Building The World's Lightest 29er DH Bike With Dangerholm

Aug 3, 2020
by Gustav Gullholm  
Scott Gambler world s lightest

Lightweight downhill bikes have been a source of debate for a long time, coming and going over the years depending on trends and new tech. Is it even beneficial at all? Don't you want a heavy bike for more stability? What about durability? Before we dive into the build process and specifications of this bike, and before you skip down to the comment section, let's take the bull by the horns and talk a bit about why a lightweight downhill bike really can be a good thing.

No, it's not for everyone. As with anything, preferences and riding style come into play.
No, it won't explode in a cloud of carbon shrapnel. It's a matter of details and a well thought out spec.
No, you won't get thrown off your line and into orbit around planet Earth because the bike is "too light".
Yes, you still want proper tires, brakes, tire inserts and so on.
Yes, it gets expensive to go super light. But not much more than many other top spec builds.
Yes, a lot of mud will add weight. But it'll still be lighter than a heavy bike with mud on it.

Reasoning And Goal

There are three main things to consider to make a bike like this truly ride well. One or more of these are often overlooked, which I believe is why the common consensus is that you want a relatively heavy bike if you want to go fast.

Rotational weight. It's easy to look at your tire setup and think that it's the first place you should shave some weight. After all, this has been a mantra forever in most cycling disciplines so it's easy to fall into that trap. But on a downhill bike the heavy rotational weight is a key factor to stability and to keeping your momentum. It helps you to keep your speed and your bike won't feel nervous. And of course there are other important reasons such as durability, grip and cornering stability thanks to the tire casings and good tire inserts.

Geometry. A long, low and slack bike will be inherently stable to ride. If you were to build a trail bike and a downhill bike to the same weight, even if you factor out the suspension travel, the latter will be faster on the descents. Good downhill geometry will allow you to get away with a lower weight while still being able to go fast.

Brakes and suspension. It's still a downhill bike, so brakes are another place you can't take any shortcuts. As for the suspension, it could be argued that a lightweight build means less unsprung weight and better performing suspension. Either way, you need to have it dialed just as with any bike. Lots of travel and great performance will help you stay on your line or plow through sections despite the low overall weight of the bike.

bigquotesBut, how many have ridden a sub 30-pound race ready downhill bike with proper tires, inserts, brakes and all that good stuff from their heavy bikes?

As mentioned above, a super light downhill bike won't be for everyone. On numerous occasions we've all heard some the world's fastest riders saying they don't want their bikes to go under a certain number or how they don't find it necessary. In stark contrast to that there have also been quite a few more-or-less crazy examples of trying to save weight. In the end, it's the bike you feel great on that will be the fastest for you. But, how many have ridden a sub 30-pound race ready downhill bike with proper tires, inserts, brakes and all that good stuff from their heavy bikes?

I think that for it all to work out you have to go all in. It won't be enough or a good thing to save some weight with EXO casing tires or smaller rotors. You need to prioritize performance on the key elements, and save weight everywhere else. If you do it right you end up with a bike that is stable, calm and confidence inspiring yet much easier to move around and control.

If you've seen some of my other builds, I guess you know by now that no matter the weight goal the bike still has to perform great and be 100% ride and race ready. This was never going to be one of those unusable weight weenie builds. So I set a few "rules" that had to be kept. The bike must have proper tires, CushCore Pro inserts, a padded seat, lock-on grips and 203mm brake discs. Everything must hold up and be reliable. But what would be needed to still bring it down to 13.5kg / 30lb or lower?

Scott Gambler world s lightest

Frame

This winter I managed to get hold of a Scott Gambler carbon frame, previously used by the Scott DH Factory team during the 2019 season. So no, the old "that frame is too light and will break" won't work here. It has probably seen more beating already than you or I could ever give it. It came to me scratched and dirty, with the cool looking sharpie logos and, as I would find out, a huge amount of clear coat.

The new full carbon Gambler is quite a different beast compared to the old chassis with its infamous and quite beloved linkage design. Being much more race-oriented Scott placed a lot of focus on flex and stiffness, while still keeping things both lightweight and strong. These days there is more talk about how flex can be a good thing in certain areas, compared to in the past when it was pretty much always a matter of stiffer equals better. Scott made several versions for tests and team riders to find the sweet spot between stiffness and compliance to make it fast. Something I kept in mind for other areas of the bike as well.

It features a ton of adjustments too. You can adjust the chain stay length, BB height, how progressive you want the rear shock and of course the head angle thanks to the Syncros angle set with different cups. Personally I wish these were standard features on trail and enduro frames too despite the added weight, but maybe things will move in that direction one day.

The weight weenie theme dictated that the clear coat had to go, and after too many work hours 112g of clear coat was removed. This is normally what a full regular paint job with primer, base and clear coat weighs so clearly (pun intended) things moved fast when getting these frames sent to the team.

Scott Gambler world s lightest
At just 2320g this thing is light.

Suspension

Having already ridden the Intend Infinity for a full season on my old Gambler and being incredibly happy with its performance it was an easy choice to go for another one. The low 2482.8g complete fork weight was of course a huge plus too. A titanium axle helped a bit in reaching that number and so did carbon adjustment dials and air cap from HOPP, but it's still very impressive considering how the latest beefy single crown forks hitting the market is almost the same weight.

With perfect timing the new and matching Intend Hover rear shock was released. Just like his forks, the Hover is quite unique and offers some cool tech performance wise. One of the main goals in developing this shock was to make it as supple and coil-like as possible. Cliché as that may sound, this is the real deal. Its shaft is of much smaller diameter than you usually see on air shocks, to help lower the seal friction and stiction. The negative chamber is huge and separately adjusted, and the big surface area of the shock body helps to counter overheating so the shock stays consistent. It weighs just 462.5g including hardware.

Scott Gambler world s lightest
A thing of functional beauty. Not bad for a one-man company. No steerer tube needed, since the fork legs easily can handle those loads.
Scott Gambler world s lightest
The small screw at the bottom closes off the chambers, and under the big one you can fit tokens. At the top you have your rebound/compression dials.

Cockpit

Here's a good place to save weight, since it'll help to keep the bike's center of gravity nice and low. Out front I went for the Syncros Hixon iC DH one-piece full carbon combo. The stock width of 800mm was trimmed down to my preferred 780mm, and of course the paint was stripped off, both to save a few grams and to match the looks of the raw frame. The final weight ended up being 285g including titanium bolts.

On headset duty is a quite special Syncros angleset. It comes with alternative +/-1 and +/-2 degree cups but it has also been stripped and brushed to match the fork crowns as well as having been upgraded with CeramicSpeed bearings. Why hybrid ceramic bearings in a headset? No, it won't make you steer faster but they do save a bit of weight and are of great quality.

The seat combo is a very nice and quite exotic German affair. A Schmolke TLO (The Lightest One, using their highest quality fibers) seat post that comes in at 91.1g. Tune Würger Skyline is my favorite seat post clamp of all time and there's a Tune Speedneedle 20Twenty up top. It may be aimed at the XC crowd but it is one of the most tried and tested seats in its category. They come in a few different versions but they are all hand made by one man, Jürgen Mikus, in his carbon workshop in Leverkusen, Germany. This 20Twenty version was created for the 20th anniversary of the Speedneedle and its split design inspired the matching top tube stripes on the frame.

This is one of just two things on the bike having a rider weight limit, with the combo being made for riders up to 220lbs / 100kg.

Scott Gambler world s lightest

Brakes

It's no big secret that I'm a fan of Trickstuff brakes and simply consider them to be the best out there. While the Maxima is the obvious choice for a downhill bike the goal here was after all to do a "World's Lightest" build. So I opted for the Piccola HD, which is the 4-piston version of their super light Piccola brakes. They weigh the same as a set of 2-piston XTR Race brakes but the power is huge. As with all Trickstuff brakes they feature the super smooth lever feel and beautiful CNC machined looks, especially so here since I managed to get a fully raw set to match the crowns and dropouts of the custom Intend fork.

I have a few different brake discs for the bike, Trickstuff Dächle and Dächle UL (Ultra Light) in both 203mm and 223mm sizes.

Scott Gambler world s lightest
Weight like a XC brake...
Scott Gambler world s lightest
...but power like a DH brake.

Drivetrain

With a lightweight drivetrain having no negative effect on descending as long as it holds up I went all in chasing grams here.

The cranks are the RaceFace SIXC, perhaps the lightest DH width crankset on the market today. Once again the clear coat was stripped to save grams and match the frame. Attached you'll find a 34T Garbaruk chain ring, a favorite of mine and I've never ever dropped a chain in the years I've been using these. To keep it spinning is a CeramicSpeed bottom bracket. Perhaps you'll find it questionable to run ceramic bearings on a bike that sees so little pedaling, but there is some reasonable thought behind the choice. I've tried lightweight steel bearing options but with sometimes questionable quality and small bearing size due to the 30mm axle and PF41 BB shell combo, they tend to fail too soon. These on the other hand are light enough thanks to the hybrid ceramic construction and comes with a 6 year warranty as long as you take care of them, which is promising.

Ceramic bearings tend to spark a lot of debate so I'll address some of that right away. Are there other good bearings out there? Yes. Can they still wear out due to the softer steel races? Yes. Are high quality ceramic bearings very expensive? Yes. None of these facts take away from them actually being great although expensive bearings. Sure, it should most likely be one of the last upgrades you do on a bike, but if we're talking about marginal gains it's really no stranger than Kashima Coating or carbon cage plates on top of the line derailleurs. Yet no one bats an eye seeing people having paid extra for those.

bigquotes...but if we're talking about marginal gains it's really no stranger than Kashima Coating or carbon cage plates on top of the line derailleurs. Yet no one bats an eye seeing people having paid extra for those.

With the goal of a "Race Ready" bike and it being my preference, I needed to go with clipless pedals despite platform options being much lighter. The clear winner of the weight game here is the CrankBrothers Mallet E11 with a titanium spindle upgrade. Yes, they're just as expensive as they sound, but they do come in at just 349g. For comparison, a pair of XTR Race pedals weighs just about 35g less. This is the second place on the bike with a rider weight limit, with the titanium spindles having a 85kg max.

I went a bit old school with my choice of chain, chasing down a PYC SP1101 which is a hollow pin model that's even lighter than for example Yaban or KMC chains. You could say I went old school with the cassette too, bringing out the Dremel to cut off the aluminum dork disc from a SRAM X01 DH cassette. Saving a whopping 7g it results in a 130.7g weight.

Now onto something truly special - the carbon derailleur. Based on a regular SRAM X01 DH 7-speed derailleur it features both some Dremel work by me and an upgrade set from HOPP Carbon Parts. This means that the B-knuckle, the parallelogram and even the pins holding it together have been changed to carbon versions. To finish it off is a set of super light pulley wheels from Extralite and some new bolts. At 200.1g it saves almost 70g compared to the stock model coming in at around 268g. Not bad.
Finally I'm running Fasi Turbo Plus shift cable housing. Thanks to aluminum instead of steel it weighs 17g per meter while regular housing weighs around 33g per meter.

Scott Gambler world s lightest
A 200g downhill derailleur, a 180g 11-speed XX1 derailleur and the behemoth that is the 385g XX1 AXS with an OSPW system. Many projects means many derailleurs.

Wheels

Most likely coming as a surprise for many of you, I decided to run aluminum rims on this bike. Why? Mostly just for peace of mind. I run carbon rims on many of my bikes, I even have two sets of one-piece carbon spoked wheels. So it's not that I don't believe in carbon rims, it's just that I'm not convinced that pure downhill is an application for them to clearly excel. If they're made to be really bomb proof they tend to end up being quite heavy anyway, and this is another place where I personally feel that stiffer doesn't always equal better. Once again this depends a lot on riding style and preference, and rider weight too.

So what better choice than arguably the most proven aluminum rim out there - the DT Swiss EX471. Wait, what? Not only are you skipping carbon but you're also going with a narrow 25mm inner width? Yes, I've jumped on the wide rim bandwagon in the past and it absolutely works but we're still seeing several top riders on these narrow rims. I've never heard anyone actually answer why, but my guess is because of compliance and impact strength, while inserts like the CushCore Pro and reasonably high tire pressures still keep them from rolling tires off the rim. For this particular build it also helps that they're pretty light too, of course.

The hubs in fresh silver color comes from Tune. A SuperClimbHill rear hub and matching front hub is the lightest 12x157mm and 20x110mm option out there. You can choose from two different freewheels, an extra light version used here or the "Endurance" version. Titanium pawls and a very minimalistic and optimized design keeps the weight low.

The wheels where built with Sapim CX-Ray spokes by German wheel specialist shop Radsporttechnik Müller, and there are two sets. One full 29" set and one mullet 27.5"/29" set. Of course to be able to ride the different setups, but also to have the luxury of spare wheels to quickly install if you get a flat or to simply run different tires. The 29" wheel set weighs 1758.5g.

Scott Gambler world s lightest
I'm still pushing for the comeback of silver hubs and spokes.
Scott Gambler world s lightest
Light, simple and reliable. Not much more to wish for.

Tires and Tire Inserts

As mentioned before, tires are not where you want to go weight weenie when it comes to a downhill bike. Performance trumps low weight any day here, although I did go for a DoubleDown casing on one of the front wheels since I've had good luck with these in the past. I'm a Maxxis kind of man when it comes to gravity riding, and my favorite all-rounder is the Assegai. It's a heavy tire but it has so much grip in so many different situations, making it especially suitable on the front. On the rear I'm running a Dissector 2.4" with DH casing, which is fast rolling but provides a little less grip. I find the side knobs a bit too weak, even after minimal wear they start to fold a bit too easily when cornering but it sure is a fast tire. Especially so when it's brand new.

To keep those tires locked in place and to soften the ride a bit I'm running CushCore Pro inserts both front and rear. While the rear tire is what's most important to stop from rolling, I tend to be almost just as hard on the front rim when it comes to impacts so the extra protection is welcome. These days there are a ton of tire insert options on the market, but CushCore is the one I personally find makes the most sense. It really locks the tire in place and it's not too tall, letting the tire behave close to as it normally would vertically. My own number one tip for super easy installation is to use Weldtite Tire Fit Mounting Gel, and if you're have trouble removing a tire it might be time to bring out the CushCore Bead Dropper tool.

All my wheels are set up with Syncros sealant.

SCOTT Gambler SL - 13.42kg / 29.58lbs

Scott Gambler world s lightest

Scott Gambler world s lightest
Scott Gambler world s lightest

Scott Gambler world s lightest
Scott Gambler world s lightest

Scott Gambler world s lightest


Additional Weight Numbers

Scott Gambler world s lightest
Time to get nerdy.
Scott Gambler world s lightest
Barely rideable with all that heavy mud on it.

• 29" Dissector DH + 29" Assegai DD, tire inserts, pedals: 13417.2g / 29.58lbs
• 29" Dissector DH + 29" Assegai DD, tire inserts, no pedals: 13068.2g / 28.81lbs
• 29" Dissector DH + 29" Assegai DD, no tire inserts, no pedals: 12535.1g / 27.64lbs
• 29" Dissector DH + 29" Assegai DH, tire inserts, pedals: 13472.3g / 29.70lbs
• 27.5" Assegai DH + 29" Assegai DH, tire inserts, pedals: 13591.3g / 29.96lbs


Ride Impressions

By now I've spent plenty of time riding the bike on varying tracks and at different bike parks, and I couldn't be happier with it. I felt at home on it very quickly, and what a ride it is. One I wish you could all try and form your own experience based opinion on, because it sure is different to your regular 35-ish pound downhill race bike.

Thanks to the tire setup and geometry it behaves quite normal when you're attacking a straight section and want to keep it on the ground. It's when you want to lift it or move it around to enter your next line that the magic starts to happen. You can pick it up so easily, no matter if it's a small adjustment or if you really push and jump into a line. It's helpful in tight corners too where you might have to really throw the bike around. Needless to say it's a ton of fun if you're just cruising, doing gaps in sections or hitting jumps.

The Intend suspension performs amazingly well, it's composed and soaks most hits up. The rear end feels especially bottomless and very supple too. Dialed suspension is always confidence inspiring and helps so much in knowing your bikes' limits as well as in saving your overly optimistic self if you mess your line up. One interesting thing worth mentioning is how the fork behaves. While it's definitely stiff enough for most, it does allow for a little torsional flex. This makes for more grip in weird corners and off camber sections, but it also makes the bike ride calmer in rough straight sections. I find this to be very fast, but then again I just weigh 75kg / 165lbs, and if you weigh 110kg / 240lbs you might feel differently. On the other hand the fork is super stiff when it comes to fore/aft flex which is a good thing in all situations.

Despite being very light the Trickstuff Piccola HD brakes are more than powerful enough. I've been riding the bike with the Trickstuff Maxima brakes too and there's no arguing they are the brakes to ruin all other brakes for you, but the Piccola HD sure are keeping up, as they should considering the price. In the end I'll probably let this bike become the permanent home for the Maxima's but not out of necessity really, but simply because I love the stupid amount of power and think they're the best downhill brakes on the market today.

There's been zero issues shifting with the Hopp tuned derailleur, and the super light seat combo has already survived a proper beating when the bike was catapulted into some trees in a crash. The saddle is perhaps a little sharp if you're riding in Lemmy shorts, but quite alright with DH pants. The wheels are still straight and true, and the rims have survived.

All in all I can say that I'm a faster rider on this bike and it's the most fun downhill bike I've ever ridden. Would you be faster on it? Maybe, maybe not. I think most would be once they got used to the low overall weight and how the bike behaves, but some riders would still feel more comfortable and therefore be faster on a heavier bike. The Covid-19 situation stopped it this time around, but hopefully you'll get to see an unbiased comparison test with this bike and say a regular Scott Gambler some day.

New Projects On The Horizon

While riding and enjoying the Gambler SL will be my top priority this summer, there are four other bikes to finish. A new hardtail build, one Scott Spark RC with completely hidden cables like on an aero road bike, another Spark RC with a sub 8kg / 17.6lbs total weight goal and also I'm building up the second version of my old and previously British Racing Green Scott Gambler. Feel free to keep up with these projects and my Lemmy shorts via my Instagram.
Because it simply needs to be done I'll also build up the mother of all downduro bikes based on the Gambler SL. With a 12-speed drivetrain and a dropper things should get interesting.

Quite the challenge bringing a full suspension bike down below 8.0kg / 17.6lbs.
Formerly green, it's now copper metallic with even more polished aluminum.

You will also see the Gambler SL in the "World's Finest DH Bike Challenge". Initiated by Cornelius Kapfinger, the man behind Intend, the goal is to build the nicest bike possible and YOU get to decide who wins in an upcoming vote here on Pinkbike. So stay tuned!

Mr Kapfinger VS Mr Dangerholm. Please note that the vote will be about our bikes, not our legs.


Warning and disclaimer:
Please keep in mind that any modifications such as paint stripping, repainting, sanding or in any way modify frames, components or safety equipment is potentially dangerous and can lead to crashes and injuries. It will always void any and all warranties, and is strongly advised against by SCOTT Sports and all other manufacturers, which take no responsibility. If you choose to modify your bike anyway, always make sure to do so with safety in mind and remember the points above.

Editor's note: Gustav is supported by several of the companies used for this build, and the views and opinions expressed here are his alone.



277 Comments

  • 340 11
 Came here for the thighs
  • 118 1
 literally saw the first pic and scrolled right to the comments!
  • 82 19
 I left because of the thighs Wink
  • 19 94
flag gladstone-s-mtb (Aug 3, 2020 at 0:58) (Below Threshold)
 @carlitouk: haha same.. he defo took drugs
  • 9 4
 who‘s, dangerholms or cornelius‘
  • 5 10
flag gladstone-s-mtb (Aug 3, 2020 at 1:02) (Below Threshold)
 @Korbi777: dangerholms
  • 8 2
 lol same. What the hell!?
  • 1 12
flag gladstone-s-mtb (Aug 3, 2020 at 1:13) (Below Threshold)
 @milanboez: haha
  • 9 3
 @gladstone-s-mtb: I'd say dangers hairdresser was on drugs, but bikewise and legwise the boys look great
  • 6 74
flag gladstone-s-mtb (Aug 3, 2020 at 1:38) (Below Threshold)
 @Korbi777: what's up with that fork tho.. looks shit
  • 8 0
 Thunder thighs
  • 9 1
 Christmas hams
  • 50 1
 Those thighs look way too heavy. Needs to be ground down with the dremel.
  • 66 0
 shaved some weight off those shorts
  • 3 0
 Me too. Like Lee Priest.
  • 17 0
 @GlazedHam: The material choice is suspect. Could have saved 300g going with women's volleyball Lycra. Is the durability of denim really required?
  • 8 0
 ...but left for the calves
  • 1 0
 Dude has some gams.
  • 3 0
 How do you go to the toilet so cramped, let alone ride a bike? Wink ))
  • 2 1
 There's a reason why they what short shorts, everything else blows up around those quads!
  • 31 0
 Those legs should end in hooves
  • 14 0
 Saved 530 grams of denim
  • 9 1
 This article is literally the best thing I've read on PB in multiple fortnites. It also gives me very bad ideas for my next build. Nice work ThunderThighs!!!!
  • 15 0
 Motorhead tee and Daisy Dukes.....its original.
  • 17 1
 How come the steroids have only worked on his thighs and not anywhere else?
  • 5 2
 Did the article state the overall weight? Skimmed through and did see but unfortunately saw the short shorts
  • 12 0
 @lastminutetech: yes. Its printed right on the crotch of his short shorts. Just zoom right in for the info.
  • 2 0
 @in2falling: those are truly scary
  • 5 5
 I publicly lol’d when I saw the pic of the kook in the coochie-cutters. Dude is on some real ‘look at me!’ shit.
  • 8 0
 He’s taken enduro bro to the next level.

He basically has mullet legs!
  • 2 0
 @Chrisgus: Careful... your self esteem is showing.
  • 3 0
 He could save another 10 lbs by using my thighs.
  • 265 1
 My next project: heaviest hardtail XC/hillclimb bike possible to be featured with a dude who has pipecleaners for legs.
  • 96 0
 Send 'er through, homepage material for sure.
  • 7 8
 My NS Eccentric chromo definitely has to be a threat for the heaviest but still most expensive build out there.. XTR Di2, Carbon wheels, XTR cranks and pedals, but still pushing 34lbs due to full DH casing tires with Cushcore.
  • 25 0
 It's probably going to more expensive than this build. The Wal-Mart fat bike you start with will be cheap, but filling the tires to the brim with Stan's is going to cost a fortune
  • 4 0
 make sure it sounds like a toolbox strapped to a beat up shopping cart w 3 fuk'd wheels
  • 10 1
 I have some quite heavy clear coat I could sell you at a good price. Barely used!
  • 3 0
 I'd start by backdriving the motor on a Turbo Levo. Nobody will have any idea why you're going so slow!
  • 175 23
 Great, but you're wearing your 15 year old sisters shorts why?
  • 15 0
 Please refer to Dangerholm's IG post re the shorts
  • 91 5
 Because he can and we don't
  • 22 0
 @colincolin: well we don't know his sister for starters
  • 11 7
 Isn't it a Euro thing like Speedo's
  • 92 6
 Everyone, since pictures can't be posted in the comments - please image google "Lemmy shorts" and you'll see that mine are actually a bit too long! And while I didn't get them from my sister, I did get them from a girl. She had a way better ass than me so they didn't fit her very well and let me have them. And as you clearly can see they're perfect on me.
  • 16 3
 This dude obliviously don't know Motörhead.
  • 18 3
 @bicyclerider: Can we see a pic of her in pair of propery fitted jorts?
  • 12 28
flag SPECK (Aug 3, 2020 at 8:18) (Below Threshold)
 Klicking on a light weight downhillbike, I wasnt expecting to see a half naked man Frown Pretty cringy tbh
  • 3 0
 rolling and laughing so hard...
  • 10 3
 If I had thighs like that I would too. Wouldn't even car what time of tear it was. 10 degrees out, I'd have the daisy dukes on. I'd cut my snowboard pants too. Imagine those thighs blasting through a couple feet of pow.
  • 37 3
 @SPECK: always though what is cringy is dudes with sexuality so fragile shorts make them afraid they will want to change teams
  • 1 1
 @spaced: They'd probably vote for Janusz Korwin-Mikke
  • 5 0
 @bicyclerider: And good for you mate, while it's not my cup of tea and I was just being a smartarse anyway, everyone's opinion can GTFO.
You want to wear them, then god damn wear them son!
  • 1 0
 @lake-st: No it's not.
  • 2 1
 @fracasnoxteam: So all the Speedo's I see on the beaches in France are Brit's????
  • 1 2
 @spaced: Top notch grammar my dude, I think I get what youre trying to say
  • 2 0
 @lake-st: I don't know about speedo's, but these shorts aren't french
  • 112 0
 I could use a bike this light. It would be easier to carry through all the rock gardens I walk. Smile
  • 60 7
 Let him look like whatever he pleases! It’s a bike website and not Tinder or rate-me.com

He builds absolutely beautiful bikes and has serious passion for bikes. That’s what counts here.
This custom Gambler is absolutely spectacular and 3kgs lighter compared to my very expensive, 2020 29“ enduro bike. Makes me wonder if I should start an all out light-enduro build Smile
  • 13 0
 This is about the same weight as my rigid single speed 29er...
  • 20 0
 is this your first day on pinkbike? the comments section here is the purified form of rate-me.com
  • 3 0
 @cuban-b: Yes!, cuban-B!
  • 2 2
 Until you land your ass on that carbon railed seat and find your junk between the back tire and the seatpost! Don't ask. Don't use carbon railed seats in downhill or enduro.
  • 51 0
 There are weight weenies, and then there is dangerholm
  • 33 0
 Probably the lightest Shorts too
  • 28 6
 They're super breathable and cool too. A true functional garment.
  • 11 0
 @bicyclerider: any shorter and you would see the ace of spades.
  • 24 0
 Can we get a price column next to that weight chart? Also just curious, are maxxis actually a decent option weight wise? I just wouldn't have guessed they'd be that competitive.
  • 40 0
 I fear that price column. And I think it's more that tires aren't a place to save weight.
  • 9 9
 Tires might not be debateble but he could save another 400gr by using Tubolight inserts instead of Cushcore.
  • 10 0
 He said that although this bike was built with ultimate weight in mind, it is no show bike and he will be using it, so choosing tires that he likes is only logical.
  • 15 1
 @brianpark: could save a lot of rotational weight going 26" Wink
  • 4 1
 @prevail: the ride quality and rim protection of cushcore is worth the extra. No tire insert will ever match against it.
  • 2 0
 The seat post is from 385 euros and the saddle is from 250 euros
  • 3 2
 @isaacfx: not many competitive weight 26er frames our there tho..
  • 22 0
 Dangerholm has never skipped a leg day but jokes aside that gambler is beautiful
  • 19 1
 Bruni said that tires fold more predictable in corners with 25mm rims and that's why he's running the ex471
  • 4 4
 Depends on the tire.. Maxxis 2. 4 I agree.. I believe some bigger tires need dh or tough csg to fold predictable on 25mm I'd rims..
  • 15 1
 I actually want to see a slow mo of a huck to flat. Just curious about the flex in the intend bc suspension. And may be a slow mo through a rock garden. I know the DVO emerald has some major flex, curious to see if intend will behave the same as it looks beefier.
  • 3 0
 @colincolin: those forks are torsionally flexy, not in fore/aft direction. Just as all the usd designs.
  • 25 1
 The plan is to do huck to flat vids of both this bike and some light XC bike of mine. Hopefully some dh section too. My camera can do 180fps so should be possible to do something that looks alright.
  • 5 0
 @bicyclerider: Ask @mikelevy if you can borrow his mini for gapping over in the huck to flat Razz
  • 16 0
 The perfect downcountry bike!
  • 4 0
 And lighter than mine.
  • 12 0
 I love how pinkbike added the following at the end:

"Gustav is supported by several of the companies used for this build, and the views and opinions expressed here are his alone."

If they add that for this article they should have that statement at the end of all their reviews as well.
  • 2 0
 Usually their articles don't advocate for taking a dremel to parts. This is to cover them against being sued as having recommended the thing that makes a bike dangerous.
  • 10 1
 Wow, so many insecure dudes here. Guys who prob appreciate tree trunk legs on Am & Euro footballers, MMA tough guys who wear nothing but shorts- some basically Speedos, but a dude wearing Lemmys rocking a sick bike build and suddenly it’s a self-doubting puckerfest? Puh-lease...
  • 10 0
 Gustav, hell yeah! Great article, loved following this and altiugh my session is lighter it is only 27.5 ;-P

Can’t wait for the next projects!
  • 1 0
 Your build should have been in the article.
  • 2 1
 Haha I dodged a bullet there with you going for a 27,5"! Would've been a good battle though!
  • 1 0
 @bicyclerider: the mind is already on it Gustav, 29 session Winter project? Although I like the gambler frame more, it would be cool to do a session 29 to see where the differences would be in weight, parts etc

And I take comfort in knowing/hoping my project was at least a bit less expensive than yours was hahaha
  • 1 0
 @christiaan: the pivot phoenix is also a very light frame. That's my project right now hope to be sub 32
  • 10 0
 couldv'e gone single speed an saved even more wieght
  • 7 1
 Fair play that's a nice build! I did a super light dh build (28lb) around 2016 with 275 session 9.9, no pedals, single ply magics, no inserts, carbon LB rims, formula R0 brakes, sram dh carbon crack, sram x0 7sp dh drivetrain, Easton havoc carbon bar and dm stem, carbon seat & post, But all off the shelf normal parts, nothing super exotic, modified or custom or paint striped probably 1/4 off the price too.
Must admit I think he's done a good job especially as on 29"!!
  • 3 0
 Nice build, how did you find the ride? I've found lighter bikes can feel like they get hung up underneath you over rough stuff, especially roots. Not a problem I've had with a regular dh bike or an ebike!
  • 12 0
 I’ve found DH bikes ride better with pedals. YMMV
  • 1 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: Haha year just thought I'd do apples for apples weight comparison as all manufacturers seem to weigh without pedals. Just add 1lb Wink
  • 1 0
 @Altron5000: It rode really well, had some results at regional dh races on it but perhaps when some people would opt for an enduro bike for short dh races a light dh bike is the best of both worlds. I think there's some truth in what your saying as a heavy bike and wheelset has that extra mass for momentum, same could be said for a rider that weighs 20kg more than someone else. Having gone to a commencal 29 now which is a heavy bike, about 10lb heavier than my session build! It certainly feels a lot more forgiving and has great traction but a large part of that is In the bike design, if i could click my finger to have my Supreme a good chunk lighter i would. The lighter bikes accelerate and stop better and more playful etc.
By time you add dh casing tyres, inserts, pedals it'd be 31lb, add 4 pot brakes, alloy cranks & rims, 29" wheels, coil shock = 35lb
I don't think the added weight is a benefit but the better/stronger components are.
  • 1 0
 I got my 2016 glory down to 31. Spank Alu rims and all. It wasn't very difficult. Boxxer wc, vivid air, specialized grid 2.6 tires. (The older ones that were between current grid and black diamond) and a reduced cogset. Down to 5 speed. All with off the shelf parts. Super solid and rode everything with it. Bike parks and local dh tracks.
  • 9 1
 Not really a fair competition. Even a hobo on a penny-farthing would get my wote if he rocked a Motörhead T-shirt ????
  • 2 0
 "sign of the horns" emoji, if anyone was wondering... Keep forgetting that PB doesn't play well with those.
  • 13 0
 If in doubt, I use \m/
  • 8 0
 He needs to change his middle name to 'Quadzilla'
  • 8 0
 Motorhead Tee and Lemmy's old shorts on.
  • 4 0
 The basic defining factors between enduro bikes and dh bikes are the seatpost, the fork and the transmission. 400 grams would be saved by going with an enduro fork, but an extra 500 would be needed to get an enduro seatpost, and perhaps 200 more for an enduro transmission. So enduro bikes are by principle heavier than DH bikes.
  • 3 0
 I can respect this, nothing is really sacrificing performance here.

Is Loic still on 25mm rims? He's done most of his winning on them... Narrower rims are strong AF for the weight, and they mean a more reliable tire too. Though I reckon 27-28mm is where I'm most comfortable.
  • 8 1
 Dude would Shmolke most of us in a race
  • 12 1
 I sure Intend to. I'll see myself out.
  • 2 0
 Another jaw-dropping build from Dangerholm! That's a dream bike for sure. I would ride that in the Megavalanche without any concern of breaking something. The only thing that makes me unconfortable in this build is the shift housing,I've used Niro-Glide aluminum housing before and it wasn't that good,it seemed like it became softer over time.
  • 4 0
 So far so good, been using them on some bikes since last year. My idea here is that the dual crown limits handlebar movement so much that any breakage/issues shouldn't be likely with the aluminium housing. And thanks!
  • 1 0
 27.5 lbs!? with pedals!? wild.
  • 1 4
 Indeed. This DH bike in the article is relatively light but left so much weight on the table. Pointless to bother with nonsense like stripping paint but make heavy choices elsewhere.
  • 1 0
 Yes That is mine, and includes pedals, no insetts but I am only 67kg and never had any problems with magic mary Supergravity tires. And mine is 27.5, would love to do a 29 version to compare with Gustav
  • 1 0
 @christiaan: Already wondered that the wheels are kinda small but still light as f*ck. And even lighter than my enduro xD
  • 2 0
 "Yet no one bats an eye seeing people having paid extra for those."

There sure are many people who "bat an eye" at XX1 when it's used for weight sake. I'd bet more people buy it for the looks than the grams. Same with Kashima: most everyone understands the slippery-ness gains of a Factory over a Performance Elite are marginal, but think the color looks great.
  • 1 0
 I agree that the black coating is sufficiently slippery. But for example, at a shop near me you can get a kashima-coated Fox Factory 36 w/ GRIP2 for only $90 more than the black-coated Performance Elite version ($1,079 vs $989). So for me the bigger question is durability. Is the kashima more durable than the black coating? They say it is, but I don't know. For $90 (10% of the cost), it seems like it could be a reasonable upgrade (happy to be wrong though).

Then I suppose for the types who sell things every couple of years, there is the resale value to consider (but that doesn't really apply to me).
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Yeah, since they finally made Performance Elite normally available (used to be OEM only, previously the only aftermarket non-Kashima options were Performance for around $200 less and with a less adjustable damper), the different of just $90 is much more palatable.

Regarding durability, I know I beat the crap out of 3 Kashima uppers over the past ~6 years and had zero issues, like barely a scratch while the lowers looked obviously well used, and I did see some friends with the older gray uppers get some some decent wear and scratches. But I don't know anyone with a Fox with the new black coating, so YMMV, as usual.

I'm about to pay about 30% off MSRP for a late-model Factory model for the 3rd time, though, so what do I know, haha. (2019 36 GRIP2 this time, previously a 2016 36 RC2 and a 2014ish 32 FIT4
  • 2 0
 "we're still seeing several top riders on these narrow rims. I've never heard anyone actually answer why"
Ive heard MANY people answer why... it puts the pinch patch directly under knobs rather than sidewalls. Ive seen some rim manufacturers revert their DH and some EN/Trail hoops to 28mm lately for this reason.
  • 5 0
 Been on silver hubs and spokes for a while now. Knew it was fire. Come at me bros.
  • 5 0
 Hell yeah Dangerholm!! You cannot kill the metal.
  • 6 1
 Techno tried to defile the metal, but techno was proven wrong
  • 5 1
 If you're just riding and not racing, why not cut some complexity and weight and go singlespeed?
  • 1 1
 I love a DH ss setup but it would still require a chain tensioner. Might not end up that different weight wise but I'm not sure.
  • 4 0
 @dirtyburger: my Rohloff tensioner (115g) and Reverse SS Kit (49g) -listed weights- come out about 320 grams less than his shifter, derailleur, cable, and cassette.

I didn’t convert for weight though. Just realized I never shifted when I broke my derailleur and why for simplicity.
  • 1 0
 @pcmxa: sounds like an awesome setup.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: cassette weight mostly, but then it’s xd vs hg and so forth.
  • 3 0
 That is two kilos lighter than my enduro bike, and maybe five times the price. Love to look at such projects but I´ll better keep my organs and ride a heavy Bike
  • 4 0
 Little disappointed that the last pic was not a "before and after" but well done on the other stuff anyway.
  • 2 1
 @gustav gullholm: I’ve loved 471’s and they last longer w/ DH casings and no insert. Why’s that? I believe the narrower width allows the tire to double up on big square edges and act as just like an insert. Empirically, my 471’s w/ inserts handled World Cup at angel fire far better than 511 w/ cushcore and same tires, and normally I’ve had my lines dialed for me - so In other words the same lines. Take it for what it’s worth but
  • 2 0
 Why wouldn't it "double up" on a wider rim? There is no way for any impact to one have one layer of tire between the ground and rim, not matter how wide or not. You think they're so wide that the rims are getting hit directly?
  • 1 0
 @just6979:it’s the only way I can explain it. I’m open to hearing others experience. Could be a fluke. Know wide spread adoption of 511’s happened after inserts. Maybe 511 w/ insert is better. Putting inserts in on 25mm rims is a pain.
  • 1 0
 Looks boss!

Saved 7 grams by cutting the outermost ring off the the cassette spacer (what about the stated goal of durability? chain falls off towards the wheel at speed and it's going to do some damage), and a few more from stripping the pain from the bars (same thing: does the paint make it more durable, protecting against small chips actually cutting fibers?), but wasted 35 grams on the pedals? tsk tsk
  • 1 0
 While you've pretty much maxed out the weight savings from shortening your jorts, it looks like you're still carrying a few extra grams of sleeve on that Motorhead shirt. Lemmy's ghost says you should cut those sleeves off - with your teeth.
  • 1 0
 I think this weight is little bit overpriced... I ride old session 9.9 on Fox susp, GX DH group set, MT5 brakes, alu 35 cockpit, DT240 + cheapest 30mm rims with SG Magic Marry, Sixc cranks and saint pedals and have 14,6kg so if I make paintless and full crb frame I can have under 13kg bike so easy.. yeah it's 27.5 but more weight is price for bigger wheels ????
  • 1 0
 Gustav, any word on how the uncoated frame holds up under use? I'm looking at purchasing a new frame for a project and they offer an unpainted version (which looks way better than the two OEM colorways).
  • 4 0
 Epoxy resins will degrade quickly with UV radiation. Even tho with carbon fibre blocking out a lot of it and it being not too big of a deal structurally i would recommend an automotive clear coat on it.
  • 2 0
 @SleepingAwake: Is this always the case? Open Cycles claim their RTP (ready to pain) frames can be left clear:

"A clearcoat is not needed for UV protection but recommended to protect against scratches and wear. Some customers leave the frame bare."
  • 6 0
 @aerik: There are UV absorbers that can be added to epoxies which help, but have a life expectancy (think of them getting destroyed instead of the epoxy).
I'm probably overly paranoid but a bike in a bike rack will get a lot of UV exposure and i wouldn't take the risk. In aerospace applications where weight is way more important everything is painted...
  • 1 0
 @SleepingAwake: Cheers, thanks for the info.
  • 2 0
 @SleepingAwake: Also, water could become a problem as well. The Matrix could absorb some water and hence loose strength. If the layup is not perfect, it might get in between some layers and if it then freezes, it could cause delamination. So paint or a clear coat definitely makes sense for a bike you intend to use a lot.
  • 1 0
 @bashhard: Guys guys, come on: you do realize I'm only going to ride this bike on sunny summer days and keep it hanging on the living room wall at 21 C the rest of the year?

All kidding aside, good info, thanks. The frame in question is actually a gravel frame I intend to use for both our gravel 'mtb trails' as well as commuting & training through the winter. Seems clear to me what I need to do.
  • 1 0
 @aerik: did you order an OPEN RTP frame? I ordered an OPEN UP rtp and indend to keep it raw, as they say it is fine to keep it raw, also did not like the colors
  • 1 0
 @bashhard: While i agree that moisture is potentially an even bigger issue than UV radiation, moisture ingress moistly happens along the fibers on cut edges which usually remain unpainted on a frame. furthermore moisture likes to get trapped on the inside of the frame which is completely unpainted.
  • 2 0
 So sick. But why couldn’t the seat stripe line up better with the frame in the photo?! So much attention to detail but when it REALLY mattered... Wink
  • 2 0
 Pffft he used regular solid titanium bolts instead of hollowed out version. Imagine all the grams that weren't saved by this...
  • 2 0
 He even used all of them, 3 bolts on the rotors is enough..
  • 3 0
 Having carbon wheels now, but hell yeah nothing beats the ex471, such a great rims
  • 2 1
 Sick bike, but I doubt a superlight DH bike would be faster on most World Cup tracks unless there is a lot of pedal sections. Heavier DH bikes (to a point) are more stable in the rocky rooty chop.
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous bike as a work of art and engineering. I would love to give this a ride and feel for myself where the lack of weight comes into play... I bet it would be amazing to throw into a berm or whip off a jump.
  • 1 0
 Is there any type of protection on the frame being used? Once all the original clear coat and paint was removed did he put something on the frame to protect it? Some question about the cranks.
  • 2 0
 "but also to have the luxury of spare wheels to quickly install if you get a flat"

Wheel swap for a flat? Quite the f*cking luxury.
  • 1 0
 Commenters Note: These PB comments are not to be taken seriously. Just like the bike, they are one hit wonders. As for the drumsticks and gravy they should be well marinated and seasoned.
  • 1 0
 I played this game once with an Intense 951 FRO. You can build a good solid lightweight bike. At the time I was a lightweight rider and it lasted a couple seasons before I sold it on. Still going strong to this day!
  • 4 2
 Be interested to know how much it would weigh without all the warranty destroying mods.
  • 2 1
 Does it look to anyone else like that shock reservoir is going to be slapping into the frame down there? Hopefully just an illusion due to angles.
  • 3 0
 He even modded his shorts for lighter weight
  • 2 0
 Just do loads of timed DH laps with bolt on weights and prove with the clock which is fastest...
  • 3 0
 Is he wearing daisy dukes
  • 4 2
 Man.. First skinny jeans. Now booty shorts for guys?? What's next lol I'm out.
  • 3 0
 Personally I'm hoping for 70's Black Sabbath bootcut style!
  • 1 2
 Rad,

I hella disagree with the statement that people intentionally use heavy wheel components for extra momentum and stability, everyone who is anyone has know for years unsprung mass and rotating mass is bad for going fast, the selection of heavy components was/is for durability.

im also shocked to see the use of 28 spokes....... with cx rays that would have been a total of 36 extra grams for 8 extra spokes, I think it would be worth it on 29" wheels for sure particularly to keep from massive deflection with those massive thighs.

also I am really surprised there is any weight savings with the titanium axle over aluminum usually they come out in a wash
  • 3 1
 Maybe I wasn't completely clear on what I meant with the wheels. My point was that I didn't want them heavier than any other downhill setup (in face they're quite light) but that the heavy wheel components relative to for example a trail setup does a lot for how stable the bike feels and behaves.

As for the spokes I went with 32h rear and 28h front, both to save a little weight but also to have the front wheel a little bit more compliant than the front.

On the Intend Infinity forks the standard axle is made out of steel, which helps stiffen up the USD design. So titanium did save quite a bit of weight in this case.

Cheers!
  • 2 1
 @bicyclerider:
I retract my statements then sir Smile
I didn't get a count on the rear wheel i guess
I did some "light"DH wheels - not by your standards though, but i was too chicken to do 1.6mm rear spokes so i used 32 dt aero comps which are 1.8mm equivalent, and 32 dt aero lights up front which are 1.6 equivalent. and also the heavier dt ex 511 rims.

However I sort of wish I had gone down the route of light bike carbon en732, with cushcore and double down tires.
  • 2 1
 I don't think rotational mass really matters either. It probably would on an xc bike, with sudden accelerations, but on a DH bike if anything, momentum is more important and more rotational mass helps that.
  • 2 2
 @rob-chambo:
no thats wrong. As its unsprung mass, more unsprung mass, worse suspension response. Also the gyroscopic effect slows direction changes. Both of those thing can outshadow the "acceleration" aspect.

Its massively noticeable chucking a huge whip with heavy and light wheels back to back.
  • 2 0
 @englertracing: Fair enough, I hadn't considered the effect of the bike in the air. I was thinking of rotational weight of the wheel when it is on the ground. I also understand (and don't argue) that unsprung mass is where you want the weight saved.
  • 1 0
 Another amazing build by this guy. The amount of effort to get to the target weight is astonishing. The Quads are goals too
  • 5 1
 Man is he weird...
  • 4 1
 Ever work your upper body?
  • 2 0
 A CrankBrothers pedal axle with a user weight limit attached to the snappiest cranks in the industry? I'll pass, thanks.
  • 1 0
 Bloody love a Dangerholm build. Always well thought out and just look awesome. When the Tate has a bike museum, @bicyclerider will have his own gallery.
  • 1 0
 You can save the Huck to flat. I want to see the flex in that frame when he mashes the pedals with those bad boys. Long live short shorts.
  • 3 1
 Porn porn and more porn what a rig
  • 1 0
 It’s an awesome bike. I wonder how they are paid for? It there sponsor help etc? If not it’s a real passion he has!
  • 3 0
 'Gustav is supported by several of the companies used for this build, and the views and opinions expressed here are his alone'.

I think based on that disclaimer he probably got some discounts and/or free parts.
  • 3 2
 @lev3000 My earlier builds like the World's Lightest 29er XC Bikes, my Scott Genius build etc was all paid out of my own pocket. So I sure really do love bikes haha. These days I luckily have a bit more help, which I'm very thankful for.
  • 3 0
 Tilt that saddle man!
  • 3 2
 Haha that has been done, I built the bike up basically minutes before the photo shoot so there was a few small but annoying mistakes.
  • 3 2
 Guess the first rocks wil make some nice indents in those forks if they remain unprotected.
  • 1 0
 into them... but, I think it could put a reference to all Ebike Manufactures.
  • 5 2
 Long Live Motorhead!
  • 2 0
 Hahahaha. You get my vote.
  • 2 0
 I wounder how this forks and shock actually work
  • 2 0
 @bicyclerider any reason why you didn't go with Berd Spokes?
  • 4 2
 Wow cool it's the same exact build as always.
  • 2 1
 I'm hungry for some KFC drumsticks. jk...bike and legs are impressive. Hard work to get either.
  • 1 1
 Haha thanks man!
  • 2 0
 Remove the chain and shave off stache, call it a day!
  • 2 0
 If only there were Scott Bikes in stock to be ordered right now.
  • 1 0
 ha, I've been looking for a Spark in the config I want.
  • 2 0
 Imagine being a weight weenie but having a 3 foot long seat post
  • 5 3
 Would be a nice pic for Grindr....
  • 3 0
 Chicken legs
  • 2 1
 Great article @bicyclerider !! Damn good read and the comments are the best read of it!! Amazing work as usual brother!!!
  • 1 1
 Real talk how much do the decals on the chainstay weigh?
And I’m very surprised to see sealant weighs more than the cassette, even a small DH one
  • 2 0
 Now this is a down county bike
  • 4 2
 Europe... so fuckin weird over there sometimes.
  • 3 1
 Those jorts made my eyes puke.
  • 2 0
 All those pictures made me uncomfortable.
  • 1 0
 well according to his thighs he could have just built an ultra aggressive hardtail and it would have similar speeds...
  • 3 3
 Dude never skips leg day does he!? Can't picture him listening to Motorhead though. Seems like more of an Avicii kinda guy?
  • 3 3
 Or Liberace.
  • 11 3
 Haha Lemmy was famous for his short shorts, they where even shorter than mine! That's the reason I'm wearing them in the first place, it started out as a joke between friends and homage to Lemmy. As for the music, Motörhead is my "light" music with doom/stoner/sludge being my main base.
  • 1 1
 @bicyclerider: ok you got me there, a quick Lemmy search reveals a lot of short shorts action, I'm eating crow!
  • 3 1
 @SoddenDeath: Haha it's all good man, any reason to talk a bit about Lemmy is a good one!
  • 1 0
 @bicyclerider: Dangerholm, have you figured out a way to build a lightweight AXS setup, maybe as a wide range 11 speed? Love the performance of my AXS combined with the range of the Leonardi 12sp NPU cassette, but not digging all that weight hanging off the back end of the bike. Any good ideas or products out there to reduce weight while retaining the AXS feature?
  • 1 0
 Edit
  • 3 2
 Now this is how Öhlins forks should look like
  • 2 1
 Cool build, but peace treaties are not that long.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Session...
  • 2 1
 Great work as always Gustav!!
  • 2 1
 raw carbon looks great, but not as great as his legs
  • 2 1
 How much weight did the top-tube stripes add?
  • 2 1
 A bike that light can't handle the watts produced by those legs
  • 1 0
 Sandblast those rims silver.
  • 2 1
 That dude doesn’t skip leg day
  • 2 1
 How much weight did the CS decals add? As always, sick builds!
  • 5 5
 Can we get a feature on dangerholm's leg day routine. or is it just: squat heavy, repeat?
  • 2 1
 Upvoted. Got you almost back even.
  • 2 1
 Dentists are running away in shame on their Yetis.
  • 2 1
 Hulk legs , paper bike...
Showroom Bike ! Wink
  • 2 0
 #Dangleholm
  • 2 1
 The difference between the winner and the looser was really thigh!
  • 1 0
 12-15 months shipping on those brakes.
  • 3 2
 Still not as light as Christaan's Session at 12.52kg (27.54 lbs) lol
  • 3 0
 Its 27.5 though
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one who understood the « Lemmy ´se short «  reference?
  • 1 0
 This bike looks amazing and the copper one looks even better! Nice work!
  • 2 1
 Wow, just imagine how light it would be if it were a 26!
  • 3 1
 HGH is a hell of a drug
  • 1 0
 Ok. Price including labour? 35k? Lol
  • 2 0
 I don't get it...
  • 1 0
 I prefer to think of them as "racehorse" legs.
  • 1 0
 Why does he only build up SCOTT bikes?
  • 1 0
 WHITE BROS FORK ... the new is old!
  • 2 1
 Silver spokes always.
  • 1 0
 Looks cool. Enjoy!
  • 4 3
 ew gross
  • 2 2
 Who needs a light bike with thighs like that
  • 1 1
 Thighs or bike, Whats prettier? Whats Burlier? What do you want more?
  • 4 4
 whats up with the shorts dude daisy duke call and she whants them back
  • 1 1
 Awesomeness!
  • 4 7
 What’s with the Daisy Duke’s? Very odd.
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