Review: Pole's 190mm-Travel Voima is Long, Slack & High

Nov 23, 2022 at 9:51
by Seb Stott  


Pole (pronounced po-lay) couldn't be accused of following the crowd. Their Finnish fonder, Leo Kokkonen, has ruffled a few feathers in the industry and the Pinkbike comments section alike. But as a bike nerd, brands who do things differently always attract my interest because sometimes their unconventional ideas end up sticking.

Pole, along with Mojo/Geometron, pioneered the trend towards slack head angles, a long reach and super steep seat angles. Now the geometry they innovated has become mainstream: a modern Canyon Strive, Transition Spire or Stumpjumper EVO's geometry numbers are remarkably similar to Pole's early bikes. So what are they up to now?
Pole Voima Details
• Wheel size: 29''
• Suspension travel: 190 mm travel F&R
• Bosch CX motor, 750 Wh battery
• 63° head angle, 80° seat angle
• Sizes: K1-K4, Reach: 450, 480, 510 (tested), 535 mm
• Weight: 26 Kg / 57.3 lb (K3), actual
• 5-year frame warranty
• Price as tested: 7502.42 €, excluding VAT
polebicycles.com

The Voima is Pole's first eMTB. They have a non-motorised version in the pipeline with similar traits, but in either case, it's hard to know where to start when it comes to unusual design decisions. There's the machined and glued frame construction, the super long geometry (even by today's standards), the very high bottom bracket height and the fact it's pumping out a whopping 190 mm of travel. All of that makes for a unique ride experience. Let's get into it.



bigquotesTrails that are fast and rough, filled with rocks, holes and drops are where the Voima makes perfect sense. To say it rides like a downhill bike would be underselling it. The extra chassis weight adds stability and suspension sensitivity few of them can match. Seb Stott





Frame Details


Pole have been building bikes out of machined aluminum for a few years now, but the process has evolved over that time.

They use 7075 aluminum alloy, which is considerably stronger and stiffer than the alloys typically used in bicycle manufacturing. The main reason it's not used more widely is that it can't easily be welded. Pole's approach is to start with solid billets of alloy and use CNC machines to carve out the two halves of the frame, then bond them together down the centerline with very strong glue. This allows them to make use of the superior strength-to-weight ratio of 7075 without the need for any welding. Perhaps more importantly, it allows them to rapidly prototype new designs by changing the computer code the CNC machine is fed.

Pole admit there were problems with their earlier machine-made bikes, but they say they've refined their manufacturing method since then. "Yes, we had issues with our technology when we started, but we’ve learned a lot. The bike you can buy now has meticulously evolved and has nearly nothing similar to the bikes we made several years ago. We are so confident in our manufacturing that we give our frames a five-year guarantee."

You can't tell the frame is made in two halves.

As one example of this incremental improvement, earlier machined frames were simply machined in two halves and then glued together. This could lead to a slight misalignment of the two halves creating a visible seam (and potential weakness) down the centerline. Now the billets are machined internally first (creating a cavity), then glued together, and then machined externally so there's no chance of creating a visible step between the two halves.

At the same time, Pole have cut down on production steps to help them manufacture more bikes with shorter lead times. Pole's machined frames are still all made in-house in Finland, a country with one of the highest working and environmental standards in the world.

The sideways shock means there's room for two full-size water bottles. I never felt the shock hitting the inside of my leg while riding.
The integrated seat clamp works well.
There's masses of tire clearance, partly because Pole aren't interested in short chainstays.
Bolt-on upper guide.

The Voima frame passes the EFBE Catagory-5 Tri-Test Certification, which is one of the most rigorous and well-recognised strength test procedures in the bike industry - after Pinkbike's Huck To Flat Test, that is.

The standard axles (right) and race axles (left)

On the back of the bike, the elevated swingarm is made up of two separate arms: there's nothing connecting the two parts together but the four hollow machined links that connect them to the mainframe. These links are tied together with keyed axles that pass through the mainframe, meaning they can't rotate independently. There are two options for these (pictured above): the standard and race axles. Pole say they developed the race version following feedback from their EWS-E race team that the back end was too flexy. I was only able to test the stiffer race axles and, without any scientific measuring equipment, I would say there is more twist in the back end than most bikes. Nevertheless, Pole say the standard axles offer a more compliant and forgiving ride which will be better for many riders, but I can't help suspecting this is more of a mid-production fix than a personal-preference tuning option.

Finally, the colour is provided by a process called Electrophoretic Clearcoat. This creates a hard-wearing surface treatment that's just a few microns thick. Every part of the frame including threads and bearing seats are coated. The process is all done in-house and, Pole say, involves no toxic byproducts like painting does. The colours available are clear/raw, storm grey (pictured) and gold. If you want the opinion of a man who doesn't see a problem with socks and sandals, having seen them all in the flesh I think the raw finish looks best.

On top of this is a custom clear plastic wrap to protect the clearcoat. This is made in Finland and apparently takes an hour to apply with a heat gun.




Suspension Design


Pole's new Sensei suspension linkage has two short links which rotate in the same direction. This gives them an Instant Center (the effective or "virtual" pivot at the point where lines drawn through the four pivots would intersect) near the top of the chainring, a location where you can't build a physical pivot with a motor.


This gives them anti-squat levels of around 100% in all gears at sag. In theory, that should promote efficient pedalling behaviour in all situations. Meanwhile, the leverage ratio (mechanical advantage) with which the rear wheel drives the shock drops from 3.04 to 2.28 throughout the travel in a smooth curve. That gives an overall progression of 25%, making it quite progressive, but nothing unusual.

In short, while the linkage looks quirky, the important numbers are on the money.
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Geometry & Sizing


At 191 cm (6'3"), I Pole sent me the K3 size. Although Pole's website says I could ride the K4, I was more interested to try the K2, which I managed to get hold of towards the end of testing, and which I actually preferred to the K3. Wheelbase seems to be the most important single number to me, and looking at all the bikes I've tested I tend to get on best with something around the 1,310 mm ballpark. Having said that, the K3 certainly wasn't too big in terms of cockpit proportions and I was able to ride it happily enough, but I preferred the agility of the K2.

Pole has long been at the vanguard of the trend towards longer reach, slacker head tubes and steeper seat tubes. But the most eyebrow-raising figure for me is the bottom bracket drop: 0 mm. That means the BB is in line with the axles (with the suspension unweighted), which corresponds to around a 370 mm bottom bracket height. This is perhaps 20 mm higher than average for an eMTB with 160 mm of travel. The Voima's 190 mm of suspension travel accounts for some of this difference. With 30% sag, the Voima will sit 9 mm further into its travel than a 160 mm travel bike would, so we're talking about 11 mm higher than a typical eMTB at sag.




Specifications


Specifications
Release Date 2022
Price $7597
Travel 190 mm
Rear Shock Rock Shox Super Deluxe Ultimate
Fork RockShox Zeb Ultimate 2023, 190mm
Headset Cane Creek
Cassette SRAM GX Eagle, 10-52T
Crankarms Miranda Kappa
Chainguide AbsoluteBlack Guide & Bashguard
Bottom Bracket Bosch Performance Line CX 750Wh
Pedals N/A
Rear Derailleur SRAM XO1 Eagle
Chain SRAM XO1 Eagle
Front Derailleur N/A
Shifter Pods SRAM XO1 Eagle
Handlebar Truvativ Descendant DH Carbon
Stem Truvativ Descendant, 40 mm
Grips Race Face Palmade
Brakes SRAM Code RSC, 220/200mm rotors
Wheelset Mavic E-Deemax 30
Hubs Mavic E-Deemax 30
Spokes Mavic E-Deemax 30
Rim Mavic E-Deemax 30
Tires Maxxis Assegai 2.5”,MaxxGrip,DD
Seat SDG
Seatpost SDG Tellis, 165 mm



Components are customisable when ordering through Pole's website, and due to the nature of supply chains these days, some of the parts available may change, so I'll not dwell on the details.

The Voima's key component is surely the 190 mm RockShox Zeb fork, allowing Pole to offer more travel at both ends than almost any other bike designed to go uphill without a chairlift.

Bosch supplies the power with a 750 Wh battery.






Test Bike Setup

The long travel makes for a wide range of setup options. You could run 35% sag and still not hit the bottom too much, or run 25% sag and still have loads of grip. After talking to Pole and experimenting myself, I ended up with around 27% sag. My bike came with the 2022 RockShox SuperDeluxe air shock, while future bikes will get the 2023 version, but for what it's worth I was fully open on rebound and compression.

I did have the 2023 Zeb fork, which is very progressive thanks to the increased negative volume and reduced positive volume. That makes it very hard to use anywhere near all the travel even with 0 spacers and a relatively soft setup (around 68 psi). I also found the rebound too slow even when fully open. I called in a Carbon Air insert to make the Zeb more linear and upped the pressure to 72 psi. This allowed me to use more of the travel on big hits while sitting a little higher in the travel, which better matched the feel from the rear. Compression settings varied but generally in the middle/neutral position on both adjusters.


Seb Stott
Location: Tweed Valley, Scotland
Age: 30
Height: 6'3" / 191cm
Inseam: 37" / 93cm
Weight: 189 lbs / 86 kg, kitted

I set the bar height high to compensate for the high BB height and make it easier to shift my weight back on the bike. I swapped the stock grips for my preferred ODI Elite Pro control grips.




Climbing

This is the best climbing eMTB I've tested.

I've said before that you can get away with a slacker seat angle on an e-bike, but I wasn't appreciating the climbing performance I was missing out on when a steep seat tube and long chainstay are combined with a powerful motor and sticky rear tire.

With most e-bikes, on a steep slope it feels like the bike "wants" to wheelie, so you have to hunch forwards to keep the front wheel on the ground; on the Voima, you can make it wheelie by shifting your weight back, but a relaxed, neutral position maintains enough weight on the front to steer and balance. Combine this with supple rear suspension that irons out the bumps and a high bottom bracket that allows you to keep pedalling uninterrupted, and the Voima regularly surprised me with what I could climb. It's almost comical what you can scramble up by just sitting and spinning. That's a good thing too, as pushing this thing isn't fun.


On flat and slippy sections there can be too little grip on the back wheel, so you have to consciously lean back, but I'd accept that compromise for the steep climbing prowess.

There's very little bob from the rear suspension even with the motor off (yes, it is possible to ride un-assisted - slowly) and it doesn't collapse into its travel when things get steep, but the suspension remains smooth when pedalling over bumps.




Descending


First time out on the Voima, you're very aware you're on a 26 kg bike with a considerable wheelbase. Threading it through tight trees or picking up the wheels to negotiate off-camber roots and crux moves requires recalibrating the timing and amplitude of every body movement. Running the fork firmer helped, but I'd have liked a faster rebound setting to get more energy back when preloading the ground before lofting the front wheel. Dropping the saddle lower in the frame than the 165 mm dropper allowed helped too, but there's no getting around the fact this bike isn't for jibbing. I can just get it to the balance point of a manual, but it takes accurate timing and more effort. Bunnyhopping is also possible, but hard work and height-limited. I consider myself pretty good at bunnyhops, but anything much higher than a kerb is beyond me. If your local trails involve regularly hopping fallen trees you may want to pack your hernia belt and incontinence pads.


But with practice, you can hustle it through the tight and technical stuff. It just takes more effort and forethought. Besides, these awkward trials-like moves aren't where the Voima was meant to excel. Get it on something fast, rough and open and the speed it can carry is sure to put a grin on your face. The suspension isn't just soft and wallowy; it's surprisingly well-controlled. The touchdown feel at the rear is super supple and forgiving but there's enough progression to prevent any trapdoor feeling when pushing into a compression.

I never bottomed out but always had a smooth and bump-swallowing feel. An impact that might cause a typical 160 mm bike to bottom out hard could still leave the shock O-ring a few millimetres away from the end of the shaft, goading you to go deeper next time. And while shorter travel bikes can be made to resist bottom-outs with volume spacers, this creates a kicking sensation as the ramp of spring force happens abruptly; the Voima's suspension feels continuous and predictable. Combine this with the stable geometry and the Voima encourages you to let it run and go fast. There's loads of grip on offer and the bike is so forgiving of mistakes you feel you can get away with murder.

Trails that are fast and rough, filled with rocks, holes and drops are where the Voima makes perfect sense. To say it rides like a downhill bike would be underselling it. The extra chassis weight adds stability and suspension sensitivity few of them can match. On trails like these, I was looking further ahead, riding faster, and most notably, had much less fatigue than usual.


Cornering is a double-edged sword. The high bottom bracket and long wheelbase slow the handling, which takes some getting used to. I was running wide in the corners to start with. But after a few rides, you can get used to this different timing, especially if you know the trail. Even chicanes requiring quick changes of direction can be handled at speed if you look ahead and anticipate them. But for blind riding where a corner can come out of nowhere, it can feel a little lethargic and demands an assertive approach.

For flat corners, I grew to trust the immense grip and lean the bike over hard. Leo recommends riding with feet level, which I think is good advice on any bike where you can get away with it because it allows you to push into the ground with both feet and generate traction; the Voima's high bottom bracket just means you can do this more often without catching the inside pedal on the side of the rut. During steep switchback turns that go from traversing the fall line in one direction to the other with a steep slope in between, I found the high bottom bracket made the bike feel tall - I was very aware of my feet being above the front axle.

But with practice, I learned to simply lower my body further towards the bike when cornering (another reason for a longer-travel seatpost). A slight bend in the knees compensates for the higher-than-average BB height. Besides, there were plenty of times when riding through stumps, ruts and rocks, where not having to worry about clipping my feet was a genuine relief. Running more sag would lower the ride height too, but I found the suspension too soft and unresponsive when set like this.

Overall, it's hard to say whether the high BB is a good thing or a bad thing - there are pros and cons. I'd like to try a Voima with 20 mm lower bottom bracket just to see. But for now, I think of the high ground clearance a bit like running narrow bars if you live somewhere with tight trees (as I do) - the handling certainly takes getting used to, but the extra clearance makes it easier to ride fast if clipping bars/pedals is a concern.

Dropping some weight would be nice too, but the Voima isn't especially heavy compared to some other big-battery e-bikes (Whyte's E-160 is heavier despite having less travel). As for the Voima's main USP: the 190 mm suspension travel? I'm all for it. It makes it easier to ride challenging features uphill and downhill.


What about a smaller frame size?

Having finished testing the Voima in size K3, I asked Pole to send me a K2 to try out. That's the size Pole's podium-finishing EWS-E racer, Leigh Johnson, rides and he's about my height.

On their website, Pole recommends the K2 to riders up to a maximum height of 185 cm; I'm 190 cm tall, but I wanted to see if the shorter front center would improve the nimbleness. Unfortunately, the K2's super short seat tube (360 mm) wasn't long enough to get my saddle to the proper height, even after I'd swapped the seatpost to a 212 mm travel Vecnum dropper - the longest one I had. But thanks to the motor, I could put up with the saddle being around 30 mm too low. I think only the 240 mm travel OneUp V2 post would be long enough to make the K2 work for me, and even that would be on the limit. That's why I'm putting my thoughts on the K2 separately from the rest of the review: I'm not 100% sure if I can actually get the saddle high enough to make it fit me!

Straight away, it was apparent that it was much easier to get the front wheel off the ground. Sure, you can still tell it's a heavy bike, but for me, it was not too hard to get to the balance point and hop over kerb-sized obstacles or manual through puddles. I was happy doing big jumps on the K3 but getting height on small, abrupt jump faces was tricky. With the K2, it was much easier to generate pop and height when needed. I also noticed I had more grip on the front wheel in flat corners and it was easier to make tight turns and quick direction changes. The bike still feels weighty when changing direction quickly, especially when moving the bike from side to side relative to your body, but overall it's surprisingly easy to sling it through the corners. In fact, with the grip the suspension and tires generate combined with the relatively balanced weight distribution, the K2 Voima allows you to really lean it into corners and carry speed through. After a few laps, I was riding the corners on my familiar test tracks with as much speed and confidence as I have done on any bike.

Downsides? We're still talking about a bike with a 63-degree head angle and a 1,313 mm wheelbase so it's not like the K2 ever feels unstable or prone to "tripping up" when braking hard through bumps, although I was still aware of the high BB height on tight, steep turns.

When sizing down, the handlebars feel close to your lap while seated, but I didn't mind this. You could always slide the saddle backwards on the rails (which would effectively move the seat angle towards 79 degrees) or run a slightly longer stem if this bothers you, but I felt no need.

Pole Voima
03.06.21. Pinkbike BikePark Wales Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography andylloyder
Nukeproof Megawatt

How Does it Compare?

I really liked the Megawatt when I tested it last year. It's got less travel, a smaller back wheel and a smaller battery too. That makes it 1.6 kg lighter, but the main difference you'll notice is the shorter wheelbase and chainstays and the lower BB, which make it much easier to throw around on the trail.

The Pole is more surefooted, both uphill and down. The extra suspension travel makes for a suppler ride that feels more confidence-inspiring and smoother at speed. I can't do a direct comparison because it's been a year since I last rode the Nukeproof, but I think the Pole is easier to ride fast, especially on very rough tracks, and easier to get up steep and technical climbs too. The Nukeproof is more balanced, easier to adapt to and definitely more agile. For the 99% of us who never intend to race an eMTB, those are some big advantages.



2023 RockShox Zeb
Bosch Performance Line CX motor

Technical Report


2023 RockShox Zeb: There is a review in the pipeline on this fork but for now I'd say it can work very well, but I've had one or two that benefitted from fresh oil in the legs from the factory. Without this, they can feel harsh and overdamped. The 190 mm version was simply too progressive (sat too low in its travel or couldn't use much travel) for my tastes until I fitted a suspension insert most people haven't heard of. At 170 mm travel, it can be very good. As good as a Fox 38? We'll see.

Bosch Performance Line CX motor: The standard Bosch motor is powerful and predictable. The pickup is quick and eager but it's easy to control the power on slippy sections with practice. The 750 Wh battery lasts a very long time if you want it to - I managed a 1,500 m x 50 km ride using a mix of modes, but in full turbo mode, you can burn through it in a couple of hours.





Pros

+ Category-leading climbing performance.
+ Supple and stable, fast and forgiving on rough descents.
+ High ground clearance reduces pedal strikes when climbing and descending
+ Great grip and cornering confidence once you get used to it, especially when sizing down

Cons

- High BB feels odd at first, especially on steep switchbacks
- High weight and long chainstays make getting off the ground tricky
- Awkward crux moves and technical manoeuvres can be tough
- Super short seat tube makes sizing down difficult




bigquotesThe Voima is not for everyone. The best way to summarise is that it rides even more like an e-bike than other e-bikes. It's even more capable uphill and even more stable and surefooted on the fast and rough descents where heavy e-bikes already excel. By the same token, it's even harder to hop and manual or negotiate tricky crux moves than shorter, lower and lighter alternatives. I'm fully on board with the 190 mm of travel - it boosts suppleness and grip when climbing and descending, but the high bottom bracket, high weight and long wheelbase make it tough to maneuver and pick up off the ground. But if you can find a seatpost long enough, sizing down makes it much easier to loft the front wheel and negotiate tight turns - in fact, I really liked how the K2 Voima corners. If you want a bike to scramble up the steepest climbs and bomb down the roughest descents, this is it. Seb Stott






379 Comments

  • 635 17
 I know the frame looks ugly in pictures, but I saw one in real life this summer and it was also ugly.
  • 53 5
 It makes me feel uncomfortable.
  • 31 7
 Shouldn't have called it Vomit, but Night Rider, cause you only want to ride this bike in the dark.
  • 3 0
 damn
  • 49 4
 A bike only a mother could love.
  • 14 1
 Personally I’m starting to grow to it, as I’m realizing that it has sort of a Giger-esque thing going on. If there was ever a bike from the movie “Alien”, this is it.
  • 40 7
 “Pole's 190mm-Travel Voima is Long, Slack & High.”

And ugly. They forgot ugly.
  • 17 4
 This makes the Orange Phase 29 look like a pageant winner!
  • 8 3
 Me too, I saw two golden dildos like these last summer in the Alps and... yeah... hum... why not :-/
  • 6 2
 I will wait for the ikea version , will have less round edges
  • 5 2
 Looks good in the vid, but I may be high.
  • 7 3
 Correct. It looks like a kicked-in biscuit tin.
  • 81 4
 I own this bike. Lot’s of people will stop me on the trail to talk about it. It looks different and people are interested to learn more. I think for value, especially in the US (no tax/ VAT) it’s a killer deal for what you get. As for how it rides? Way better then I expected. Big, burly and fast with enough suspension for just about anything. I’ve ridden and owned a lot of Ebikes and this wins my best vote at #1. As for Pole they have been awesome. They booted the past CEO, Leo has taken full control, even though they nearly died during Covid. He said that a few times. But they had their own machine shop and kept grinding and worked on this bike. I appreciate that as a business owner myself. The best things about Pole is they don’t care what everyone else is doing… They build bikes that THEY think are fun and in return I believe they nailed a really great ebike.
  • 14 0
 @allredbikes: Thanks for the input, I just ordered one a couple weeks ago - you're right it's a superb value for a high end build.
  • 10 0
 @allredbikes: yeah to be fair it has gotten really good reviews and I enjoyed Levy's recent podcast with Leo.

I'm in between sizes and I'd give it a bit more time on the market to be sure the frame holds together this time, but it definitely is on the list for bikes to consider buying.
  • 7 1
 holy boomerang batmon.
  • 5 1
 PB needs a filter for this saddle angle. I know it has become prevalent, but it is uncool.
  • 6 1
 Definitely a bike that looks better in reality than in pictures especially if you prefer machined alu rather than plastic. It wouldn't take much to make is look a lot better, ditch the oval shape swingarm for something more angular, align swingarm angle and top tube angle, have a longer seat tube (as per Seb recommencantion) with a nice bracket. Small details but it would help it find its market.
  • 2 15
flag thewanderingtramp (Dec 6, 2022 at 4:30) (Below Threshold)
 NO really if it was to be pronounced POLAY it would be spelled POLAY ! As it stands its spelled POLE just like telegraph POLE .....ENGLISH
  • 8 1
 @allredbikes: my buddy has a V2. I’m 5’10”and it felt right to me. I expected it to be a sled, but it handled really well in the tight trees and it has insane traction in flat corners. Fast and rough is amazing. I have a wild and my son has a rail. This is better than both of them. I’m a lifelong motocross racer. This is a dirt bike riders e bike. It’s big and heavy, super stable, but still maneuverable. The weight of e bikes has never bothered me though. I think the weight helps the suspension work better, and the bike is more predictable at high speed and big jumps. This one more so than other e bikes I’ve ridden. I do like riding my DJ and my other bikes and light bikes as well…. This bike looks cool in person. The machining looks great and it’s well done. I’m honestly surprised it’s not $5k more. I’d buy one.
  • 3 8
flag honourablegeorge (Dec 6, 2022 at 5:06) (Below Threshold)
 @Mugen: Well. if there are any issues, you have Poles legendarily bad customer service to back you up. Add in the extra unreliability of an EBike motor on top.... well, I wish you good luck, put it that way.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: I want my pole long and high, but not slack.
  • 3 2
 @txcx166: its a fun bike for sure and considering the price it’s even better. I’ve ridden several of the other brands motors and I really like the Bosch. Leo and his team have done well making a fun bike and increasing customer service too. IMO a company that re-corrects an issue and is out there everyday to prove it wins my vote. Hope they keep it up.
  • 8 5
 For what it’s worth, Sm/Md (K1/K2 size) bikes looks a lot less Ugly than K3/K4. The top tube and Seat stay on the smaller frames are parallel and this gives it more symmetry and looks heaps better (aka less ugly).

But hey, PB readers here all like Cookie Cutter bikes made in China/Taiwan that look like a Session so this bike is totally unacceptable!!!!
  • 1 0
 @ashlemon: How long did they say it will take to get the bike ?
  • 2 0
 @og-squid-mtb: a few weeks ago, their website use to say 2 weeks to build. I’ve been waiting over 3 weeks now.
  • 2 0
 @og-squid-mtb: Didn't ask. It says still in transit - I'm not in a hurry or I would have paid for DHL. I got the battery within days.
  • 3 0
 @jonwhite5: My K1 shipped whithin 4-5 days of placing the order.
  • 6 0
 @vanillarice19: 100%! I’d rather have a bike that’s performance first. And I’d prefer it not look like every other Chinese made catalog bike on the trails. These people bagging on the Voima can’t think outside of the box and they have a hive mind and have to hate on anything that looks different than what they have, regardless of the performance and design engineering that’s gone into it. I like that it’s different looking and manufactured differently and made in another country besides China. I also like that it’s a relatively small company and it’s cool that the owner shreds on the bikes that he creates. Mine lives in the house with me, because I love it! It’s that good.
  • 1 4
 makes me want to voimet.
  • 1 1
 Yeah that head tube looks comically oversized, well ...
  • 1 0
 @ashlemon: What’s the plan if you ever have a warranty issue ?
  • 2 2
 @og-squid-mtb: Same plan as any direct to consumer bike. I expect Pole will stand by their frame - components you typically deal with the individual manufacturer. God forbid I have to ride my biobike again.
  • 1 1
 @ashlemon: Im sure Pole will stand by their frame but it might take a long time getting a warranty replacement .
  • 3 0
 @allredbikes: My friend has a k2 clear Vioma and I love it. Mine is somewhere between Finland and Albuquerque. I can't wait ride that golden beauty! The bike shipped less than 3 weeks after payment.
  • 1 0
 @og-squid-mtb: K2s take the longest due to demand. Mine shipped in 2.5 weeks after full payment. The bike ships in 3 boxes. The one for the battery arrived in like 4 days. The rest of the bike has been in transit for almost 2 weeks. I hear it will just show up one day with no notice.
  • 1 0
 @og-squid-mtb: Bro, just get one! You will not regret it. It’s a f*cking awesome bike!
  • 2 0
 @Outdrgod: you’ll love it! Just got a EXT coil shock for mine and exited to test that.
  • 1 0
 @Outdrgod: Drop us an email if you've had no movement on your shipping tracking by tomorrow (09.12) and we'll look into it for you. Be sure to check the USPS parcel tracker also. Sometimes the Posti/EMS tracking doesn't update as quickly once it leaves Finland
  • 1 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: You have one?
  • 1 0
 @og-squid-mtb: Yep, K1 with a 40 up front. It’s in my profile pics.
  • 2 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: looks almost normal with a 40 on there
  • 155 28
 F me that is a hideous looking machine. I am firmly in the camp of form needs to follow function, but ......damn. Confused
  • 27 8
 Ya, kick that thing in the nuts!
  • 36 21
 Have you seen one out on the trail? It looks way better in real life. Maybe not beautiful but cool. These things seem to be everywhere around here so maybe I've just grown to like it.
  • 57 2
 it looks like a praying mantis that is mid twerk
  • 13 2
 Polarizing.
  • 19 13
 @Braapp: yeah, no. Its an ugly bike
  • 39 8
 All its lines are misaligned. It looks like someone spilled a jar of tooth picks on the ground
  • 4 2
 Looks like a bullfrog tadpole.
  • 55 4
 I'll put my head on the chopping block. I think it's a really cool bike. When I first saw it, I didn't love it, but the design has definitely grown on me alot. Pole are doing some pretty cool things design/kinematic wise, and aren't afraid to try something new, and I can definitely get behind that. I think we need more companies who are willing to do something risky to achieve their vision for a bike. Plus an aluminum 190mm ebike is sick, this thing is a winning formula in my opinion. I think it might be a vocal minority hating on this bike. I'd buy it.
  • 29 19
 Im glad that people are finally openly admitting that they care about what others at the trailhead think about their bikes more than how the bike rides.

Explains how Yeti can charge 10k+ for analog bikes and get away with it.
  • 3 0
 @kingbike2: I really don't know what you mean, but you're probably right.
  • 13 0
 @8a71b4: Did you really just use "analog bike" unironically?
  • 3 3
 Somehow, someone, somewhere said 'yeah thats the one, it looks great!'. And everyone else in the room just looked down and said 'oh god no'.
  • 6 0
 @Braapp: Id have to agree. My mate Angelo has the exact same bike and in real person it looks impressive.
  • 16 5
 @8a71b4: downvote for the term "analog bike" the term is "regular bike" I'll also accept bicycle or bike.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-jon: given the comments i'm reading, maybe trolling the crap out of peeps was the point
  • 2 9
flag baca262 (Dec 5, 2022 at 12:50) (Below Threshold)
 @nickfranko: that's just a kid you retards
  • 1 0
 @mayha49: hahahahahahahahahaha
  • 4 2
 @8a71b4: I love this comment
  • 3 2
 @8a71b4: you can't call real bikes "analog" and get away with it. No matter how much they cost.
  • 2 4
 Its lovely to have my little downvotefollwanker back ive missed you
  • 1 0
 @mtb-jon: Well, a lot of Finnish bands used that technique to design their logo.

The Pole head tube badge is pleasing to my eye - what follows behind it hits a sour note for me.
  • 1 0
 @8a71b4: Yeah and Yeti is also well known for not backing their products and denying warranty claims. I didn't believe it until it happened to me. The SB66 was a paper tiger. I went through 3 backends before the headset folded.
  • 1 0
 @ridingofthebikes: how about Amish bike?
  • 1 0
 @Outdrgod: the Amish bike is a horse
  • 77 3
 Is this thing a bit of a bargain at €7600?

For a boutique frame with unique manufacturing method, decent build kit and quite unique suspension & geometry vs a very generic bikes for the same price from the big manufacturers - or even add another €4k from the likes of Evil, Yeti etc.
  • 14 1
 I would say it is when you compare it to other CNC/Glued frames. The Actofive frame alone is 6750 Euro without a shock but gosh darn is that (Actofive) a good looking CNC frame!!
  • 10 10
 The price is not bad but I can tell you that these ebikes around the 25kg mark are not really fun to ride except maybe if you're a really heavy dude that rides wide open gnarly tracks at warp speed. I recently tested the Scott Ransom eride and wanted it to get as my next bike but the long ass chainstay and the heavy weight made it so sluggish and not fun on mellower trails that I canceled the order. I'll stick around with my 22,7ish 500 Wh ebike until there are better options.
  • 6 4
 When I saw that number, I thought not bad either. But it's in Euro - still 5% more than USD. Both currencies are not good for Canadians. Translate that €7600, you'd get $10,822CAD + 18% duty&taxes. So, price is not a bargain at all. especially for an aluminum frame e-Bike that's still over 50lbs.
  • 7 2
 @KalkhoffKiller: This things made for serious terrain though so I am not sure the weight is too bad.

It is a 190mm travel bike, essentially a DH Ebike, probably a blast in the Alps.

I agree though, for my local riding it would be way too much bike, my current 160mm ebike is too much most of the time.
  • 16 2
 @CSharp: Not everyone lives in Canada though and in euros where a yeti is €14k and a generic alloy ebike €7k with the same kind of kit I think this is a great deal.

It’s also a unique bike, unique geo, 190mm, cnc in house - not made in Myanmar by people who are beaten if they unionise.
  • 3 1
 @justanotherusername: I was riding it in the alps. It might be fun on wide open bike parky stuff. But on natural, twisty trails with direction changes idk. It just feels so incredibly sluggish and almost impossible to get off the ground on your own.
  • 18 4
 @CSharp: well, CAD is weak as hell. that isn't their issue, that's your governments issue. take it up there.

I mean, this thing costs 45,980,000,000,000 Zimbabwe dollars! LOL
  • 2 1
 @KalkhoffKiller: Fair enough, and as I haven't ridden one I cannot really comment. I know of a few trails in the Alps I could see this being awesome but 50+lbs is a fair lump.
  • 5 22
flag CSharp (Dec 5, 2022 at 8:56) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: Yeah, but you and I live in the Great White North and our currency is one of the weakest in the 5-Eyes countries. And, I don't care who makes the aluminum frames - could be Taiwan for all we care. "...not made in Myanmar by people who are beaten if they unionise" - Don't be a Justin Trudeau and make politicalized comments.
  • 23 3
 @CSharp: I live in the UK, our currency is fried but it still works out about the same in GBP, again not everyone lives in Canada.

Since when has being aware that some companies make frames in factories that stab staff for protesting working conditions 'political? - (Btw Justin Trudeau's job is to make political comments you dumb shit)

If you don't care, that's up to you, but I like to buy things from people that have decent conditions for workers if there is a choice and with Pole you know that will be the case.

Its the carbon guys that make frames in Myanmar by the way, not alu frames - have a look - globalmayday.net/2020/10/18/myanmar-union-busting-at-sporting-goods-factory

I think Taiwan got a little too expensive.
  • 8 0
 I was looking at the Vikkela on their site the other day (Voima with a meat motor) and was blown away that you can get a GX/RS Select fork SuperDeluxe shock build for $4745 USD. Seems a bargain for a boutique manufacturer.
  • 10 1
 @mrpfp: it's almost like their claims of more efficient manufacturing processes with the cnc are true? Who'd have thought it lol
  • 2 1
 @justanotherusername: You got yourself marked as being in Canada. So, kind of confusing that way. It's good if you're making USD, Euro, or GBP. However, the Canadian market and currency suck when comparing those markets and currencies.
  • 6 0
 @Mtbdialed: But doesn't your Nigerian cousin, who is a prince, have $2.5 Million USD of unclaimed funds waiting for you to claim it?
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: Its less about riding location, more about riding style. This thing will tackle all trails, but its definitely not a jump machine for boosting off of stuff. Handling big bikes around tight stuff is just a matter of getting used to the platform, just like the long time riders did with current slew of bikes that are over 4 inches longer than comparable bikes from 10 years ago.
  • 2 0
 @8a71b4: I disagree somewhat - we all have preferences in riding style and the type of riding we enjoy, sure you can get used to a bike, doesn’t make it good or fun though.

I have a 160mm ebike, 180 forks, 63 head angle, just under 50lbs - I ride it in varied terrain but it’s plan shite in some situations, getting used to it is just accepting that.
  • 3 0
 I know nothing about e bikes, but quite like Poles outside the box manufacturing methods. After seeing the field test bikes today I’m still trying to figure out how this bike is so (relatively speaking) affordable.

The machine time on these frames has to add cost but it’s like 3-4K cheaper
  • 1 1
 @8a71b4: yeah, you gotta be a good jumper and really aggressive rider and the trails gotta suit it. Like these bikes just feel glued to the ground. Total opposite of nimble. I think apart from the non removable battery the direction orbea is going is the future. Weight wise. 26 kg is just too much in most cases.
  • 5 3
 @justanotherusername: fwiw, Justin Trudeau's job seems to be more about being a tyrant and couching it with tears and black face.....wait....that last one doesn't help at all. lol
  • 1 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: not true, the Pole is shockingly playful. I’ve scared myself whipping it on some big jumps. As for the Scott Ransom I agree, that is not a playful fun bike at all. It likes to stay near the ground.
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: yeah, the 13% tariff is a real kick in the nuts on non Canadian made bikes.
  • 7 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: You had this experience on the Voima? Or the Scott Ransom? The Voima isn’t anything like a Scott Ransom. The Voima is not sluggish at all. It is so efficient that it can easily ride as a trail bike, but it climbs so good and descends so good, it can literally be ridden anywhere! It can also be built up to be around 50lbs. I know this because mine is 50.8lbs with a Fox 40 up front.

www.vitalmtb.com/community/Faster-Than-U,27599/setup,46165
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: no, he was talking about a Scott Ransom, not a Voima, so he is making assumptions that are not accurate. The bike rides awesome, everywhere. I own one, and it’s the best bike I’ve ever ridden, by far.
  • 2 1
 @AppleJack76: Your cousin must be broke, mines holding 16.5 mil for me...
  • 4 3
 Don‘t know if it really is a bargain - will there be a gas-engined version? Than I could compare to my son‘s Yamaha YZ250…
  • 3 0
 And made in a country where they have... rights
  • 1 1
 @KalkhoffKiller: That plus the price = no thanks.
  • 2 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: Didn't ride the Voima but I can't really believe that the voima, bein 1-2 kg heavier, is so much more playful. Granted the Scott has even longer chainstays. But it got really good reviews and I wouldn't say its a shitty bike and no fun at all. I just noticed that the last generations of ebikes with 625 and 750Wh batteries is just a tad too heavy for my taste. I don't want a light ebike with not enough power, rather something around the 20 kg mark like the new Orbea.

btw.: why did you go for 27,5 and 2.8 tires?
  • 4 2
 6750 buys me an aprillia ........
  • 5 0
 @justanotherusername: Thanks for sharing that link. It's crazy that some of the most expensive carbon bikes are made using the cheapest, worst conditions. Myanmar is a hotbed of atrocities, and has been for decades. Sad but not surprising that people are getting hurt for standing up for themselves. I hope Pivot and Evil are really thinking through their supply chain choices. A lot of people had to scramble during the pandemic and may have used companies that weren't properly vetted. But there is no excuse to not remedy that situation moving forward.

Maybe Pivot can substitute all the XT parts in their "XTR build" with SLX to save some money there and use it to find a better supplier.
  • 2 3
 @Compositepro: if you wanted something shit, you should have said, there's a voodoo ebike for just over a grand in Halfords...
  • 4 1
 @NERyder: I think its worse than substituting part x for part y to save a little money.

We have to assume that Myanmar is the very cheapest labour source available for a carbon fiber factory but yet these brands are amongst the very most expensive frames available - more expensive than Taiwanese built bikes where employee rights are much greater and a similar price to the Guerilla Gravity stuff that is made in the USA.

It also stated in the article the brands were asked to intervene in the issue to resolve it and all refused to do so.

Not a good show at all really, but if the customers don't care then thats that.
  • 1 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: Just wondering why did you put 27.5 x 2.8 tyres on this bike? You made it even more Downhill by putting Fox 40 on it, but you put on single ply EXO tyres with paper-thin sidewalls? Is there something I do not get?
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: I was mentioning parts swapping tongue-in-cheek as Pivot always includes lower level parts then their trim level would suggest (like an XTR build trim where the majority of parts are XT)

But it is crazy that they charge so much and choose the most inhuman cheapest place to make their boutique bikes
  • 1 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: I built mine up with 27.5 because i’m 5’7 and the smaller wheels fit me better, but they’re also lighter and stronger. And 2.8’s because I’ve been on them for years and I really like the ride and traction that they give.
  • 2 3
 @inked-up-metalhead: not sure how the two compare ones a relatively lightweigh classic two stroke and i havent a f*cking clue what halfords is........i wish you poor people would f*ck off lol
  • 2 3
 @justanotherusername: have you picked up a downvotefollowanker too? why yes yes you have!!
  • 2 2
 @Compositepro: ones a shit motorbike and the other is a shit bike with a motor.

And you live in the UK, yet aren't aware of one of the largest high Street retailers in the country? Nice attempt at a flex, but OK.
  • 2 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: I think I’ll stick with me two stroke cheers
  • 2 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: I ride schwalbe 2.6 too but with super trail casing. But it lets me run really nice low pressure.
  • 2 3
 @Gsprunner: my assumption is that they are so ugly, and they have a history of falling apart from a tiny huck to flat. So they charge less.
  • 1 0
 @danger13: Lucky!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 46 0
 I have a friend who has one. He he got the k1 size so of course I had to tell him that he has a small pole. Then I read above that it's not how they're pronounced, disappointed.
  • 41 0
 You can still give him crap. Just use a Canadian accent. “You sure do have a small pole, eh?”
  • 2 1
 @boopiejones: Punctuating with ehs is accurate but we pronounce pole like you folks down south.
  • 8 0
 @boopiejones: Nvm I just got the joke
  • 31 0
 More bike and more expensive manufacturing for less money than others, it’s almost like many brands are just charging too much.
  • 6 0
 "What are your overheads!?" - Flight of the Conchords
  • 23 0
 If I were to get an ebike, this is the type I would go for. Tons of travel and relatively cheap compared to many other ebike options. I personally see no reason to buy an expensive, lightweight, short travel ebike.
  • 2 1
 I could see low power ebikes going the way of the 27.5+.
  • 5 0
 Yeah just go all in if you're gonna get one. Might as well get the fun of a downhill bike on your way down.
  • 1 2
 @ashlemon: or the 27.5…
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: I need the clearance
  • 1 0
 2022 and 7 thousand Pole bike being called cheap.
  • 21 0
 I tried mulleting the bike with a +1 degree Wolftooth angle adjust headset and the thing is brilliant in the tight stuff. Lowers the BB to about 356mm which is perfect for a 190mm bike. Didn’t notice any loss of stability or suspension in high speed chunk and Gnar and jumping is easier. Definitely worth a try
  • 4 3
 Love some more details on this. Any pics? Havent seen a mulleted one yet one the thread on emtb forums. Seems the logical thing to do.
  • 3 0
 Good to know, I'll be doing that for sure.for the ass clearance alone.
  • 2 3
 Strange that it comes with such a high bb when it is spec'd with 160 cranks. If you are using shorter cranks why not lower the bb instead of raising it?
  • 3 2
 @HelterSeltzer: Pole said they believe a high BB rides better - I disagree. Also people say shorter cranks are faster/more efficient, supposedly.
  • 4 0
 +1 for the angleset mullet hack! I did this on my Sight VLT 29er with a +1 Cane Creek angleset and the bike feels much better with it's long (458mm) chainstays. What's cool about the Cane Creek angleset is it's got an external lower cup, so it pushes the BB back up while also pushing the fork away from the frame, nullifying the need for a knock block headset. I always thought the external lower cup was a downside but it's solved 2 of my problems on this bike! This is why headset cable routing can suck it.
  • 6 2
 @HelterSeltzer: It’s an ebike. The cranks are a vestigial remnant of its common evolutionary ancestor with the Taival.
  • 1 0
 I know who this is. Wink
  • 1 0
 I was wondering about trying mullet. My current emtb is mullet and it rocks. Did you have to do anything with the speed sensor since the magnet is on the wheel and the stock sensor is in the motor?
  • 1 0
 @Outdrgod: The sensor still works fine with a 27.5 wheel. The only difference is it will have a slightly slower top speed unless you take it to a Bosch dealer to be reprogrammed for the new wheel size, which is what I did.
  • 24 2
 Finland is putting these in the front line along the Russian border...
  • 2 0
 ...As a scare tactic.
  • 25 3
 oh my god for the last time use a damn dual crown
  • 5 0
 Mine has a dual crown, and it’s awesome!
  • 1 3
 @Twenty6ers4life: its a 1 1/2 crown
  • 2 0
 @mior: wut? It’s a dual crown 40.
  • 2 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: oh only saw the intend
  • 1 0
 A Zeb has won Rampage - what, exactly do EEEEBers plan to do on this bike?
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: dual crowns look better
  • 1 0
 @mior: Always. But they turn like an oil tanker in the Suez Canal.
  • 21 8
 $7299 shipped to your door in America. I honestly think this is the perfect second bike to a lightweight ebike or analogue trail bike. I think she looks quite custom and might turn a few people off, but then again, it might turn a few people on. Wait, who gives a crap.. I can imagine this bike would fancy your desire to explore a different type of trail and terrain. So it's in a category that an justify a second bike. Problem may be that you may like this so much that it may become your weapon of choice. Note- many who have tested this bike has described climbing unthinkable paths only to also report crazy fun decents at any speed. I can see this type of machine taking on the best of Lake Tahoe, Downeyville, and trails you may not consider on your other bike. Congrats Pole, looks like a sweet rig. Oh, I think this $7299 comes to your door complete in places like CA without sales tax (i think but could be wrong) but if so, it put the Ibis to shame as a similarly build bike purchased locally with tax is just a tad over $12k. So roughly 5k less... Oso Sorry, Pole if I'm buying.
  • 2 2
 did you mean "turn on" in reference to it being an e-bike

because i sure hope you're not implying people have ebike fetishes
  • 13 0
 I look forward to the review of the non-motorized version of this. It sounds like it could be an impressive rock-crusher.
  • 13 1
 Been waiting a long time for this review. Thanks for the open in-depth thoughts.
  • 12 1
 "Let's make the hill it's climbing in the photo look steeper; just turn the image counter-clockwise a bit. No one will notice the trees are all at an angle." Done.
  • 4 1
 I noticed and came here to say the same thing. It's not even subtle.
  • 7 1
 After many years off-roading with my Jeep and trying to get the perfect poser shot, I’ve come to the conclusion that pictures never look the same as the obstacle… try it yourself on a steep climb, gnarly rock garden, etc…

The Jeep could be teetering on the edge of flipping over, and the picture will look like one tire ran over the curb at the mall. So I admit that I am guilty of occasionally tilting the camera to make the pic look like what my eyes see, but only when there are no trees in the background.
  • 12 0
 Great $7.6k are considered cheap now.
  • 9 3
 My takeaway from the very thorough review: if you are an excellent rider and completely change how you ride to suit the bike, you can continue to enjoy riding excellently, as long as you don't ride terrain that doesn't suit the bike. It seems like saying this is 'not for everyone' is an understatement.
  • 3 1
 If you rode all bikes the same why would you change - ever? Your comment is ridiculous.
  • 9 2
 When an experience bike tester chooses to size down TWO SIZES from the recommended geo chart, and prefers the smaller bike, maybe they've gone too far in the reach/wheelbase dept
  • 8 2
 My next bike for sure once they re-engineer the top tube to take the latest Bosch display.
I f@cking hate the current Bosch display/controller. I don't want the bridge of the starship enterprise bolted to my handlebar.
  • 7 0
 @sebstott: is this zeb suspension insert the carbon air insert there was an article about awhile back? Is there an upcoming review?
  • 2 1
 I want to know more about this too. Come on @seb-stott - spill the beans Smile
  • 1 1
 It's sounds as plausible as them stick on anti vibration pads the commencal team used a few years ago.
  • 8 0
 Stays high, so you don't have to
  • 7 0
 Definitely not a session.
  • 7 2
 I think it would look kind of hot with a downhill fork. Weight obviously isn't a big design concern. Price seems really reasonable in comparison.
  • 5 1
 Would be ace with a 200mm dual crown fork. Similar axle to crown as a flexy creaky 190mm single crown fork also. The 140mm headtube makes it a bit of a challenge to fit some though.
  • 2 0
 I can confirm, it does look hot and ride even better with a DH fork. Pics of mine in my profile.
  • 4 1
 I’ve had a frameset for around 9 months and i can say that most the points here are pretty spot on. Glad its not just me that finds it a handful in the turns.

I’ve tried all sorts of configurations, but settled on dropping the front to 180mm and sticking a coil on the back (both ohlins). Really transformed the bike for me. Makes the bike turn in that little easier and with an ohlins 38 you get to use all the travel, zeb was terrible…choose one: small bump, mid stroke or bottom out support. Didn’t notice any decrease in dh performance.

One point thats not in the review (maybe i missed it?) is that the actual ground clearance is pretty poor due to how the motor is oriented and you up hitting it pretty hard sometimes going through large rock/boulders.: couple of scary moments considering the speed you end up taking on sections.
  • 2 0
 Looking at the pics I was thinking re: you last point - neat, the pedals are high but there are few inches of motor below the BB...
  • 1 2
 I was hoping someone would speak up about it, it looks awfully low due to the angle. So it's high but low. If I wasn't already in the No category at this point, this made it worse.
  • 1 0
 I had an evolink and it sounds like it rides the same as this, if you want to go fast as f, open rough steep trails it eats for breakfast, tighter mellower flat trails it can be just as fast, but you better be strong and skilled to make it happen.
  • 1 0
 @toad321: i think that sums it up exactly. If you’re tired or can’t really be arsed, back off the speed or do tracks with no corners Smile
  • 1 0
 Was thinking, this bike with new TQ motor would solve these clearance issues, Bosch has more metal/plastic around. Maybe in the future?
  • 8 0
 Hi @Monkeyass The ground clearance is not significantly different between the angles. Here's a video of how the Bosch CX Gen 4 Smart System motor rotates: youtube.com/shorts/sNfui0wxLTA?feature=share. There is only a 4mm difference between the orientations. We chose this angle because we want to have more clearance in front of the motor. This is how you get more time to go over obstacles. This is also one of the reasons why the bike climbs so well technical climbs.
  • 15 8
 I wish I could get stoked on E bikes...but I just don't....
  • 12 27
flag deadmeat25 (Dec 5, 2022 at 9:11) (Below Threshold)
 When you can afford one you will feel the stoke...
  • 18 3
 @deadmeat25: Can we stop with the "you're salty because you're poor" attitude? It's truly embarrassing for the sport. Not everyone wants to spend 5 paychecks to "feel the stoke" bikes are fun and different people ride for different reasons. You can have a difference in opinion without shaming someone for not spending even more money on an already ridiculously expensive sport.
  • 7 15
flag kokofosho (Dec 5, 2022 at 12:01) (Below Threshold)
 @JPostuk: I mean its fair to assume they dont have one because of the cost. Which is informing their opinion. I have not heard of someone who tried and ebike and didnt like it
  • 10 5
 @deadmeat25: you're disgusting for saying that.
  • 12 5
 @kokofosho: me.. I'm right here. whirl whirl whirl underneath you as the bike goes along.. I couldn't relax or take in the trail. which is why I ride. I was along for the ride.... not a fan.
  • 4 2
 @kokofosho: Elitist BS E-comment. We have the money ......
  • 3 4
 @JPostuk: This is one of the cheapest sports I know of... Once you have a bike and some tools, there are almost zero ongoing costs, even fishing is more expensive. You seem to have no perspective, try RC car racing and then come back here and try to say the same thing again...
  • 3 2
 @ridingofthebikes: Doesn't make it untrue...
  • 5 4
 @kokofosho: Truth..! Everyone that tries one thinks they're either the best thing ever invented, or continue to make what are clearly bullshit excuses for still not wanting one, based purely on cost... If they were given one for free, thier regular bike would never leave the shed again...
  • 2 5
 @ridingofthebikes: Yup, still true though...
  • 6 6
 @ridingofthebikes: My Kenevo is almost silent...

"I couldn't relax or take in the trail"...

So you only ride over silent terrain? You wince every time you get chain slap or even change gears because the sound is ruining your peace and tranquility..? Total bullshit..!

Yours is the most transparent and pathetic of excuses...
  • 5 4
 @deadmeat25: perhaps the guy spamming the thread shouldn't hurl the term "pathetic" around.

Like what you like. Just STFU about your off-road moped already, some people don't like those. And not just 'cause they're poors.
  • 3 1
 @deadmeat25: Are you kidding me? YOUR ebike is silent (whuch it's not) I hear ke-homos whirring by me every other ride smart guy. and you think because you tune out your financial mistake its silent lmao? and I also touched on the bike taking me for a ride. Way to cherry-pick noises that would bother me as if I'm supposed to be okay with an electronic motor below me buzzing away because I can't pedal for myself. I've been listening to chain slap and roots crunching for years and that is therapy for me. a sound I lust for. Whats a stupid thing to say! You are full of them I see.
  • 3 0
 @deadmeat25: your a piece of meat. ape.
  • 3 0
 @deadmeat25: BMX, trail running, hiking, soccer, basketball, I could go on. There's plenty of sports more affordable than mountain biking and just because more expensive hobbies exist doesn't make MTB affordable. Also maybe try to understand what other people are saying to you instead of just telling them they're lying because they're poor. It's pretty easy to understand how someone who rides for fitness may not have any interest in e bikes regardless of wealth. Think about it.
  • 4 2
 I almost took out a pair of EBers on Santa Cruz rigs on Sunday riding up (because they could) a trail that has been exclusively DH direction for decades and they looked at me like I was the problem. I will not join their ranks. So many EBers I see are kooks. Even when the tech gets better and lithium mining isn't destroying sh1t, something my friend (who drives and restores vintage 911s) says rings true. "The only bad thing about Porsches is the people who drive them." I bet those EBers pronounce the marque "PORSH".
  • 1 2
 @TheRamma: No, it's because they're f*cking dumb...
  • 1 1
 @ridingofthebikes: You really are top tier stupid, you just make stuff up to suit you eh...
  • 2 3
 @JPostuk: I am and have thought about it. EMTB's do not limit or reduce your ability to use your bike for fitness, if you're out on a purely pedal based ride, you can simply go further and faster for longer. If you're in a bike park, you just get more laps. The downs are a workout too, but i shouldn't even need to state that.

Maybe you think pushing your bike bike up the hill is 'riding', i don't.. Maybe you think struggling like f*ck up hill is fun, i don't.. but you can make it even harder by turning the motor off if you want which is propbably more your style, you probably stick forks in your legs when you have too much fun as well...
  • 4 1
 @deadmeat25: lol. what weaksauce trolling. too bad you can't just slap a motor on your shitty jokes...

enjoy your moped!
  • 2 1
 @deadmeat25: Don't you have a battery charge weak boy. Your mouth is like your bike, auto pilot with no effort.
  • 3 1
 @deadmeat25: The best part about mountain biking is the downhills and it isn't as fun on a 50+ pound cinderblock with a motor and battery onboard.
  • 8 1
 This is a very unique machine. I want.
  • 4 4
 The look of it gives me goosebumps but definitely not in a good way.
  • 4 1
 Beauty, which is in the eye of the beholder, aside: This bike is unique, the design is bold, the engineering masterful, and the production located in a country with highest standards. On top of that, it seems to ride really well, from what I hear/read. So, the amount of vitriolic comments here is somewhat puzzling, even if one doesn’t like the looks. I, for my part, do, and I‘m looking forward to riding the „acoustic“ version soon.
  • 6 0
 I do not understand the straight up hate for almost everything this guy/ company puts out there.
  • 1 0
 Internet people. Same with ebikes. Never met anyone in real life who doesn't think Pole is great or someone who has a problem with ebikes. It doesn't exist in reality. Just here on the forums.
  • 2 0
 @Bunabe: I listened to the podcast with him on it. Seemed like a good dude. Bikes are very well reviewed. They look different but that is not a bad thing.
  • 3 0
 I love it! I am an Engineer so that might explain why I really like the way it looks. But I really need that 190mm of travel and climbing ability here in Colorado. I’ve been waiting 3 weeks for my custom build to be finished. I may be putting my Yeti 160e T1 up for sale.
  • 6 0
 My next bike, once I’ve saved up the €€€s
  • 7 1
 Saw the first pic and then immediately scrolled to the comments.
  • 11 7
 Ahh, yes. The elephant man of bikes. Genuinely the ugliest bike I've ever seen in my life. Worse than the dreaded Supercycle Hooligan.
  • 5 0
 Well, it it's definitely not boring and definitely doesn't look like a Session...I guess that's something...
  • 3 1
 "The extra chassis weight adds stability and suspension sensitivity few of them can match" but ... but ... didn't PB tell us that sprung/unsprung weight ratio effect was fale news that was definitely not a thing on Mtbs ? Is PB the Fox News of MTB ? Big Grin
  • 4 1
 Beast mode! Innovation! Forward thinking! High quality. I like the gold color of this model. Everyone on my local trail would drool over it. Just get out and ride! My half cent.
  • 2 0
 I measure 375mm to the center of the axle on my front wheel in 29 with an Assegai 2.5 on 35mm(external) rim, so about 375mm BB height on the Pole. I wonder if this will take off in the industry over time, maybe not that high, but higher than the early days of lower, slacker, longer. I personally don't appreciate the extreme low BB's, even with 165 cranks, I hit everything.
  • 7 2
 That steerer looks like the infamous salami in the hallway
  • 4 0
 Is tilting the camera to make things look steeper en vogue again?

I thought that died with skinsuits.
  • 2 0
 Skinsuits also look way better if you tilt the camera
  • 1 0
 I hope so, it's the only way I can convince myself that I'm a bad-ass in action shots.
  • 1 0
 Saw one of these at the recent Maydena Enduro Jam, which in Itself is an interesting event to ride an E bike for but it was definitely an eye catching bike. Sounds like it would have eaten up some of the faster straighter stages but something like king brown might have been a handful.
  • 1 0
 The shock orientation reminded me of the Kellys Theos bike. Back when it was first mentioned Pinkbike was still in this phase of e-bike denial which they now seem to have forgot about. But what I liked about that one was that is a European robot-made bike (out of a carbon-steel hybrid composite) and that it has a low top tube. Chainstays are slightly longer than of the Pole even though their marketing dept considers that "short" (and they have a funny way of measuring head tube angles). But either way, it seems well worth a test. Just for the interesting production method and the low top tube. Just for the sake of journalism of course. I'm not in the market for a new bike.
  • 9 8
 After being stung by the Pole Stamina debacle I would question anyone who buys this bike.

The awful manufacture and much, much worse customer service leaves a lot to be desired.
What have they improved to make the much heavier and longer ebike stronger than the previous bikes?
Has the customer service improved?

I like the bike but would struggle to give this company another penny after the previous bike I had from them which basically snapped in half after a few hours of easy riding then spent nearly a year trying to get a refund.
If you purchase from Pole make yourself acquainted with consumer laws because if (When...) it all falls apart it's more hassle than worth.
  • 6 2
 Hard for those burned by the stamina, but I can attest the customer service has improved. I got answered solutions within hours and Leo is very active on many of the forums to help out too.
  • 2 0
 So it didn’t have stamina , to be honest i did think a press release using the lyrics from a shite record should maybe have raised a few red flags
  • 4 0
 Socks and sandals are a winning combo in my eyes, albeit perhaps not one for the fashionista's. Also, nice bike.
  • 4 0
 It looks like a secret German weapon the allies would find in a shed after the war (Project:"Heuschrecke").
  • 1 0
 I feel as if this review indicates that Rock Shox ZEB and Super Deluxe are a bit of a mess. If you cannot use either the compression damping or rebound in either, that basically leaves you with a simple positive/negative air spring. Pretty basic stuff!

Funny enough, I went all in on my current Fox 38 Factory - and yet I leave the compression circuits wide open (as do many of my friends). I guess I like knowing that I have the Grip2 damper - although I don't use it. Smile
  • 2 0
 Oh and I forgot to also add, how many of you are actually riding bikes that are now closer to the geometry that Pole have been leading in for years and are now adopting ... hahaha.
  • 1 0
 Buyer Beware!
I still haven’t received the wheelset. USPS tracking shows the package was sent to a neighboring town and then returned to sender 3 weeks ago. Pole won’t send a replacement and will only send the original wheels when they arrive to them. They won’t send a partial refund either. If you are in the US and Pole sends via EMS, check USPS tracking and then sign up for text updates. The posti link Pole provides is useless. Also, if part of your bike was backordered, you may need to contact them a couple times to get it shipped out. I may not get the wheels, but maybe, if you heed this warning, you’ll get yours.
  • 1 0
 “ but I've had one or two that benefitted from fresh oil in the legs from the factory‘. Are you referencing the fork leg oil or the damper cartridge oil being changed? Did you use a lighter weight oil or just fresh oil of recommended weight?
  • 8 4
 The frame has a very POLErizing Look to it, damn.
  • 33 4
 Making me Voimat
  • 1 1
 The longer you look at it, the more Pole-rizing it gets. However, they might have Bosch'd it with the price!
  • 3 0
 It’s not run of the milled, I’ll give you that
  • 7 3
 Does it come with a sidecar?
  • 4 0
 My local businesses heart says Canfield lithium but my wallet says Vikkela
  • 1 1
 Lithiums are pretty reasonable on sale right now. Those are two really different bikes (just based on geo, not even counting how much of a dog the Pole is). If you're really local, you can always test ride a Lithium. I wouldn't trade if for a Pole...
  • 1 0
 Vikkela can be mulleted with a 356mm BB and a +1deg angle adjust headset to get the HT back to stock if you want a more playful version of the bike
  • 5 5
 "earlier machined frames were simply machined in two halves and then glued together. This could lead to a slight misalignment of the two halves creating a visible seam (and potential weakness) down the centerline. Now the billets are machined internally first (creating a cavity), then glued together, and then machined externally so there's no chance of creating a visible step between the two halves."

In other words, they didn't fix the alignment issues, they just hide them now by machining the outside. The potential weakness down the centerline is still there, and in fact may be worse because some of the material thickness has been machined away.
  • 4 2
 This is a courageous assumption, especially since the used wall thicknesses haven't been mentioned in either case.
  • 2 2
 Yes, and because the whole cnc-production method is so crappy, other boutique brands are moving in this direction, too (e.g., Actofive, Ministry).
  • 2 2
 Lots of Voimas out in the wild. Been out for almost a year. Way more sold than any other Pole bike ever. Zero cracks so far
  • 3 3
 @vanillarice19: You couldn't possibly know that?
It took a while for the Stamina problems to become know because Pole spend a lot of time hushing up people on public forums.
  • 3 0
 It would be a hard sell for me after being caught with one of the poorly constructed Stamina frames.
Poor construction of the Stamina. At least they have changed something, hopefully for all the people purchasing these bikes it is a much stronger frame.

I like this bike but given how poorly I was treated when I wanted a warranty for my previous Pole I'd be pretty hard pressed giving this company a cent (Frame split in half after a few hours usage, was told I washed the frame with incorrect cleaning fluids WTF!!!, had to basically get legal intervention to get my money back, took nearly 12 months).

Would consider if they offered a very good discount for customers who they had previously burnt.
  • 3 0
 @jukka4130: The only 'assumption' I'm making is that the words I have quoted are an accurate representation of what Pole are doing and why. I suppose that is pretty courageous Smile If you have to machine the outside so there's no visible step, it implies that there _was_ a visible step prior to machining, which implies some degree of misalignment. If they can't machine the halves with significant tolerance to avoid external misalignment, then they can't machine the insides any better. It's therefore inevitable that after machining some parts of the joint will be thinner on one side than the other, and that won't make them stronger.
I'm not suggesting these frames actually are going to break - after all the problems with the Stamina they would have been mad not to allow for this with conservatively thick wall sections.
  • 5 2
 @dsut4392: This is an excellent topic, but your assumption is incorrect. Machining the insides is always in line with each other because they are done first. However, machining the outsides the old way is the most challenging match because the pieces must be flipped and machined separately. In addition, there are other challenges with the older method that involves manual labor.

As mentioned earlier, we have changed management and improved our processes and quality. With the new method, we removed most of the manual labor. Now that we make the whole outside in one piece, the chance of misalignment is meager. We have used years to perfect this and have patented and pending patents for our methods.

Our frame surfaces are within 0.17mm tolerance, and our main bearing seats are within 0.02mm. On Voima, we have optimized our wall thickness to be only 0.9mm in the thinnest part. We have successfully made wall thicknesses of 0.7mm. Therefore we claim that our frames are more accurate than any other method in the market.
  • 2 2
 @polebicycles: im calling bull shit on this the bike has been in production a year the rest have been utter trainwrecks hardly a great advertismene for "new" processes
  • 1 2
 @6foot5aussie: I think it's fair play to offer you a discount. Send us an email, and let's see what we can do for you.
  • 3 1
 @thewanderingtramp: I understand your concern. Nevertheless, we have significantly happier customers than ever. We have already produced and sold more Voima's than all our previously CNC-produced bikes. I encourage you to talk to the bike owners. You can find them in the Facebook group. www.facebook.com/groups/961973767170964
  • 2 1
 @CrixxBrain: Who and who? Both tiny little companies! if you are making 5 bikes a year fine mill them from solid lol the rest of the industry knows what a wasteful folly this is.
  • 3 2
 @thewanderingtramp: Our factory produces 80 bikes per month. Next year's goal is 100 bikes per month. That's not much but also not nothing. www.pinkbike.com/news/pole-bicycles-announces-new-factory-and-operational-improvements.html
  • 2 3
 @polebicycles: LOL 80 bikes a month IS absolutely nothing.i will bet they all are not this model I reckon 10 a month tops which puts you in the same little league as any other bespoke builder, I come from a country where polishing a turd is the standard operating model, fanc/comedy press release to your own narrative mean absolutely JACK buddy.
  • 1 1
 @thewanderingtramp: Who? The innovators, the visionaries, the artisans. And: buy/ride whatever you want, fine by me.
  • 1 1
 My observation about this bikes rear suspension, it reminds me of the early parallelogram forks. With the pivots so close together the bearings took tremendous side loading, resulting in a lot of side to side lay in no time at all. I think that design applied to the rear suspension, where you are actively flexing the rear triangle with every pedal stroke will result in even faster wear with its resultant play.
  • 6 2
 I used to think this bike was ugly…..I still do, but I used to too
  • 4 1
 I can't decide if it looks really good or really bad lol
  • 5 2
 Specsavers
  • 15 7
 Ill help you, It looks really bad!!
  • 5 4
 Hideous
  • 1 0
 K1/K2 looks ok, K3/K4 is ugly
  • 8 5
 bikes weighing 60 pounds should have moto hoops
  • 2 3
 Why?
  • 2 1
 You are 10lbs off. Mine weights 50.8lbs with a 40 on it.
  • 1 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: and EXO tyres, please explain this...
  • 1 0
 @gooral: yeah, I guess it’s because I’m a smooth rider and make good line choices, because I don’t have any issues with destroying wheels or tires. Wide rims and large volume tires help too. So I don’t need to run heavy tires or inserts to get by. Wink
  • 1 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: Fair enough mate, if it works for you, that is what matters. Do you put more heavy duty tyres when you go on holidays to more rocky places? You must do, right?
  • 1 0
 @gooral: No, I actually ride these wheels and tires everywhere, from my local So Cal trails which have plenty of chunky rock gardens to bike park laps with jumps and drops. Like I said, I think the wide rims, large volume tires and Berd spokes all play a role, but it’s mostly line choice I think.
  • 1 2
 Serious question, why mount the shock perpendicular to the way the bolts want to rotate? Looks like there will be stress added. Just doesn't look right to me, on any bike that mounts that way. Probabaly a good reason, and maybe I have just not sat and thought on it hard enough...
  • 4 0
 The side to side rotation reduce the loads on the shock when the rear end flexes side to side.
  • 1 0
 @8a71b4: Ok. I have read about, or thought I have about shocks mounted with only one end that way having issues, loading the shock with forces it is not used to. Interesting either way.
  • 4 0
 The way the shock mounts to the linkage and frame eliminates any side loading that destroys so many shocks on other bikes. This setup allows the linkage bearings to move side to side or up and down instead of putting those forces on the shock.
  • 2 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: This is precisely the reason. Thanks for sharing!
  • 2 0
 Just another 10 mm to make it 200mm of travel. 200 is the golden number, 190 sounds inadequate.
  • 3 1
 Not only does the cable not go through the headset, it goes through a vag. Pole nailing the market.
  • 4 1
 WOW that thing is a brick
  • 3 2
 Ya, what's the point of that fancy alloy and machining when it's heavier than a comparable welded frame
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: it’s not though. If you read the review, you would have seen how Seb said “ Whyte's E-160 is heavier despite having less travel”. There are plenty of other e-bikes with comparable motors and batteries that are just as or heavier than the Voima. P.s. mine is 50.8lbs.
  • 6 7
 FFS, this congregation must be biggest gathering of worthless posers and whiners in the short history of MTB snobbery. If you guys drag your feet any longer the dirt will start filling up your cracks. In a few years time you will have swallowed this load like you eventually swallowed the overly long and slack loads of forward progress. Meanwhile go ride your Sessions and be happy.
  • 4 4
 When the 6'-3"guy ends up preferring the medium frame, I don't think they HAVE swallowed the overly long and slack progress, have they? Boom.
  • 1 2
 So you are saying less options is better? Boomers sure had that option.
  • 5 0
 Just a bunch of morons lacking neurons. "Hey guys it's ugly haha me funny get it, sick burn" *hops on big wheel and burns plastic*
  • 2 3
 Really neat machining work on the frame, i like those details. But, as others have said, it’s hard to get past the appearance of this bike. It could be the best bike out there but if it looks like this, I’d rather compromise and ride something that looks a bit nicer.
  • 2 0
 So it has a long TT, high BB, it's very heavy. So it's a 2003 DH bike with a slacker head angle?
  • 3 2
 Pole has gone from making some of the most beautiful bikes in the industry to the ugliest. What was purposeful and progressive is now kooky and bizarre.
  • 3 0
 The Zeb looks small in it. Would go for a triple clamp.
  • 1 0
 So it is possible for complete bikes to come with Double Down tyres! Weak casings are always being identified in reviews as the bike's downfall
  • 1 0
 @sebscott What is the previously unknown insert you added to the 2023 Zeb to help? A Diaz Suspension Runt has been a positive addition to mine!
  • 1 0
 ~60lbs... I get how a little extra weight can be good but there's nothing good that can come from something this heavy. Makes the 41lbs Orbea Wild look like a XC bike!
  • 1 1
 High BB is necessary for ebikes because you pedal so much more so much faster that you need the clearance to avoid pedal strikes. Kinda stupid to put as a con for an ebike. It should be a pro.
  • 1 0
 "you may want to pack your hernia belt and incontinence pads"

This is the greatest single line ever written in relation to a bicycle
  • 1 0
 Nice to see a tester who focusses on wheelbase. I know what feels good to me, and it seems more important than any other single measurement of bike geo.
  • 4 3
 The only thing I like about this is how difficult it looks to smash a chainstay on a rock.
  • 6 0
 cant break a pre production chainstay if you dont have a chainstay Wink
  • 3 0
 It’s also silent, no chain slap.
  • 4 2
 pretty sure even rocks wouldn't want to smash a bike this ugly...
  • 2 2
 What's the point of touting the colour coating process as being environmentally friendly, when it is slapped with a cover of disposable plastic over top of it?
  • 3 3
 and filled with lithium and a disposable motor lmao.
  • 2 0
 @ridingofthebikes: Neither of those are recyclable. Oh wait.
  • 4 0
 Hi @Canadmos, Good question. Surface treatment facilities are generally not very environmentally friendly. The surface treatment is not just the material on top of the frame. The process can be very nasty, with toxic substances ending in nature if not processed correctly. Our approach is clean, and we protect the frame with plastic wrap. The wrap gives the bike a longer lifespan as it looks nicer for longer. We look at sustainability as a whole. For example, we use bubble wrap instead of shredded cartons in our packaging because bubble wrap uses fewer resources from nature. Bubble wrap contains more air than plastic; cartons must be made from trees. Cutting trees and making pulp is far more resource-intensive than making air bubbles from thin plastic sheets. We also save weight by not using cartons. We hope that more companies will use the holistic approach.
  • 1 0
 @polebicycles: Could shredded cartons not be made with recycled paper or boxes? I'm not in the packaging industry, so I really have no clue. But using plastic anywhere, can't be good in the end. In a lot of places, those plastic wraps and bubble packaging can't be or aren't recycled.

The frame is already protected by the coating and you're using 7075 aluminum, so perhaps it doesn't even need the plastic wrap. And for those that go through frames like candy and need the wrap purely for aesthetic reasons, they probably don't really care about the whole sustainability thing. Smile
  • 2 0
 @Canadmos: We're a bit more optimistic about this because many of our customers know that we take environmental things seriously and use effort to consider the overall impact.

Most packing cartons here in Finland are recycled. However, recycling renewables also needs energy. Here's more insight into this. Around 0:30, there's the whole thing in a nutshell: youtu.be/A7eVwrLXScM

We have thought that some people don't want the protective film and want to go raw finish on our website and the bike builder. There you can choose whether you want the protective film or not.

Ps. Lithium is also recycled these days. www.fortum.com/services/battery-recycling
  • 1 2
 @polebicycles: That plant is "being built" in america. all lithium is wasted away. way to spread misinformation to justify your electric contraptions while trying to claim you hug trees.
  • 6 4
 this has to be one of the ugliest bikes Ive ever seen
  • 4 3
 Loving the shock installed sideways...... like the icing on the cake of ugliness.
  • 2 1
 Where's the "proportional chainstay" gang? Their "small size" is 450 reach with 455 stays. That sounds pretty awful...
  • 1 0
 It’s the opposite actually. It puts you perfectly centered on the bike, which is great for climbing or descending. And it’s awesome.
  • 1 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: so we need 535 stays on the largest size?

never change, pb commenters...
  • 1 0
 Haters be hating I guess - but I bet you are all riding bikes that are like ... ummm ... every other bike.
  • 2 0
 the integrated seat clamp is trick
  • 9 8
 Long, slack, high and....ugly.
  • 1 0
 you know its big when it makes the 29 wheels look small
  • 5 5
 The 2023 moto x bikes are dropping this time of year, fingers crossed we get a review here.
  • 2 1
 To be fair, the only e-bike that interests me is the Stark Varg.
  • 4 2
 @ryetoast: Sur Ron Ultra Bee.
  • 3 4
 What a surprise Seb Scott couldn’t get through a review without mentioning he doesn’t like rockshox and how much better he thinks Fox are. At least he’s managed to ride some Assegai’s without being triggered and mentioning the Magic Mary’s so there’s at least some improvements.
  • 1 0
 What bike rack will this fit on with that huge wheel base?
  • 1 1
 Dragging on the road and would probably bend my NSR4 rack.
  • 2 1
 Still waiting for my adult sized Stacyc
  • 5 4
 The word ugly doesn't do it justice.
  • 2 2
 Don’t ride this during hunting season. Not sure if you being mistaken for a buck would be a mistake
  • 3 1
 Grim Donut, it's real
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott Did you weigh the K2 frame? Much difference?
  • 3 3
 Pole has release the first bike designed by the ugly tree, then dropped from it.
  • 4 3
 So that’s how a stripped down crf250r looks like.
  • 4 3
 Wait is Pole that Waikiki guy?
  • 3 2
 Long, slack, high... and absolutely hideous.
  • 1 1
 It's not stiffer. Maybe it did feel stiffer to you, but it was all in your mind.
  • 3 2
 what a waste of precious raw materials
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott What insert in the Zeb?????
  • 1 2
 Started reading this article and saw the first pic, woof. Then I saw the weight, double woof. Then I read it was an e-bike - okay, skip to comments!
  • 9 8
 Oh man... why?
  • 1 0
 wow. thats gnarly.
  • 6 5
 More like ug-lay.
  • 4 3
 Rough!
  • 6 6
 Visit the high-res gallery for more images. No thanks.
  • 3 3
 They forgot 'ugly' in the descriptors...
  • 3 3
 Ideal tool to outrun a Russian invasion?
  • 4 4
 So gross looking... Flush it down the toilet.
  • 1 0
 its pronounced Po-Lay??
  • 3 4
 They could lower the bb, ditch the cranks and just put footpegs on it like a proper moto.
  • 3 3
 Circa 1990s, with a motor.
  • 1 0
 Who eat all the pies!
  • 5 5
 Could look much better, covered under blanket deep in garage's dark corner
  • 4 4
 Hopefully it rides well enough to justify its ugliness
  • 3 2
 just say no to drugs.
  • 2 3
 I was looking into this bike before I found out how much it would be to get it to the USA.
  • 5 0
 Free shipping, no Tax, no import duties. The price you see is the price you pay.
Were you pricing it for next day Air?
  • 1 2
 @vanillarice19: I’ve heard otherwise . Idk
  • 1 1
 @vanillarice19: No not next day . People on FB pole bike page have mentions they got surprise taxes .
  • 1 0
 @vanillarice19: Have you purchased one ?
  • 3 0
 @og-squid-mtb: Yes, if u pick free shipping from USPS, it’s 100% free. If you do expedited shipping with DHL, you pay Duty. I’m in Southern California.
Mine is a frame only, Mullet build, +1 deg angleset, 356mm BB height, handles and corners on rails as a mullet and still eats up all bumps.
  • 1 0
 @vanillarice19: What color finish did you go with ?
  • 3 2
 pole vomit haha
  • 3 2
 makes me want wo voimit
  • 2 2
 Even for an e-bike, thats one ugly mofo
  • 1 1
 This bike has a great face for radio
  • 1 0
 Fugly!
  • 1 1
 Chicanes. This guy wins the pulitzer for bike reviewers.
  • 12 14
 Presumably the frame wrap is a new design attempting to prevent the frame cracking again? The old 'duct tape' trick.
  • 2 0
 It says its to protect the color finish coating right in the article. Its not anodizing, its a different process.
  • 3 4
 Surrons look so much fun.
  • 3 6
 Scrolled down straight to comments, but I'm disappointed so far. Come on Pinkbike, you can do better! This monstrosity deserves at least top 3 roast of the year.
  • 2 0
 You didn’t bother reading the review did you?
  • 1 2
 @Twenty6ers4life: of course, that's what "scrolled down straight to comments" mean
  • 4 5
 Would riding this make you the cock of the trail?
  • 3 5
 Wonder when Leo Kokkkkkkkkkkkkkennnnneennneennnen will enter chat and start waging his usual keyboard war?
  • 1 2
 These do not look any better in pictures than in real life...
  • 6 7
 Kill it mit fire
  • 3 6
 Lol, the seat tube is shorter than on some 24, or 26 inch kids bikes. This is peak clown world Thank good it's so ugly too.
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