Review Roundup: 6 Flat Pedal Shoes Tested for 2022

Oct 19, 2022 at 14:50
by Samuel McMain  

When I think of a flat pedal shoe, I think about moon boots. Not the ones that left footprints on the actual moon. Those had terrible lateral pin retention. I mean the big, chunky, fake leather, sofa-cushioned, moon boots that were the original Five Ten Impacts. When push came to shove and you needed a burly pair of kicks for serious riding, those were probably—no, definitely—the best option on the market. You could essentially kick rotten stumps out of the ground, land old-school drops-to-flat, and come away without a single broken metatarsal. 

Love them or hate them (probably both at the same time), the flat pedal shoe market has historically been pretty limited compared to the wide world of clipless options. Sure, there have been myriad new offerings lately, but if I’m honest, few, if any, stack up to what Five Ten has been doing for years. Usually, grip is the main shortfall; I have not found a shoe that truly goes toe to toe with Five Ten in terms of dynamic, on-bike grip. Some shoes might feel just as grippy in a parking lot test, but bouncing down the trail, they just can’t hang. Do some riders want less grip? Absolutely, but I would posit that the vast majority want maximum stick because, well, flat pedals are really, really sharp.

With all that in mind, the last two seasons have seen major strides made in the flat pedal shoe department. There are finally brands offering rubber designs that actually compete with Five Ten in terms of grip, and there’s nearly enough variety to rival that of the clipless-shoe market. 

Guess who?

Collected here is by no means an exhaustive list, but rather a representative list. One that effectively spans the full range of riding disciplines applicable to flat pedals, and thus are my personal go-to whenever I’m indulging in one of those specific disciplines. We’re talking shoes good for everything from deep winter puddle bashing to mid-summer hike-a-biking to pump track laps and, of course, your garden variety trail and enduro riding. Missing here are more niche focuses like ultra-cold weather boots and some of the dirt jump/slope-style-focused options—I don’t partake in or feel qualified to review the latter options, and I use Xtratuf fishing boots for the snow. We’ll dive in with the lighter-duty options and work our way up to the big guns. 


fi’zi:k’ Gravita Versor | $140

Pros:

• Stylish
• Light and very comfortable
• Stiff enough for XC/trail riding

Cons:

• Not as much grip as other shoes
• Not as stiff as burlier shoes for hard enduro/park riding


Of all the names that I was expecting to put on this list, fi’zi:k was not one of them. Historically more of a performance road and XC shoe brand, I was quite intrigued when the Versor showed up on my doorstep earlier this year. Opening the box, I found a very contemporary looking, yet fi’zi:k-ly styled, flat shoe. Made from a light-yet-tough ripstop fabric for the uppers and Vibram’s Megagrip takes up the pin-hugging duties. Of course, the offset lacing is immediately noticeable, but as it turns out, only in style and not in fit and feel.

A few of the shoes on this list, actually most of them, required a break-in period for things to start feeling just right. The Versor was the exception—right out of the box it was supple-yet-form-fitting, feeling snug enough to serve its pedaling duties without being tight anywhere through the typical range of motion. The offset lacing might have something to do with this, as the top of my foot usually gets squashed by thick tongues and/or tight lacing. On the Versor, I felt like I could actually get things tighter without feeling like anything was getting compressed, kind of like a compression sock versus a normal sock. 

The Gravita Versor feels light on the foot, but has good toe box protection for trail and light enduro riding.


On another comfort note, the Versor’s lightish uppers make for a fairly breathable, heat-shedding shoe as well. They aren’t as good as the Five Ten Trailcross, but then again the Versor feels more protective as well for general duty trail-bike and light enduro applications. There’s a PU-laminated and reinforced top cap, helping both to ward off toe strikes and wet grass. There’s also a raised inner ankle that prevents the worst from cranks smashes. I would be very interested in a high-top option for additional protection—and fi’zi:k actually makes a high-top option as well.

The offset laces are distinctive, and quite comfortable as well.


On to the important things though. To start, the Versor has a middle-of-the-road to slightly-flexy feel to the sole. It isn’t unsupportive by any means, but it leans more to the pedal-feel end of the spectrum. This actually blends nicely with the feel of the Vibram Megagrip rubber, which feels to have about 90 percent of the grip of Five Ten Stealth rubber. What does that mean? I like to think about it this way. If I’m riding my XC hardtail mid-summer in the heat, or want a more minimalist trail feel, I’ll take the Versor, no questions asked. It has plenty of grip for climbing, is easily repositionable on aggressive pedals and I’ve never slipped a pedal on the downs.

That being said, the Versor requires more attention on proper foot management while descending, especially in really rough, high-speed trails with lots of unweighting. Whereas (spoilers!) Five Ten, Specialized or Giro are rock solid and I never even think about them, I find that part of my mental capacity has to be spent making sure I’m not going to blow a foot off over some roots when wearing the Versor. For this quality, I tend to wear these as a casual use shoe, perfect for cruisy rides, XC laps where comfort is key, or for around town/pump track sessions with the DJ. 

A shoe not to be ignored, the 2FO rivals Five Ten Stealth rubber in outright grip.


Specialized 2FO Roost Canvas | $120


Pros:

• Matches grip with Stealth rubber
• Breathes fairly well but not light-feeling
• Stiff enough for most types of riding
• Casual, relaxed fit

Cons:

• Could be stiffer for downhill/park laps


Specialized has been making shoes for a long, long time. Like fi’zi:k, they may not be the first company to spring to mind when it comes to flat-pedal footwear, but their 2FO line has been steadily growing in performance and popularity. Two things should make Specialized stand out from the crowd. First, they’re able to focus their massive R&D capacity toward projects like the 2FO, and real improvements are seen with each iteration. Secondly, those latest improvements are really, really damn good. 

Specialized has developed some of the best, stickiest rubber on the market. That’s not an exaggeration either—the 2FO stacks up against any Five Ten shoe when it comes to pedal stickability. While brands like UnParallel, Shimano and few others have come close to dethroning Five Ten, Specialized actually does the deed. If I were blindfolded, I probably wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between Stealth and SlipNot (Specialized’s rubber). But I’d also probably crash a lot.

If you’re looking for an alternative to Five Ten, Specialized has stepped up.


If we want to really get into the nuances though, there are a few minor differences to note. SlipNot rubber doesn’t have quite the same off-bike grip that Stealth rubber does on wet, slimy rock, which isn’t a huge concern unless you do a lot of … rock climbing? The two rubbers also behave differently in cold weather, with Stealth feeling slightly firmer and slower to rebound than SlipNot, the latter rubber staying fairly consistent in normal riding temps. 

On a durability note, I have noticed that the slightly tighter-packed lug pattern on the 2FO puts the pin wear on top of lugs, rather than in between them as is typical on all of my Five Ten shoes. Usually, I need to retire footwear because of holes from pins. While I haven’t had the 2FO for long enough to punch any holes, I wonder if having a tighter lug pattern will result in longer life for the shoe.

Of course, there’s more to a shoe than just the rubber. The latest version of the 2FO, the Canvas model tested here, features textile, canvas (who would have guessed) uppers with a molded toe cap for extra protection. Unlike most other shoes, apart from the fi’zi:k, the uppers are very supple and feel more like a nice slipper than a padded riding boot. The canvas did require a bit of a break-in period, more of a pack-in period for the foam padding bits, before everything softened up. Once it did though, the 2FO has a very relaxed, slipper-like feel that is as comfortable on the bike as off it. That also means that on the bike, the 2FO doesn’t feel quite as streamlined and hungry as some other shoes here. It has a casual attitude, more like skate shoes of the past. I wouldn’t shy away for the 2FO for that reason alone, but it offers a different feel and fit to typical riding shoes today. To again compare it to Five Ten, the 2FO is closer to the Impact Pro in fit (minus the heavy padding and chunky feel) than it is to the very narrow and fitted feel of the Freerider Pro. 

The 2FO feels most similar to the regular Freerider, albeit with a much stiffer sole for hard riding.


On a final note, the 2FO, despite being in the ‘downhill’ category on Specialized’s website, is closer in terms of stiffness to a trail/enduro shoe than a full-on downhill bruiser. Again, think Freerider Pro over Impact Pro. It’s plenty stiff for long and rough descents, but you’ll start to feel things a little if you’re overshooting doubles on A-Line. On the flip-side of that, the 2FO is very comfortable to walk around in, wraps a pedal nicely and in general, I think the stiffness of the shoe will suit a wider range of applications than if it was a pure bruiser. It also looks pretty dang good in the grey canvas too.

Giro came out swinging with the Latch, a shoe that also matches the famed Stealth rubber in sheer grip.


Giro Latch | $150


Pros:

• Very grippy, matches Stealth and SlipNot
• Performance, fit. Not tight but fitted
• Good weather resistance

Cons:

• Uppers can be a bit stiff when the foot bends
• No high top option


When I first received the press release email for the Latch late this summer, I was dubious. My experience with Giro shoes in the past has been less than stellar—Giro’s claim that the Latch was “a benchmark in flat-pedal performance” seemed a bit lofty. But I’ll be damned, they actually pulled it off.


The Latch straight-up blows anything Giro has produced thus far out of the water. Their new rubber, Tack Rubber, truly competes with Stealth in performance. Tack Rubber is, well, as tacky as anything else out there, clinging to pedals through rough sections of trail where violent unweighting moments skipping over roots under hard braking would usually blow sub-par shoes right off the pins. In the wet and cold, Tack Rubber still holds on tight, refusing to give up the ghost even when packed with slippery mud. Really, I have a hard time finding anything negative to say about the Latch when it comes down to pure rubber performance; I haven’t had them long enough to truly test the durability, but so far they haven’t accumulated any more or less pedal pin wear than either the Specialized 2FO or Five Ten Freerider Pro Mid VCS, which I’ve ridden in equal amounts. 

The Latch is on the slim side of fit, when makes excellent on-bike feel but isn’t as roomy as some other shoes.


When it comes to the rest of the shoe, the Latch feels very, very similar to a typical Freerider Pro in fit and materials. The shoe is fairly fitted, narrower (in the size US12 tested) than the 2FO and maybe even the Freerider Pro Mid VCS. Where sometimes I felt like I was spilling off my DMR V11s on the 2FO, with the Latch I felt more streamlined and planted on the pedals in that there was room for adjustment side to side before part of the shoe was actually spilling off. Moreover, my feet feel very contained in the Latch, not really compressed, but quite snug without much room for slipping around inside. For more aggressive riding, I prefer this feeling as I have more immediate feedback both from and into the pedals. The downside is that I can’t really wear thick socks without things getting a bit tight. I don’t think it’s that the shoes are on the small side, rather that they are meant for a more performance-oriented fit.

On another performance note, the Latch’s synthetic uppers have been ideal for the damp fall riding weather here in the Pacific Northwest. A robust synthetic outer layer does an amazing job (for a non-waterproof shoe) at keeping water out. Puddle spray, wet grass and soaked salal have all failed to penetrate the Latch—it’s not actually waterproof, but it does an exceptional job at keeping moisture out. The Latch is also generously padded, and even with thin summer socks I’ve ridden down into the low-40s without getting a hint of chill. The downside of that weather performance? The Latch takes slightly longer than I’d like to air dry after actually being saturated. Then again, none of the shoes on this list really air dry in the humid Pacific Northwest; that’s why I have a boot dryer.

Minimal styling make the Latch attractive for off-bike encounters as well.

But back to that padding, especially in the tongue, the Latch required a few days of use before packing in and feeling comfortable. In fact, the first few times I wore the Latch I felt like the top of my foot was getting squashed, even with generously loose lacing—that feeling has since gone away. What hasn’t gone away is a bit of stiffness in the uppers when bending my toe while walking. Maybe I’m just used to the comfy Specialized and fi’zi:k shoes, but the Latch isn’t as comfortable off the bike when hiking or walking. 


On a final note, Giro also included what they call Mute Foam in the midsole of the Latch. The idea is that the foam is a slow-rebounding damper for the shoe, helping to “mute” trail chatter. While I didn’t feel like the Latch was harsh, I also didn’t feel like it was any more “mute” than other shoes here. The one shoe that really does feel dampened is the Ride Concepts, see below—the Latch can’t compete with that level of footbed comfort. At the end of the day though, the Latch is a complete package that does compete with the big guns in pretty much every metric of flat shoe performance I can think of. 

The evolution of the OG, the new Freerider Pro Mid VCS is an excellent performance-oriented flat shoe.


Five Ten Freerider Pro Mid VCS | $180


Pros:

• Very comfortable
• Keeps debris out
• Easy to don and doff
• Ultra grippy

Cons:

• Easy to over-tighten Velco closures


You didn’t think we’d get through this list without talking about a Five Ten shoe, did you? Picking just one model from the OG was a hard call—I personally own, right now, pairs of Freerider, Freerider High, Freerider Pro, Freerider EPS, Impact, Impact Pro, Impact Pro Mid and the entire Trailcross lineup. Out of all of those options, however, I prefer to ride in the newest addition to the Five Ten lineup: the Freerider Pro Mid VCS. 

The VCS has an interesting backstory; the shoe is an adaptation of the brand’s kids' version of the Freerider. It uses an OrthoLite sock liner for high-top coverage and a full “tongue” gusset to keep debris out, and instead of laces there are just three simple Velcro straps. Apparently, simple works for any age, although the looks of the new shoe might border on love-it or-hate-it.

No laces, fewer problems. The ankle cuffs keeps out debris and you won’t be struggling to untie these with frozen fingers, come winter.

There’s a lot to love about the VCS though, looks aside. For starters, it’s basically a slip-on shoe. The Velcro is, like Velcro does, quick and easy to operate when donning or doffing, which just makes life that tad bit easier. I appreciate this on wet, cold rides when frozen fingers don’t operate wet, muddy laces well, and when spring rolls around I’m sure I’ll love not having to poke my fingers on grass seeds caught in the laces. The one downside to Velcro over laces is that it can be tricky to get the exact right tension on the straps; I often over-tightened them when I first got these shoes. 


What really sets the VCS apart in my mind is its fit. The original Freerider Pro marked a shift to a streamlined performance fit for Five Ten, and the VCS refined that even further. The additional sock/ankle cuff keeps the heel very secure in the heel cup, bolstering the hugging, slim fit of the rest of the shoe. It’s not any tighter than a regular Freerider Pro, but the new design has subtle changes that close up any gaps and make the VCS the best-fitting bike shoe I’ve worn. Of course, this is pretty subjective, but if your foot normally fits Five Ten shoes well, the VCS carries that torch forward. 

The small D3O patch on the ankle helps ward off crank strikes. It’s a small but useful feature.


On the bike, that wrapping, hugging fit makes for a very connected feel on the bike, even more so than the Giro Latch. With barely any movement in the shoe, helped by the ankle cuff to keep the heel in place, leg movements and bike feedback are crisp and efficient through the pedals. Further, the square edges of the sole keep foot rocking to a minimum for a very planted, solid feel. 

I won’t talk about the Stealth rubber much, as that poor equine has been beaten to a pulp in countless reviews, but it’s the rubber it’s always been and we all know and love. What I will explore are the shoe uppers. Synthetic through and through, things aren’t drastically different from the regular Freerider Pro. It’s generally pretty water-resistant for bushes with wet foliage, occasional puddle splashes and the like, maybe a touch more than regular Freerider Pros due to the ankle liner that keeps muck out. On the flip side of that, the VCS doesn’t breathe especially well, something I don’t mind from shoes but that I know others do care about. The fi’zi:k and Specialized are your shoes if that’s a priority.

On a protection standpoint, the VCS is again very similar to the regular Pros, with good toe box stiffness and enough padding on the sides to ward off glancing blows. For me, the VCS feels like what the Trailcross lineup should have been in this regard; it’s light enough to be useful for hike-a-bike missions but I would not shy away from riding hard in shale or boulder fields.

Where the Freerider Pro is an excellent riding shoe that doubles as a casual option, the Freerider Pro Mid VCS is a dedicated performance machine, through and through.

The biggest gun here, the Hellion Elite has a ride feel unlike any other shoe.


Ride Concepts Hellion Elite | $150


Pros:

• Incredible trail feel
• Lots of foot protection
• Comes in a high top alternative
• Very grippy

Cons:

• Not as grippy as Stealth, SlipNot or Tack Rubber
• A bit bulkier than other shoes


Of all the impressive shoes on this list, the Hellion Elite might have had the biggest “wow” impression on me. The Hellion Elite is designed as a “light-weight, no compromise, all-mountain flat shoe.” This sounds like it would put it right in line with something like the Five Ten Freerider Pro, however, its build construction and level of protection feel more akin to a harder-hitting shoe like the Impact Pro. 

This also aligns with its ride feel, which is kind of like a fluffy cloud compared to other shoes. Seriously though, this is the aspect of the shoe that wowed me on the first ride; it’s like there’s memory foam in the footbed of the Hellion Elite or something. To best describe the feeling, imagine riding a short-travel bike down a downhill track, then riding a full-on downhill bike on the same lines. Of course, you’re going to feel the hits on both of them, but imagine how much more comfortable it’s going to be on the big bike. The same goes for riding the Hellion compared to other shoes; it feels like all the vibrations are muted. In this respect, the Hellion is unique on this list. 

With the additional D3O inserts in the shoe, but the Hellion Elite seems to mute harsh trail feedback better than other shoes. Hardtail rider take note.


As mentioned, the Hellion is also a bit burlier than typical trail shoes. If I hadn’t read Ride Concept’s tagline for the shoe, I would have thought it a direct competitor to the Impact Pro (which, to be fair, is also an excellent trail shoe in many regards). It’s head and shoulders above any of the other shoes here in terms of protection, with a burly toe box and gobs of padding throughout the shoe. The synthetic uppers are pretty thick as well, which doesn’t do wonders for breathability, but wards off glancing blows with ease. There’s also a high-top version, called the Powerline, if you’re after more ankle protection. I think I would prefer that on a shoe this ready for park and shuttle laps, but low tops might be better if you plan on putting in a lot of pedal days too. 


The fit of the Hellion is more generous than the Freerider Mid VCS and Giro Latch, but not as boxy as something like the Impact Pro. I wore a size US12 in all the shoes on test, and the Hellion wasn’t noticeably bigger or smaller in that regard. It just has a little more room in the toe box for thicker socks or a wider foot, but around the arch and heel the shoe is nicely secure for hard riding.

The only downside to the Hellion Elite is that is can’t quite match other shoes here in terms of grip.


On the rubber, the DST 4.0 MAX is really quite sticky, but just falls short of the leaders in the field. It’s around 95% the grip of Stealth, SlipNot or Tack Rubber, to give some perspective. That sounds pretty dang close to par, and really it is. Initially, I actually thought it was on par, however after riding some harder, faster trails I noticed that in the roughest sections of unweighting, the Hellion wouldn’t stick to the pedals quite as well as the stickier shoes. In reality, I think this means that unless you’re absolutely dead set on having the stickiest shoes out there, the Hellion will offer plenty of grip on the pedals. Off the bike, however, the pretty tight lug pattern and slick heel does cost the Hellion a bit in the traction department. Again, it’s not bad by any means, but other shoes here are a bit better. Then again, these are riding shoes, not hiking boots.

One other factor to consider on the Hellion is that it comes with elastic, stretchy laces. Personally, I change most of my shoelaces to something stretchy for added comfort, and I really appreciated this small feature about the Hellion. 


Where does this leave the Hellion in this roundup? Burlier than other shoes here, and with a ride feel that offers more damping than any other shoe here, the Hellion is a great option for bigger trails and intention, as long as you don’t mind taking a small hit on the outright grip.

Note: Ride Concepts recently updated the Hellion with new colors, along with a lighter, more breathable upper that uses recycled microfiber. The model can be seen here.

A foul-weather-specific shoe, the Trailcross GTX is unique in design and niche in application.


Five Ten Trailcross GTX | $200


Pros:

• Actually fully waterproof
• Very warm
• Roomy enough for thick socks
• Ultra grippy

Cons:

• Water stiff gets in over the cuffs
• Will be too warm on some shoulder-season days


Finally, we come to a special shoe in this roundup. A bit of a unicorn in the flat pedal world, there haven’t been many wet-weather specific shoes ever made for flat pedals—in fact, I can’t think of another out there. There are plenty of clipless options, but really no fully gusseted, actually waterproof flat pedal equivalents. Maybe there’s a reason for that, but that’ll come a bit later down the road.

I reviewed the rest of the Trailcross lineup earlier this year, and came to the conclusion that they were, essentially, a warm-weather shoe. The GTX though, that’s a different beast. Where everything about the regular Trailcross screams fast and light, the GTX is a thick-skinned bruiser of a shoe. It uses Stealth rubber (excellent as always) and has a similar silhouette to the rest of the line, but that’s pretty much where similarities end. 

The Stealth sole is as grippy as ever, and the altered lug pattern helps a touch when hiking.


For starters, the GTX is actually waterproof by way of a GoreTex membrane inside. I’ve successfully completed some highly scientific puddle explorations and can confirm that water does not enter the shoe below the ankle cuff. I received this shoe in late summer, just in time for our hoped-for good weather in the Pacific Northwest to quickly deteriorate into frequent rain and showers before fall even properly began. With plenty of wet rides on the GTX, I have a few thoughts to share on such a shoe, because things aren’t as straightforward as they might seem. 


I’ll start with my critiques. The shoes are only waterproof below the neoprene ankle cuffs. This sounds like a “well duh” moment, and it should be. Say you’re riding in shorts. Say you ride through a deep puddle that splash up onto your shins. Great, now you also have wet shoes from the water draining down your legs and into the shoes. This also occurs when wearing pants, although to a lesser degree depending on what pants you have on. In this regard, waterproof shoes for mountain biking are kind of a moot point for actually keeping your feet wet in downpours. You’re better off using waterproof socks if you really want to keep your feet dry from front wheel spray and deep puddles. 

While they won’t keep your feet dry from water dripping down your legs, they are waterproof everywhere else.


Now, with that all being said, I still tend to reach for the GTX when the trails are going to just be damp with a few puddles, or when I know I’ll be riding overgrown trails with lots and lots of wet vegetation to brush through. Especially with pants, the GTX does an excellent job of protecting against light spray and other minor water intrusion, not to mention accidentally walking into thick mud or the stray puddle. Plus, the extra weather protection makes the GTX incredibly warm and cozy on cold days, and I anticipate wearing these almost exclusively once the mercury starts to fall below freezing. It’s all too often that one sneaky, frozen puddle completely ruins your day on mid-winter rides, and while I haven’t had a chance to test the GTX in those conditions, I have confidence that they are going to be the right tool for the job, based on my experience with them thus far.


When it comes to fit and feel, the GTX is actually pretty similar to the Five Ten Impact Pro Mid. There’s plenty of room around the foot and toe box for thick socks (US12 tested, so this is compared to same-sized shoes), but the ankle is nice and snug to prevent debris from coming in and adding a bit of support for that joint. I would have liked to see an alternative to laces; I shudder at the thought of trying to untie wet, frozen laces with wet, frozen fingers this winter, but one can only wish for so much. To their credit, the laces on the GTX are elastic and make for a comfortable fit. 

Unlike the rest of the Trailcross line, the GTX feels heavily padded (probably additional material for the waterproof membrane) and has a much burlier top cap, in line with the Freerider Pro Mid VCS. The shoe is quite a bit heavier than the regular Trailcross, but it’s not any more than other burly shoes and I’ll take the weight if it means warm feet. 

Speaking of warm feet, the GTX keeps heat in like no other, other than some of the winter-specific clipless shoes I’ve worn. The neoprene ankle gaiter can get a big toasty, as it doesn’t breath at all, on warmer rides, but I have a feeling it’ll be an asset on the upcoming winter days.

The Trailcross GTX has its limitations, no doubt, but with some forethought, it is an excellent shoe for foul-weather riding.





259 Comments

  • 53 3
 I often read that 5.10 shoes have become less sticky since they were bought by Adidas. For what it's worth, I can't confirm that at all. Just this morning I put on a fresh pair of 5.10 freerider (not even the pro version, it was like 60 bucks) and I was again baffled by the level of grip. I have yet to try a pair of shoes with the same mix of stiffness and grip...
  • 17 1
 For anyone that wants absolute max grip, you should try unparallel dust ups. I've tried a ton of flat pedal shoes and always gone back to 5 10 for the grips despite not being satisfied with the durability. The dust ups are the first shoes I've tried that I feel like actually grip better than 5 10s, and I've been riding them for a full season and they're still going. I usually go through two pairs of freerider pros per season
  • 6 0
 @nfontanella: cheers, actually never heard of them before - good to see some more alternatives!
  • 12 2
 Apparently there is a madness with the PrimeBlue material Freerider Pros that people are saying do not have the vaunted Stealth S1 sole of the Impacts & regular Freerider Pros.

PrimeBlue's have been on sale almost since day one & I'm assuming the people gobbling up the discounted shoes or buying them out of environmental nobility are the ones saying this.

I've even had buddies who said they hate their PrimeBlues compared the regular Pros & Impacts. Anybody confirm?
  • 9 0
 @nfontanella: Pretty sure unparallel is the same guy that started 5/10 before it was sold to adidas. So no surprise they have grip
  • 11 0
 @blowmyfuse: I bought the prime blues to give them a chance (on Sierra for dirt cheap), and can confirm they are absolutely not the same compound/grip. Returned them and got the giro’s listed above. The review above is spot-on as to the Giro’s in my opinion.
  • 6 2
 @nfontanella: haha, these shoes are reincarnation of Teva Links that were my go to shoes for years.. super comfy and durable but I wouldn't say they're grippier (or same level grip) as 5-10 Stealth soles.
Though I really miss Tevas and would love to buy some new old stock..lol
  • 7 0
 @qirill: Teva links were f****g amazing.
  • 2 0
 @nfontanella how is the fit on the dust ups - wide, normal, or narrow?
  • 1 0
 @qirill: I never rode the tevas but is it possible they use a softer duro in the unparallels? I know they're softer than stealth soles
  • 1 0
 @contigo: I bought the same size as I ride in freerider pros, they felt a little tight at first but broke in very well
  • 4 0
 @blowmyfuse: my first pair of 510 were the freerider pro primeblue. They were ok, but I didn’t understand what all the hype was about. Then I did more research and noticed that the freerider pro canvas came with S1 rubber, whereas the adidas website makes no mention of s1 rubber on the primeblues. So I tried a pair of the non-primeblues and they are significantly grippier. Interestingly, I just went on adidas website this morning and noticed a couple things: 1) the primeblue freeriders are gone. 2) the regular canvas freeriders are now made with parley ocean plastic (primeblue) and still use S1 rubber and 3) they’re on sale for $105. Looks like adidas wised up and combined the two shoes into one, because they were indeed confusing.
  • 2 0
 @nfontanella: Good to see another rock climbing company making mtb flat pedal shoes! That's why we have 5/10's... not sure why it took so long for another company to join the fray!
  • 1 0
 @boopiejones: I also own and currently ride a pair of freerider pro primeblues. I probably have around 750 miles on these shoes, and have ridden the same pair for just under a year and a half. I rode them at the snow summit bike park a few weeks ago and they did great.

I'm fine with these shoes, I think the grip is almost as good as the vans i was riding before (lol), and i like how stiff the sole is for long days in the saddle in the mountains east of San Diego (Noble Canyon non-shuttle days).

I'll try the non-prime blue option next, but as you can see I'm not super picky. Overall quite happy with these shoes.
  • 10 0
 @nfontanella: I'm a total nerd so I bought a rubber durometer and tested every shoe I could find. As suspected, the 5.10s (Freerider pros and Freeriders) are much harder rubber now than they were before 2020. They used to be about a 55, they are now around 70. Most other shoes test between 65 and 70. The Unparallels are at 50. They are the softest rubber, and they have deep holes for pins to sit in. I've ridden the 2022 5.10 Freerider Pros then the Unparallel Dust Up (2022 model) back to back. The Unparallels have way way more grip. They don't fit my foot as well, but I won't use my 5.10s anymore because of the difference in grip.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: My Prime Blue Freeriders are definitely not as grippy as my Freerider EPS (or older Freerides before that). I had to use longer pins to get more grip. I've just had them resoled with Vibram which does feel grippy.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I had exactly this experience. Been riding 5.20’s for 20 plus years. Grabbed a pair of Prime Blues over the winter and tried them this spring. Terrible. Honestly the grip is worse than any casual sneaker I own. It’s almost like plastic on the sole. Adidas wouldn’t warranty them. I moved onto the Specialized 2FO’s and could be happier.
  • 1 0
 I tried about 5 different flat shoes and never felt anything was all around as good as 5 10s. There were some I liked the fit better, but the balance of stiffness and grip was about ideal to me. I'm more of a clipless rider but use flats some in the winter. My main gripe with flat shoe design is they tend to make the bottom too wide and that can mean you have to move your foot out a bit so you're not rubbing against the crank.
  • 3 1
 I bought a bunch of freerider vxi shoes for $60 on clearance before 5ten was taken completely over by adidas. That Mi6 compound is the grippiest ive ever used in my experience of a decade of riding. Ive been able compare grip to other freeriders I own with s1 stealth, and its not even close.

Totally jaded at this point
  • 1 0
 I bought the cool-guy recycled 5.10s and they were not that impressive for grip and the sole was destroyed in a year. My new RC Tallacs feel way grippier. Those I'm really impressed with. I almost bought new pedals!
  • 1 0
 Only if Pinkbike could have done a simple grip comparison test with say, a shoe, some weight and a workshop hanging scale. Even an board lifted on angle could have been used if the scale was too fancy to come by.
  • 5 0
 @ebrown123: you send that test to Project Farm on YouTube since he's the only guy who knows how to genuinely test products and materials. If no one has seen his cordless leaf blower test, it's 100% bike content, but I'll leave that part as an awesome surprise. Beer


@ATXZJ for good reason. The Mi6 compound was even softer than S1. But they stopped production on complaints of it being too grippy and/or wearing out too fast under wear. Also had a buddy who did a split in a wet pair in a bike shop on tile floor.
  • 3 0
 @blowmyfuse: the prime blue use the “Marathon” sole vs the regular freerider and pro using the “Steath S1” so the compound was for sure different. I think the other issue was the pros weren’t available for a bit when the prime blue first dropped leading to more confusion.
  • 1 0
 There are 3 or 4 different levels of “stealth” rubber so you have to be careful which one you buy
  • 1 0
 @CFR94: I always choose S1 stealth compound. If you want less grip, I say buy sneakers. You're probably "that guy" who just has to validate bad decisions. heh
  • 2 2
 @nfontanella: Do I have a story for you.. 2 (maybe 3) broken toes later caused me to fall out of love with unparallel shoes. Everything you say is true regarding the grip... but they have almost ZERO toe protection and honestly, mine fell apart pretty quickly. But I loved the shoe so much I called the company to urge them to address the lack of toe protection to at least the level of competitors... but nope. Could not / would not do. Can't recommend... and back to the impact pros.
  • 2 0
 @paulwatt: that’s brilliant! Thanks. All these words written and really that is all that had to be done. The rest, fit and looks, are subjective.
  • 1 0
 I can attest to the grip og 5.10 rubber. I currently run 5.10 Trailcross GTX and Freerider EPS High, and RC Hellion and Powerline. The 5.10's are grippier for sure, but I just love the fit of the RC's.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I can confirm, Prime blues are not as grippy
  • 2 2
 I have been wearing 510s exclusively for over 10 years. I have found no measurable difference in the quality or grip of the shoe since the big bad corporation took them over.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: been riding the Mi6 for almost 7 years. No splits
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: yup, I had a set of primeblues because I thought they were the same level of grip and had a big ol’ crash because of it. They claimed they were the ‘stealth’ sole, a little research showed they actually weren’t.
Anyway, I run 2fo’s now and they’re great
  • 1 0
 @qirill: yea the teva flat pedal shies were good
  • 3 0
 @paulwatt: awesome info, matches my experience. I tried Bontrager, RC and Shimano but always went back t9 510 until I tried Unparallel, since then I've had 3 pairs and love them, the only shoes that have 510 grip in my experience.
  • 1 0
 @paulwatt: and that’s fine with me—they appear to last longer now (based on my personal experience) and I haven’t missed any loss in grip. My latest Pros are my favorite biking shoes yet and they pair very well with my OneUp composite pedals (that I actually prefer to my Tenet Occults on my other bike).
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I was convinced my pedal pins were getting dull but they practically cut my hand when I press on them. Thanks for bringing this up. I thought the prime blue was in the uppers so I don't know why the sole would be different.
  • 1 0
 It's not always the grip that has changed since the takeover from adidas but it's often that they just don't last as long as they used to. Like myself and others I know has experienced the soles of the newer five tens get shredded by flat pedals wayyy faster than before the takeover. Beforehand they would take forever to make holes in those shoes. Now days you can ride them for a couple months and hefty pin marks are left in the bottom of the shoes.
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79: dudee tevas were the bomb I had a pair that lasted for everrr whish I could buy them again
  • 5 0
 The unParallel Dust Up is indeed the same shape as Teva Links, but the grip is entirely different league. I used to have the Links but hardly rode in them, the 5.10 had much better grip. Now I have the unParallel and I hardly ride in any of my 5.10s. Actually on my second pair of Dust Up this season, it's noticeably the grippiest shoe I've tried.
  • 2 0
 @MrDuck: Alright, all this love for the dust ups has me keen to try them.
Tried RCs, the fit and feel was really really nice for my foot. Unfortunately the grip was insufficient for my needs. Even got them resoled (two rides old) with some climbing rubber… still no good.
I try to ride them… but just switch to my clapped out regular freeriders after a lap or two Frown
  • 2 0
 @dirtyburger: the reviews often say RC has similar grip to 510 but that wasn't my experience at all. You won't be disappointed with the Unparallel shoes
  • 2 0
 @russthedog: worst thing I noticed about RCs was even when it was a little wet the grip basically went to 0
  • 5 0
 @nfontanella: Unparallel Up ownership is a combination of former Five Ten people & the company that produced both Five Ten & Teva shoe components/designs.

They took the climbing rubber tech of Five Ten & merged it with the clipless technology & sole patterns they owned from their Teva Links clipless & flat production runs. The rubber used on the Unparallel UP clipless & flats is NOT the Teva rubber, which was OK, but not even close to any Stealth compounds.

Great thing about Unparallel Up's clipless sole is it was the first design (they worked WITH Crank Brothers) to directly integrate with the Mallet clipless pedals as a "system".

I have a friend who refused to try their flat pedal shoes because he saw that the sole pattern of the clipless was the same as the old Tevas. Had to explain it's the same mold, but not the same compound. Beer

...also, I thought I posted this yesterday, but it vanished?
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79: bought a barely worn pair of Links on here for 30 quid over 5 years ago, soles still look only a few rides old despite having been beaten on pretty hard, the only downside of them being so comfy and lasting so long was the reduced grip and increased weight, but for all out value for money they couldn’t be beaten
  • 1 0
 Got a pair of Primeblues on clearance at Burlington Coat Factory, their sole is about grippy a cold chunk of plastic. Not only that, but it rebounds super quick so keeping feet on pedals is a bit challenging for no good reason. One ride on them and back to 2FO's I went. My one gripe with the 2FO's is the rubber it sufficiently tacky to pick up dust and dirt and lose all pedal grip entirely, would not recommend for dirt jumps or skate parks where you wind up walking around in dust or digging in them.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I have a pair of 4 season old Freeride with barely any sole left and still more grippy than the Freeride Pro Prime Blue that I bought a year ago...buy prime blue if you care about turtles that recycle plastic compound its terrible.
  • 1 0
 @nfontanella: same sole as the old teva links so gutted they stopped making that shoe!
  • 2 0
 @nfontanella: I agree with all the hype of the Unparalleled Dustups. Started with 5.10s a few years ago because that's what I was told the cool kids were wearing. And they were fine. Tried the Dustups and haven't looked back since. My brother has a pair of RCs but he actually prefers the slightly less grip than the Ups.
  • 18 2
 If you have wide flat feet, Specialized, 5.10 and RC are all super uncomfortable and narrow. Shimano seems to be the only one to make good shoes for wide feet. None of the other features don't matter at all if the shoe doesn't fit. I wish some of these manufacturers made a wide version as well.
  • 4 0
 Shimano lists the various lasts of their shoes, and tell you which one are wider and higher volume than normal. They also make some of their less wider in a wide version. Unfortunately the GR9 with the Michelin rubber is the last grippy shoe they made as their new proprietary ultread is half as sticky. I own every generation including the current of the GR series.

bike.shimano.com/cs-CZ/technologies/apparel-accessories/footwear/more-lasts.html

Specialized if you are reading this, your new rubber is the best but your 2FOs are like narrow dress shoes, can you make something with a more natural foot shape? You don't have to go as far out as Altras or anything.
  • 5 0
 This! 5.10 before Adidas were wider IMO (Adidas cut is on the narrow side).
  • 12 1
 @cogsci: Somebody, go as far out as Altras. Some folks would be stoked.
  • 8 0
 @cogsci: I think they should look like Altra shoes. As should all shoes. If not they’re designed for fit and not aesthetics.

I agree though. Shimano's shoes have by far the most foot shaped fit. I bet most people could run a size smaller in Shimano as their forefoot likely won’t be pinched in them. The problem with Shimano on the latest generation of shoes is the opening. They now tighten up against the bottom of my leg. A shame as the previous AM07 (I ride clips) were pretty much perfect.
  • 2 0
 @cogsci: I agree, the 5.10' are a pointy shape which is not how my feet look. I end up going up a size so my toes don't get pinched in but then the fit isn't great. May be I should stick the the SPD sandals.
  • 3 0
 @mkpfaff: They would get all my money. Especially if they made a clipless gravity shoe.
  • 2 0
 I have shimano GRS and they're pretty good, size 47 fits my US12.5 just right. Even though they say they are 11.7. I still have my Impacts. glued the sole back on five times, but they're smooth on bottom now.
  • 2 0
 @mkpfaff: Check out hte Altra Graftons
  • 2 0
 I have wide flat feet. I tried the Specialized 2FO's and couldn't get the width to fit right without going up to a size that was too long for my foot. Then i tried the 5.10 freerider pro's and they fit nicely in my regular size, even though they have a reputation for being narrow. Been riding them now for almost a year and a half.
  • 4 0
 You said it! I am having trouble finding any cycling shoes that are wide, or even following a natural foot philosophy. I use altra running shoes (ugly as sin) for my casual/travel/running shoes, and my foot doesn't hurt-at all, but once cycling, my neuromas from years of wearing too narrow of bike shoes hurts pretty bad. Altra cycling shoe-yes please haha.
I've tried a few brands of cycling shoes in their 'wide' platforms and just not wide enough, i've put a shoe spreader tool into the shoe and it helps a bit.
FWIW, I wore sz45 bike shoes for 30 years, all the usual brands, and it's come back to haunt me as all those years of compressing the foot bones caused neuromas. So young kids, don't mash your foot into a shoe! lol
  • 4 0
 @mkpfaff: Super stoked if more wide shoes with low/no drop could be released!
  • 3 0
 I have wide-ish feet and found 5-10's torture but Specialized and RC (and Bontrager) have been fine. I find it annoying that reviews like this one make no mention of the concept of people having different width feet and instead just talk about a "performance fit"! If it's narrow, just say its narrow. Manufacturers need to start telling us this stuff too. It doesn't help anyone for riders to waste their time trying on shoes or returning them. There are multiple existing width fitting systems, just pick one!
  • 1 0
 @mkpfaff: I would be one of those people too for sure!
  • 1 0
 I have Northwave Clans, and they fit my wide-ish feet better than anything else.
  • 1 0
 Check out Lake Cycling shoes. They only have 1 flat shoe but the wide Lake fit is the best I've found so far. Still wishing Altra would make some cycling shoes but unless/until they do, Lake might be the best option.
  • 1 0
 @caledar: i don't see it on their site. Lake cycling that is.
  • 1 0
 My feet are quite flat and wide, and probably resemble more flippers than feet. And I have found that Etnies makes perfect shoes for me.

They have some available with Michelin rubber, but I personally prefer their "Semenuk pro MTB" model.
  • 24 8
 Ride Concepts Powerlines are the truth. The toe Protection is invincible and honestly the rubber is perfect. Sticky, but unlike fivetens you can actually reposition your foot if it gets out of position.
  • 15 2
 I've had 5.10 Freeriders and now have RC Hellions. Not mentioned is that a trade for stickiness is RC's soles are much more durable than 5.10's. 5.10's would look chewed up after a summer compared with RC only has small marks.
  • 7 0
 i've been ridding the powerline too. good feet, comfort and protection! but i miss the sheer grip of the 5/10
  • 6 0
 I've been riding powerlines for a couple years now, I really like them. Something about my riding style causes me to chew through soles of flat shoes pretty fast, can't usually get more than a season out of a pair. Something cool about RC is that they have a 1 year warranty on their soles and shoes. After like 10 months, my soles had holes in them, doesn't really seem like a fault of the product, my Freerider pro's wore out just as fast. RC sent me a brand new pair for free. Good company, good products.
  • 14 3
 Never had a problem repositioning my foot on FiveTens. Lift and shift. Easy-peasy.
  • 3 0
 After a really bad toe impact a few weeks ago, I ordered the RC Transition shoes simply for the fact that they seem to have the most toe protection. Toe impacts hurt so bad. I don't care if they're a little heavier. So far they're awesome and feel really protected. Burly toe box. Big RC fan so far.
  • 3 2
 I tried so hard to like the RC's, loved the uppers shape/feel... after 3 pairs of 510's (I get a good year out of them by switching pedal half way through, with a different pin pattern -- use that opportunity to rebuild the other pedal too).... but the RC's pads are spaced closer together and deeper than the 510's... sure repositioning is easier, but finding good bite is harder due to the groove spacing -- and that I think is what breaks it for me (could also be pedal/pin dependent.... I have deity tmacs and oneup's). If they were shallower I think it would work out. I love that the review says "pro: very grippy" and then then "con: not as grippy as any other brand in this review". I guess it's the shoe version of "climbs like a mountain goat, descends like a pack of wolves on an injured lamb".
  • 2 0
 I bought some RC Tallacs to replace my Freerider Pros which wore out faster than I had hoped, and I was in disbelief with how poorly they kept my feet on the pedals. Luckily they were willing to let me swap them for the Hellion Elites. So far, these have been almost as grippy as the Freeriders, as stated in this article, but man, the 2022 version is pretty painful to look at. Unfortunately, if I had to buy a new pair of riding flats tomorrow it would definitely be Freerider Pros again.
  • 3 1
 Glad that they work for someone. I strayed away from 5/10 with powerlines and I hate them, sole feels like I am wearing my old man white New Balance shoes.
  • 3 1
 @dirttosser: I agree. I was losing my feel constantly with the RC shoes...even started riding clips again as I thought maybe I was doing something weird with my technique...went on a trip to Crested Butte and forgot them..only brought my beat up Freeriders I dirt jump with...rode those trail riding and didn't lose my feet once...back to 5.10 Impacts. They are ugly as sin but just work better.
  • 1 0
 Spent the summer in Quebec and was surprised how many people I saw on RC shoes. Way more than the USA.
  • 1 0
 Toe protection is key. I dislocated my big toe hitting a rock with 2FO shoes. I am not saying it would not have happend with something like a Freerider Pro but I do find them pretty flexie at the front.
  • 2 0
 I really like my new RC tallacs. Good grip and look cool. really sturdy construction as well. WE'll see if they hold up.
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: I love the look and construction of these shoes but I'm surprised you found the grip to be good, as I found the grip to be quite poor relative to my Freerider Pros
  • 1 0
 @Kayco: really. I had the eco-hippy freerider pros and I like these a lot better, although I appreciate that the recycled rubber version may be crappier. I'm happy nonetheless and haven't had an issues since I got them. Maybe the atlas pedals are the reason.
  • 1 0
 I have a pair of these and I absolutely love them. I've had a couple rock strikes that woulda broke my toes wearing some other shoes.
  • 2 0
 I tried RCs, found the grip horrible and got rid of them. On Unparallel now, and they're the o ly shoes I've worn that truly match 510 - nothing else does.
  • 1 0
 I rode the RC Wildcats for a year and shredded the sole, but they were pretty decent during that time. the grip was not on par with 5.10 but they were awesome hi-top riding shoes in general.
  • 11 1
 The 2FO's are more grippy than any 510's I've tried. I would not get the canvas ones, but instead get the regular Roost model or the DH one. Tbh, the standard Roost offers plenty of protection for all, but maybe the most terrorizing bike park stuff or freeride shenanigans. I'd equate the Roosts to the Freerider Pro in terms of feel and stiffness. They are like comfy slippers and drain water surprisingly well too.
  • 2 0
 I've had the 2FO DH since late spring. I've been questioning whether I should have got the Roost. I find the DH pretty stiff - first time I wore them, they almost felt like a low ski boot. They don't wrap round the pedals to generate grip like my Freeriders. So I find on gentle trails over roots and rocks, my feet get bounced off. However, point down something higher intensity and they feel totally nailed into the pedals, and also provide great foot support - no sore arches after days in PdS etc. I do question if they're maybe suffering pin wear faster than my 5:10s.
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: fwiw I've had the 2FO DH for about 2,000 miles on my trail bike. I would typically get 1,500 out of my 5.10 Freerider Pros before I retired them because grip was compromised. I see the pin holes (more so on the front foot) on the 2FOs but no degrade in performance. And the uppers look almost new still. So in my experience the 2FOs are more durable.

I do find it interesting when I go back to my freeriders how much more floppy they feel. That has its place at times, specifically technical climbs. I also am curious to try the Roost but I also am happy with the DH.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: that's largely been my experience with the 2FO DHs as well. Will likely get the Roosts next once I wear holes in my Freeriders Pro (which to be fair have been solid). But I really like the 2FO compound. In the end, its great finally to have several good options to choose from.
  • 2 0
 Yes, my impression too, current 2FO deliver more grip than 5Tens.

Which is great, not that Specialized is a particularly likable company, but at least much much more so than Adidas, and I don’t have to buy the latter’s typical Chinese quality at high prices anymore.
  • 2 0
 I’ve got a pair of Roosts and a pair of DHs. Grip-wise I don’t feel a difference, what I do occasionally feel is that the Roosts are a bit softer though. So if it’s going to be a rougher day I’ll have the DHs on
  • 1 0
 I got the 2fo DHs to run on a hardtail where I wanted as much cushion as possible. At the bottom of the trail I would have to pull the pins out of the shoe. They are great. Really appreciate the sole stiffness. Helps keep my foot from getting tired. I did use a shoe stretcher to get them to fit perfectly though.
  • 10 1
 The comment about waterproof shoes is a view I have long held coming from backpacking experiences. Waterproof shoes are really just a bucket to hold water in. I very seldom find myself in conditions that would require a waterproof shoe where water does not end up overtopping the shoe. I would rather have a pretty free draining shoe for wet rides.
  • 2 0
 I've read more than once that people who hike the Pacific Coast Trail (PCT) during the wet snow shoulder seasons, none of them wear fulll coverage leather boots or Gore-Tex lined ones on their treks because their feet blister or stay too wet inside the waterproof liners to ever really dry out, whether from sweat or swamp.

Apparently having trail runners or summer style hiking boots is better because they can dry them out at night, swap to dry socks and when they get to the next dry section, their feet balance back out.

I run my Freerider Pros most all year long here in the low mountains of Western North Carolina. I've gotten down to 20 degrees Farenheit easy on dry days, but I have Five Ten Impacts that larger volume internals that I can ride in snow.

Going to pull trigger this year on the Crosspoint Wool waterproof socks for this winter now that I've turned 50 & the toes are acting their age. I can only assume waterproof socks mainly help by being a wind blocking barrier first & foremost & any waterproof benefits are minor if it's raining or wet snow???
  • 1 0
 `I would rather have a pretty free draining shoe for wet rides.` This - absolutely. I`ve just got some Etnies Semenuks that are fairly waterproof and they took 2 days to dry as the lasts get so soaked as teh water cant escape. you just get that squelchy feel everytime you pedal or walk which is horrible. normal freeriders doi the same but also end up weighing 2kgs. my spec 2f0 clips are the best as they have less water absorbant padding and dont hold water.
  • 1 0
 Maybe the trailcross GTX are not the ticket for bikepacking. But for mid season to winter MTB rides in the french South Alps, they worth every penny! With the right pants, they're really good and I enjoy riding in the wet again. Only when it's freezing hard do they lack some lining. 2FO + GTX and I'm good all year long!
  • 1 0
 depends I guess...waterproof high tops for muddy/puddle conditions where you can put the top cuff of your pants over the top has been a lifesaver for me. Of course no big stream crossings like you said...
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: This is a good point and my generally approach. I prefer my 5.10 Trail Crosses (original) with all the venting and warm socks on a cold day (in western Oregon, let's call that 20 to 35 ºF (or about -7 to 2 ºC).

However, I think there is a big distinction to be made between consecutive all-day hikes and relatively short (~4 hr?) rides when it comes to taking care of your feet.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: shoes don't really dry out overnight though, especially in a wet and snowy environment.
  • 1 0
 @SeanC1: For sure. The PCT hiker accounts I've read, basically the light hikers, mesh hikers, trail runner shoes...they'll breathe/drain enough during the next day's hike that if they're walking anything other than the wet snow or puddles to prevent complications. They can dry on nights that aren't damp though when you've just been sweating on hot days. Waterproof boots, even after a dry day, you stand to be right back in a steamy garbage bag full of one way microscopic pores.
  • 1 0
 We only need to look at the footwear worn in rainy countries, thongs aka flip flops rule.
  • 1 0
 I've not tried it, but a few people I know who have to do lots of all weather training for 24 hour races etc use dry suit cuffs upside down to stop water running down their shins into the shoes. Would probably work well for those high tops. Shoes that are not waterproof but fast drying are fine when it's warm and wet, but when it's a few degrees above zero, feet get really cold with regular soaking from cold wet puddles. Even with waterproof socks, as you have fresh cold water sticking away the heat from your extremities. An outer where most of the water runs off (leather or similar synthetic) is far better. Also stops the wind chill
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: at some point, the weather is telling you to find a better activity...
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Don't know if they still make them, but Appalachian Trail hikers used to wear these boot covers that were elastic at the top, velcro'ed around the leg and then had a clip to hook onto their boot laces.

Since there is so much dense undgrowth in Appalachia (well, there was before popularity turned our trails into roads), it keeps dew and rain from vegetation from drenching your pants/jeans. Heck, we used to wear them ski-ing to keep the wet snow off the lower part of our pants.

But the dry suit cuff does act more like shingles if it's staggered under a pant leg.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Those are called gaiters and yes, they do still make them. They are very common amongst hikers/mountaineers for keeping water/debris/snow/etc. out of boots. You can also get "trail gaiters" which are much lighter weight, low-profile version of the same thing for use with trail running shoes. A lot of trail running shoes (the above mentioned Altra included) have little velcro tabs on the heel for keeping gaiters designed to use that feature in place.
  • 1 0
 @SoCalTrev: ahhh...that's right. I've still got a pair.

So if trail running shoes have them, we should probably consider them for downhill and winter riding.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: A lot of gaiters have straps that go under the shoe in front of the heel on hiking boots. That'd probably be ripped off in seconds by flat pedals. But would be fine with cleats I guess
  • 7 0
 510s are called so because they take between 5 and 10 days to dry out
  • 2 0
 Or Stay 5-10 ft away cuz they smell
  • 3 0
 I've been wearing Ride Concepts for a couple of years now. Great shoes that actually hold up. My last pair of 5.10's were the Trailcross, and they literally came apart at the seams of the toe in 3 months.
  • 8 6
 ..my 2 cents..been riding bikes and flat pedals for over 20 years, I do big long rides and am currently on Burgtec MK5 pedals...my got to shoes for the last 2 years has been the Vans BMX Shoes..cost half the price and have held up for more than one season of shredding..and the good thing is is if they start getting holes, they double up as a casual shoes. WIN WIN!!!
  • 1 0
 ...This Is The Way
  • 2 0
 Hardtail/ Hellion Elite rider here, can confirm the benefits are quite nice.
Also, as a haver of wide feet, I have found Ride Concepts shoes to be exceptionally comfortable. I wear their Vice shoes almost daily for the comfort and durability. I wear them for dirt jumping too but I use the hellions for all other types of riding.
  • 2 0
 Same here. I have a wide foot and the Hellion Elites are a good true-to-size fit for me.
  • 1 0
 Another nod for the RC Vice. They are the dirt jump meets casual shoe that Vans wishes they were. Just look at the bottom of the Vice and then the Vans BMX shoe. Waffle pattern meets pedal pin perfection in a firmer but not too stiff that the heel never lifts from when walking off the bike. Just because of this article and comments I pulled out my trusty pair of Freeride Contacts. Man there s no way rubber today can compete with that sole as it was essentially rock climbing shoe rubber. Hell the Contacts didn't even come with any real tread!
  • 4 2
 To the bike Industry (clothing / footwear) Why are there no options for a Boa style closure on a flat pedal shoe? Why is it only corss country style cleat shoes or road shoes that have the Boa option.

I want my FiveTen, flat pedal shoes with the option of lace or Boa.
  • 3 0
 There are boa flat shoes, bruh.
  • 2 0
 Check out Crank Bros Stamp with the Boa enclosure.
  • 3 0
 @seandalziel both Ride Concepts and Crank Brothers offer this. I’m riding the RC Tallac Boa at the moment and it’s a phenomenal trail shoe, uses their softest rubber compound but is stiff and lightweight. Plus it’s got to be the best looking shoe out there?
rideconcepts.com/collections/mens-shoes/products/men-s-tallac-boa
  • 4 0
 Why would you want this? BOA is solution in search of problem.

Just put lock laces on your shoe(s). Does everything BOA does but its not proprietary.
  • 1 0
 Pearl Izumi offers BOA laced flat pedal shoes. Grip is less than 5.10 though with the Vibram compounds they use (see Fizik shoe comments in the above article on that) so you'll have to deal with that to get your dial closure.
  • 1 0
 @broscience: Thanks man
  • 1 0
 @camelvendor: thanks dude
  • 2 0
 5.10s fit my wide feet and they seem to go on sale every fall for around $50. Probably going to stick with those. It's hard enough finding wide shoes that once I find some I like, I stick with them (regular shoes and bike shoes).
  • 3 0
 I may have read to fast but adding the presence or lack of a lace retention loop/system should have been added to the pros and cons. One thing I love about Ride Concepts is the little elastic lace keeper.
  • 2 0
 @hangdogr: the latch, hellion elite and roost have lace retention elastics.
  • 3 1
 I have the Specialized 2FO Roost, there’re a fantastic shoe, mine more durable than the canvas one (brushed suede/leather). Been riding all summer with them and been in a few downpour's riding to and from work ( about 15mins to) and they’re stayed quite dry inside, grip is also fantastic with my burgtec plastic pedals and chromags daggers.
  • 1 0
 How do you find them size wise? I feel like they are too roomy / bulky especially on top of your feet compared to other shoes that are less tall / more flat. I found it a bit annoying. But grip is great!
  • 1 0
 @kusa: I find them fine.. normally I’m a 7-7.5 but I went for an 8, think I have wide-ish feet
  • 3 1
 I can put holes from pedal pins through stealth rubber under the ball of my foot with 510s in about a season. I've tried Crank bros, which last longer, but aren't as grippy. They definitly don't perform like 510s. Etnies Camber is where its at right now. The rubber is as sticky as 510s but they las 3x as long. They're stiff too. They're also cheaper than anything in this review.
  • 3 0
 I found etnies to be not sticky at all. I rode back to back year over 5.10 free riders then brand new etnies and it was crazy how much more feet moved around with etnies
  • 3 1
 At this point, I consider shoes to be a consumable item. My wife runs half marathons, and her $200 Hoka shoes last about 3 months with regular training. So, getting a full riding season out of some ~$150 shoes isn't all that bad, at least in comparison to some other hobbies.
  • 2 0
 5.10 Freerider Pro soles last one season before I have to trash them. Grip is outstanding and I am sure they would review well as top shoes, but long term I cannot run them anymore. I would resole them if at all possible - the uppers are still bombproof. Does 5.10 sell soles anymore? Doubt it...
  • 2 0
 I miss my first and second Gen Impacts and Sam Hills. Never ridden in anything better. Currently using Freeriders and and they’re still great but as good.

My early Impacts were not only super grippy, but had some of the best ‘feel’ through the soles as well.
  • 3 0
 Bunch of donkey looking shoes with no ankle protection. Mountain bike market, it’s time to make stylish high tops again. Free riders highs and the line kings are the best of all time.
  • 2 0
 The Impact Pro Mid (not sure 5.10 are still making them) have been my favorite so far. They're the perfect blend of stiffness, protection, grip, and comfort in my opinion. They're more durable than both my Freerider and Freerider Pros were too.

Saved me from some stitches on my ankle over the summer when I washed the front tire out and somehow managed to take a massive chunk out of the top of them / my ankle with the chainring. Would have been a pretty nasty cut without the protection from the mids!
  • 1 0
 With these ads on Pinkbike recently, I would have expected a mention of Shimano shoes. Experience with those? Like many (or most) on here, I've been locked into FiveTen for fifteen years or so. They may not be perfect, but I know what I'm getting when I order online. I'm honestly curious how Shimano compares.

"
If I were blindfolded, I probably wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between Stealth and SlipNot (Specialized’s rubber). But I’d also probably crash a lot.
"

This is a well written article. Props for that!
  • 1 0
 Shimano GR9 are the best overall shoe for my feet. I love my 2FO's, but lacing up is so annoying compared to the GR9 speed lace system and the mud flap. I don't like the idea of BOA on mountain bike shoes as the adjusters are easily damaged (for road cycling its fine). But now Shimano has completely redesigned the GR9 for 2023 and its back to laces...ultra bummer.
  • 2 0
 I finally broke a Boa lace the other day after like 20 years of having them on various sporting equipment, when I tried to pull my foot out of my shoe and didn’t unclip it fully. Boa has free replacement for life but it’s a little inconvenient to send out for replacement parts even if it’s rare
  • 3 0
 Gr9 with a neoprene gaiter would be the ultimate.
  • 2 0
 Love my GR9's. Feel, fit, and quick lace system. I've had the green/grey version and the black/drk blue version. I actually had to look for an old model since their newest version they did away with the lace covering. Really unfortunate move on their part, it was one of the last shoes with full lace coverage. Not sure now what will be my next shoe because this is an important feature to me.
  • 1 0
 After years on 5.10’s I made the switch to ride concepts a few years ago. My first set of hellion elites lasted longer than 2 sets of 5.10’s and I only replaced them to try something new, not out of necessity. The new Tallac boa from them are great as well. Love the boa closure system.
  • 1 0
 I picked up the new RC Tallac's and they seem like the perfect combo of stiffness, still being sensitive on the pedal (I hate when a shoe is too too stiff), some toe protection, actually pretty darn light, and very good grip. They also grip wet ground and rocks much better than 5.10s in my experience, which is a huge plus for hike a bikes.
  • 3 0
 The lack of toe protection in most flat pedal shoes blows my mind. RC is the only shoe I’ve found sufficient, wanna try the DH 2FOs.
  • 5 0
 Y'all forgetting the vans old skools Wink
  • 1 0
 Or any Vans pro model skate shoes
  • 1 0
 I have the 5-10 shoes: old freerider model and new pair of trailcross (not gtx) but I use waterproof socks in winter and when it is forecasted possible rain for both models. Trailcross have much more accurate features than the basic freerider but haven't the same cool look. The sizes are a little different from normal shoes. e.g. for trailcross 27=42 2/3
  • 1 0
 Regarding the fi’zi:k’ shoes, i never understand why mtb shoe brands always spec Vibrams second grippiest rubber. Which then predictably falls short of 5.10 stealth. "Megagrip" is less grippy than "Idrogrip", Vibram say so themselves. I sometimes use a pair of Idrogrip approach shoes for biking and really can't notice any difference in pedal grip compared to my 5.10 freerider pros.

Maybe product managers think the marketing buzzword "Mega" is more important than actual performance.
  • 6 0
 Vibram won't allow cycling shoe companies to spec Idrogrip on their shoes, which makes no sense to me either. They push Megagrip as the compound of choice. Source: frustrated cycling shoe product manager that worked with Vibram.
  • 2 0
 @bicycle019: It's not useful for OEM but I had an cobbler resole a pair of my 5.10 with vibram 7130 dot grip sheet and they are working well again.
  • 1 0
 Impact pro the best of them all ,and Sam Hill ones ,heavy yes ,comfortable yes,good grip yes,lasting soles yes ,rock hitting safe yes,more then 100km riding comfort yes,water resistant a litle,there are only a phew cons ,like if the water gets in when riding when the rain is heavy ,your feet’s will be riding under water (after the ride our feet’s will be old skin free),the other one is the back of the shoe in the inside just gets rip in the back bone place ,it creates a litle bubble foam ,and the other one is sizing it is the worst thing since adidas took over ,same shoe different sizes while the same size is on the label ,it’s confusing,the rest an impeccable shoe ,the others are a lithe to soft to ride roughy terrain ,you feel like you are in your skate shoes
  • 1 0
 I'm on my second set of mid high Pearl Izumi, great shoes, kinda sad that PB picked the more commonly known shoes, none of which are high top other than the wet weather shoes. I wear my Pearls year round, mid height, BOA, velcro instep strap, togh box protection, and water resistant.
  • 1 0
 I have a pair of the X-Alp launch with boa. They're awesome to pedal in. Love the fit, uppers, boa, breathability, and stiffness so much. But I'll only wear them for mellower/flowy trail riding. On high speed hits or chunkier stuff the grip can get sketchy real quick, even more so when it's wet. I like to think that prolongs the life of my freerider pros since I only pull them out for gravity riding now.
  • 1 0
 Anyone try Etnies Culvert Mid shoes? Want to try them but can't justify another pair of shoes at the moment. Currently wear Freerider Pro most rides but also Freerider EPS in the winter. I've had a handful of rides in the Trailcross GTX and they could take over winter duties unless it's really cold.
  • 2 0
 I have the culverts now. Was on 5-10 VCS and various other models before.

Etnies are the truth. 5-10 are good but they do not last and cost $180 USD so I won’t be buying them anymore. Got the etnies for almost half the price and the are so good. Best grip and durability I’ve experienced out of a mtb shoe. Try them.
  • 1 0
 @jjbmtb53: Thanks. I may just bite the bullet and buy a pair, especially since I see Etnies on sale quite often. Just need to figure out if there are any sizing issues.
  • 1 0
 100% bought my RC Tallac for style but am really happy with them. Very grippy on my old atlas pedals and look good too. Appreciate they have knobbily toes and heels too as I often hike around/walk when biking.

rideconcepts.com/collections/ride-concepts-mens/products/men-s-tallac?variant=39618754412617
  • 2 1
 Can't go wrong with a good ol' pair of Vans Old School BMX shoes. Half the price of anything on here, won't punch holes through the rubber in under a season, still grips just fine. Only real issue with them is that they're not very stiff.
  • 3 0
 Yes Man! Vans all the way. I never have had any grip issues riding and racing downhill and enduro. I´m sure the etnies are also very good. I do not understand why people think you have to have overpriced flat pedal shoes. Freestyle BMX riders put a hell of a lot more pressure and demand through their pedals then most mtb riders, and yet they don´t seem to be looking for a special BMX shoe. Lastly, the pro freeride guys who are not shoe sponsored are all running vans.
  • 1 0
 @scraig1599: how are they if your ride includes pedalling up? I used to wear skate shoes when I first started and they were flexy enough that there would be pain and pressure points from pedalling.
  • 2 0
 @Dogl0rd: I can't do Vans on the bike. I've tried. I had the same experience with pain/pressure points.

Maybe it's my XC background with super stiff soled shoes and clipless pedals, but I was skeptical of even riding flats when I made the switch. The grip of 5.10s on wide platform pedals with a stiff sole convinced me that I'd be just fine on flats (after I learned not to pull up with my opposite foot while climbing steep stuff).

I've since tried riding in vans for short skills practice sessions in my back yard, and after about an hour of practicing bunnyhops and manuals one day my feet were sore for the next two days. Next practice session I made sure to put my 5.10s on and had no such problems.
  • 1 0
 got Ride Concepts Hellion Elite as my first ever MTB flat shoe mainly because they were on huge discount in the middle of winter and in my size. Based on the condition they will last me one more or two weekend riding seasons. Super grippy (compared to sneakers ahahahha), and durable and I am happy to read that they also offer tons of dampening, I cannot compare it to anything else
  • 1 0
 i loved my ride concepts tnt for grip and comfort, but they didnt last long at all with that rubbish vinyl outer, i warrantied 3 pairs in 6 months and then just asked for a refund as everytime they would split along here your footbends. shame as they were nice and cosy on the foot.
  • 1 0
 Impact Pro Mid is the ticket for hard tail enduro. They are currently “On Sale”… but last year Adidas refused to honor the advertised discount. It always comes down to customer service. Too bad they are not owned by One Up or PNW.
  • 1 0
 I bought a pair of fiveten gtx right after they released it and I absolutely love them on wet days. But I absolutely agree on the laces not being the best idea and that the cuff to should have been waterproof. Tend to reach for the waterproof socks on really wet days when I know that my pants are gonna get drenched and we all know where the water will end up.
  • 1 0
 I've ridden my Trailcross GTXs in many wet/sloppy rainy rides and cold/snowy rides in North Van over the winter and never had any issues with the water entering my feet from the cuff with my NF Berserkers or DP3s. The only crappy part is the wear factor on the sole from my OneUp pedals—they are probably only going to make it through another winter. Weight-wise they feel similar and maybe lighter than my RC Transition clipless shoes. If 5.10 could work on the rubber durability, these would be truly great and I'm on the fence for/against a lace cover. I never felt they were too warm but I only wore them in the crappiest of months when my clipless get clogged a little too frequently. If they had the Trailcross GTX in a clipless version, I'd grab those.
  • 3 0
 the first two shoes already have wear through marks where the bend is on them and somehow that isn't in the cons...
  • 2 0
 Read the RC review an thinking a liitle less grip could be a trade off for the ability to reposition? Sometimes grip like 5ive tens can be too much
  • 1 0
 For the same amount of grip you can use the stickiest rubber with lower pins or use less sticky rubber with taller pins. The former option seems like the safest. And it is probably also easier to tune (as you can't really tune a shoe but you can play with pin length and placement).
  • 3 0
 I'll never elect less grip. I ride too haphazard to have any shoe that would let my foot let go of the pedal any sooner than S1 stealth rubber. They all look cooler and cooler by the day.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Unless one sticks to the most super gnar bro stuff, there may be a reason for less grip. One is comparable to the reason to ride with less suspension etc. Grip comes from both gear and technique. Sometimes you need a bit less "gear" to practice your technique, to keep it sharp so that when you need more grip you can still add more and/or longer pins. The other reason is that to shift the foot a little on the pedal, you need to ease off the pressure on the pedal. The more grippy it is through pins and rubber, the more you need to actually disconnect whereas if the grip isn't so tight, the disconnect is often more gradual and it will be easier to "shuffle" your foot into the right position rather than to lift it and put it down in the correct place. I primarily feel this on the mountain unicycle where lifting a foot is more challenging than on a bike. But of course it applies to bikes too.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: Agreed. I always want the most grip available from the rubber - you can tune your pins. Occasional awkward foot placement > occasional pedal slip in a techy section.

Fixing an awkward foot placement is easy - just slow down for a moment and reposition. Fixing the results of a slipped pedal sometimes requires a trip to the emergency room Smile
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: True, sometimes you can't afford your foot to slip and if you always find yourself riding trails where this is unacceptable, you'll always need maximum grip. Just saying that not all of us always find ourselves in such situations that that might be where you can do with a bit less grip. Sure it is not necessary, but I actually do like to play with this spectrum of grip rather than the on/off type of grip you get with most grippy combination. Not just to shift the foot, but to also get that subconscious warning that I'm about to loose grip and I have to work on pedal pressure etc. Maybe it is comparable to tires. Those tires that give you the most grip often also let go with less warning. I like to play in this "warning" spectrum even though I may not get as much grip as I could with other more grippy but less forgiving tires.

But yeah, maybe the foot-shift thing is primarily a mountain unicycle issue. The stable position on a unicycle is with the cranks horizontal. If you release the pressure on one foot, you're pushing the other one down and that's the most unstable position to have. So the more you can maintain pressure when shifting your foot, the easier it actually gets.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: When I read your post about wanting less grip, I read "dirt jumper".
  • 4 0
 No Skytops.... Muska disapproves.
  • 4 0
 wish these companies would make wide or extra wide shoes
  • 4 0
 Highly dislike how 5.10 is moving toward pointy toes
  • 2 0
 I hate how everyone seems to be moving towards narrow pointy shoes. Have shoe companies never actually looked at the shape of a human foot?
  • 2 0
 Five10 GTX- can we get someone to review that in some cold weather? Like -4c (25f) or colder? Maybe it's what I've been hoping for.
  • 1 0
 I’m wondering how warm the GTXs are in the Winter as I would love to wear a decent flat pedal shoe that is warm in 20* temps while on my fat bike. Boots just suck.
Anybody have any experience with them?
Thanks.
  • 1 0
 Five Ten Freerider Pro Canvas with Stealth S1 rubber soles are on sale for 40% off at REI and other shops. Just bought two pair and two years from now I’ll wish I’d bought four pair.
  • 1 0
 Every shoe review up to now has had someone complaining that there’s no 5.10 to compare to since 5.10 is the pinnacle of flat pedal shoes. Now we get this and then, “5.10’s aren’t they sticky anymore!”
  • 4 1
 Cons:
• Water stiff

Hate that water stiff me.
  • 6 0
 a water stiff - isn't that when you have a boner in the morning because you have to pee?
  • 2 0
 Would have liked to see the Crank Bros Stamps on this list. My Mallets have been great.
  • 3 0
 So still nothing better than the Impact moon boots... Good to know.
  • 1 0
 I think the good old standard 5.10 Freeride Pro's are still just great. I have a pair of the Ride Concepts with the BOA, and they are very good as well
  • 1 1
 My 5.10's with that same tread pattern of all those shoes suck, and I quit using them. I won't buy shoes that don't actually have a flat sole anymore. So, none of those shoes are on my list.
  • 1 0
 Where is Shimano? I'm a big fan of their SH-GR701ML and I would like to see those compared to others to see if I'm missing out on something.
  • 1 0
 I didn't think I'd like the Freerider Pro Mid VCS very much, but holy cow. They are my go-to flat shoe now. I absolutely love them.
  • 1 0
 Old school 5 10 guide tennie mid for the win. I have three pairs and just got 2 of them back from being resoled by 'The Rubber Room' in Bishop CA. Awesome shoes
  • 1 0
 Can the Rubber Room get proper 5.10 Stealth for the resole?
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Dunno mate. Give em a call. One of the main guys there (Tony ??) is a cyclist. I went with his recommendations.

Mine turned out awesome. I'll be sending mine there again when the soles are torn up. I think the key is to not use superlong pins in ya pedals and to get ya shoes to them BEFORE they are too hammered.
  • 1 0
 Those Specialized are comically narrow - immediate return. Endura makes a good flat shoe that actually provides some traction on hike-a-bike...
  • 2 0
 Skipping Crankbrothers offerings seems like a fail. They're right up there with Spech and 5.10
  • 1 0
 Why haven't Adidas just put the 5:10 sticky runner on some Basketball shoes? I'd like flat peddles shoes with 'air cushioning'.
  • 1 0
 After hyping the Impact Pro...it does not make the cut for the review. The low and high top versions are grippy and stiff, and water resistant, and bomber.
  • 1 0
 People often miss a key selling point of the 2FOs which this article also skips....they dry out far faster than most other shoes.
  • 1 0
 Vans are still a pretty gnarly shoe. I run a regular pair of the regular Atwood low shoes and they grip pretty dang well in the wet and dry.
  • 1 0
 This is one of the best reviews of flat pedal shoes I've ever read, especially the description of fit going beyond wide\narrow. Well done!
  • 5 5
 Is it just me (and it probably is) but have 510 shoes become less and less sticky over the years? It's not like I'm ice skating on the new ones, but something is...different.
  • 3 3
 @grnmachine02 I think their sole material changed when Adidas bought them out. I remember their "Stealth Rubber" or whatever being really good prior to the shift.
  • 3 0
 It does feel like the initial fresh-outta-the-box grippiness has slipped a little but once they break in they feel just like they did 10 years ago (at least to me).
  • 3 1
 And they wear out much earlier. Thanks Adidas
  • 3 2
 Just you. It's like I'm riding clipped in sometimes
  • 2 0
 Yes less grippy & narrower fit is the new way?
  • 2 1
 510 was bought out by Adidas. I've heard that the new 510's are not like the old.
  • 2 0
 @Rngspnr: Here's my super science I'm basing this on. I have a pair of pre Adidas freeriders that are beat to hell but live in the room with my trainer. (Yes, I ride flats on the trainer. Train like you race, right?) Those are noticeably stickier than the 6 month old pair of freeriders I now wear.

Yes, I'm basing my set in stone opinion on a sample size of one.
  • 2 0
 They changed the formula a few years back, for durability. The originals, if you ran long pins, you'd have a hole in the sole before the shoe wore out. It is a bit less tacky, but they last much longer and still offer good grip, but I found I need a few long pins to stay planted in the rough.
  • 1 0
 @oldschool43: Now that you mention it, my old pair do have some very pronounced track marks.
  • 3 0
 Got a new pair of freerider pro two months ago. The grip is ok but I'm done with the narrower fit. sore feet within an hour of use. Hope they offer a 2E wide option or I must look elsewere after 15 years of loyalty
  • 1 1
 It’s just you.
  • 1 0
 @Rngspnr: Adidas bought 5-10 in 2011.
  • 2 0
 @grnmachine02: I also ride my trainer on flats. Smile Has helped tremendously with developing a more appropriate pedal stroke to generate power - also alleviates the tightening of the hip flexors from the "pull" portion of the pedal stroke.
  • 1 0
 Last pair of 5.10's only lasted me a short period of time before I gave up on them. They sit in a storage bin as a backup in case of emergency because they just don't stick. I have two other pairs of shoes that do stick, and I use those now. One is Pearl Izumi, the other I think are Shimano.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: Glad to hear there are at least two other yahoos who have even considered this. I've been meaning to try it out. Maybe I will tonight.
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: I found that the work I was doing on the trainer seemed to carry over more when I put flats on indoors. Apples to apples and all that
  • 2 0
 @pmhobson: I’ve been riding flats on everything including the trainer for years. Not sure it helps. I might just be the third idiot
  • 3 0
 @blinglespeed: I think really my biggest issue was foot position. I ride with my feet very far forward/ middle of foot position. Even my shoes with a very long cleat bed couldn't replicate that.


I am also willing to accept I'm an idiot
  • 1 0
 Reduce, reuse, recycle - best soles ever and a huge savings over new shoes - www.rubberroomresoles.com
  • 1 0
 I took a peek at their website. Will they repair any shoe? It kinda looks like they really only cater to a few specific brands/types. I'd love to get my old freerider pros repaired.
  • 1 0
 I want cleats (spikes) on my shoes and replaceable rubber grips on my pedals!

NO MORE PEDAL SPIKES!
  • 1 0
 Any manufactures have steel toe options?...i kick too many rocks with my toes.
  • 1 3
 These are some of the most expensive Fugly looking shoes you can have for flat pedaling. Way to go for bike fashion industry when companies are raping you to wear shitty looking shoes and your bleeding money through your nose while getting bent over!
  • 1 0
 I tried to like the Hellions and other RC models but their fit just felt boxy to me.
  • 2 0
 Where are the reviews of clipless pedal shoes for us old guys? Smile
  • 1 1
 5.10 / Adidas, why do you not make a single flat pedal shoe with boa and a whole bunch of them for clipped in riders??? WHY?!
  • 1 0
 @Samskuatch: what would you recommend for flat pedals to go with these shoes?
  • 1 0
 Regular Freeriders. More than $150 for flats you are going to tear up is way too much.
  • 1 0
 No lace cover! No hard toe caps! No sale for me. Brands listen up! We want those lace cover and toe cap on our shoes!!!
  • 1 0
 They all look the same.... Anyone got a set of NOS 5:10s in 10.5 from 2 generations ago?
  • 1 0
 Which stretchy shoelaces do you use? Wouldn’t mind trying them on my free rider pros.
  • 2 0
 I would have loved to see the Crankbrother's Stamp shoe reviewed?
  • 1 0
 Thought this was going to be a Win it Wednesday... How great would that be. 6 pair of flat pedal shoes :-)
  • 1 0
 A really useful comparison & in-depth review, thanks for that!
  • 1 0
 Velcro is as Velcro does Lt Dan
  • 1 0
 Samuel 'Imelda Marcos' McMain
  • 1 0
 Trail cross mids from last year, with 3DO are the ones to get.
  • 1 0
 Sandugo has been surprisingly great for me.
  • 1 0
 im glad to have finally learned "doff" is the opposite on "don"
  • 1 1
 The Ride Concept Vice shoes are best for flat pedals, the waffle tread design is the way to go.
  • 1 1
 Adidas shoes doesn't last long. Poor materials used. Delamination of rubber and cloth on sides and front of shoe.
  • 1 0
 I'm all about Northwave Clan 2. They are certainly worth a look.
  • 1 0
 Half of these look like a aqua shoes the other half disability shoes
  • 2 0
 Vans.
  • 1 0
 I want Maxxis to make shoes with a DHF tread sole! I'd buy a pair.
  • 1 0
 But for now I'll ride with my Air Jordans!
  • 1 0
 And I'd never buy any of these shoes
  • 1 0
 5.10 FREERIDER CONTACTS, best flat shoe ever!!, can still be found in ebay
  • 1 0
 Easy to over tighten a strap is not a con that’s a user problem
  • 1 0
 Where are the GR9's?
  • 1 0
 Etnies Culvert mid ftw.
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