
 I don't know why it could not track cadence, if it already knows your gearing, it just needs a tiny magnet and coil pickup. Then it could even calculate your speed and most other functions of a cyclo-computer.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 How about Durability? I bet if I bought this it would be one ride then bam good buy levers or display.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 What I want to see is electric Zee.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I think if for RB is not a problem, but not for MTB. One crash can destroy electronic components, and the low batt situation will be very bad... not a good idea.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 Are we in the Trust Tree? Can I ask an honest question about this? What are the benefits?

My road buddy says it just makes it so you have to push your finger slightly less. There must be more to the story.
[Reply]
  • - 1
 This might be great for the XC crowd but I see no use in DH. And I wouldn't call this progression. Its been around for a while now shimano just needed to make it offroad worthy. I'm with Protour in this,ditch the rear mech.
[Reply]
  • + 3
 Ya not into it
[Reply]
  • + 2
 Pick your derailleur actuation type, then be a dick about it
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I like the feel of a cable. How weather resistant is this gonna be? It's a good idea but like said above I will be pissed if cable drive terrains become obsolete in 5 years.
  • + 2
 You can still get mechanical Dura-Ace, and believe it or not, it is HEAVIER. Di2 should be weatherproof, EVERYTHING is sealed, and sealing is far easier with wires than cables.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 No no no no!... Get out!...
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Very cool! Even as a guy who can get great prices on gear I'll probably stick to mechanical though. 9spd to 11spd is going to be quite the jump!
[Reply]
  • + 2
 I want wireless more than electric components, less cables !!!!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Electric dropper posts? Ohhhh I can see the benefits of that...think "vibrator" mode!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 WAIT - how has no one asked about a type 2? Is this thing clutched or not? The road version certainly is not.
  • + 1
 Don't you mean Shadow Plus? I bet it is, and clutch tension would no longer be an issue with EASY/LIGHT, crisp shifts.
  • + 1
 tomato, toe mot toe.
Isn't it chatter from the trail that often leads to the der bouncing in an annoying fashion? although it might not effect shifts here, it would be annoying to hear on my price not yet stated drive train. If I look at the road version of the Di2, nothing is preventing that thing from bouncing around besides the expectation that the system will not leave the tarmac.
  • + 1
 It is clutched.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wonder how long it will be until we see ABS and stability control on mountain bikes?
  • - 1
 ABS is not too tricky, but stability control is absurd. It is possible, but why would you want a sensor/servo turning your handlebars based on what a gyro and accelerometer. Last I checked I have my own built-in.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I can't wait to see cheap knock off versions of this in Wal-Mart in 5 years, that completely do not work.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 my legs are electric, my mind is solar and my eyes are projections to feature my soul.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Google Bike?? The bike that rides for you. How about the iBike. Control you're bike using an iPhone.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Electric servo tucked "Out of harms way" on a mountain bike? Is there such a thing?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Do you people actually read the article before you post all these moronic comments?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 At least they could build into the display a video player so I can watch movies on those long climbs............
  • + 1
 With the display looking about as good as my 2005-era GPS watch?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 I wonder if you HAVE to have the display unit... I'd be all for the group without that goofy thing hanging off my bars.
  • + 1
 No, but if you don't want the display you will need another junction or it won't function. But then again, a normal junction can be placed anywhere.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Triple cranksets and negative rise stems. Gonna leave this one to the dirt roadies.
  • + 4
 Nobody is telling you to use a triple setup with negative rise stems. You can buy the rear derailleur separately anyway. Therefore 1X11. And a lot of pros use negative rise stems to get perfect fit.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Front derailleur looks ugly and bulky - get rid of the wires on the rear and it would be sweet for single ring use!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 So heavier, cant fix it yourself if it breaks, and its way more expensive.... Sweet
[Reply]
  • - 3
 This is sooo stupid!!!!! I have been selling bikes for year's I have been selling DI2 road bikes for over 3 years now, but that cable from the Rear D, will get rip so quick its not even funny. Because it work's for road bikes doesn't mean It will work for Mt. Bikes. WHAT NEXT SPANDEX FOR EVERY BODY AGAIN!!!!!!! This product its very lame.
  • + 2
 Didnt derailleurs come from road bikes in the first place? Internal cable routing will finally make sense. I wonder what the DH version would look like? Maybe a built in display into the shifter and a smaller battery. I would worry about destroying a super expensive rear d but the pros wont.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 not internal battery ? i haven't bottle holder on my commencal meta
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Perfect timing I was starting to get athlete's thumb.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 A topic, perhaps, that will replace the wheel size debate
[Reply]
  • - 3
 one of the problems i see with mtb electronic is that we are going to be seeing a lot of bent chains and chainrings from that front derailleur (especially with the single handed operation). it is incredibly strong and doesn't care if it is shifting under power / double shifting.
  • + 7
 Well obviously shimano has designed their chains and chainrings specific for Di2 shifting since this isn't a problem for their parts... and if they're bending aftermarket stuff... well that's another reason NOT to substitute in cheaper aftermarket bits now isn't it ?
  • + 4
 Also, DA di2 doesn't bend chainrings, with larger tooth-bcd distances and even more weight conscious riders
[Reply]
  • + 1
 The big news that everyone seems to be avoiding, is that a dovetail stem!?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 XTR Di3 Gearbox... Who do I pay?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Maybe we can put a skull cap on and just think about shifting and it will do it , that might be cool hahaha
[Reply]
  • + 0
 This wasn't supposed to be out until Monday O_O but hey I'm excited!! Looks sweet, but not for me.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So when do we get power steering?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 The problem with electronics is that they are electronics. What happens when you are out for a long ride and the battery fails or runs out?
  • + 0
 The problem with electronics is that they don't belong on a bike
  • + 1
 @mrfitz424, What happens if you actually read the article and see that they answered your exact question so that you don't have to wonder?
[Reply]
  • + 1
 When was the last time a roadie ripped derailler off on a rock?
  • + 2
 roadies rip derailleurs off all the time actually.
  • + 1
 On a rock?

Should use Shadow.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Next step: wireless!!! Big Grin
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Already can't afford last years XTR so won't be able to afford this years XTR.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 If it was wireless maybe just maybe I would be interested
[Reply]
  • + 0
 can we just leave biking how it is. don't need this electrical crap on my bike
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Waaaay too expensive to be a game-changer at this point. And 33 gears?? Are you serious??
  • + 2
 I'm waiting for the 4x12 "super-wide" rock crawler system......gonna be sweet!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Bikes should be purely mechanical. Otherwise it becomes less and less about the rider
  • + 1
 I have to disagree.

Bike brakes are now hydraulic and the suspension is now pneumatic, and no one seems upset. Actually we as a whole, are glad to not be riding cable actuated rim brakes and elastomer forks. I'll probably pass on pre-ordering this new system, but eagerly await the progress of sport still only a few decades old. As the trends go, so far it has consistently gotten better, not worse. You guys are how old? And you sound like old men b!tching about iPhones being to damn complicated.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 10 years time, and electric shifting will be standard on most bikes Smile
[Reply]
  • + 1
 It's only like 800 dollars if you break a derailleur..... No thanks
[Reply]
  • + 1
 SO LAME. NO NEED FOR THIS!
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Make it wireless and I'm sold. Until then, no thanks.
[Reply]
  • + 2
 aawww heeelllll no
[Reply]
  • + 0
 April Fools was last month...Electric shifting thats like an obese people and an electric wheel chair = lazy...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 So...Hum yeah...33 f*ckin gears ?!?!
[Reply]
  • + 0
 oh forgot to shift...oh forgot batteries dead.... time to juice up with a Di2 battery pack (coming out soon)...
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Very cool. But it just seems like another thing to worry about
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I'm going to wait until I can control it with bluetooth - no cables bro
  • + 1
 Not gonna happen. Battery life would be reduced and there'd be the risk of loss of shifting control from outside interference. Bluetooth isn't infallible.
  • + 2
 And for $20 I can build a jammer to totally block the ability to shift that SRAM setup, that'd fit in a jersey pocket.
  • + 1
 Not bluetooth, but SRAM has already debuted wireless shifting so it won't be long.
  • + 2
 Its operating on the same bandwidth of the spectrum, 2.4Ghz, that wi-fi, cordless phones, bluetooth, and other wireless public devices use. And the technology to spoof them is easily sourced / put together. There are instruction videos all over youtube. That's why Shimano hasn't bothered with making a wireless Di2... they have a no-compromise approach to doing things, and using wired connections is more reliable and can't be messed with by outside interference. Its also why shimano doesn't license others patented designs... that'd be compromising and they don't do that. They'd rather wait for a patent to expire before implementing a technology even if they know its way better than what they currently use.
[Reply]
  • + 0
 Game changer! Can't wait to try this out
  • + 7
 and im still here with my alivio
[Reply]
  • + 0
 do they make a 7 speed one?
[Reply]
  • + 0
 first look - mavic zap 1992/1993. if anyone remembers...
[Reply]
  • - 2
 No need for electronics in MTBing, this is an epic fail for the sport in my opinion as it takes the freedom away from being free on a bicycle
  • + 1
 Please explain how another option like this "takes the freedom away from being free on a bicycle"?
[Reply]
  • - 1
 No cable... bar spins!!! Give it a few years and maybe it will become affordable
  • + 1
 There is still a cable carrying the electrical signal from shifter to derailleur brah
  • + 1
 oh cock... surely they'll figure that out in time
[Reply]
  • + 0
 I'll wait for the wireless version...
  • + 1
 This is just the first step. Eventually wireless will make it's way. I'm certain it's just getting things small enough to fit and not look like ET's head is on everything. Think Magura's brain fork. Man, the day we can eliminate wires on our bikes will be amazing. I'm loving all the hate this gets on PB comment boards(aka couch engineers). They obviously haven't tried a Di2 setup. I tried one out and it's amazing. You can easily program it to shift how you want. That's customized shifting unlike one at a time SRAM crap.
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  • + 1
 ...take my money!
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  • + 1
 sooo Yaaaaaaaaaawnnnn...
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  • + 1
 Thanks, but no, thanks.
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  • + 1
 In short, I want it.
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  • + 1
 Ride single speed!
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  • + 1
 Nothing will beat xx1
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  • + 0
 Ooooh, shiny new fad! Take our money!!!
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  • + 0
 Good thing I am rich and I and only have to pay industry pricing! I'm in!
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  • + 0
 Is it really to have this type of electric technologie on your bike ?
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  • + 0
 I'm waiting for wireless.
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  • - 1
 Hold on guys, I gotta charge my shifter
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  • - 1
 Look how that guy is struggling to lift that huge wheel in pic #2
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  • + 0
 RIP derailleur cables
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  • - 1
 what happens when the battery dies..?
  • - 2
 You're shit outa luck, I guess. Gotta ride home in one gear.
  • + 15
 From the article: "Unlike a cable actuated mech, there is no return spring in the XTR Di2 derailleur – the servo motor drives it in both directions. Because of this, if the Di2 electronics should fail, or if the battery gives up the ghost, it will stay in the last gear selection it was in – and the mech can also be shifted by hand to line up anywhere in the cassette. This means that you can comfortably ride out of any situation without being force to suffer in an impossible gear combination."
  • + 8
 Don't the Di2 batteries last hundreds of hours though? As long as you don't forget to charge for like a month you should be fine.
  • + 1
 ...you charge it?
  • + 8
 well.... it's a rechargeable battery.... so yes. The DA road group battery says 600 to 1500 miles between charges.
  • - 5
 It would be cool if you could manually put it in any gear you want after the battery dies.
  • + 2
 @josefe-You can, you have to stop an move the cage by hand, and then carry on (see burnbern's comment)
  • + 4
 Please read the article in future.
  • - 5
 reading is for nerds
  • + 6
 Well shit, you got me there...
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  • - 1
 is there an iPhone app? integrate to Strava? wat, no? NO SALE HERE
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  • - 3
 Sorry, did I miss the part where they mention battery life? Kinda important...
  • + 3
 Probably same as the road group. 600-1500 miles.
  • + 1
 No reason a smaller battery couldn't be charged via a magnet or small wheel system running from the rims rotation. If yer bikes moving yer wheels are spinning. BB and brake regeneration would be much less affective. If your bikes been sitting a while, pick up the wheel, give it a few spins to give the battery a bit of juice to get you started and your ride will do the rest.
No reason an electric system can't work nor be cheap. The only reason it's price will be as high as it is, is because it's the sponsored teams have the money as well as the the folks with money and an addiction to out Gucci'ing their other bike junky friends. That's fine. Like anything, it trickles down. It's not that this shit is expensive to actually manufacture. If they can make big money on it from those willing/able to pay, why not. They're not a charity. Having the most Gucci kit isn't a right or even necessary. Want? SURE! Have? Likely never. Oh well. One speed will still get you out there, anything more is cream.
  • + 2
 A review I read suggested a weekly re-charge should be fine even for the above average rider.
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