Review: 3 Mountain Bike Handguards Ridden & Rated

Nov 14, 2022 at 23:44
by Dario D  
For when the going gets tough.


Handguards remain a bit divisive amongst mountain bikers, at least according to some rigorous trailside polling. Some folks think it’s one step too close to moto aesthetics, or just another frivolous accessory to add to your blinged-out bike, while others see them as a useful and valuable component for protection and performance. As handguards see more use on the EWS circuit, I would venture a guess that we’ll start to see them at more trailheads as well, for those things always seem to trickle down.

I’ll be comparing three of the most popular and well-designed options on the market these days in hopes of narrowing down the choice for those looking to keep their knuckles safe and sound.

Prior to the individual examples, though, it’s worth laying out some general thoughts on the genre in general - why even consider running handguards in the first place? The first and most obvious answer is the protection from brush and debris, keeping your tender little fingers safe and sound behind a nice plastic shield. They can glance off trees as well in a pinch, should you cut a corner too close. Another benefit is the protection they provide to your cockpit controls, as brake levers and shifters will no longer be the first thing to hit the ground in the case of a crash, providing the handguards have enough coverage.

The other benefits are a bit less obvious, as they’re more psychological than anything else. There’s something about having the visual cue just beyond your hand that makes cornering feel more committed and secure, almost like the mental effect of knowing you’re wearing kneepads - you can just commit that tiny bit more. Some claim that handguards can help with cold hands in the winter, but I’ve found that unless you’re just flying down a section of road there’s little noticeable difference in chill.

One last unforeseen upside to the cockpit accessories was the addition of another hand position when climbing fire roads and mellower sections of trail. Not unlike inner-mounted bar ends or Togs, the mounts of the handguards allow you to open your palm and still get to the brake lever, giving you a more upright and comfortable climbing position if you should want it.

Each of these options had unique attributes and benefits, so read on to see how each of the handguards shook out on trail.





RevGrips

• MSRP: $79.95
• Measured weight: 131 grams
• Replaceable polycarbonate shield
• Aluminum mount
• Made in California
revgrips.com

With a smokey clear plastic guard and a grey anodized aluminum mount, the RevGrips handguards certainly make the extra accessory look as clean as possible. Thanks to a high arch in the mount, there is no interference with your brakes, though the relatively square faceplate allows for some levers to contact the plastic when the reach is fully extended. This may pose an issue for those that run especially flat brake levers, doubly so when combined with long levers assemblies like that on the SRAM Code.

The hard polycarbonate shield does a great job of holding brush and branches off the bars, keeping your hands and brakes unfazed. That said, that rigidity might bite you if you smack a tree at the wrong angle, as the shield could dig into your hand in a worst-case scenario.
Despite the lack of reach adjust, I do think the RevGrips' mount is the nicest of the bunch, with a smooth feel and small footprint. Per the secondary hand position comment above, these served as the most comfortable perch while rolling along.


Pros
+ Sleek and robust mount
+ Easily replaceable parts

Cons
- Hard plastic shield can do damage in a crash
- Lack of mount length adjustment





SendHit Nock

• MSRP: $66.41
• Measured weight: 170 grams
• Flip chip for lateral and fore-aft adjustment
• Aluminum mount
• Flexible plastic with foam backing
• Made in France
sendhit.com

The Sendhit Nocks have seen some major screentime on the EWS circuit over the past year, as they've been consistently mounted to the front of the overall winner Jesse Melamed's bike at every round. This should bode well, and for the most part it does - the Nocks are quite well made. The coverage is very wide, and just tall enough to do the trick without too much extra material. Thanks to a soft plastic with a foam interior, they should be comfortable in the case of a hard hit or crash.

That said, they are a bit overbuilt compared to the others on test, with more parts and a larger footprint than the other two. The primary frustration here is the mounting clamp, as it can get in the way of certain controls, especially if you're running an AXS controller. The other options have the mount on the frontside of the bar, keeping the back relatively low-profile and out of the way. A small gripe, but with some handlebars as cluttered as they are, every bit counts.

I had the unfortunate opportunity to see how all three options fared in the event of a crash, and found that the relatively soft plastic of the Nocks was the least effective at protecting your controls from getting moved around or damaged. A relatively simple washout still resulted in a turned and marred brake lever, which is frustrating when you're hoping to just hop back on your bike in the middle of a race run.


Pros
+ Largest coverage option
+ Foam and soft plastic for comfort

Cons
- Least robust in a crash
- More parts and a larger footprint than other options
- Mount design conflicts with some controls






AVS Racing

• MSRP: €59.90, ~$66.00
• Measured weight: 105 grams
• Adjustable-length aluminum mount (also available in plastic)
• Flexible plastic shell
• 13 shell colors, 24 decal kits available
avs-racing.com

AVS Racing might be one of the oldest players in this game, as their delightfully vintage website suggests. As the choice of both Sam Hill and Nico Vouilloz, their reputation seems well founded. The AVS shield is the smallest of the group, but the shape is well considered, giving solid protection to your hand, while remaining sleek in the areas you'd tend to extend your fingers to grab brake. Heavily domed, the shield does the best job of the group in glancing branches and brush away from your grip.

The main downside to the AVS design is the relatively flat mount can conflict with some brake lever assemblies, namely the tall master cylinder on Shimanos. This should only be a problem if you run your levers Yoann Barelli flat, but it's still something to consider.


Pros
+ Least interference with other controls
+ Good shape for glancing impacts
+ Tons of wild color options

Cons
- Coverage may not be enough for some
- Won't clear a flat-mounted Shimano lever




Final Thoughts

Each of the handguards here do a solid job of keeping your knuckles un-bloodied, your hands a bit warmer, and your cornering just a tad more committed. The value in each will be up to you and your specific cockpit setup, but for me, there was one option that ended up on my personal bike more than the rest: AVS. They have the smallest form factor, but do just as good a job at keeping your hands protected as the larger alternatives, with the added benefit of being less noticeable while you're riding.

In terms of general fitment and space concerns, both the RevGrips and AVS are best mounted directly inside of the grip, while the Nocks allow for a bit more side-to-side adjustment should you need it.

Though I've been using the alloy mounts for all three options, it's worth noting that AVS is the only brand that makes a plastic version, which strikes me as a wiser move for carbon bars in the case of a crash. I never had an issue with the mounts gouging carbon bars, but it seems like the right (wrong) situation could do some damage.

Those who ride trails that warrant handguards know who they are, and I must say: as a long time skeptic, I now understand the appeal. The protection and crash insurance is one thing, but the weirdly beneficial cornering effect is a big selling point. I can see why folks are running them year round, and for me they'll be a happy companion whenever the brush starts jumping out into the trail again.





269 Comments

  • 150 2
 None of these are named "hand job"? Frown
  • 13 0
 They're trying to avoid people getting hand jobbed, silly. That's what it's called when you clip a tree.
  • 12 0
 Doe Ibis still have that trademarked for their v-brake/canti cable guide?
  • 1 0
 I understand your joke. And it’s on target!
  • 26 0
 "The Fister"
  • 18 0
 @enduroelite: You really had to stoop that low with that comment... and I couldn't be any prouder of you for it!
  • 2 0
 @enduroelite: Bravo sir ...Bravo
  • 14 2
 So a barspin with handguards is a circle-jerk. Wow you guys are gross
  • 2 0
 @sjma: I had the HJ bottle opener in the 90s.
  • 4 0
 If you use you friends guards, is the 'The Stranger'?
  • 4 0
 @bman33: it'll be called the Dutch Rudder
  • 2 0
 I'd love a handjob
  • 1 0
 Anyone else have one of their old school "hand job" one hitters?
  • 2 0
 Maybe they didn't want to tread on Cove's old territory: www.pinkbike.com/news/cove-handjob-shimano-alfine-review-2010.html
  • 4 0
 @toooldtodieyoung: WAKI is prolific in those comments
  • 3 0
 @Dogl0rd: There's a blast from the past! I didn't scroll down far enough.
  • 1 0
 Cove did that years ago.
  • 1 0
 @jeffrocx: I agree. But please never use the word "silly" in that way again. Thanks.
  • 2 0
 Come on Transition, grab it before one of us trademarks it. Make this happen Razz
  • 1 0
 They should offer these at every trail head.
  • 2 0
 @toooldtodieyoung: I've still got one of these, runs mint. total retro sled now. 1x10 xtr on crossmax xl, pike. its a casual random ride choice these days.
I think the naming strategy has played out as I thought it would. RIP COVE
  • 2 0
 @Dogl0rd: what ever happened to WAKI?
  • 1 0
 @nigelnobrakes: no idea, I thought he came back as calmWAKI or something like that for a little while, but haven't seen him
  • 72 1
 Can you get the mounts on the headset?
  • 20 0
 Only ones where the brake hoses go through the handguard arms as well, but also requires you to remove your crankset to adjust the deflector angle.
  • 2 0
 No, only through them
  • 74 32
 Nobody needs these. I’ve rode and raced around the world for 2 decades and with certainty I can say hand-guards are not required. Well I’m making a point .. neither is the slide mitt in MLB. Or a rear wing on a front wheel drive. Or a chain on an empty wallet… you freakin idiots… you know who you are.
  • 68 0
 ... Blundstone workboots in the city... toques/beanies in warm weather... friends according to Quinney...
  • 2 1
 the people developing this stuff are really in the wrong sport
  • 19 2
 @rrolly: blundstones are great winter boots, fight me
  • 2 1
 There's a joke about opinions and nobody needing more of those here somewhere.... Oh nevermind I found it.
  • 17 4
 I'm gonna hard disagree on this one. A get whipped by bushings or clip trees all the time. I run armored gloves instead of hand guards, but I completely get why one would run these.
  • 4 1
 How about basketball players that wear leg sleeves? Is there a sweating epidemic that causes sweat to drip down legs into shoes, thus causing players to slip 'n slide?
  • 4 1
 Needs and wants are two different things. I have them because I want them.
  • 53 2
 "Or a rear wing on a front wheel drive." That is not correct. In a lot of applications, a rear wing on a FWD car is very beneficial. Car's generally tend to generate lift due to their shape, and a rear wing negates the effect from lift making the rear end "floaty". Additionally, FWD cars tend to much more front biased in their weight which can be balanced out a bit at speed by adding a rear wing. Wings and spoilers on vehicles have everything to do with their aerodynamics, not what drive type they are.
  • 2 1
 @Hogosha: I was just going to write something similar; you saved me the bother.
  • 4 1
 I like em...it may be vanity, just like riding boutique brands like Intense.....
  • 8 0
 @Hogosha: 100% understand and agree with your argument; I think he's referring to the 2004 Corolla thats been lowered and has a super loud exhaust.
  • 2 0
 ...battery assisted bicycles...jk I don't care about that.
  • 6 11
flag Benjamin97 (Nov 18, 2022 at 8:36) (Below Threshold)
 @Hogosha: The real question is why would anyone worry about the "performance" of a FWD car. If you want your car to be fun to drive, dont buy a FWD....
  • 3 0
 @Hogosha: Found the guy with the giant triple wing on his FWD car. I'M KIDDING I'M KIDDING - it's just fun to say "found the guy". You'll get old, have kids, and start caring more about how the booster fits than whether the wing matters. Sigh.
  • 3 0
 Dentists watching the value bike field test.
  • 4 1
 @Benjamin97: One of the fastest time attack cars in the world is a FWD....
  • 8 1
 @Intense4life Come ride roto tunnels on overgrown trails and tell me you don't need them. Also, ppl don't realize the wind block from them helps IMMENSELY for winter riding.
  • 1 1
 Have you heard of aerodynamics?
  • 6 1
 @rrolly: the duck is wrong with Blundstones in the city?
You don’t think there’s work to be done in the city?
Clowns
  • 4 9
flag scott-townes (Nov 18, 2022 at 11:20) (Below Threshold)
 To be fair, a rear wing on a front wheel drive reduces control so it does make a big negative difference. Handguards seem like front fenders. They were hated for being a new aesthetically different approach in MTBing and they were not adopted widely because the benefit wasn't worth having it for most. I've whacked a number of trees with my handlebars but luckily I haven't crushed a finger. It makes sense as to why the top enduro riders would have them because they're regularly racing at an insane speed on some narrow trails.
  • 3 8
flag GunnarGunnarGunnar (Nov 18, 2022 at 11:30) (Below Threshold)
 Not only does no one need these, but we need to start actively bullying anyone you see running these. Social pressure is very effective in stamping out bad trends.
  • 3 0
 @scott-townes: How the f does it 'reduce control'???
Do some reading on basic motorsport aerodynamics and get back to me...
  • 1 0
 @Benjamin97: I bet a CTR will smoke whatever you drive around a track.
  • 2 1
 @Hogosha: This helps me understand why my 2000 Subaru Outback Sport had two rear spoilers. Because of the AWD, obviously!
  • 5 3
 Sure bike park bunnies don’t need these but come ride on some real trails and you’ll change your mind
  • 2 0
 If you ride in overgrown trails then these certainly help.
  • 1 0
 @tm2000: to be fair, a large amount of rear downforce, without being balanced with front downforce, either by weight or aero, can contribute to front end lift. Again, only if done without consideration of the front of the cars grip.
@scott-townes is looking at it fairly simplisticly
  • 1 0
 I wouldn’t bother myself but for rides with loads of spikey plants sticking out into the trail they’d be great.
Thankfully there’s not much of that on my local trails but if i was weaving through gorse, blackthorn and brambles a lot I’d probably chop up an old plastic bottle and save myself some bloodied fists and lotsa £€$
  • 2 0
 You are quite right that nobody needs these but they can be very useful. I have ridden in Wharncliffe here in the UK for 25years and never thought that I needed them until I met a very friendly tree that tried to de-glove my ring finger and made quite a reasonable job of it. After that I fitted a pair and take my ring off before I ride. They last well until I turned my bike upside down and promptly stood on one so now they are laid on the bench waiting for a solution to get them back and working. You don't need a lot of things but we do buy a lot of needless things!
  • 4 0
 @Tykebike: you rode for 25 years without them and then one clip was enough for you to think they were necessary? Do you have stanchion guards? Disc covers? Do you wear a cup? Happy trails man.
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Intense isn’t a boutique brand. Those days are long past. If you like them you like em. They just aren’t required.
  • 1 0
 @Hogosha: This guy knows what he's talking about. How do I know? Only real one's use apostrophe's for plural's.
  • 2 0
 @SomethingBikes: Fully agree. I bought fully plastic Acerbis ones last seasont to block the cold wind on the fingies and they really work for that. Then, we had so much overgrowth because of the wet early summer, that they kept my hands from catching random branches as well as my brake levers. Btw, we’re mountain biking, which is not a “need” thing,so choose whatever yiu want and you’ll be right.
  • 2 1
 The reason so many of these are made is because people need them... Dumb comment. Bought last year and I'm going to be having these on every bike I own.
  • 1 1
 @Bunabe: one pair per year? you need a new job. Ask for your allowance to be increased maybe. Window licker.
  • 1 0
 @Intense4life: You aren't even making sense anymore so pretty much concludes this conversation. You are butthurt for some reason who knows.
  • 28 7
 After breaking my hands punching a tree a few years ago I started using the AVS guards and they are worth it. Yes the guards look a bit funny but I can't tell you how many times they've saved my hands since. Even if I clip a tree it has enough protection to dissipate the force and not hurt myself again. I don't run them on my everyday bike but ii run them on my race bike.
  • 12 1
 Would these actually help in your case?
  • 72 1
 What did the tree say that made you punch it?
  • 47 2
 @IluvRIDING: I've had AVS for a year or so now, they don't really do anything in terms of proper impact protection and even make you a bit more likely to hit things you'd have otherwise missed. I love them with a burning passion though and are worth every penny of the £55 i spent on them. Things they do do: 1) look well moto and therefore fast 2) keep your hands warmer 3) sort of protect your brakes in a crash 4) annoy people
  • 11 0
 @pbuser2299: they also keep brush from catching your brake levers if you're off trail doing some bushwhackin.
  • 3 1
 teeth guards are this years must have
  • 27 0
 @fatduke: the tree told him to leave.
  • 3 0
 @fatduke: it was looking at his bird
  • 9 0
 You broke your hands - plural? Broke both hands on a tree? What in the hell did you do?!
  • 2 0
 @pbuser2299: Ha ha I too have a pair and have noticed similar results - the biggest benefit I think is brake lever protection in a crash, followed by deflecting sticks and things that might otherwise have hit my arthritic little finger nuckles (jeebus it hurts when that happens), followed by annoying my kids because they think my bike looks ugly...
  • 1 0
 Yeah the AVS seem to work, offering some protection for fingers and brake levers against trees, mother earth and smaller hits when charging through something. (Cutting down the bars also helps when wiggling through trees.)

They are not very durable though. I have broken few of those mounts which is better than my fingers ofc. I dont know if it is intentional but the handlebar mounting screw is on the fracture plane and/or there is too little material around it, the mount cracks around it.
  • 19 0
 @nyhc00: I'm pretty sure the tree must have barked something that triggered some deep-rooted feelings.
  • 3 0
 @pbuser2299: #2! This is what I was wondering. As the temps dip into winter I am looking for ways to keep my hands warm.
  • 3 0
 @porkchopsandwich: Pogies for the win for warmth. Nothing better.
  • 2 0
 @catoctinmountaincyclery: Im too vain to rock those....
  • 2 0
 @porkchopsandwich: pogies get too hot for me, handgaurds make a hoge difference in the cold. I only use mine for winter riding. Gaurds didn't save me from breaking 3 fingers already.
  • 1 0
 @lifeofloon That must have been a wide tree to break both hands
  • 2 0
 @fatduke:
"Intense4life (3 hours ago) - Nobody needs these. I’ve rode and raced around the world for 2 decades and with certainty I can say hand-guards are not required. Well I’m making a point .. neither is the slide mitt in MLB. Or a rear wing on a front wheel drive. Or a chain on an empty wallet… you freakin idiots… you know who you are."
  • 2 0
 @ddmonkey: Or deflecting the sapling that would overwise cause an instant and OTB creating brake lock!
  • 1 0
 @IluvRIDING: yes I believe the AVS that I use would have. The guard would have taken the brunt of the force and not my hand. I believe it would have been enough to prevent it from breaking.
  • 2 0
 @duncanstrohnd: right hand, darn auto correct. I was too lazy to ride the stage pre race and misjudged one of the final corners.
  • 1 0
 @fatduke: dad joke
  • 2 0
 @pbuser2299: I came here to ask what they're for, and you've given me the answers; mainly keep your hands warm and piss people off. I might have to invest...
  • 2 0
 @ddmonkey: This is right on point for me.

My AVS guards are 85% for protecting my brake levers, 15% for my fingers. Mainly cause only my index and part of my middle finger are covered LOL

I've unintentionally stuffed the bars a few times into roots and rocks this season. Definitely would've scarred up the whole master cylinder, if not broken it completely. Definitely some added peace of mind since I started running Magura's. I may take them off my daily driver and put them back on for wet days, but they'll be living on my park bike for sure.
  • 1 0
 Do you think it will protect my lilttle finger when I hit a tree? I’ve broke my finger few weeks ago and had an operation Frown
  • 2 0
 @pbuser2299: I'm buying them just to achieve #4 like you listed.
  • 1 0
 @andrewbikeguide: THIS! A real problem riding steep tech low speed stuff in twisty birch woods. Your fingers are real weak at preventing unwanted brake snags.
  • 17 1
 As much as I hate how these look, I have to say that they do an excellent job of keeping wind off your hands when it’s super cold and wet out. Up here in bham they also shield you from water laden trees/bushes. Unfortunately I hate how they look so much I can’t run em, but people less stupid and proud than me may benefit.
  • 1 0
 This is what I was wanting to see.

I’m in the PNWet as well, and I’ve considered them for wind/wet protection in the winter, then raspberry/stinging nettle protection in the spring.

Do they actually do much in the way of windchill/hand warmth? And how much of the wet foliage does it actually help prevent against?

It’s not cold enough for pogies around here. But cold enough that you want your brisker gloves, and are thinking of more sometimes.
  • 6 0
 @ocnlogan: I'm in Bend and have used handguards for three years now. In the cold months, I can use 1 stage lighter gloves than without them. Absolutely worth it to me, as the thicker the glove, the less bar feel when going fast.

I honestly don't give a rip what other people think about how my bike looks. The benefits in cold weather and keeping the sharp bushes off my hands are worth it for me. Do they save you from hard tree punches? No. Can you still get whipped by some branches? Yes. Will your hands still get wet from the bushes? Yes, but far less than without.
  • 2 0
 Dang I was thinking of commenting and mentioning you but you’re way too on top of it
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: I pretty much avoid using gloves whenever possible and these help me do that. Or run a thin glove sometimes. Brake levers are still cold af, but yeah these keep your fingers and tops of hands drier and warmer. I’ve got rev ones, which are kinda small, and the steepness of the trail dictates the angle a little bit. But I love them.
  • 4 1
 @andrewfif: Miles Wide Sticky fingers will stop the cold brake levers (and so do carbon brake levers BTW).

@ ocnlogan I find the guards deflect about 67.3% of the water that is sitting on bushes/ tree branches/ other trail users that stop in the middle trail junctions. No just kidding but quite a bit is the non quantitative answer.

The biggest pluses for me are:
1. no torn open back of hands/ fingers (gloveless) due to my lack of ability to tell the difference between hard and spikey baby trees and soft and bendy baby trees (there are botanists cringing out there I know).
2. Not having to compromise on front wheel line choice because an other wise spikey/ grabby sapling is growing next to that part of the trail, and
3. No unexpected brake lock when a branch or a sapling impacts the front brake lever when you were not anticipating it (which is usually combined with points 1 & 2 above and generally whilst hauling into something steep and rocky!!).

In addition some of ride in places where there are a lot of kilometres and very few (relatively ) riders and trail maintainers so the saplings grow in beside the trail and in some places the Shepherdia is 6-8' tall and dense AF.
Being able to ride through those sections without having one's hands stripped raw is worth the pfaff.

Are the ugly AF? Yes. Do I care what someone else thinks that I run them on my bike? Heck no.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: l use them on my winter bike here in bc , they provide great protection from impacts , also excellent on wet and cold days
  • 1 0
 @andrewfif:

Gotcha
  • 1 1
 Do people not own gloves?
  • 1 0
 @tuftjse: Try gloves made for Nordic skiing. All the insulation is on the back of the hand. Same bar feel, better warmth.
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: I'm in the PNW and starting running them about a year ago. Most of my riding/trails are old school "primitive" trails in lowlands, so lots of brush (nettles, black berries) growing into/along/over trails. The guards make a big difference in keeping your hands from getting snagged, ripped from bars. Also help to clear the brush so I can focus on charging down the trails. Also not getting soaked after rains, or from plants holding water. Seems like I finish rides with 'drier' gloves than normal. I'm a former Moto desert/enduro guy, hand guards and fanny packs don't bother me from an ascetics standpoint. Been using them for decades.
  • 14 0
 I'll stick with the Acerbis X-Elite MTB handguards for $20-$30 less than all three options here. Also, why wouldn't the Acerbis guards be included in this comparison? Seems silly to omit a brand that has been making handguards for nearly 50 years.
  • 2 0
 I thought the same thing honestly.
  • 3 0
 I have the Acerbis X-Elite on both my enduro and DH bikes, they are great, saved my levers and shifters more than once
  • 2 0
 Also running them and liking them
  • 1 0
 Fully agree. Bought a set and really like them. For a part that you want to crumple instead of destroy your expensive bars, plastic seems like the way to go.
  • 8 0
 I have the VCGuards handguards and love them! Pros: line choice coming into corners with shrubbery on inside, brake lever protection, brake lever protection from shrubbery (we have bushes that’ll grab your levers!), wind protection, being able to not wear gloves in brushy areas resulting in less arm pump, function as mini TT bars when going up long fireroad climbs, and i think they look cool.
Cons: clearance on hitch mounted bike racks, aerodynamics, aesthetics for some people, and the “feels weird seeing them there” phenomenon.

It literally takes A ride to get used to them- then maybe another because you realize what poor line choice you’ve been taking because of trying to avoid bushes.
  • 7 0
 Thanks for the positive post. Not sure why we didn't included in this review?
Been around longer than anyone and have the most shield adjustability.
vcguards.com
  • 3 0
 @VCGraphix: I bought a pair of VC Guards last year that I am super happy with. I love them on my fat bike and attest they do help keep your hands from further cooling off when the wind chill is blocked. Definitely nice for the overgrown stuff too. Well built too.
  • 5 0
 @pgm83: thanks for the support!
  • 1 0
 @VCGraphix: one of the most underrated upgrades on mountain bikes and fatbikes for sure. Haters will hate and pinkbike wont always acknowledge the OG’s. We still love you. A lot.
  • 1 0
 I've been running both the VC guards and Sendhits. The Sendhits get the vote for looks, protection from the harder hits, and a lower profile mount on the bars makes it easier to mount the light controller. The VC guards are definitely better for wind protection, with a larger size, and the split clamp is much easier for installation/removal, although the new Sendhit design appears to have caught up in that regard.

Overall, I'm astounded by the vitriol in the comments. Tossing a bike around, cornering hard on singletrack frequently means leaning into thorns, thistles, brush, saplings, etc. depending upon region. Like riding a dropper posts 15 years ago, you don't know until you tried it and once you do, you won't want to go back.

And your riding a bike in the woods. If you're trying to look cool, I can assure you that mountain biking isn't it.
  • 13 3
 Motorcycle yes, bicycle no.
  • 6 0
 These things are so stupid but I've been struggling to not buy a pair of one brand or another for years... I ride natural trails almost exclusively, plenty of tree clipping and pinky bashing for me...
  • 5 0
 I have a set of Rev guards on my race bike, and so far I have been enjoying them. I added them for a few reasons: I build a lot of new trail, and when riding things in it's easy to get twigged by brush you've yet to cut back - with the guards on I can test ride stuff before cutting more than I need to, and trim trail afterward to not kill off as much of the forest. In a similar vein, riding a lot of unsanctioned trail or "secret lines" often means there is overgrowth.

I also found in an EWS race this year (Sugarloaf) that my bars were too wide (780, now 760) to commit in certain sections, so I cut them down and added guards to see how I felt about them. The first few rides I found them almost invasive, and they messed with my peripheral vision a lot. After running them on my bike everyday for a while, I eventually found the opposite to be true. I can see my bars more clearly when I get forward in chunk and need to push through, and once you get used to them, you can position hands closer to tress without worrying about being wrong and hitting your finger first.

As for the winter warmth aspect, we ride in -10 and snow on the east coast, so anything to break wind is nice... Even if its just placebo.

Note: I run the Revs with MT7s, and there is no fitment issues at all.
  • 4 0
 You cant race enduro with 760 bars. Thats about where bar spin territory starts
  • 3 0
 In case anyone else is in the same position, the AVS Handguards work well with Magura MT-series disc brake levers (I use the HC1 blade but a friend uses the standard longer alloy blade, neither of us have any issues with positioning). From the measurements I did, the SendHit ones wouldn't work with them.

Would definitely recommend the AVS guards in any case! I've crashed a few times and they've protected my fragile Magura levers. We have quite a lot of overgrown trails here during summers and they've been great for fending that stuff off too - you can just charge through it all without getting your hands shredded or having them snag your levers. I've clipped a few trees with them and they help glance off those kinds of impacts too. They're surprisingly good for keeping your hands dry too when you ride wet trails!

Overall, I've had mine on for about 18 months now and the guards have some pretty big scratches and gouges all over them. I'm glad they're on the guards rather than my hands. Aesthetically they aren't incredible, but they're so good functionally I don't see myself taking them off any time soon.
  • 5 1
 Ok, how about this... If you ride park days with a group of buddies, do a timed run/race at the end of the day. Whoever loses each outing has to install a pair of these onto their bike for the next group park day!
  • 3 0
 We got hit with fires back in 2017, and after that, we got a bunch of overgrowth - especially the prickly stuff. It's not a nice feeling getting needles in your knuckles at 20mph, or having bushes grab your brake levers. I started using hand guards back then for brush protection and never looked back. I can hug tight lines, and the guards knock the overgrowth out of the way. It's nice just to not feel anything brush up against my hands at all while I'm riding, and they make a big difference in keeping my hands warmer when it's cold, due to wind protection. They're not at all for tree protection - I know this from experience. They won't make much difference there unless they're also anchored at the ends of the bar as well. I started using the AVS guards, but the problem I ran into is they're so stiff, they snap when I crash. I've gone through several of them. I later found VC Guards and love them. I initially thought they were a bit ugly, but they're bigger to deflect more brush, have a ton of adjustment range, and they flex enough to not snap.
  • 3 0
 Thanks for the support!
  • 5 0
 I expected some shots or videos with scienntific wild rides through bushes...pretty disapointed Wink
  • 5 0
 Or use a set of mx hand guards which are just the same thing and can be had for half the price of the cheapest one on test.
  • 2 0
 I have AVS on one bike and Rev on the other, both work fine and no issues with Code levers. I've had AVS for years now, wouldn't be without hand guards as there's tons of poorly maintained social trail in the area. Seems hand guards are like bidets, and there's 2 kinds of people.... those without them and those who never want to be without them.
  • 2 0
 I've fitted Rtech hand guards to my daughter's tagalong. They do help with 2 things. The job they were made for, protecting her hands from gorse bushes (we have a lot of them around here) and secondly they keep the wind chill off her hands. She has noticed a difference and said it is warmer with them. I'm to vane to fit them to my bikes lol
  • 3 0
 You made a roundup of handguards and didn't include the undoubtedly market leader in the moto realm (Acerbis) that makes a solid but cheap MTB option? I guess they didn't give you a set for free is why they weren't included?
  • 4 0
 or VCGuards which have been around for years. and we did give them a set for free previously.
  • 2 0
 The thing that everyone here missed is the MAIN selling point of the AVS guards. None of these guards will fully stop a tree from bending the guard back into your hand. They're not barkbusters with a substantial wrap around alloy frame. Hence the importance of the foam on the AVS guards to protect your hand when the guard bends back during a crash. Jesse Melamed has specifically mentioned this in recent interviews.
  • 1 2
 why not just wear gloves with knuckle guards......mtb handguards are merely wind shields. stupid useless bling
  • 3 0
 @jokermtb: But... they're not? The amount of foam impact protection on the inside of the AVS handguard is significantly thicker than what you could comfortable wear as part of a glove.

Again, Jesse Melamed has credited it recently with saving his hand.
  • 1 0
 @jokermtb: It doesn't work the same. Handguards protect the brake lever and your hand from impacts. Gloves with knuckle guards don't work the same.
  • 3 0
 I like my Loamlab counterpunch they're minimal and have definitely saved my pinky finger & knuckle from breaking on tree strikes. I like their small diameter grips too
www.loamlab.bike/products/counterpunch
  • 1 0
 +1 for the Loamlabs counterpunch. not protection against brush, but surprisingly effective against trees. and the bar just seems to slide past the tree instead of really turning the bar.
  • 1 0
 Ditto. Theyre great and low key. They just seem to deflect your bar from catching things.
  • 1 0
 I've been considering these but I run single lock on Ergon Grips. Been curious if anyone's modified them to work with counterpunch.
  • 1 0
 @iduckett: I have the ergon GA-2 Fat grips. The rubber ends peeled off long ago after crashes, so I didn't even need to modify the grips to fit the counterpunch. I originally bought the full grip, but the small grip size was an issue so I ditched the grips and just use the counterpunch piece now. Be aware, the counterpunch adds about a cm each side of width.
  • 2 0
 Hmmmm, never put on a comment before so here goes, I ride narrow cliff paths with gorse on either side!! Fed up with picking thorns out me knuckles so hand gaurds are a no brainer . The look sucks but the pain relief is massive!
  • 6 1
 Because my bars aren’t cluttered enough.
  • 18 0
 Have you thought about a Scott Genius? Wink
  • 30 0
 @korev: The 2023 Genius will have cable actuated handguards.
  • 7 0
 @browntown40: Yeah but they'll be internally routed through the bars, headset, and back to the bars. So no big deal.
  • 4 0
 @browntown40: That extend into wing mirrors.
  • 5 0
 If you need these things, then you need to do maintenance on your trails or your riding.
  • 3 1
 @EnduroManiac: You guys are both missing the point! Save your money and stop wasting your time with cable actuated relics. Everybro who is a bro knows the upcoming wireless actuated handguards are the way of the future. More batteries = way more better! You can thank me later.
  • 9 4
 All about them on my moto but 0 chance on a pedal bike
  • 6 6
 They're just not necessary. You're not going fast enough on a pedal bike for them to be necessary. Even the fastest DH riders in the world don't run em. If you're busting your hands up going 5-10mph on a pedal bike than something else is wrong with you.
  • 4 1
 @yoimaninja:
Some enduro pros use them. If you ride downhill, the speed is comparable to moto. I dont have them on the DH rig because that mostly sees parks and built trails. On the enduro though, I do single trails, "unofficial trails" and exploring.
  • 4 1
 @JudgeJor: Some enduro pros use the

- sponsors.
  • 4 0
 @t-stoff: Jesse talked about this in a podcast, but my understanding is that Jesse actually just bought a set of these handguards to try without talking to the company. The company saw them in photos, and started using those photos of Jesse for marketing. Jesse said you can't really do that if you're not a sponsor, so then the company sent the Rocky team a bunch of product.
  • 2 0
 Ive never seen a DH pro using them, as their trails are usually super wide. But pro enduro riders you do see using them pretty often.

Jesse Melamed, and Sam Hill both notably run hand guards either full time, or just “quite often”.

Jesse started running his a while after breaking some fingers. So maybe that’s related/the reason? Not sure for Sam.
  • 2 1
 @t-stoff: Forgot that DH pros don't get sponsors, sorry!!
  • 1 1
 @ocnlogan: Yeah because DH runs are maintained to the highest standard so the argument is pretty stupid that DH riders don't use handguards.
  • 3 0
 What about the grips with the small pinky protector? It’s a lower protection item but for people riding maintained bike park laps would they be a better choice?
  • 3 0
 I can see how those little finger protectors might help specifically for your little finger, but having run AVS guards for a year and a half now I find the biggest advantages are the protection from ferns/bracken/branches/spiky-nature and the protection for my levers in crashes. I've clipped trees with the AVS' on, and they did help glance off impacts, so that's certainly a bonus but not my primary reason for them.
  • 1 0
 Loam Labs Counterpunches? I have these and they're great - they help with tree clips as well.
  • 1 0
 I run Ergon GP-3's. First off, helps me keep my hand from rotating under the bar when I get lazy/tired. And the mini bar-end grip might be a bit long for some people's taste but it does curve to the inside so a little less chance of catching stuff. They offer a small amount of protection in so much as they keep your hand from the very end of the bar and the bar end grip should hit an obstacle first.

www.ergonbike.com/en/product-details.html?a=griffe&s=gptouring&anr=42410036

I just use the extra position for long easy climbs. I don't think I ride the same type of trails or as fast as some here do so can't speak first hand on the protection piece. They also have the slightly smaller GP-2.
  • 3 1
 I’ve been thinking about hand guards for the emtb, which I mostly use for trail work and exploring overgrown relics of old trails. Plus they’ll make me look like even more of a kook.
  • 4 0
 Anyone rocking VC Guards?
Curious how you might throw those up against these above
  • 5 0
 I am, and I like them a lot. I tried the AVS and they didn't work with my cockpit setup (smaller hands, xt brakes, a bell). The VC guards had a lot more adjustability making it possible to run them on either side of the XT levers. Also I find they have a lot more coverage. I almost always ride without gloves and a lot of places I ride have a good amount of overgrown bush. My hands stay cut free. I've also punched a couple trees, they deflect into the knuckles sometimes on those bigger hits, but that is to be expected and still better without them.

I like them so much I bought a second pair for my hardtail or when I show up to a ride I know is super overgrown and give them to a buddy. They are really fast to install.
  • 1 0
 @jasbushey: great feedback and appreciate the response! Was between VC Gurds and the AVS but after that, I’ll try out and order some VC Guards!
  • 3 0
 I have a pair. I like them. I exploded my hand a couple years ago and slapping trees and branches with the outside or top of my hand sucks. VC rips. The folks that own that company rip. You can get some custom fork graphics from their other company... victory graphix. Fully support them and their product.
  • 2 0
 @jasbushey: thanks for the support!
  • 3 0
 Love my VC Guards, haters are gonna hate. In the two years I've been using them they've saved me countless times.
  • 3 0
 I do and love them. I got tired of snapping the AVS ones every time I crashed, cause they're so stiff, so I tried out the VC Guards after seeing them on a few different pros' bikes.

I like them so much cause they're bigger to deflect more brush (we have a lot of overgrowth and prickly bushes here after getting hit by fires), have plenty of adjustment range, and they flex enough to not snap.
  • 3 0
 Here in Arizona sometimes we need some hand protection for all the different bushes , cactus or pointy things that grow in the side of the trails.
  • 2 0
 I tagged some large, but otherwise innocuous looking flower riding in AZ near my parents cabin, and felt some hand pain.

Turns out it had left a 3/16” or so long thorn completely embedded/hidden in the soft tissue just to the side of my fingernail. It took me a week to notice that it wasn’t just soreness from the impact, and dig it out.

So yeah, if you ride anywhere where you are hitting brushy trails at speed, this seems like it could be worth it.
  • 5 0
 @ocnlogan: 3/16"? How long is that in football fields?
  • 4 0
 @bigtim:

About 0.000052 football fields, or 0.000043 football pitches, depending on which "football" you meant.

Or about ~4-5mm (ok, 4.7625mm for that one guy that wants to know) for those not wanting to bother visualizing how small of a chunk it is of a sporting play area.
  • 4 1
 Anyone remember those longer, 90º curved bar ends from the 80s/90s? They will serve for this purpose and have additional function on the climb up.
  • 1 0
 I remember when I was a kid on my full suspension Schwinn. Are used to try to fabricate hand guards and fenders out of anything I could to make my full suspension seem more like a dirt bike. These look awesome can’t wait to try
  • 4 0
 What about the VC Guards? I like that you can adjust how far in or out they sit.
  • 3 0
 Exactly. we have the most adjustability of any to work with any cockpit configuration.
  • 1 0
 Wonder if the popularity of these will last as long as neck braces' Big Grin
Few years back, everyone looked weird to you, if you had no neck brace, even for a Sunday afternoon ride through the park. It was so important for your safety, that NOONE use them anymore, not even @ UCI DH races.
Live long overrated bike products!

BTW, it's just as stupid thing, as the derailleur guard decades ago Smile ) During a crash could cause more problems than protection it has. But don't listen to me, hurry, go and buy +130g of weight for $80, then cry because of your titanium screw kit for your bike costs $300, while saving you around 27g Wink

Spend smart, not hard.
  • 1 0
 cant wait for mtb axle slider protectors come out......this is ridiculous
  • 1 0
 Adding plastic to various parts of your bike just makes sense. If only someone would invent some kind of plastic disc that could protect the spokes of the rear wheel from dropped chains. Since so many people clearly ride gnarly bush-lined trails, it would also keep sticks out of at least part of the rear spokes saving many crashes and expensive damage. I'd pay $69 for that in a heartbeat!
  • 1 0
 These are one of those things I find intriguing. Then I ask myself, remember that time in my 39 years of mountain biking that I hurt my hand on a trail obstruction? No because I have never hurt myself that way. I have torn a glove or two. I have struck branches but it’s never really bothered me. But there are probably places in the world where these would be a great idea. That place isn’t here though.
  • 1 0
 Handguards are STUPID. Look at any motorcycle hand guard and they're designed to actually protect the 'end of your bar'!!! These ridiculous devices reviewed above, are merely wind deflectors. Stop being nice to this rubbish, Pinkbike. Call it out for what it is.
  • 2 0
 If you run these you'd better be wearing a full face all the time. You are way more likely to take it on the chin than crush your hand. Also, just loosen your controls on the bars so they rotate instead of breaking.
  • 2 0
 PB should look into small companies, too

there's a little company in Israel called Elephant Skin witch makes cool hand guards at really cheap price!

elephantskin.co/en
  • 1 0
 it would be interesting to see a reviews of more guards. I have Acerbis X-Elite hand guards, I think they will clear all flat mounted brakes, I run Formula Cura 4 at flat angle, the plastic arm is arched to clear brakes. The guard sits far enough out, also covers most of the brake, only the hose seal, is exposed. I see Mr-Wolf does similarly, but I've not tried them yet. The screws are PZ2/Pozidriv 2 mm, so if you don't have that you can't tighten them properly, and most if not all multi-tools don't have it.
  • 2 0
 IMO, that's a poor and lazy design. It needs to clamp to the bar where it already is and mount inside/on the end of the bar to have proper strength.
  • 1 0
 use a plastic milk carton instead....prolly works better!
  • 3 1
 80 USD for a little piece of plastic bolted on a clamp. While I have nothing against hand guards, these prices are the rip off of the year....
  • 5 0
 Right up there with dropper levers.
  • 3 0
 VCGuards.com $59.95 and USA company.
  • 2 2
 the entire reason moto racer use this style handguard is to protect their hands from roost from other riders... which doesnt occur in mtb. For legitimate hand protection you need a proper full wrap hand guard. All of these options will likely push right into your hand or break if you were to actually tank a tree full on - soo they dont actually provide any real protection, and are completely pointless. The loamlab counterpunch is more beneficial for mtb, as it actually protects your outside finger.
  • 4 1
 Full wrap around guards are very dangerous in our opinion. And we come from a moto background.
in a crash, your hand needs to be able to escape out the end. I have seen more broken wrist from wrap
around "bash guards" in moto. Also heavy and bad idea to connect into end of bar.
  • 3 0
 @VCGraphix: Potentially dangerous on the track, pretty much mandatory for riding trails though unless you like broken hands and levers.
  • 2 1
 @VCGraphix: i come from a enduro riding/racing moto background as well (before i got into mtb), in the many years spent both riding and racing I saw far more injuries like smashed/broken hands from non-full wrap hand guards than full wrap...
  • 1 1
 Pretty dumb comment on your part. Yes they provide protection. The AVS ones bend but that doesn't matter. They both protect the hands from impact but also the brake levers from branches. They are absolutely great for anyone who rides actual mtb and not just downhill centers.
  • 1 1
 @Bunabe: not a dumb comment at all, the guard bending will matter when you smash a tree and it pushes directly into your hand/fingers... If your worried about your brakes, then just run them loose enough that they can move when you crash. Im also sure if you run carbon bars, the mounting bracket will become a fairly high stress area if you were to hit a tree as most of the force would be redirected to that fixed point.
  • 1 1
 @qman11: It unfortunately is dumb. I actually own and use handguards so I'm speaking from experience rather than ignorance like you.

The guard bending is a fine feature because it doesn't break. If it did break it wouldn't protect. The guard pushing into the hand is good compared to just crashing your hand into a tree. So again ignorant just completely wrong. I've actually had this happen so again actual knowledge and experience.

The guards protect the brakes from tree branches. There's no replacement. So again completely ignorant in the advantage the guards give you.

They are a thing because they are useful and everyone who tries them likes them... You look pretty stupid buddy.
  • 1 0
 @Bunabe: I am speaking from having 20+ years using handguards riding/racing enduro moto... I have seen plenty of people break hands using this style of hand guard - as if they had no guards at all. There are plenty of times when riding in the bush dirtbiking that speeds are similar to that of riding DH, so I would argue that yes my experience is valid. Saying that I dont think these offer any actual protection compared a full wrap style handguard doesnt make my comments ignorant at all...
  • 1 2
 @qman11: The problem is I know what you are saying from experience is false. It provides protection simple as that. Even in case of a crash. And the kinda crash where you actually have your hand squished is so rare that I think you are also full of shit saying you've seen many people brake their hands.
  • 1 0
 @Bunabe: lol okay. Now were at the point of just claiming someone elses experiences are false? What reason do I have to lie hahaha. Thanks for the laugh hahaha I could then say the same about all of your claims or "experiences." Your entitled to your opinion, and im entitled to mine lol
  • 1 1
 @qman11: You admitted you have no experience. You are talking about moto. Not mtb. I have actual experience using these guards and actually getting my hand crushed. And from actual experience I can telly you are wrong.
  • 1 1
 How to look like a complete joke on the trails..

Branches on the trail? -> Gloves & snips
Cold hands? -> Gloves
Crash protection for breaks? -> Tighten the mount to just move before bending
Full impact on tree? -> Gloves & crash, bars rotate and take the impact. Same with handguards just 6cm sooner.
Ride behind a moto with high speed on a track spitting out chunky rocks? -> Handguards
  • 1 0
 Complete joke is a full grown man who is such a snowflake to care about what others think. Like a child. Pretty pathetic. Handguards are great. Been riding with them for the last year and will ride with handguards on all my bikes.
  • 1 0
 Don't be a coward, just punch the tree. Side note, I find it really funny that bar in's like Togs are not UCI Legal, but hand guards like these are, just more ways the UCI makes no sense
  • 2 0
 AVS' design not working with one of the top two brake manufacturers is rather an omission...
  • 1 0
 How?
  • 5 2
 would rather punch a tree
  • 2 0
 Yeah but what if the tree punches back?
  • 2 0
 @nozes: I probably deserved it
  • 1 0
 I tend to ride with my hands on the outsides of the grips, so I've been wanting to try counterpunch. I wonder if these combined with counterpunch would be effective...
  • 9 9
 Great for e-kooks and Sam Hill and real dirt bikes PERIOD end of story.

Just silly for MTB and I’ve broken tips of fingers on branches so I’m know and still won’t ride a MTB with them. Just silly.
  • 1 0
 I think the only reason I could see having them is winter use to reduce the cold wind flowing over your hand. But otherwise...100% agree.
  • 2 0
 These all look like someone made them in their basement with a pair of scissors.
  • 1 0
 Isn’t that long aluminum arm with a narrow clamp around your bar likely to take a hit and score/ stress your fancy carbon bar?
  • 1 0
 That was a handy review. Hands down the most informative. Gotta hand it to Pinkbike for being on top of the latest in MTB. Have you hand enough?
  • 1 0
 I love my AVS. They are strong and flex and saved my hands many times from thorny bushes. they also look good and used by Sam Hill...
  • 3 0
 these are the best guards, made in Golden CO. vcguards.com
  • 1 0
 If you're racing and need to dangle through trees, hand guards make sense! If not, you don't need them and look like a complete dweeb - slow down a touch and avoid the tree.
  • 3 0
 Acerbis X-Elite MTB Handguards for $ 36 motosport.com
  • 1 0
 Seriously though. Way better value.
  • 1 0
 Better to have pivots on the handlebar so that the ends can easily deflect whenever it hits a tree. That should alleviate the impact on the hands.
  • 1 0
 Brake lever guards - high utility and not mentioned in this article. No bigger bummer than having an errant vine grab ur front brake at speed
  • 4 1
 Now those are HANDY!!
  • 2 0
 I guess I don't cut corners enough.
  • 2 0
 Time for a visit to France? Wink
  • 2 1
 Now Pinkbike has content for people who like to punch trees while attempting to ride bikes. Good job being inclusive!
  • 2 0
 Yes! We want more reviews for people in the forces.
  • 2 0
 Can we route them internally through the headset????
  • 2 0
 Only way I'd use these is if I consistently biked in colder temps.
  • 1 2
 If you're gonna do handguards, do handguards, not these flimsy things. I am guessing barkbusters will eventually make it over to MTB world: www.adventurespec.com/barkbusters
  • 1 0
 Not that I'm condoning handguards but they could easier be modified to fit an MTB. No need to wait for the MTB version that will inevitably cost three times as much.
  • 1 0
 @Hogosha: barkbusters are really fun when going otb
  • 1 0
 @HardtailHerold: Hmm, would be interesting to see someone give it a go. It's just....there's a reason why you don't see these bendy things on motos- they don't stand up to any real impact. If you wanna protect your brake levers and knuckles, protect your brake levers and knuckles!
  • 1 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: you can get your hands stuck in them, hit the ground and then the bike bounces and gives your hands/wrists/arms a hard yank. It’s pretty rare, but the chance isn’t 0.
  • 2 0
 I've ran these on my moto, but I don't see a point on mountain bikes. Mountain bikes are easier to maneuver to avoid contact and the speeds are slower. The ones I use on my mountain bikes (VC guards) I use primarily for bushes, not broken hands. It would just add more weight.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if the reviewer has done an extensive series of crash to to test the efficiencies of the reviewed components?
  • 1 0
 Fox Bomber gloves. They work great in the cold too and last far longer than regular gloves.
  • 1 1
 Acerbic failed with handguards in the late 80s. Best reason for handguards? Deflecting cold air during winter rides. Otherwise a useful as a dork disk.
  • 2 0
 + pros: You look like Sam Hill
- cons: You can’t ride like Sam Hill
  • 1 0
 i guess some people might find these beneficial. but i have never felt like this is something i needed.
  • 1 0
 maybe we should have some proper front and rear fenders for our bikes before moving onto these.
  • 1 0
 These would fit perfectly on the 2001 Specialized Enduro. Those who know, know.
  • 1 0
 Holding out for the heated version with integrated turn signals and direct range extender battery integration
  • 1 0
 Anyone run AVS with Hope brakes? Wondering if there's interference to worry about.
  • 6 9
 I don't care how people think they look, I mean why the hell would you? I don't care how they look. What I do like is how they protect my hands and brake levers from getting torn up and the lever breaking. When I fall and put the bike down it also slides on the guards instead of my cockpit which is great especially considering the Acerbis ones are $30 versus the cost of other cockpit parts.
  • 1 0
 WTF. Lol not required. When you fall?
  • 1 0
 @Intense4life: I don't really understand your question? Do people just not crash? Lmao
  • 1 0
 pure fantasy
  • 1 1
 AVS work great with Shimano brake levers. I run the combo on two of my bikes.
  • 2 0
 Off you ran your brakes Barelli flat could you flip the guard mints over to run under the lever?
  • 1 2
 @wobblegoblin: Sure you can. If you don't use a shifter or dropper post lever, should work!
  • 2 0
 Nevermind
  • 1 0
 Those controls are pretty far inboard.
  • 6 5
 How to identify a tool, 101.
  • 1 1
 Look at you all being able to identify yourself! Amazing
  • 1 1
 Whats nice is sometimes when you crash the guard hits first and digs into the mud and keeps your grips clean.
  • 3 1
 Fugly
  • 1 0
 These scream my wife wouldn't let me buy a scrambler.
  • 1 0
 Chickens dont have hands.
  • 1 0
 Would these work for gravel?
  • 1 1
 Ebikes becoming motorcycles piece by piece. Soon they will be getting rid of the pedaling for pegs, lol.
  • 1 0
 Big logic
  • 1 0
 Things you didn't know you didn't need....
  • 1 0
 No acerbis guards? Those looked nice.
  • 1 0
 Bluetooth version that folds for parking your ebike coming soon
  • 2 1
 Bar ends do it better!
  • 3 4
 As lame as ebikes and bikepack racing all in the same category..oh and trail dogs too
  • 1 0
 Friday review fails
  • 1 0
 weiner
  • 1 4
 RevGrips grips & hand covers and you're set.





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