First Ride: 2022 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Alloy - Adaptability Meets Affordability

Oct 12, 2021
by Matt Beer  



Twelve months ago, we gave our “Mountain Bike of the Year” award to the Specialized Stumpjumper EVO, but until today it was only available with a carbon frame. A new aluminum version has now been added into the mix, one that takes nearly all of the features of the carbon model, including the SWAT box, and puts them into a more affordable package.

First appearing on the 2016 Stumpjumper, Specialized opened the door and utilized the void space of a carbon downtube with the SWAT box. If you’ve been out of the loop, SWAT is Specialized’s acronym for onboard utilities; storage, water, air, tools, which can be onboard the bike or your person. The Stumpjumper EVO Alloy is the first aluminum frame in Specialized's lineup to receive downtube storage, although I'd bet we'll see it show up on more metal bikes in the future.
Specialized Stumpjumper
EVO Alloy Details

• Wheelsize: 29" (MX with 27.5" link)
• Travel: 150 mm
• Alloy frame with SWAT box
• 63° - 65.5° head angle
• Chainstay length: 438 - 443 mm (S1 - S4), 448 - 453 mm (S5, S6)
• Sizes: S1 - S6
• Weight: 15.4 kg / 34.0 lb (S4 w/tubes)
• Price range: $3,800, $5,600 USD. Frame only: $1,900 USD.
specialized.com


SWAT box aside, the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy has 150mm of rear travel and is available with two 29" wheels or a mixed wheel setup.


Frame Details

Unlike some other aluminum takes on carbon models, the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy's silhouette is virtually identical to its carbon framed sibling. The half paint/half brushed finish is a clever pat on the back to the 2018 model that boasted some wild geometry at the time, but this new model is further refined and more adaptable.

The aluminum frame also has the same sleek cable routing and adjustable geometry as its carbon counterpart. With the use of neutral or angled headset cups and a flip chip at the dropout pivot, Specialized’s Stumpjumper EVO Geometry Finder can guide you through all the numbers to choose from. To remove the guesswork, simply enter your riding style and local terrain.


The SWAT box makes its first appearance on an aluminum Specialized frame.



The two hoses running to the rear wheel feed into the front of the top tube and take a turn down the side arm brace, held in place by a plastic shroud.


No fuss cable routing and paint protection.

Adaptability is the Stumpjumper’s speciality where the bike can transform from a bar-dragging corner destroyer to a contemporary trail seeker. A specific MulletLink is available as an aftermarket suspension component purchase to retain the geometry for riders wishing to use a 27.5” rear wheel over the stock 29er setup.

Stumpjumper EVO 2021

Geometry

Size wize, the Stumpjumper EVO family covers a huge range of rider heights, from 150 cm up to 203 through six frame sizes. Specialized uses their “S” sizing scheme which allows riders to choose a couple frame size options to suit their riding styles, ruled by wheelbase not seat tube length. Starting at 385 mm for the S1 and S2, that tube length grows in 20 mm increments and the reach ranges from 408-millimeters to a whopping 528, so all riders should be able to find their happy place.

To match the change in front centers, the 438 mm chainstays on the S1-S4 bikes stretch 10 mm for the two largest sizes. The dropout pivot chip can be flipped to gain an extra 5 mm of rear center and dropping the BB height by 7 mm, which will also slacken the head angle by 0.5º.

Up at the head tube, a 1.0º offset bearing cup can be installed to make the head angle as steep as 65.5º or down to an aggressive 63º, depending on the chainstay setting. The swap is as simple as rebuilding the headset and doesn’t require anything more than a few allen keys.



Build Kits

Keeping it straightforward with just two component packages to choose from, Specialized has mixed things up from the options available on the carbon frames. Starting at $3,800 USD is the Comp package with a Fox 36 Rhythm fork and Float X Performance shock, X-Fusion Manic dropper post, SRAM NX drivetrain and Code R brakes, as well as Specialized tires, wheels and finishing components.

On deck for our First Ride is the ‘no compromise’, Elite level build, which lands at $5,600 USD. You’ll find a fancy Fox Factory 36 and Float X suspension, SRAM GX Eagle 12-speed drivetrain and Code RS brakes with dual 200 mm rotors, plus an MRP AMg chainguide with a skid plate. The shoes and socks are Roval Traverse alloy wheels and Specialized’s Butcher T9 and Eliminator T7 Grid Trail.

For those picky riders who like to choose their own parts, the frame kit is available with a Fox Float X Performance shock for $1,900.


Ride Impressions

As you might expect, the alloy version of the Stumpjumper EVO rides a lot like the carbon iteration. Despite the large section of the downtube that has been removed, there were no worries about unwanted flex in the front triangle. Housing management carries over from the Turbo Levo aluminum frame with a plastic shroud to capture the lines against the inside of the sidearm front triangle support.

I found the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy to be a very comfortable bike to ride, especially with flat pedals. The soft and linear nature of the rear suspension kept the wheel tracking well while pedalling over small bumps, but that did give way on some large square-edge hits and harsh landings. Adding a 0.6-cubic inch volume spacer helped to ramp up the progression and take the sting out those impacts.

The bike really shines on twisty single track with the feeling of being close to the ground; think slalom meets trail, especially in the low and long setting. The increased leverage requires a bit more PSI in the rear shock and careful navigation through chunky terrain as the bottom bracket hovers just off the dirt. Falling back on the Geo Finder to check some numbers, Specialized suggests the high and short setting for the terrain on my local North Shore trails and I reverted to that setting for more clearance and quicker turning.

Under the downtube, it was refreshing to see an MRP AMg guide with a skid plate. I don’t understand why all bikes aren’t spec’d with this equipment, especially with the lack of chains in supply these days. They’re so light and save you from blowing up a chain or bending a ring, so why not have that extra security?

One part that didn’t fare so well was the Roval rear hub with 18-tooth DT Swiss Star Ratchet internals, which stripped out under normal use - not the ideal way to start the first ride. I can't speculate on what may have caused this. The axle was torqued sufficiently and there were no hard wind-ups on the cranks. All the parts were greased, but not over packed so the teeth didn't engage and the springs were in the correct orientation.

Back in action with some new parts, riding the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy showcased how much fun a shorter travel bike can be on the same old trails versus a big enduro rig. I looked to add in some creative side hits and loved taking the long way around some sections of trail. Adaptability geometry allows riders to transform the bike from an ultra-aggressive, MX-wheeled berm smasher to a platform ready for backcountry missions with more ground clearance and dual 29" wheels to roll fast. These characteristics are some of the reasons why the welded version of the Stumpjumper EVO remains as desirable as its fibrous counterpart.

Look for head-to-head comparisons as the SJ EVO alloy goes up against a handful of other aggressive trail bikes in our Fall Field Test.






341 Comments

  • 362 5
 The all new Specialized EVO Alloy! Descends like a bike, climbs like a bike, feels like a bike! Taking preorders for 2024 now!
  • 192 8
 I wanna hump the hell out of this stump
  • 157 3
 @stumphumper92: username checks out
  • 19 3
 As of right now (11am PDT 10/12/2021) on the specialized website all sizes are available and in stock on the comp model in satin smoke/black.
  • 35 1
 @skyroach:

Shush. You're ruining the narrative.
  • 3 2
 @Fullsend2-13: I think that's the point
  • 1 0
 @skyroach: One size disappeared, in a few days it'll be out of stock lmao
  • 2 0
 I want a bike that feels like a bike. Imagine
  • 159 15
 okay so it's maybe actually the perfect bike? 3800, upgrade the Rhythm damper to Grip 2 for $300 and it's better than realistically 99% of riders need. Well done, awesome price point
  • 34 78
flag ratedgg13 (Oct 12, 2021 at 9:29) (Below Threshold)
 So it's an OCCAM H20 LT, with worse parts for more money?
  • 66 1
 I dunno, on one hand I really like this bike and nearly bought a 2019 stumpy, but OTOH with the upgrade I'm spending $4100 for 35-36 pounds (in my very XL sizing) and an NX drivetrain? Not great value in my world, but that's just me.
  • 35 18
 @transam711

The most perfect bike is the one you already have…

This bike is too long, too low and too heavy…
  • 72 3
 It's still hard to beat the deore build Ripmo AF in this spec / price level.
  • 10 0
 @number44: the real value will be if its in stock anywhere.
  • 10 0
 @Saidrick: you can adjust how long and low it is
  • 13 2
 @ratedgg13: There's a lot to like about the Occam LT. For me, the deal breaker is the long seat-tube on the XL. I like a long reach, so I would size up to the XL, rather than size down to the L. Maximum dropper stroke I could use would probably be 150 mm. The Stumpjumper EVO also offers more geometry flexibility.

Both good bikes at not-crazy prices. For me, it would be the Specialized.
  • 17 52
flag nickfranko (Oct 12, 2021 at 10:22) (Below Threshold)
 @ratedgg13: Worse parts? NX and SLX are pretty much the same for shifting, the fork is only slightly better and can be made equal, the shocks are the same, and I'll take Code R brakes over base Deore brakes. Those wheels have a Formula rear hub (which sucks) compared to what is a DT Swiss 370 in the Roval. Also, the storage is awesome for spare parts.

So, unless you're planning on ripping off the stock wheels, I'll take the Spec over the Orbea.
  • 7 2
 @hamncheez:

I guess… Based on my height and Specialized’s website, the “short” version is still as long as my DH bike. 34lbs for a trail bike? Seems too much.
  • 10 7
 You think? Once you've gotten this bike ready for hard riding (changed the drivtrain, cockpit, wheelset and tires) it's going to be more like $ 4800. There's quite a few carbon bikes with better components in that price range.
  • 9 2
 @Saidrick: You'll be hard pressed to beat that weight for a 29er in this price bracket.
  • 20 1
 Personally, "soft and linear" is the opposite of how I want my suspension to feel.
  • 32 18
 This is a TERRIBLE value of a bike. Rhythm fork (not same chassis as normal Fox 36) and NX for 3800$???

Polygon N9 3099$ shipped (via Bikesonline)
www.polygonbikes.com/product/mountain/siskiu-n9-2

Full Fox Performance Suspension (Rhythm stuff is fine but not the same)
Freaking Shimano XT drive train
TRP Slate 4-piston brakes

You can even buy an XL today:
www.bikesonline.com/2021-polygon-siskiu-n9-dual-suspension-mountain-bike

Reach is more like a new Capra than ultra long but you can size up. Then throw a wolftooth Angleset if you want for 90$. Killer value on a sweet bike.
  • 69 12
 @nickfranko: What? NX is the SAME as SLX??? Lol bro, come on. SLX is nicer than my XO1 drivetrain. Literally, it shifts smoother in every way. Its just a bit heavier.

The Code R brakes aren't great. I was just on a pair. RSC's- awesome brake but not the R's. Deore's are actually a really nice brake and don't have the servowave stuff (kind of a good thing).
  • 37 6
 @nickfranko: so sorry but nx is garbage, good to be placed only on 900 USD hardtails... maybe..
  • 11 2
 @Svinyard:

The N9 is a great value for the components you get, but that doesn't make the evo a "bad" value.

Also, the N9 is somewhat "older" in its geo. For instance, XL has a crazy long seat tube of 520mm (75mm longer than the S5 Evo), and the wheelbase is something like 40mm shorter than the Evo.
  • 27 5
 @nickfranko: I like slx better than GX... Sometimes I wish I had slx instead of X01 on my primary bike.
  • 24 1
 @transam711 you can’t upgrade rhythm forks to grip2. You can only upgrade performance forks.
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: sometimes.. actually.. most of the times in the last 3 years I wish I had an xtr back on my bike/bikes; it won't happen soon as my next derailleur will be an axs though..
  • 27 3
 @Svinyard: lol, but it’s a trash heap of a bike. I always laugh at these comparisons. It’s a price competitive market. Brands that cost more, for the most part do so, because the product is more expensive. Have you ever worked on a Polygon? Ridden one? Tried to sell one? Things are cheap and that’s fine, but not in the same boat at this bike is. Lol.
  • 28 1
 @nickfranko: SLX is waaaay better than NX in terms of shifting and durability
  • 22 2
 @nickfranko: have you been smoking crack? NX isn't even in the same ball park as SLX for shifting performance
  • 1 1
 @OpeSorryAbootThat: I'm still loving mine a year later, but this looks pretty badass I have to admit.
  • 9 3
 @bonfire: The Polygon N9 isn't a "trash heap", but it doesn't have the same level of refinement.
  • 3 19
flag nickfranko (Oct 12, 2021 at 12:40) (Below Threshold)
 @Svinyard: Same tier. I am not arguing that they perform the same, I merely said that SLX and NX are meant to compete with each other.
And the Code R brakes are good brakes. They perform well for the price they are, just like Deore do, although I'll take Codes over Deore for brakes.
  • 9 2
 @eugenux: A $900 bike would have SX not NX.
  • 31 2
 Lol people defending these builds are the reason for the prices we have now
  • 6 13
flag nickfranko (Oct 12, 2021 at 12:43) (Below Threshold)
 @mr-moose: Did I say anything about shifting performance? NX and SLX are the same tier from two different companies. Whether or not they shift the same is irrelevant to my point. Would I take SLX over NX? Yes I would. But, they're still on the same level when it comes to tiers. Which was my whole point.
If you hate NX so much, you can pull off the brand new groupset and replace it.
  • 9 1
 @ocnlogan: 18.1kgs for the polygon, really
even my DH bike is lighter.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: lol indeed!!
  • 1 1
 @ocnlogan: that polygon frames rear end is brittle compared to stumpy, have you seen it bottom out?
  • 3 0
 Better still fit a Marzocchi Z1 coil conversion in there, then you are winning!
  • 11 1
 @Saidrick: Too heavy, really? 34 lbs is not bad at any price point for a rowdy bike
  • 2 5
 @ridetilt-com: That's insanely heavy. I wonder if that's a typo.
  • 8 1
 @bonfire: Polygon's are solid bikes. Their Sikiu T8 won the value bike challenge. Out climbed the Ibis Ripley (tho they thought it was as responsive initially) and out-descended everything else. What more do you want for a 2500$ there?
  • 1 0
 @dcdavid12: Are you sure? I looked that up elsewhere yesterday (randomly) and it said that you could. The lowers are different and made out of a lesser/heavier alloy tho but I think they are built to handle the same internals (if you want) as the other higher end forks.
  • 9 0
 @nickfranko: fair point, although I would equate SLX with GX since they're both the third from top group. I guess it depends whether you count up or down.
  • 4 0
 @dcdavid12: yep, different diameter stanchions. The air springs are different too
  • 12 1
 @nickfranko: SLX and NX are not the same tier. SLX is 3rd tier in the Shimano lineup - which might account for the better performance. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ (and personally I don't hate NX, I just don't think it belongs on a $4k bike)
  • 6 1
 @nickfranko: sx is only good for supermarket bikes.
  • 2 0
 @Jshemuel: What about the avalanche upgrade?
  • 1 0
 @OpeSorryAbootThat: yep. I got mine right before the price hike so $3,199. Even with the price hike it's $400 less than this EVO with NX.
  • 2 6
flag chrismac70 (Oct 12, 2021 at 15:01) (Below Threshold)
 @whippsb: it’s way heavy. Should be no more than 30lb
  • 8 2
 @dcdavid12: incorrect. I have a 2021 Fox Rhythm 36 that I upgraded to Grip 2.
  • 3 1
 @eugenux: That's Alivio territory. Lol
  • 4 0
 @number44: I agree. $375 groupset on a $3,800 bike doesn't really make sense. I'd much rather see a full GX, or at least a GX cassette with maybe a GX shifter and NX derailleur.
  • 1 10
flag REZEN (Oct 12, 2021 at 15:58) (Below Threshold)
 @Svinyard: The only difference between Code Rs and Code RSC are the piston coating/material. The hydraulic leverage is the same.....so they will feel the same.
  • 11 0
 @Saidrick: the most perfect bike is always your next bike before you get it
  • 1 1
 @whitebirdfeathers: That is great news, any idea if it's a change to the 2021 model that allows it?
  • 1 0
 @boozed: I’m really not too sure about past versions. My friends shop had a Grip 2 damper kicking around so it was a free upgrade for me!
  • 5 0
 @REZEN: swinglink?
  • 4 1
 Honestly I am impressed with the Rhythm that is on my comp.

It has done super well on almost everything. Only place it seemed a bit out of sorts is rough high speed off camber. But I also run it with less pressure then suggested so that could be on me. Seems like a great option. Price creep hurts as my carbon comp last fall was just over $5000 Canadian.
  • 3 0
 Also the comp carbon this year was full slx. Which would compare favourably to the nx.
  • 4 2
 @nickfranko: I agree about the Codes. I think they’re very good brakes for the money. I’ve got XTs on my trail bike and Codes on my long-travel bike and I’d take the Codes even over my XTs.
  • 2 0
 @REZEN: The difference is the LEVER
  • 9 7
 @daweil: "Lol people defending these builds are the reason for the prices we have now"

Nothing to add, just needed repeating. MTB industry is going to price itself out of existence.
  • 6 2
 @GeorgeHayduke:
@daweil:

The pricing is higher than it was a year or two ago, thats totally true. I doubt anyone here would try to argue that.

But in the reality that we now occupy, the pricing on this isn't bad.

Personally I'm looking at frame only options for a new build. And I can tell you right now that $1900 for the Evo frame only, is a pretty good deal. The only brand I'm aware of that has anything cheaper at the moment, are Privateer (both the 141 and 161 are $1750usd), and Commencal ($1800usd).

The bikes that used to be cheaper than this, are now more (Norco Sights AL frame went from $1700 to $1950 recently), and bikes that were more... are still more (Transition Sentinel $2100usd, Banshee Titan $2500 usd).

So yeah, its more expensive than it was. And if you don't need to buy a bike right now, its probably a good idea to wait. But for people wanting something now... its honestly not as much as I was expecting.
  • 4 2
 @number44: Come this time next year or maybe even by spring you may think otherwise re: the value of this bike at 3.8k as inflation creeps in. Even the NYT is talking about inflation now.
  • 1 1
 @BenTheSwabian: In stock? And by the time they have stock again, the price point will be up. This is the new norm, folks. Until prices go up again. Then that’ll be the new norm (for a few months).
  • 5 0
 @bainer66:
I also don’t get why the 36 Rhythm is seen as a something that needs to be upgraded immediately. It has basically the same damper as the Marzocchi Z1 and in the 36 version, it’s plenty stiff. I left it on my 2021 stumpy comp and it works fine for me. Maybe you just have to be in the average weight range, since the tuning options are of course limited.
  • 3 0
 @cvoc: Agreed, it's hardly a weak link. If there's anything to upgrade it's the wheels and/or transmission.
  • 1 0
 @dcdavid12: yes you can. My one has a GRIP2 damper.
  • 1 2
 @nickfranko: that is where I place the quality of sx.. actually, I think Alivio is actually better than sx. SX is simply horrible... the worse, bar chines no name shifters and derraileurs I have ever tested/checked. The worst ever!
  • 1 0
 @bainer66: Rhythm seemed ok to me. not lyrik ultimate level but, good enough not to complain on a 30 miles over mountain ride on a rented e-bike.
  • 1 1
 @cvoc: it’s an excellent fork. I’ve got GRIP2 and smashpot in mine. It’s heavy but also stiffer than a standard 36. It was even excellent with the standard damper in tbh.
  • 3 5
 Ya'll crazy. The Rhythm is trash.
  • 2 8
flag Bikesss3 (Oct 13, 2021 at 8:37) (Below Threshold)
 @Svinyard: Slx is actually the worst drivetrain I have ever ridden. I have had nothing but problems from it. So it gone now.
  • 3 0
 @dcdavid12: I have a Grip2 in a csu from a rhythm, with z1 coil parts, and a 36 elite lowers.
  • 1 0
 @ridetilt-com: Haha mine too, 2017 TR500 with a coil boxxer. Bike weights are getting out of hand.
  • 2 0
 @cvoc: I agree, I have ridden the 36 Rhythm extensively on my previous bike and it is so good. I actually miss it compared to my Pike other than the weight. It gets good reviews from the testers on this site too but I think many people think they will need to tune every aspect of their fork. Expect to find them cheap used when you want/need a new fork!
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: I totally agree.
  • 1 0
 @lemjam: what year rhythm?
  • 3 0
 @ocnlogan: Bikes are more expensive but their value as a tool is also much much more. What we ride now are so much better than what we rode 10 years ago. Compare this to the most expensive 2013 SB66C build you could possibly imagine and this thing will eat it up in every department at half the price, and those things were insane back in the day.
  • 1 0
 @inside-plus: except for weight. Freaking 29ers have become a5 pound weight penalty.

I'd still rather have this haha
  • 1 5
flag Saidrick (Oct 14, 2021 at 11:00) (Below Threshold)
 @inside-plus:


Bikes like the SB66 are the reason the bike industry had to change wheel sizes…

Those bikes were too good, couldn’t get people to buy new bikes without forcing obsolescence on their current bikes.

For the record, the evo will never be lighter, handle switchbacks, ride super techy, tight, single track or jump better than the SB66.

There’s a reason Rampage riders still rode 26”…
  • 3 0
 @Saidrick: Not saying that am SB66 is bad. But yeti are prime examples of trying new suspension designs to get the most out of the bike. Yeas bike companies want to sell more bikes. But no MTB's weren't perfected in 2011.
I think durability is often over looked when remembering older bikes. My evo has needed minimal maintenance compared to some older bikes and it has been on much rougher trails. Wear parts will always wear, bad decisions always lead to broken parts, but overall the ability for a "trail" bike to be ridden almost anywhere now is fairly amazing.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: spent a lot of time wrenching on a polygon? Fasteners made from cheese, weighty, zero resale, limited after sales support.

Wouldnt touch it. Just like I wouldn’t touch a trash heap. Same same.
  • 2 0
 @OpeSorryAbootThat: I love my Ripmo AF, it's such a sick bike and still great price a couple years later! I was just looking thru the Ibis's warranty and I'm pretty pumped on 7 year rim warranty. I think for my other bikes I'd buy the $500usd aluminum Ibis wheels as they're reasonably weighted and rim warranty is pretty sweet... and I'm too cheap for We Are One or other Carbon wheels w life time warranty
  • 82 7
 spesh is on fire lately
most brands havent figured out how to make weed box with carbon frames and they're doing this on decently priced alu? take my money.
  • 32 86
flag ratedgg13 (Oct 12, 2021 at 9:25) (Below Threshold)
 I mean, other than their top their road bike being under recall and selling a gravel bike frame only for more than a whole, decent bike. Remember kids, the "S" in S-Works is for Stupid.
  • 59 2
 I've heard the capacity is large enough for 1oz of flower, a 6" graffix bong, and a king sized pack of Reese's penut-butter cups.
  • 24 0
 @jaytdubs: can confirm.
  • 10 1
 @ratedgg13: You really hate Spesh?
  • 7 1
 I sold my old Enduro 'cause the yoke would blow up rear shocks like crazy. Is this still a problem?
  • 19 23
flag BenTheSwabian (Oct 12, 2021 at 10:56) (Below Threshold)
 A $4k alloy bike on which you'll have to change out half of the components before it's ready to ride?
Is that really what you call "on fire"?
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: it seems that not for 2022 enduro, where they ditched the trunion mount.
  • 25 11
 @ratedgg13: who tf is biking on the road? Roads are for shuttle vehicles.
  • 3 4
 Spesh hasn’t figured out how to make weed boxes on carbon frames. You seen how thin the made the downtube? Tons of damaged carbon swat frames from rock strikes.
  • 5 2
 @BenTheSwabian: You can buy frame only which is a pretty good price. Then build it up how you want. Assuming you can get the actual parts.
  • 9 0
 I use the trunk in my Enduro every ride. Very useful space,to pack keys and wallet in short rides. For long rides or the unknown I always pack my tube&tools for flats and have little space to put snacks and other stuff.
It would be hard to buy another bike with no trunk in it...
  • 2 1
 @eugenux: They ditched the yoke; not the trunnion mount. Is that what you meant?
  • 4 0
 @eugenux: I'm talking about this bike!
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I still have my 2019 SJ Evo with yoke. I have run air shocks just fine. Certain coil shocks with smaller diameter shafts run into this issue. Ive had a coil Ohlins on it and it's not a problem at all.
  • 2 0
 Ratedgg13 actually kinda has a point. On the road bike, they knew that heavy loads could snap the carbon steerer because of the headset design but then designed a new one and shipped new bikes with it before telling people. And on top of that, people found out from a leak instead of specialized.
  • 61 0
 Boy Trek accidentally launched the best possible marketing campaign to support this release.
  • 8 0
 this is my usual news source. what did trek do?
  • 17 1
 @Spencermon: Not sure this is what OP meant but in the new Top Fuel ad just a few days ago they said Trek is the only brand to offer frame storage in alloy frames.
  • 43 0
 @Spencermon: trek said aluminium is better on long term for enviroment
  • 5 0
 @Noeserd: Ah, of course! Totally forgot about that. You're right, I'm sure that's what OP was talking about.
  • 13 20
flag BenTheSwabian (Oct 12, 2021 at 10:30) (Below Threshold)
 Trek tried to green-wash alloy frames.
  • 6 0
 @Noeserd: Yep. In my mind that article was a perfect primer to get people thinking about alloy frames and this stumpy launch is timed perfectly to ride that wave.

Whether the article is true/correct who knows... but it certainly presents a reason to consider your frame material and another possible advantage to going alloy. I choose carbon now because the weight benefit is wort the extra cost to me, but if alloy is proven to truly be better for the environment then that (plus the cost savings) might be enough to sway me.
  • 23 2
 @BenTheSwabian: Honest question: where was the green washing in that report exactly? Seemed pretty to the point and devoid of unnecessary fluff to me.

Remember it was PB who chose to headline with that specific part of the report for the clicks. Note that Trek never said in that report that one or the other was "better for the environment". That report focused only on one metric: carbon footprint.

I'd find it strange if one of the major carbon frame sellers tried to specifically hype aluminium in any way. Do you think they were also trying to green wash bikes in general because the report indicated a larger footprint of e-bikes? So overall they are intentionally shitting on two of their highest profit margin product categories?
  • 8 9
 @bananowy: a mtb company publishing their cool environment facts while trying to sell more and more every year is literally greenwashing. There's nothing wrong about them trying to make their footprint better, but it's just another piece of marketing. Trek would not do that if they didn't think they would make money out of that in the long run.
  • 4 2
 @bananowy: My guess would be that they will try and use this as an excuse to raise prices on alloy frames to the level of carbon ones:

"Surely you will pay a little more (a grand) to help the environment, won't you?"
  • 14 3
 @daweil: eigentlich wollte ich downvoten...falsch gedrückt, sorry Wink . The world is very simple to you, is it? Have you ever thought that we the customers are to blame for the "everything must be carbon" hype just as well as the manufacturers and marketers?! There's great aluminum bikes all over but look at the agruments we are putting together; "you can have a carbon frame for the money of this alloy frame", "this is bad value for the money".... But never have we thought that high quality aluminum frames are much better quality than those glass fiber filled cheap carbon frames people compare them to, and are just as expensive to produce... Then a company like Trek or Spesh try to change the conversation and bring some actual facts to the table, the best you can come up with is "greenwashing...". Mein Freund, geh noch ein paar Jahre zur Schuhle und lern noch ein bisschen was. Das Internet Trollen steht Dir nicht.
  • 2 1
 @Ttimer: I’m sure your right but I wouldn’t pay the extra
  • 13 2
 @daweil: No, a company publishing simple facts about its footprint while selling product (which is the sole reason for its existence) is not "literally greenwashing". I don't think you understand that word at all. Greenwashing is presenting actions as beneficial for the environment when they are not in reality. The definition of greenwashing hinges on the eco-friendly message being false.

Trek isn't trying to tell you this report is going to fix anything. They're just showing you numbers, nothing more, nothing less. This being part of their marketing does not automatically make it "greenwashing" either, so no need to state the obvious.

If they indeed do lower their environmental footprint in the future and then use it for marketing, guess what? That still won't be "greenwashing" as long as the ad copy will be factual and the positive impact real.

Because of your misunderstanding of the term, you seem to contradict yourself when you say it's OK if they try to be less destructive but it's bad (i.e. "greenwashing") if they talk about it. I think the confusion comes from that naive but oh so common on PB view that "marketing=bad" which is obviously quite detached from reality.

@Ttimer My guess would be that they won't make any illogical business decisions like that unless they want to voluntarily kill their alloy frame sales. Let's not be silly. By that logic do you think they'll level prices between bikes and e-bikes?
  • 5 1
 @Noeserd: Trek said carbon is better for the environment. Carbon produces more carbon dioxide, and that is what plants crave.
  • 5 1
 @TinuKu: you're not wrong, and I agree with you. You are just making a different point than me. Of course consumers are to blame! I'm here riding my 6 year old Alu bike, repairing the battery of my smartphone and don't understand the world anymore. I think I had a misunderstanding on the word "Greenwashing" and meant a slightly different thing.
Still I am staying on my original point, trek is trying to sell bikes and that's it.

Und noch was, Please stay factual and don't call me a troll while telling me to stay in school while knowing nothing about me. Schule wird ohne h geschrieben, mein Freund, vielleicht solltest du sie besuchen Wink
  • 3 0
 @bananowy: all right, I had a misunderstanding of the term. And by that I used the word literally even more wrong, argh!
To be clear: it's good that a company cares about the environment and publishing facts is an important first step. I am not against that (wrote that in my first comment). But as a consumer that information gives me nothing (compared with other mtb companies), so I interpret those figures as bland marketing. And marketing is not bad at all in a big scheme, I just see many people making purchasing decisions on shallow company communications and don't like that. How can I even see if their numbers add up? Is the sram or the Shimano equipped bike better for the environment? If I would be honest with myself and would care for co2 and water and energy consumption worldwide, I would keep riding my old bike instead buying a new one - while telling everyone "I care for the world so I bought an aluminum mtb!".
  • 2 0
 @ironxcross: Trek released their report weeks ago, but Pinkbike's timing to actually mention it is perfect for Specialized. Maybe that's what PB wanted, for us all to start talking about alu again.
  • 2 0
 @daweil: All good. I think you said it best here: it's a first step. Right now it's just some information without any comparisons that won't really affect your decisions. I don't even think Trek can do much real marketing around it yet. At this stage the consumer can figure out the footprint is probably similar across all brands, adjusted for scale. It's when they take action based on the report that the "eco" messaging can start and if the action is real I can't see many drawbacks.

What's good about this that someone in the industry did something that (I think) hadn't been done and others might follow. I don't mean everyone publishing such reports; of course smaller brands like Transition don't have the resource or time for this like a big corp and as I said, it will be similar anyway. I mean that if/when Trek takes actual action, it might set a precedent and example to follow (even if only to not get left behind on the marketing front).

Some big players could probably follow sooner than later. You ask "Is the Sram or the Shimano equipped bike better for the environment?" Well, we'd know if both published the data Smile But in reality it's probably similar. One small company that comes to mind who I think absolutely should show some numbers is Guerilla Gravity. So much of their message relies on the local, low-waste manufacturing etc. that it would be nice if they backed it up with data. How much better is it really when a Colorado resident buys GG vs Trek? What if I buy it and add the transport?

Of course you're right that the most environmentally friendly thing to do is... not buying a new bike. I'm on an older one like you (mine is 5yo) so I should feel good about myself, but definitely getting itchy for a new ride. I mean, how can I have fun anymore with that short reach, steep HA and tiny wheels??
  • 3 1
 @daweil: touché monsieur. Thanks for clarifying and sorry for misjudging you and being a douche, calling you names. In retrospect, not very classy of me. I apologize for that.
Meine Muttersprache ist Deutsch, da sollte ich Schule eigentlich korrekt schreiben können...peinlich peinlich.
Happy trails
  • 1 0
 @TinuKu: all good in the west, Prost mein Guter!
  • 40 1
 Ally frame only option with downtube storage. I cant wait until this is the norm.
  • 17 3
 dude, it aint the norm in carbon frames why more companies aint doing this is beyond me
  • 12 0
 It's probably a lot of work to do the engineering to make the frame strong enough with a big hole in it? And it actually manufacture said big-hole-frame. Otherwise, I'm not sure. It's a wonderful feature.
  • 1 0
 Same here. I recently switched from a Enduro with swatbox to a Status 160 and I really miss it. Its just so simple to bring everything i need with me for shorter rides
  • 1 2
 @grgsmith: Sure, other than the fact all ebikes have a few enormous holes in their frames which a lot of companies are poring resources into.
  • 5 0
 I've got the 19 Stumpy with SWAT and idk if I can ever go back to a bike without it. All my spares/tools are housed. I never have to worry about swapping tools or forgetting anything vital. And when I bring a hip pack I can stuff it with water/clothes/fuel.

It's such a game-changer!!
  • 1 0
 @RockCrawler: curious why you 'downgraded' from an Enduro to a Status?
  • 1 0
 @vemegen: Patents!
  • 3 1
 @Will762: Presumably because the enduro climbs like a bag of dicks and is cracky cracky.
  • 2 0
 @vemegen: Probably because after a while your water bottle makes the SWAT door rattle like crazy.
  • 1 0
 Frame on the Enduro cracked so thats mainly why. On the other hand i wanted to try out a more playfull/jib Bike so thats why the Status.
  • 1 0
 @notthatfast: Never made cracky sounds not even with the cracked frame (broke after about 6500km of use). And it climbes far better then the Status
  • 1 1
 For a contrary point of view, I believe engineering the frame for the SWAT box adds weight. My estimate is about 200g.
  • 1 0
 @preston67: my estimate of the weight of some sort of vessel to carry the things that go in a swat box is about 200 grams
  • 2 0
 @Bobadeebob: ha ha touche !
  • 40 0
 The 2021 Comp retailed at $4100 with an SLX drivetrain / brakes and was a carbon frame... I know prices are going up, but an alloy frame with NX drivetrain seems like a big step down for only $300 savings.
  • 1 4
 @BikeSauce: That bike was $4300

But yeah, I'd usually expect the jump from alloy to carbon to be more like $1000
NX is roughly equivalent to SLX though I'd say
  • 2 0
 @notthatfast: "NX is roughly equivalent to SLX though I'd say"
Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @notthatfast: I bought the Comp in January of 2021. It was $4100 at that time. Spesh raised their prices for all bikes some time after that.
  • 1 0
 @BikeSauce:

yea - this will be the norm. inflation inflation inflation and supply chain challenges are hitting the bike industry hard.
  • 1 0
 @BikeSauce:
Your point being? It's $4300 if you want to buy one now. You couldn't buy a stumpy evo aluminum in January 2021.
  • 1 0
 @Zayphod:
Having owned and ridden both I'd say they're both of pretty poor-average quality.
  • 26 0
 I'm not sure the Elite is that great of a deal. For $500 more you can get the Carbon Expert. That comes with Elite suspension vs Factory, but the performance is the same. Also with the Carbon Expert you get X01 derailleur, shifter, and cassette. That is almost the price difference vs GX on the Alloy Elite. I'm glad I was able to Find a Carbon Elite this summer, its been truly a great all around bike. I do really like the Alloy Elite paint job.
  • 9 1
 Yes, the pricing is a bit of a head-scratcher. I guess if you really love Kashima and really hate Carbon, then the Elite is the winner because you could just pull the shifter, derailleur, and cassette and sell them as brand new pull-offs+$500 to have X01 (or just buy an X01 cassette and GX AXS).

Personally, I'll take non-shiny fork/shock+carbon+superior shifting over Kashima and alloy.
  • 2 1
 @nickfranko: I pulled the X01 shifter/derailleur off my Carbon Expert and put on GX AXS. AXS is amazing and makes a great bike even better. Also have a spares in a pinch now. X01 is very hard to come by right now. My daughter works at a bike shop and a coworker offered to buy my take offs for full retail.
  • 1 1
 @luckyguy19:
I will eventually switch to AXS. I keep hearing great things about it.
  • 3 1
 @luckyguy19: protect your downtube if you're someplace with loose chunky rocks. They dont believe in warranty right now
  • 1 0
 @Grosey: I did, got a Rockguardz soon after I bought the bike. I hear rock hitting it every once in awhile, I'm glad it's there now.
  • 26 1
 I had a deposit down on the Expert Evo last year but was too late with it so I ended up with a Status 160. Lots of that would transfer over nicely onto the $1900 alloy Evo frame…hmm
  • 4 0
 Same dude. This is exactly what I'll do next year after slowly upgrading more bits...
  • 3 0
 @sjma same shit bro, ended up with status bike which is dope, however eco frame for under 2k looks insanely sick
  • 2 0
 what wouldn't transfer over?
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I’d rather have a full 29er on the Evo chassis so the rear wheel & cassette would be replaced (cassette is an NX 12 speed so it’s on the old standard and it’s wearing out). Other than that I might just need a different air spring in the fork to keep the geo the same - maybe do the Grip2 upgrade down the road
  • 1 0
 @nickmaffei: I’ve resisted the upgrade bug real good except I swapped my derailleur for a GX unit - blew up the NX one on a rock. It’s such a solid bike from stock but it’s just too heavy to justify throwing a ton of money at for me. The Evo though…yewww
  • 2 0
 @sjma: I'm right with you. The NX derailleur is hot garbage. I totally agree - mine w/ Assegai + DHF rear in a DD is like 37 lbs on the dot. I'd love to just port the parts to a better frame, the geo is dialed but the weight is imo what holds it back from climbing ok.
  • 19 2
 Frame only option excites me so much. Time to hammer tf out of my carbon Evo and if it breaks it breaks. I can then just swap everything over to a new alloy frame and not blow excessive cash.
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't they replace the frame thru a warranty claim if it breaks?
  • 5 0
 @crazyXCsquirrel: They haven't been approving warranties for rock strikes that compromise the downtube
  • 1 0
 @chxnter: Wish specialized would beef up their downtube protection... they currently just use that short piece of plastic.
  • 16 0
 Surprised that the DT Swiss hub was the letdown... I consider them to be the height of reliability.
  • 9 4
 They used to be. New LN ratchet seems to be hot garbage.
  • 5 0
 Had a buddy with the same issue related to the rear axle on the stumpy evo.
  • 10 0
 Vital had the same issue with their test bike
  • 5 1
 @ratedgg13: Lol, who's in for the LN to three-pawl conversion?

I have been hammering on my 3-pawl 370 since 2018 and it's still going strong. Not as great of engagement as some other hubs, but it's damn reliable and it's cheap.
  • 2 0
 I moved away from DT after suffering through multiple seasons with my 1501s. The star ratchet hasn't actually been the issue - the bearings jam up somehow and get really stiff. Then they have to be popped out and re-inserted (at which point they feel great again). I've since switched to Hope Pro 4s on most of my builds and they have been outstanding so far (well, if you can ignore/get used to the sound). I'm trying out RaceFace vaults for my next build, so we'll see. I used to be a DT Swiss hub fan, but no more. I will say the rims on those 1501s have been wonderful though.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: I had this issue with my 370, the ring stripped out. I got a 350 from the warranty but still had to have the wheel rebuilt on my own
  • 1 0
 @celestis57: On the new LN design or the old 3-pawl?
  • 1 0
 I've heard that the recent problems were because of a heat treating problem with the ratchets.
  • 2 0
 I had a buddy strip out a Specialized branded hub with "DT Swiss internals." It stripped the hubshell. I've often seen companies say their wheels use DT Swiss internals which implies the hub she'll wasn't manufactured by DT. This leads me to believe the hub shell wasn't made of an adequate alloy, manufacturing tolerances weren't right, or some other manufacturing defect.
  • 1 0
 @georgiamtbiker: Ah, I've only ever used full DT hubs.
  • 2 0
 @georgiamtbiker: I have two pair of DT350’s and they’ve been great. I always get suspicious with these OEM hubs.
  • 1 0
 @ratedgg13: I thought it was the EX ratchet that was the problem
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: I converted my 370 on my Commencal TR 29 to the Star Ratchet system and spent the extra money on the 54t upgrade kit. Night and day difference, especially with a heavy bike like the Commencal. I can get power to the wheels quickly especially on punchy climbs. I find I can maintain my momentum a lot more effectively. It wasn't a cheap upgrade over the stock 370 3 Pawl Hubs, but it's still cheaper than purchasing a high engagement hub like an I9. Reliability has been great so far.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Yes my understanding was the issue was with the EX ratchet which was only a problem on the DT240 hubs, not the 350's. This failure in the test bike is very concerning, but as someone said above, perhaps its an OEM problem, as there has been no buzz about 350 hubs/ratchets failing. I hope not as I just purchased a 350 for my next wheel build. I know I have never had an issue with ratchets in my Roval wheels (DT Swiss "internals") or my DT Swiss hubs.
  • 1 0
 @preston67:

Yeah I’ve read the same thing about the ex failures with only one spring. Been running and have had friends running 350s with various ratchets (54, 36 and 1Cool problem free for years - knock on wood!

Interesting to hear about the dt Swiss internals with a specialized hub body.
  • 19 6
 solid review, makes sense since Specialized owns this site now. zone5ventures.com
  • 7 0
 Wow, I didn't realized that Outside and Specialized were business partners... From the website "Zone 5 Ventures is an early-stage investor with Specialized as our sole limited partner." For those that don't know Zone 5 is the parent company of Outside.
  • 4 0
 @ratedgg13: me neither, super wack! You can see Outside is listed as the second company in their portfolio...I didn't love the Outside ownership thing, but being owned by big S is a whole other level of corporate shrill.
  • 4 0
 So the VC company behind Outside is actually a business partner of Specialized. Huh. Interesting to say the least.
  • 2 1
 @heartofagravelra Nice find. Big red flag for future specialized reviews. Love their bikes (currently riding a demo & enduro) but $ / partnership may influence how they are portrayed on pb.
  • 9 0
 I think there should be a competition to see who has the nastiest SWAT over time. I imagine they must get pretty gross with some melted chocolate, maybe some sticky granola residue, banana goo. Come on, let's see who's got the stinkiest swat!
  • 13 3
 Looks slick and $1,900 US is a pretty damn reasonable price for a frame these days! Good to see the big S releasing bikes like this to the market.
  • 3 0
 Very fair for an alloy frame. I just got a Spire alloy frame which was $2300, although it has a factory x2, which is a better shock, it doesn't have as many geo adjustments or the swat box. The transition scout is even $2100, with a better version of the same shock. You could do a great build for the price with this honestly.

I test rode a carbon evo though and it didn't ride as nice as the spire for me.
  • 9 1
 The Stumpjumper evo is is back on the table now as an option for me then.

And honestly, its the adjustment that does it. Almost like a test bike, where I can check to see if my preconceived theories about what I want from a bike are correct (HTA, chainstay length, BB, etc).
  • 21 15
 I've said this many times in the past, but will repeat it. I've owned the previous Evo Stumpy for an year, one of the most disappointing bike purchases ever. Wont comment on the insufficient anti-squat, over linear suspension or crazy low BB, as those are not necessarily intrinsically bad and there might even be a market for them. But, the build quality was abysmal, the thing was made of butter. It flexed like crazy, most if not all bearings were on the verge of exploding, it creaked from every single cubic inch of material and I went through 3 shock bolts during that period. Yes, it was absolutely gorgeous and was incredible on flow trails and corners
  • 4 0
 To clarify, you're referring to the previous ALLOY evo stumpy correct?
  • 5 3
 I did explode one... Absolutely loved how it rode, but it died real quick. Carbon stumpy evo only lasted one month. got a 2021 status alloy, broke the chainstay on the first trail ride. sold it, got a different bike and all the sudden frames stopped snapping. Gotta love specialized...
  • 10 4
 Don’t know why this is being downvoted. Stumpy Evos and Enduros are suffering from major QC problems. The Enduro WILL crack within a few months of use, right around the headset. Specialized has not addressed this and will make you work for the warranty. Their bikes still feel incredible but the QC problems are frustrating to say the least.
  • 6 1
 @gipsyjeff: My buddy (son of the owner of a Specialized dealership) has cracked three S-Works Enduro frames in about 18 months of ownership... Specialized makes great bikes, but their frames are very fragile.
  • 1 0
 By previous do you mean the old one? Before the geo adjust headset etc?
  • 5 0
 @ironxcross: I'm talking about the 2019 alloy Evo
  • 6 1
 @edamamedumplings: Yeah, who knows. It's not like I'm even expressing an opinion, only sharing my experience.
Specialized fanboys feeling their options questioned?
  • 1 0
 I love my evo, once you give up on a smooth ride and over spring/long shock it it's really good. Although the build level does leave something to be desired. Crack a chain stay and blew 2 shocks.
  • 3 0
 @4thflowkage: I feel you.

On the build quality side, jut to put things into perspective, I'm currently nearly 1,5 years into a V3 Bird AM9. Mostly the same trails, riding 2 or 3 times more frequently than the Evo, also riding harder. Zero creaks, bearings like new, everything perfect
  • 4 0
 @edamamedumplings:

The MTBR forums have an EVO thread, and there are plenty of people there who have indicated that the Carbon evo frame is simply too light/thin. I'd "hope" that the alloy version isn't a problem in that regard, but it still could be.
  • 13 2
 @edamamedumplings: this reminds me of when Kona had "major QC problems" like 20 years ago. People thought all the broken Konas they saw meant Konas sucked, but then what we realized was that when a brand is so big and sells so many bikes, the same failure rate as other brands will appear much worse since people only post about their failures. So you'll see 20 people with snapped Stumpys and only 1 person with a snapped Sentinel and think wow I'm going Transition... except in reality specialized probably sells 40x the amount of bikes (all #s totally made up) and so that actually means Transitions are twice as likely to be lemons. Again, all made up numbers and I love Transition and would buy one... just making an example.
  • 3 1
 @ironxcross: You're leaving out the type and ability of the majority of riders who make up all those sales though. If average middle-aged trail riders are breaking frames that's a real issue.
  • 5 0
 @ironxcross: true to a point.
First, I'm not sure if the '19 Evo was as mass produced as the more conventional Specialized models. But since I have no figures, I'll refrain from further comment.

Second and maybe of more relevance, it was not like I had a bad weld that cracked. I had issues all over the place, and this type of situation reveals more about the actual design than an isolated breakage.
Coming from a place of eyeballing, it seems to me like the Stumpy was designed more like a light trail bike and then came the Evo with it's harder intended use that kept the same basic brackets, forgings, bearings etc. I remember once having a MK1 Meta AM 29 next to my Evo and being amazed on how much thicker the Commencal was everywhere.
A good number of issues often reported on the Evo, like bearings, bolts, shocks dying or wearing might be traced to insufficient frame stiffness that place the components under awkward stress
  • 1 0
 @edamamedumplings: the molded in headcup will crack of you over torque your headcap assembly. Mine have been running fine no problems for almost two years. No reason to go any tighter than to remove the play. Your headset bearings will thank you too.
  • 1 0
 @edamamedumplings: yes right, had this issue. Simply but a bit grease on head set and was ok. It's coming from micro mouvement due to head cups.
Also had dead frame bearings like all bikes I ever had that's because of small bearings who ovalised. I only can suggest to put bearings apart to see the different failure and engineering fail.
  • 10 2
 Anyone know frame weight vs. carbon? Have not googled… I’m lazy today and hoping someone’s feeling generous.
  • 6 1
 I was quite disappointed this wasn't in the article...
  • 7 0
 if they don't mention it, its probably because they don't want it talked about....
  • 2 2
 According to Kaz's Evo carbon review, the Evo Alloy is about 4 lbs heavier for the same size.
  • 7 0
 @jrouellet: I think that has different components too. Typical weight difference is 2 pounds.
  • 2 0
 @lefthandohvhater: Yes you're right. Also the 34lbs mentionned is with tubes while it is not mentionned in the Evo Carbon review.
  • 2 4
 @jrouellet: woof 4lb penalty! that would indeed explain why they don't want it talked about... sad that reviews are just PR pieces dictated by the brands and not useful information.
  • 1 0
 @jrouellet: my 2020 carbon comp 27.5 S3 was 200 grams lighter than the alloy 29er S2

Very disappointed!
Hopefully this isn’t a tank, as I’d like to go back to alloy for the less stress!
  • 1 0
 @ironxcross: take that with a pinch of salt pal
  • 8 0
 Ordered the Expert Evo this time last year. Still haven't heard shit.
  • 6 2
 I have a Status and a 2021 EVO and I've enjoyed riding both the 2020 (alloy) and 2021 EVO (carbon) as well as the Status; I get that longer rear ends are trending but just wish there was an option for a 432-ish length stay.

At least for the mullet/MX configuration. I love riding the Status and the manuals for days but having two bikes that are similar is getting hard to justify. I know there are other plenty of other riders that still want playful bikes, where's that aftermarket jib-tune kit?
  • 3 1
 Word dude. I got a 160 status with a dual crown that’s a super fun shuttle bike cuz it’s so short.

I think the jib boiz should all go short travel beefy like the optic. That bike is sooooo much fun. I got mine overforked with a 40mm rise bar and it feels like a big dirt jumper.
  • 8 0
 Beauty lookin bicycle
  • 8 0
 Looks stumpy and jumpy!
  • 5 0
 I'm afraid to get a new bike and have to decide between 498mm and 528mm reach. I'm tall but my goodness that's lengthy
  • 5 2
 Remember you can mess around with stem length. Go short and get a longer stem if you feel you need it. I’m 6’3” and the S4 status at a 490 reach with a 50mm stem feels comfy.
  • 6 1
 @zmums: This. After years of being obsessed with big frames/short stems, now that the frame industry has gone so crazy on long and slack I've found myself opting for smaller frames with longer stems to balance things out. For the typical trail rider it's a pretty huge benefit to get yourself out over your front wheel a little.
  • 2 0
 Im 6'3" on a S4 Enduro, feels great. Tried the S5, seemed too big.
  • 2 0
 @rockyflowtbay: 6’3.5” on S5 Enduro with 50mm stem, wish it was longer.
  • 1 1
 @zmums: That isn't really a good way to think about stem length. As far as climbing comfort (effective top tube lenght) most people are good 25mm at least each way. For descending and weight balance you often actually need a longer stem on a longer bike to get more weight on the front wheel.
  • 3 0
 @DHhack: Ya, it's interesting. Everyone has such different preferences when it comes to this. And no ones wrong. Id say go try out both.
  • 1 0
 @lefthandohvhater:

That’s all true, but all the more reason to go shorter reach and longer stem. Obviously stack matters too, but you can deal with some of that via rise and spacers. I’m just saying if you have a 530 reach the shortest you can go stemwise is a 35mm. If you start with a 500 you can pretty much get the same effect with a 50mm stem. But you are right, there are other effects.
  • 2 0
 @zmums: Ah yeah sorry I misread your comment a little. I totally get it and that is actually what I do!
  • 2 0
 Bar height is an effective way to improve your position without resorting to longer stems.
  • 3 0
 @lefthandohvhater:

Word up g! Look at all this love in the comment section.
  • 1 0
 @rockyflowtbay: for sure. I’ve got long arms and torso with shorter legs so I’m definitely a fan of the longer front end and short seatpost.
  • 2 0
 @rockyflowtbay: I'm 6'6" on an S4 Enduro, used to have S5 and don't ever think about that 5 one bit
  • 1 0
 I had a 2021 S6 Stumpjumper and at 6'5" and long legs it was pretty much un-ridable, ridiculously long. I sold it after 2 weeks. I'm looking to get an S4 now and run a 50mm stem as prefer the handling that way. I've been saying for a while reach on bike is getting too long now!
  • 8 5
 I'm still rocking my 2012 carbon stump jumper with 150mm either end, 26'' wheels, it's doing just fine passing all sorts of high end latest this and that shit on the trails...
  • 4 2
 We just bought a Stumpjumper Alloy base model for my son and I have been riding it while my shock is blown. It is an amazing bike for $2,500. The fork is the only thing that needs upgraded out of the box. I am very tempted to order a frame and swap the parts from my Hightower over onto one of these. The added weight of an alloy frame means nothing to me and not having to worry about carbon in the back of a truck bed shuttle is worth ever ounce.
  • 2 0
 I bought the original alloy evo when it came out (think it was '19/'20 season, can't quite remember) for $3200 USD. Same spec, slightly older geo, etc etc. The bike was great for the most part, other than two specific things: 1. the rear suspension couldn't cash the checks the overall geometry would write you (which seems to have been sorted on this model) and 2. the NX drivetrain is just BAD. Mine in particular exploded after 20 or so hours of use (could've been a one-off, but it was problematic from minute 1 on that bike).

IMO, the right move would be to put a reliable 10 or 11 speed drivetrain on this bike that will last a long time and won't weigh a ton. There are options.
  • 2 0
 Any one catch the fact that the wheels failed during normal riding condions? Those Roval hub shells are made out of butter. I shredded two in 7 months of riding. Specialized gave me some new wheels because they were under warranty, but once the bike isn't warrantied your looking at spending some cash on a new rear hub/wheel. Do your self a favor, budget $500 extra with the price and swap that garbage out day one. Your $4,000 equipment wont be out of action for a month and leave you stranded on the trail.
  • 1 0
 I love that they added the swat box to the alloy frame! I have a 2020 27.5 Alloy Comp and I've always envied the swat box on the carbon framed versions. Also that weight is rather curious, as my 2020 in very similar spec is only 32lbs
  • 7 2
 Id rather spend 5999 and get a transition carbon frame gx build.
  • 5 2
 5k for a 35lb trail bike. What is the world coming too? That used to buy you the one down from the sworks 5 years ago and was 7lb lighter
  • 7 5
 1. that was 5 years ago 2. This bike will do things the one 5 years ago couldnt dream of doing. Weight barely matters if the bike rides properly.
  • 7 3
 @zyoungson: weight always matters that’s why every form of cycling tries to get rid of it. Minnar was even weighing the paint on his worlds bike
  • 5 0
 Do you want a lunchbox or not?
  • 3 0
 Doesn't seem like that great of a value to me. My bike was $3400 with Lyrik Ulitmate, Super Deluxe Ultimate Coil, XT drivetrain and brakes.
  • 6 5
 Surprised no one has mentioned how ugly this bike is (as are all Specialized with the same frame design). That single sided support that joins the top and seat tubes is a hideous piece of design.

I know that looks are bit that important for bikes, but this one is bad enough to make me not want it.

JP
  • 1 0
 I bought a ‘19 alloy evo and would highly recommend the Comp model for anyone on a budget to get themselves into a very capable trail bike. Since then I’ve upgraded almost all the components as they’ve worn out and still love the bike. The NX drivetrain unfortunately will give up first, but the best value upgrade has been a Smashpot coil conversion for the Rhythm fork.
  • 1 0
 How did bikes get this heavy? 15.4kgs?
They claim the Levo SL is only 17 ish?
They keep claiming frames are getting lighter, but overall weights are up a good two kilos in the last few years. 29 er tyres and wheels don't help, but these things seem like tanks now.
  • 3 0
 You want value look at Vitus. Why are Specialized as one of the largest bike manufacturers not able to produce good value bikes.
  • 3 0
 They’ve worked long and hard to create brand value. Look at the comment section, people responding positively to the value proposition of this bike. Even talking about frame only for $2k being good value. That’s getting to transition, banshee, sort of money. It genuinely boggles the mind. Brands like vitus, canyon (of which three are in my family), and commencal wipe the floor with specialised. Even norco, trek, Scott, gt are much better value in comparison. We just need Giant to drop a new line of bikes.
  • 2 0
 I just looked up the price of this in Australia. It costs the same as my gf’s canyon spectral did. The spectral has 36 performance elite fork and dpx2, full XT build kit, dt xm1700 wheels, and a carbon frame.
  • 2 0
 @Afterschoolsports: SW Stumpjumper FS is $3,000 and Trek Top Fuel FS is $3,700. Specialized is far from cheap but they are still more realistically priced than Trek....
  • 6 2
 This is a bike worth paying retail for.
  • 5 1
 They really didn't screw this up.
  • 6 3
 Fucking ugly!! ..how the ugly and irritating strud is attached to the top tube. Its owful!
  • 1 0
 Ok, might be my next bike. The top level build looks great, cheaper than my enduro expert was, all I would upgrade are the brakes and wheels, which I already have. Love this.
  • 5 1
 What the fk is a cubic inch?
  • 4 0
 about 31.5 grains of corn
  • 2 2
 for the bike park it seems quite good but for the self shuttling... why the hell the seat tube not only that short but also broken in half... what is the max insert length for the dropper post? it is literally doesn't' exist, the long dropper one will be out of the seat tube for a ft.. again - it is quite good for the bike park..ah, wait, why do you need 150mm travel bike for the bike park?
  • 2 0
 $5600 usd is roughly $6985 Canadian at this time. Specialized lists this bike at $7300 Canadian. What the excuse for the extra $315 charge is this time
  • 2 0
 Pretty cool that they are making an alloy bike with a high end build. Nice that companies are listening to that market of riders.
  • 4 0
 Finally, drug dealers can buy an alloy Specialized.
  • 1 0
 I rented the carbon version last weekend. It's very linear, and im afraid that if i weighed much more than 250 lbs, i couldnt get enough air in the shock to get my proper sag.
  • 3 0
 interesting but EVO angles are totally not Grim
  • 2 0
 I'm wondering if this is what Super Bruni crushed those poor willing participants with at RB Campo.
  • 4 1
 I found my older EVO to be much too linear in the back.
  • 3 1
 that cable routing near the rear wheel is not the smartest idea, mud, stones, sand. I would stuff that thing with moto foam.
  • 1 0
 I've ridden mine (2020 with the same routing) 1000+ miles without issue. Any mud or dirt that gets in there is rinsed out pretty easily.
  • 1 0
 Agreed! Given how much mud and muck gets clogged there on with most other bikes that have a similar shelf you can tell the designers live and ride in California...
  • 4 1
 $1900 for frame only... Hermmmm
  • 1 0
 Props to Specialized for offering geo adjustments in the ally version and not just reserving that for the carbon. Hopefully they do an alloy enduro in the future as well.
  • 2 0
 Well seeing that the 3800 model has shit components..slash 8 blows this thing away
  • 4 5
 The problem with getting Specialized is that you get house brand everything for the components, which have no resale value. Also there is the issue of supporting a litigation happy company that puts the boot on the neck of the little guy. I just can't drum up the excitement for them.
  • 2 1
 Cutting edge wanna-be for the new school big brand pretenders. No thanks, I'll stick with bikes that actually offer, well... a better bike. Thank you Pole and Nicholai!
  • 4 2
 Golf clap, Specialized. Golf clap.
  • 4 2
 That frame routing looks annoying
  • 2 1
 Specialized just swatboxxed anyone previously worried about drilling a hole in their frame for internal dropper posts.
  • 10 7
 3800 is affordable?
  • 3 0
 Yeah, on DentistLand is pretty cheap! I don't live there though! #depressed
  • 2 1
 Yessss! I love not worrying about carbon damage potential. I want this to replace my 2020 carbon evo.
  • 3 2
 Here on pinkbike, the frameset price is $1900. On the specialises website lists the alloy framsest for $3100
  • 2 0
 It's $600cad more than the conversion price from usd should be as well. Their full builds do not suffer as much of a markup in price though. $400 extra for the comp alloy build.
  • 1 0
 It takes a lot to get me excited about a full squish, but I'm excited for this one.
  • 2 0
 3k€ frame only in europe
  • 2 0
 I'd do the S2 in full 27.5.
  • 2 0
 doesnt look as cool as the last Evo by far and cant put my finger on why
  • 2 0
 SRAM NX on a 3800 $ bike. Was that a typo?
  • 1 1
 Not sure I wanna buy another Specialized. I have a SL7 that I can ride because of sub standard engineering and design by Specialized.
  • 2 0
 affordability? the price in italy is € 6000,00 ah ah ah ah
  • 1 0
 what i dont´t understand is why bikes of this price range don´t have downtube protection....
  • 3 1
 bad ass
  • 3 1
 Looks sick.
  • 2 1
 What does the MX link cost?
  • 2 2
 Found it - $79
  • 2 2
 $60
  • 2 1
 gloss rasberry and satin aluminum / gunmetal..?

hahahahahahh
  • 2 0
 two tone malone
  • 1 0
 SL7GHTLY risky with those rear brake lines. YOLO!
  • 1 0
 This is what the people asked for
  • 3 1
 Sweet orbea!
  • 3 3
 BIG News! Specialized finds carbon is bad for the planet.
Next day: Specialized drops an new aluminum bike!
  • 1 0
 Specialized please bring the frame only option to the UK
  • 1 0
 Love the reach to seattube ratio but hate the NX parts to price ratio
  • 1 1
 My least favorite feature of my ‘19 Sj is swatbox. The box itself and what’s inside inevitability rattles.
  • 1 0
 I was always a Spezi fanboi but ,man, that thing is fugly!
  • 1 0
 BUT WHEN CAN I BUY THE FRAME!!!!
  • 1 1
 member 2 years ago when the carbon elite enduro was £4250.
  • 2 4
 That stupid Mullet link will go straight into the bin. Along with that infuriating abbreviation..... MX! That can f*ck right off!
  • 7 0
 You have to pay extra for the mullet link, but I'd like to think you'd buy one just so you could throw it away.
  • 2 2
 @chakaping: I would actually do that. Immense satisfaction.
  • 4 0
 @MattP76: Do it! You wouldn't even need to buy the bike.
  • 2 1
 @chakaping: I may just do that and post a video.
  • 1 1
 But I already bought the carbon comp model...Wink
  • 1 0
 N +1 Smile
  • 2 1
 why no 27.5?
  • 2 1
 It looks terrible.
  • 1 0
 niiicccccceeeeeeeeeeeeee
  • 8 9
 That is the sickest color name! “Gunmetal”
  • 14 10
 It's for all those crazy gun-lovin-trigger-happy Americans! Wait until Spech comes out with a "Rifle Blue" color version. Big Grin So, who wants to ride shotgun?
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: haha of course this is coming from a Canadian(correct me if I'm wrong. Don't worry I am not offended, nor should I be. This was actually a really funny comment!
  • 5 4
 @CSharp: yould be speaking german if it wasnt fror crazy americans, fruity pants
  • 2 2
 Ewww gross FSR
  • 7 7
 What an ugly bike...
  • 1 2
 Specialized excels at making ugly bikes! but they ride well.
  • 2 4
 Very beautiful bike. Damn, spec just makes the nicest bikes right now.
  • 3 3
 ??? The Stumpjumper and the Mojo are universally considered the ugliest bikes made!
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: tzz some people think the mojo looking good. so it comes down to individual taste. i like the stumpy
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: Don't leave Evil out of this please.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: i think the pole grasshopper wins ugliest bike this year
  • 1 0
 @Korbi777: By a landslide Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: Universally? The Martian votes have not been counted yet.
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