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First Ride: Atherton S170 - Long Travel & Lugged Aluminum

Mar 18, 2024 at 16:25
by Mike Kazimer  


Atherton Bikes recently celebrated their fifth anniversary, a notable milestone given the tumultuous state of the mountain bike industry during that time period. Up until today, all of their bikes used carbon tubes bonded to titanium lugs created with additive manufacturing, a process that allowed them to create a vast array of size options even for riders that didn't go the full-custom route.

A new model has been added to the lineup, the S170, and there isn't any carbon (or titanium) to be seen. Instead, the bike is built with tubes of 7075 aluminum that are bonded into lugs, no welding required. The S in the model name stands for Subtractive (as opposed to the A series frames, where A stands for Additive); it refers to the machining used to remove material during the frame's creation.
S170 Details
• 7075 aluminum frame
• 170 mm rear travel, 180 mm fork
• 29" front wheel, 27.5" rear
• Head angle: 63.6°
• 12 sizes
• Weight: 37.5 lb / 17 kg (size 8 )
• Price: $5,199 - $6,399 USD / Frame w/shock: $2,985
athertonbikes.com

The S170 is billed as a mini-DH bike, and with 170mm of travel, a 180mm fork, and a 63.6-degree head angle it certainly qualifies. The steep seat angle and good pedaling characteristics make it possible to skip the lift or shuttle and get to the top under your own power, although it's not the lightest thing out there – my test bike checked in at 37.5 pounds.

There are three complete models in the lineup, ranging in price from $5,199 USD to $6,399 for the bike shown here. The frame only with a Fox DHX2 coil shock is $2,985 USD.

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No welds here - theS170's 7075 aluminum tubes are epoxied into the head tube lug.

Frame Details

I'm a big fan of the S170's look – it has sort of a retro-futuristic thing going on, like a very modern version of the Iron Horse 6Point. The front triangle is constructed from 7075 series aluminum, with the tubes bonded using a double lap shear joint into lugs at the head tube and seat tube junctions. The swingarm consists of two machined segments that are bolted to the two short links that make up the DW4 suspension layout, and there's a brace bolted on at the front of the chainstays for additional stiffness.

The S170 has passed the EFBE Tri TestCat 4 (Enduro) and Cat 5 (Downhill) tests, and is covered by a lifetime warranty.

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photo

There's room to mount a bottle cage inside the front triangle, but there aren't any other accessory mounting points or in frame storage. Well, technically there are a bunch of potential storage compartments – check out the underside of the swingarm. There's also a hatch on the top tube that's used to help with the internal cable routing, but I bet at least a gummy worm or two could be stashed in there.

The seat tube is uninterrupted, which means there's plenty of room for running dropper post with lots of drop. My test bike showed up with a 170mm dropper, but I was able to swap that out for a 210mm OneUp and still have plenty of room to spare.

photo
They aren't officially marketed as storage compartments, but I bet there are some clever uses for these voids.
photo
The underside of the chainstays.

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The S170 uses a DW4 suspension layout rather than the DW6 configuration found on the carbon Atherton models.



photo

Geometry

There are a total of 12 different frame sizes to choose from, which could potentially lead to some riders succumbing to analysis paralysis when faced with all of those choices, but it's great to see such a wide range of options.

The reach starts at 405mm and goes all the way up to 515mm in 10 millimeter increments. The chainstay length and seat tube angles vary depending on the frame size. The smallest size has a 430mm chainstay length and 76.6-degree seat tube angle, while the largest measures 440mm and 78.6-degrees.

Builds & Pricing
photo
Build 3 $5119 USD
photo

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Build 2 $5865 USD
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Build 1 $6399 USD
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Dan Atherton logging those frequent flyer miles. Photo: Dan Griffiths


Ride Impressions

I only have one ride in on the S170 so far, so this truly is a First Ride article. I built up the bike, installed a longer dropper post, and hit the trails. The ride ended up being a touch under 5,000 vertical feet of climbing over the course of 28 miles, so it was a decent initial outing.

There were some singletrack climbs in the mix, but the vast majority was done on logging roads, followed by steep, rough descents, which happens to be the type of riding that best suits the S170. At 37.5 pounds it's no lightweight, so it's best to get to the top as efficiently as possible, rather than meandering around on twisty singletrack.

If that number on the scale is taken out of the equation, the S170 is a good climber, at least on logging road grinds – it's responsive under power, and doesn't bob or wallow wildly, even with the shock in the fully open mode. The seat angle is quite steep, which works great when you're actually climbing, but it's something to keep in mind for riders that regularly find themselves on longer, flatter sections of trail, since it does put extra pressure on your hands in that situation. Overall, the S170 is the type of bike where climbing is simply the toll to pay before the fun begins – at the end of the day its main focus is on smashing out downhill laps.

'Smashy' is a good way to sum up how the S170 feels – it's the sort of bike that encourages letting off the brakes and plowing through whatever's in the way. That 180mm Zeb up front is there to absorb the initial blow, and then the SuperDeluxe Coil takes care of the rest. The weight that slows it down on the climbs translates into a solid, planted feel for the descents – the mini-DH term really is appropriate here. Even thought crushing everything feels like its main modus operandi, hitting jumps and natural doubles doesn't feel like a chore – the overall wheelbase is long without being outlandish, and the suspension design provides a good platform to push off of from any part of the travel.

The S170 isn't the quietest bike – the chainslap protection could use some refinements, and there were a few other noises that I'll need to try and quiet down (the brake pads on the Hayes Dominions were another source of rattling), but hopefully that should be a fairly simple fix. We'll be putting in more miles on this aluminum beast over the next couple of months and report back with a full review.





Author Info:
mikekazimer avatar

Member since Feb 1, 2009
1,744 articles

360 Comments
  • 242 10
 Is it possible to have the lugs tack welded...... asking for a friend
  • 61 14
 Pivot has shit the bed 1 day before their lunch, bad bad Pivot Smile
  • 51 14
 can’t weld 7075
  • 20 13
 That would require them to do a post weld heat treatment. I think there are other aluminum frames out there which are indeed welded (and heat treated after that). Make sure to ask around a lot and stipulate you're looking for a welded frame.
  • 4 4
 @Upduro: That´s right
  • 25 2
 @vinay: he joking my babbie
  • 16 2
 @vinay: it's not heat treat that's the issue; it's the composition of 7075 that makes it essentially unweldable.
  • 20 0
 headtube storage, its the new downtube storage.....I
  • 27 0
 Maybe sink a few sheet metal screws through the joint to be sure. Telling for a friend?
  • 25 6
 You can, but you would permanently weaken the tubes by doing so, even with post weld heat treatment you might want to pivot away from such a plan.
  • 22 0
 Is your friend Bernard Kerr by any chance?
  • 6 3
 You are better of drilling and bolting, just be carefull to not bend everything. 7075 is not weldable.
  • 13 1
 I think I will just order a container of duck tape from china, will call it the LugTape, it will be in 12 different colors. I accept preorders, $50 for a set. -10% discount on a code "SWIVEL".
  • 1 0
 Just epoxy that bad boy back together Smile .
  • 15 4
 Considering airplanes are glued together, tack welding would be overkill... unless you're afraid to flySmile
  • 4 0
 J-B Weld?
  • 6 0
 That would negate the BK-pivot functionality of dropper front end feature
  • 5 0
 @manco: I've seen a destructive test showing how much stronger "gluing" two alum sheet together is vs riveting, it was surprising....but general consensus, glued joints are much stronger than riveting due to surface area of load/stress.
  • 5 42
flag scary1 (Mar 19, 2024 at 7:53) (Below Threshold)
 @Tambo: Nicolai /geometron g1
The whole damn thing is 7075.
Huge,fat, beautiful welds.
Man, you people need to look things up.
  • 36 1
 @scary1: "We manufacture all NICOLAI frames from 7020-T6 aircraft aluminum" ....
  • 3 4
 @Tambo: Fair. Back in the days I thought it indeed couldn't be welded but recently I read some articles regarding friction welding and also arc welding where they could still get fair mechanical properties after thermal and mechanical post-weld treatments. Apparently it isn't production yet. Either way, they glue frames. That's what they're good at. I wonder whether aluminum can actually be brazed. Obviously it requires a filler material with quite a low temperature to work with aluminum but yeah, curious whether it could be done. It is how most of my other steel frames have been produced, steel tubes in steel lugs, brazed together.
  • 46 1
 @lkubica: as a founding member of the pinkbike community, I refuse to be wrong, despite your alleged “fact finding” and “research”
As you can see, making a definitive , incorrect statement, full of hubris, compels me to state that now that YOU are wrong and question your intelligence and possibly your lineage in the most demeaning way.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: the pivot that is launched will be full carbon and not bonded
  • 17 0
 Two words... Flex Seal.
  • 1 3
 @vinay: yeah, it can be. And aluminium can be welded to steel.... It's just not practical at all, unless you somehow have an application which cannot be done any other way *and* lends itself to the available processes. You can even braze Ti...
  • 9 3
 Ive been in the auto industry for 30+ years. A lot of you would be surprised to know how many of your vehicles have their roof skins glued on from the factory and in bodyshops during replacement.

Sleep tight
  • 3 0
 @manco: BK isnt afraid to fly... landings are a different story!!!
  • 21 0
 @vinay : I actually did my master's thesis work and my first startup developing friction stir welding (FSW) bicycle frames. 7075 takes to FSW really well; better than 6000 series. This was in 2003/4.

But you are also correct that you can't practically heat weld (e.g. TIG) 7075. FSW is unique in that it takes the metal up to it's precise phase change temp and not a fraction of a degree beyond. Very cool process. But very challenging to get the internal tooling/anvils needed to back the material to complete the FSW weld. You end up with such compromised structural geometry that it negates the benefits of being able to use 7075.
  • 5 0
 @scary1: Kudos, on your enforcement, good sir. I cannot upvote your comment enough. Wink
  • 4 5
 I’d rather have a welded one than an epoxied one.
  • 3 1
 @manco: I think this is how Boeing makes there planes.
  • 1 0
 @scary1: its 7020
  • 1 1
 @kcj801: i hope not i could do without the thought of my storage door falling off
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: headtubes are for cable storage.
  • 1 0
 Cable ties
  • 7 0
 If it's Atherton proof I think your friend will be fine.
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: yup, and the geo chart for S9 is so close to my Nicolai that my lust for this immediately deflated.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: put me down for 1 black roll please
  • 2 1
 @Compositepro: Or is the headtube "storage" hole purely there for accessing the internals for machining? Seems like it would be really hard to hollow that lug out without it?
  • 2 0
 @Upduro: I'm sure people have tried!
  • 1 2
 @Upduro: My 20 year old hardtail says you can.
  • 4 0
 @imbiker: don't confuse 7075 with 7005...
  • 5 0
 @Tambo: My 20 year old hardtail says I need new glasses. You are right, after a closer look.
  • 1 0
 @Upduro: very true.
  • 1 0
 @ATXZJ: what do roof skins have to do with bike frames?
  • 1 1
 @kcj801: their.
  • 98 17
 Its crazy to me that this machined Atherton frame is 1K cheaper then an Ibis HD6. I would pick this in a heart beat.
  • 38 32
 but is it? if you compare carbon to carbon ibis is 1K cheaper.
  • 25 0
 I would love to ride both back to back, especially if the bike is not going to just be a park bike. The IBIS is MUCH lighter than the Atherton.
  • 19 5
 Wtf are you talking about, it's $200 more expensive than the (carbon) hd6 for a similar build.
Sure it's almost $1k cheaper if you want a Domain up front which uses an ancient damper and heavier casting.
The HD6 has full factory level spec at $6100 USD. On a carbon frame. It's $6300 for that here.
  • 23 1
 @Gristle: Ibis HD6 frame only $3899
Atherton logo frame only $2985
  • 12 1
 @howejohn: I stand corrected
  • 16 4
 But the ibis won’t weigh 38lb
  • 8 1
 This is sort of true true even with the carbon variants as well, even though it appears that Atherton has raised their prices a bit lately.

You can buy the A150 frame and shock for $4,762.50. A Yeti SB160 is $4800 for the frame and shock.

It blows my mind that the Atherton is cheaper, despite being offered in 22 sizes, and being "super boutique". While the Yeti is mass manufactured in 5 sizes, and is somehow more expensive.

I said "sort of true" at the beginning, because the A170 frame/shock combo is $5,027, which is more than the Yeti. Still though, not a bad deal.

For the S170 frame, its fairly competitive with other high end aluminum frames. Banshees are $2600, Raaw Madonna frames with shocks are $2600 without a shock, and $3000-3200 depending on the shock. Kavenz is similar at ~$2650 with no shock.
  • 29 5
 @chrismac70: Everytime I comment this I get downvoted but personally 38 pounds for a 170 bruiser enduro bike seems pretty reasonable to me. The 3 pounds of savings for that money doesn't seem worth it.
  • 6 8
 @howejohn: seems massively over the top to me. If I want a dh bike it would be lighter. If I want an enduro bike it would be lighter. Who wants this
  • 6 1
 @chrismac70:

Want is maybe the wrong word.

But 38lbs for an aluminum park/enduro bike, is very normal/fairly reasonable.

For perspective, thats 2lbs lighter than a Privateer 161 gen2, and my personal bike (Banshee Titan), with one DH tire on it.

So 38lbs is still fairly heavy, but not really compared to other big burly aluminum bikes.
  • 6 1
 A fairer comparison will be when IBIS drops an aluminum HD6… that doesn’t use glue. That bike is gonna be finger licking good.
  • 3 1
 @chrismac70: my previous gen meta am is 40.7lbs with 2x cushcore and 1x double down, air sprung. I want this, because I am more concerned about smashing and not flatting/mechanical and then winching to the top. My old DH bike is certainly lighter, but that doesn't have a dropper, 29" wheels etc. A 35mm boxer is probably similar weight to a 38 performance...

Some people aren't worried about weight, especially if the trade off is for downhill speed and a planted ride.
  • 2 1
 @SherlockOoms: Still from construction standpoint A170 will be a better bike. 100% accurate frame alignment and no weak spots around welds = possibly much less cracking.
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: totally fair point on alignment which I now appreciate the design style much more for. Thanks for bringing that to my attention! I don’t have any Al bikes (that I actually still ride) but cracking definitely is a point of concern at the welds and have had friends with issues.
  • 75 0
 Speccing Dominion A4s is pretty sweet, more brands should do this. Brakes worthy of the bike's capabilities.
  • 11 0
 Some interesting spec choices on these build. Some strong (like the A4s), but the decision to do 180mm rear rotors is interesting on a 38lbs bike. I'm also interested to know who buys the Build 3 kit. Can't imagine dropping over 5k on a bike to get a Domaine fork.
  • 11 1
 Yep, Dominions are the best of all worlds in high-end brakes. The do always rattle out of the box. Gotta spread those spring spacers really, really wide, then they're fine for the life of the pads. That's literally their only flaw.
  • 1 0
 @JustinVP: does this really alleviate the rattling? I've thought about a few different ways to try and get rid of mine but never got past ideas and just kinda dealt with it.
  • 1 0
 @intensemack10: Theres a hack that involves taking a disposable ear protection, cutting a slice out, boring a hole in it, then putting that 'donut' between the spring and the bolt.
  • 2 0
 @intensemack10: Yes it works, but they need to be spread out fairly aggressively - use needle nose pliers and bend them right at the base. I have the brakes on both of my bikes and have gone through many sets of pads. I have my bikes set up suuuper quiet, no rattles, quiet hubs. The brakes don't rattle.

Metallic pads are noisy as always in the wet or certain dust (been this way on Shimano, SRAM as well). If you want super quiet without losing wet control the Galfer greens (Race, I think) are the way - but they wear out faster than OEM metallic pads. I need to try Galfer purple (e-bike compound) next.
  • 1 0
 @bigjimdaniel: That may help a little, but in my looking at the system, the most noise comes from the backing plates of the pads rattling against the inside of the caliper. Which I dont think this would really help.
  • 2 0
 @JustinVP: Hmmm, alright then. I will give it a try. Its not like there's much to lose. Thanks for the tip.
  • 2 0
 @JustinVP: been digging the purple pads on my hopes. The greens were great but wore out extremely fast.
  • 1 1
 @hatton: I wonder how many people will buy an Atherton spec 3 and a factory spec bike from a less renowned brand, swap the parts and then sell the leftover bike ...
  • 1 0
 @hatton: @hatton: I had the same thoughts on Domains until a ended up with one on my other bike. I was going to swap it out but after a few weeks of riding I realised its a criminally underrated fork. Its not only cheap, its also a very good fork. I was a cynic who became a convert.
  • 2 0
 @JustinVP: Thx for the tip. Just the tip. Thx
  • 55 4
 I hope tube sealing has been done with sufficient Kerr
  • 18 1
 Sick Bern-ard
  • 20 1
 I conKerr
  • 6 0
 @korev: never been a better time to release a lugged bonded bike!
  • 7 1
 Kerr splat
  • 3 2
 @Gristle: You'd need to be a Bankerr or a Dentist to afford one of these...
  • 45 0
 @mikekazimer all of this cries out loudly for a comparison test between the aluminium big hitters enduro bikes that came out over the last 6 month!
Atherton S170, RAAW Madonna v3, Airdrop Edit MX.
All of them in Mullet config, comparable weight, same usecase ....
I'd absolutely LOVE to read that one!

If you're capable of giving a first comparison between your winter test Madonna v3 and the S170, this would be awesome too!

And, by the way, which size did you go for on the Atherton?
This seems to be missing in the article?
  • 16 0
 banshee bikes all in raw!!!
  • 22 0
 Agreed.
  • 5 0
 @brianpark: If you need a lay person to help with the shoot out, I have loads of time and am willing to! Just let me know! Throw a Canfield One. 2 and the new Knolly in there for good measure too.
  • 7 0
 Don’t forget the Kavenz VHP V7 in that test!
  • 7 0
 Throw the Geometron G1 in there for fun as well. I'd love an alloy shoot out with all of those.
  • 27 0
 Agreed. Burly aluminum bike group test would be sweet.

AirDrop Edit MX
Atherton S170
Banshee Titan
Kavenz VHP 16 (or 18…)
knolly Chilcotin
Nicolai nucleon 16
Privateer 161 gen 2
Pole Vikkela
Raaw Madonna v3

I’m sure I forgot some, but a good selection from that list would be a great read.

I’ve got a Titan, and live a bit south of Kaz, and could let him do some rides on it if that helps.
  • 12 0
 @ocnlogan: Frameworks
  • 2 0
 @red-wood:

Gah, knew I'd forget one or few at least.

I always forget they are available for sale. But I'd love to spend some time on one.
  • 7 0
 @ocnlogan: Bird Aeris9
  • 4 0
 @ocnlogan: great list of bikes, would love to see them in a field test.
  • 6 0
 @ocnlogan: + Last Coal
  • 46 2
 oh man that’s a lot of possible spots for some @bicyclepubes tiny f*cking framebags
  • 72 1
 im gonna fill all them holes on the seatstays with peanut butter.
  • 28 1
 @bicyclepubes: Looks like a VSSS design to me. (Vienna Sausage Storage Solution)
  • 1 3
 So...my friend doesn't know what @bicyclepubes are and since you are here in the chat, maybe you should explain it.
  • 24 0
 For a moment there I thought they'd machined out the tops of the seat-stays. That would have been ideal in wettest Welsh Wales. Glad to read that it's actually the bike upside down in the photo!
  • 8 0
 Same, didn't realize it wasn't until I saw your comment.
  • 5 0
 @spudsmtb: I also thought they were mud pockets. Turn that 37.5 pounder into 40 in a jiffy
  • 12 0
 @gmiller720: still they will pack with mud to a certain extent
  • 3 0
 @Muckal: Probably best to run helicopter tape down the bottom of the stays to seal them up.
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: 100%. Clay around our parts, will pack in there like peanut butter.
  • 1 0
 @FaahkEet: I'm thinking expanding foam
  • 1 0
 @spudsmtb: same here... the pic should be rotated at least horizontally
  • 15 1
 What's the benefit of this lugged technique over the more traditional welded frames that seem to work just fine. Maybe I missed it in the artcile, but I'd rather be yelled at here than have to re-read.
  • 24 1
 If I had to guess:
1) it allows them to use 7075 aluminum which is stronger but cant be welded
2) it allows them to leverage their processes for frame building that they developed for their carbon bike
  • 12 2
 It plays to their specialities (i.e. CAM).
It allows them to use 7075 Alu which can't be used for welding
It allows them to use different lugs and tube lengths to create loads of sizes. There's nothing stopping welded frames from doing this, but inventory can be a problem when predicting sales and welding overseas. This allows them total control.
  • 6 28
flag dododuzzi (Mar 19, 2024 at 8:13) (Below Threshold)
 None. It just increases the weight of the frame. Nobody uses this kind of construction other than for prototypes.
  • 1 0
 Maybe it also allows for some flexibility to, rather than use tapered or hydroformed tubing, to do the reinforcing towards the ends of the tube in the lug. So in addition to what @thingswelike mentioned considering making different sizes, it also allows them to tweak the lugs so that they can use the same tubes for different rider weights and styles.
  • 7 0
 @mtmc99:
3) you are bringing basicly no heat into the frame so theoreticly(if the tubes are straight) its easier to build a straighter frame)

4) Its simpler labour to bond the tubes in then to weld aluminium well(hard to find good aluminium welders in youre area which are looking for a job). The cnc machines require a litttle more skill but ones set up its not that big of a deal.
  • 2 1
 @JasperTS: Interesting takes. Feels a bit like a solution to a problem not many have been having, but I hope it benefits them. Looks kinda cool, sorta, ha. I kinda wonder if they'd do a steel version for all the feels, but probably not. As a consumer, if this makes manufacturing easier, I'd hope for a real price advantage, or maybe for lots of geo range; but as for the benefits of 7075, I don't think I'd notice.
  • 2 4
 @JasperTS: I think Ed Haythornthwaite was a bike builder well before he became an editor at Dirt Magazine which was well before he co-founded Robotbike which eventually turned into Atherton bikes. Maybe he never started welding aluminum but I think he could become a good aluminum welder if they really needed that at the company.
  • 10 1
 @jesse-effing-edwards:
Its a solution to problems everyone has who wants to manufacture bikes outside of Taiwan.

Its not youre problem as a customer but its the reason why there are not many bikes build in the west.

Point 3 is also good for the customer as bad alignement f*cks up all kind of thinks and most users dont notice it (they just feel that the bike isnt good, needs to much Bearing services, has Suspension performance which is not as it should be, Joint pain for the rider....) so its not a sexy point for marketing but its very important(and one of the best indicators for quality)
  • 4 1
 @vinay:
Not a real solution

Does he want to weld allhis bikes?

How many can he weld?(i think Atherton is trying to sell some more of the affordable alloy bikes)

There a reasons why not manny Alloy bikes are made in the west and lack of available skillfull welders is on of the biggest and hardest to solve(other then giong to taiwan)

PS not even every welder is able to become good at welding aluminium (in my field of work we say rougly 1/10 welders is good with aluminium). Its a real skill and thats one of the reasosn why ther are much more small frame builders doing steel then aluminium(becasue its much easier(they hide it by steel is real and other phrases))
  • 2 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: It also reduces manufacturing waste, especially on the carbon side. It's theoretically just as strong as welding, and is very efficient. Less man hours per frame, once the cnc machines are dialed in, and your average person can be taught to bond the frames together in the jig much faster than having to learn all the skill and techniques that you need to do tig welding. Keep in mind, they are making all of their bikes domestically in the UK, and still able to sell them for a really reasonable price point, which by itself is impressive. Performance of the bike isn't the only benefit of this technique, and the performance isn't hampered either, when done with the proper care that the Athertons seem to be taking.
  • 2 0
 @JasperTS: sure steel is easier to weld than aluminum, but that isn't its only benefit. It can withstand impact and bending without getting brittle, and can create a different ride feel, not as noticeable on full suspension bikes but very aparant on hardtails. Tig welding is a very important skill, and needed in a lot of industries, so there is a lot of competition for those welders, and the bike industry probably can't pay the same amount as other industries that need them. Lots of factors that go into it, but it's not just that not every welder is good enough to do tig.
  • 2 0
 Tolerances in position and alignment is the biggest benefit. It should result in repeatable geometry, long lasting bearings and smoother suspension motion. If you have linkages riding on bearings and pivots aren't lined up, you're going to have premature wear and not so smooth motion. The machined lugs and extruded tubes should be a more precise assembly than welded and heat treated frames that get aligned by eye post processing. Ability to offer 12 sizes while only stocking a few size lugs is another benefit. They can offer 3 times as many sizes and just cut the tube to length to build on demand. This allows the bike company to keep carrying costs down while offering the consumer a level of customization that isn't available from most manufacturers.
  • 5 5
 It allows them to make sure it weighs as much as a small house
  • 18 2
 @vinay: I left the company quite a while ago now, so I'm definitely not up for welding them! That said, if it were down to me then I'd definitely be welding rather than bonding these cheaper aluminium frames. Robot was purely driven by sound engineering (probably one of the reasons why we didn't survive!), which the carbon/ti bonded approach was/is, but I'm not sure the same can be said for this. Definitely driven more by in-house skills, but from a business perspective I guess that makes sense.
  • 1 0
 @edhayetc: what's unsound about the Al bike in your opinion?
  • 9 2
 @The-Spirit-of-Jazz: it's not that I'd say it's inherently unsound (although it is over a year delayed due to unforeseen problems), it's more that in my opinion if you want to make a great affordable frame, in many sizes, then welded aluminium is the way to go. It is a very well proven and cost effective method. I don't believe the 7075 aluminium really brings anything to the table. So yeah, I believe you could make a frame that's just as robust (possibly more so?), cheaper and lighter by going down the welded route. The eco warrior in me reckons the welded one would probably be 'greener' too.
  • 1 0
 @edhayetc: gotcha. Thanks for taking the time to answer!
  • 1 14
flag Caddz (Mar 19, 2024 at 13:21) (Below Threshold)
 @edhayetc: So no real reason other than you use to work there as a welder and think it'd be better if they wanted you back
  • 11 3
 @Caddz: haha, nope! I was never a welder there, I was the co-founder of both Robot Bike Co and Atherton Bikes, plus Technical Editor of Dirt Magazine for over a decade, degree in Material Science & Engineering...and definitely wouldn't ever go back to Atherton!
  • 4 1
 @edhayetc: Funnily enough.....that's not the first time I've heard that! Hope you are doing well now.Love your work.
  • 2 0
 @watchmen: Cheers! And doing great thanks!
  • 1 0
 @mtmc99: I think the only process from the carbon bike that's being reused here is the assembly. Everything else is different.
  • 14 0
 Dual crown compatible? Thinking iron horse Sunday…
  • 3 0
 Wish I could double upvote... If they did a retro version with the old Sunday colors I would consider spending an irresponsible amount of money, and blame it on 12 year old me
  • 4 0
 DW link and a big gusset at the headtube? It's a Sunday to me
  • 2 0
 @Onetrakcmind: nothing stopping you from painting it
  • 10 2
 'The seat angle is quite steep, which works great when you're actually climbing, but it's something to keep in mind for riders that regularly find themselves on longer, flatter sections of trail, since it does put extra pressure on your hands in that situation.' It's pretty much the same comment a certain Mike L. Had reported. Interestingly enough, Mike K. had answered something along these lines: 'if you're often on a flat stretch, then you have the wrong bike'.
  • 3 2
 Baby steps, a few years ago we were at "90 DEGREE SEAT ANGLE IS THE ONLY GOOD SEAT ANGLE"
  • 1 0
 Yes, Mike hits the nail on the head. This is not exactly the bike to ride on flatter sections. It will either used to climb a long steep fire road leading to a descent or a bike park with lift access. Atherton bikes from the A130 all the way to 170 are designed with a similar STA and similar intentions. Think PNW terrain.
  • 1 1
 @sprung-mass: which Mike? And when?
  • 11 3
 Beautiful but chainstays aren’t long enough in the largest sizes. And I’m guessing this is the one geo number you can’t tweak as it seems they decided on 3 rear triangle sizes. Should have topped out at 450 with a 515 reach
  • 1 1
 Would be relatively easy for them to update the design to offer modular drop outs like Forbidden has on their new DH bike.
  • 1 1
 @haen: Exactly! That’s the beauty of CNC‘d and bonded frames. Design changes can be implemented easily and quickly. If enough customers demand a longer rear end, I’m sure they’ll offer one.
  • 13 5
 A headtube only a mother could love.
  • 8 1
 So those voids in the rear triangle don’t have a cover? They’re just there to fill with mud?!
  • 17 0
 or cocaine
  • 4 3
 They're on the underside of the rear triangle, gravity will (hopefully) take care of it.
  • 8 0
 @stevemokan: tell that to the mud that sticks to every other surface of my frame. I think these will have permanent mud caked into them. Ah well. I’m not the customer for this bike anyways.
  • 1 1
 @whitebirdfeathers: that’s why I said “hopefully”. I’m with you, I wouldn’t want an extra pound of mud stuck in my frame either.
  • 3 0
 Smart owners will be taping over those before the first ride but it's a shame on such an otherwise well thought out bike!
  • 3 0
 Yep weird design decision.
I’m also not the target customer but those are a non-starter.
  • 1 6
flag jdkellogg (Mar 19, 2024 at 10:15) (Below Threshold)
 @whitebirdfeathers: yeah atherton which is based in one of the wettest areas ever, definitely didnt test these at all in wet conditions. bro they obviously evaluated them, and its a non issue if it made it to the production bike.
  • 4 0
 @jdkellogg: weird holes grab mud. No way around it. People like to make things look cool and attempt to save weight.
  • 2 0
 @jdkellogg: You're probably right, bike companies never do stupid shit to their production bikes.
  • 5 1
 I think it's beautiful and honestly for that size range and built in UK it seems reasonable value. Weight? Well it's basically the same as half the enduro field test last year so not really noteworthy. Want to take 1-2 kg off get the a170.

Something about solid rear triangle FS just also ticks the boxes for me don't know why.
  • 7 3
 Wowzers what a beauty! Very fair price too for something as exceptional as that.
I imagine a few folk will be trying to cancel orders of other frames to get their hands on one of these.
Stick on a raw intend usd fork and loads of silver ano bling you’d have a very sexy bike.
  • 3 0
 You got me drooling.
  • 8 1
 Gotta love the Athertons! Dream park bike right there!
  • 12 4
 Almost 38lbs? Jesus.
  • 3 0
 the rock cracker
  • 10 0
 It's ok, on a Pinkbike commenter's malfunctioning scale it'll say 34lbs
  • 10 1
 Alternatively-nearly 37lbs.Alu frame. Coil shock. Zebs. Conti Enduro tyres. Seems about right to me.
  • 7 1
 @succulentsausage: It's ok....my bike was 37lb until I put some carbon bars on it.....34 now.
  • 3 0
 It's the top build as well. The NX one with RS Domain is probably well into its 40's
  • 3 1
 Madonna's right up there. As is my Process 153, which has almost 20mm less travel. Seems reasonable for the smashy nature.
  • 8 0
 My Knolly chilcotin 167 was 38lbs with pedal and dh caseing contis. If people would actually weigh there Enduro bikes, with pedals and usable tires they would be surprised, most of them are around that weight. Ever see the youtube video where Ed Masters goes around the EWS pits weighing peoples bikes?
  • 5 0
 @jokullthor:
Banshee Titan owner here

With one DH tire, and one trail tire + insert, deore 11speed drivetrain, coil shock, 2kg wheelset, and a light fork for its category (Mezzer), is almost bang on at 40lbs. I could drop some weight with fancy drivetrain and lighter wheels, but a burly aluminum bike with real tires, is going to weigh a fair bit.

38lbs for a 170/180mm travel, aluminum trail bike with a coil shock, seems pretty normal.
  • 4 1
 "Yeah Gee, all we had laying around was this 7075, so we sanded the ends a bit and JB welded those suckers into the lugs. It'll be great, they love epoxied stuff!"

Does anyone have an idea of the mechanical properties of their bonding agent? I've been thinking of machining my own lugs for a gravel bike for my girlfriend, but I don't have an oxyacetylene brazing setup, and JB weld would be... convenient
  • 33 0
 Depends how much you like your girlfriend?
  • 17 0
 @pbuser2299: not enough to buy an oxyacetylene brazing set up but enough for her to be his bernard kerr
  • 3 1
 I know some of the people working there worked in the aviation industry so they have experience with bonding wings to planes. So its dam strong
  • 1 0
 Many good choices out there from Permabond, 3M, LORD, and Henkel (Loctite)
  • 1 0
 @k-n-i-x-o-n: gorilla duct tape
  • 1 0
 We use this stuff for potting umbilicals on underwater ROVs
www.wirelock.com
  • 1 0
 can't delete a comment?
  • 1 0
 lotus Elise was aluminum bars glued together 30 years ago. If you trust Athertons' engineering is sufficient to design a bike, you can trust their binding agent selection.
  • 2 0
 @johnny2shoes: hey, it's steel and aluminum, not carbon fiber and aluminum. Much closer on the galvanic series and much harder to screw up!

That being said, if you're offering to donate an oxy setup, just let me know Big Grin

@pbuser2299 more than Pivot likes Kerr?
  • 1 0
 @intelligent-goldfish: sounds very interesting and it's a lovely gift!
  • 8 3
 37.5 lbs for aluminum 4 bar 180/170 travel bike is pretty dang good. With a dw-link I expect this to climb alright, at least compared to my 39lb range...
  • 12 0
 Lighter tires on this one though... I bet it ends up closer to 39lb with proper meats.
  • 2 2
 @brianpark: but still have a DW linkage instead of a VHPig
  • 3 1
 engineers/designers can make Horst bikes climb just fine... there are tradeoffs when you increase the AS.
  • 3 8
flag chrismac70 FL (Mar 19, 2024 at 10:46) (Below Threshold)
 It’s way too heavy. You can tell they test at an uplift venue
  • 1 0
 Isn't there a Knolly Chilcotin that's about 33 lbs. with the cheapest build?
  • 2 0
 @chrismac70: maybe it is and thats subjective, but it’s in line with plenty of other long travel bikes. My patrol with dd tires and carbon wheels is 39lbs. With pedals and proper tires the Norco range is 39, commencal Meta and clash are 38/39, devinci chainsaw is 37, raaw is 38, I could go on. These are bikes that I have personally weighed.
  • 2 2
 @idontknowwhatiexpected: And I wouldn’t touch any of them at those weights. I think my mega at 35lb with cushcore in the back is at the upper limit of acceptable and it was alot lets than any of those you listed
  • 3 0
 Beautiful looking steed!
It’s full circle the Alan aluminium bonded Road frames are still beautiful to this day and many are still on the road today nearly 50 years on, so it’s a proven technology!
No tack welds needed, I’ve seen many a welded aluminium bike fail on the welds!
Modern epoxy has to be stronger and more fail safe than a weld!
Go Athertons
  • 6 0
 Lots to like about this but would prefer longer CS in the bigger sizes
  • 1 0
 This was my first thought too actually, at least for my personal preferences.

Would be cool to see this with a dropout sort of rear end (like Banshee, and Kavenz), this way you can get adjustments in length, or axle spacing, and still keep your UDH compatibility if that is what they want.

I'm here wanting Kavenz to offer a +30mm length on theirs, so the VHP18 on the XL/XXL sizes is more balanced Big Grin .
  • 10 5
 Damn, that rocker really does the bike an injustice.
  • 4 0
 I invision Atherton branded trail snacks that fit perfectly in the stay holes.
  • 13 0
 A-hole snacks.
  • 4 0
 What about a ~150mm bike? This one is dope, but rather a park/freeride bike.
  • 5 0
 Has anyone mentioned 1980 Rayleigh bikes yet?
  • 2 0
 Ah yeah, you beat me to it. The Atherton is the grandchild of my 1985 Raleigh Technium.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer if you would have gone one size up, the steering tube would be 25mm longer. Could that help with the pressure relief of your hands on flatter sections of trail? Wondering because I’m looking at both sizes, 8 & 9 and have a hard time picking one. The Madonna also has a long ST…
  • 1 0
 To all the bonded non believers: I think Gee's crash, and the frame being unharmed at that tiny little Rampage drop he did, proved it's not the bonding itself, rather the execution, exactly like Chris from Pivot explained. Errare humanum est.
  • 1 0
 Can anyone make sense of the size chart? There are 3 chainstay lengths which corresponds to 3 rear triangles. Got it. And each size varies by 10mm in length. Seems sensible. But then there are only 3 stacks, 4 seat tube lengths, and 4 seat tube angles. I’m having trouble picking how this saves manufacturing costs since it seems like there would need to be custom lugs and fixtures (or and adjustable fixture) for each size anyway. What am I missing?
  • 4 1
 Definitely a pretty looking thing. Does look a little Skynet built to me for some reason, in a good way.
  • 7 1
 If you cover up the head tube and bottom bracket junctions I would agree. But those two areas aren’t pretty.
  • 2 0
 @rich-2000: A sticker on the head tube lug would sort it Smile
  • 1 0
 I'm assuming the shock in the cheapest build is the Rockshox Super Deluxe Select Coil (and not the inline RS Deluxe Select), otherwise there are going to be a lot of disappointed riders when they receive their bikes.
  • 4 0
 Really rockshox domain?... Really?...
  • 7 0
 Yeah the price difference between the bottom and top seems really small compared to the standard of kit
  • 4 0
 kind of cool, but looks even more like plumbing
  • 2 0
 i wonder what drove the decision to go with DW4 over DW6 for the alloy version. i hope they start expanding alloy to the rest of their range.
  • 3 0
 Thought the same thing, I have a feeling that 95% of a DW6's characteristics can be accomplished with DW4, or even Horst Link to a lesser degree. It's just harder to tweak bc 6 bar isolates the various kinematic elements from each other as you make changes
  • 1 0
 @zuker81: right, but they already did the r&d for dw6 on the carbon version. weird they didn't just carry it over to the alloy version instead of having to go through kinematics again to get the dw4 in place.
  • 7 0
 @novajustin: exactly the same kinematics can be achieved with the DW4 as the DW6, and this is the same. The reason for the difference is down to packaging and the different manufacturing processes and restrictions that those bring (which although on the surface look similar, they are very different).
  • 3 0
 So this is the Pivot Firebird for metal loving people who dont mind a view extra pounds
  • 1 0
 x2, I thought this, very unique looking Firebird
  • 2 0
 Atherton's wide size selection is awesome!
Especially for those of us who're right in between modern T-shirt sizes that 95% of manufacturers have settled on.
  • 2 0
 "Now shipping worldwide"

Frame only (to Australia): $1,397

Chain Reaction charged me AU$200 for a complete bike. Even RAAW only wants €106 for a frame.
  • 1 1
 I used to buy new bike every year since 2010 .I havnt in 3byears bikes have been such a let doen this thing looks sick and also looks strong ....the headtube alil questionable but if it held up to atheron brothers then I guess it's good for anyone else ....im definitely getting one in a month or 2 if there in stock
  • 5 2
 Looks like a Ghost :-o



(Ghost Riot Enduro FYI)
  • 3 0
 That rear triangle looks like it fell off of a T1000, I like it!
  • 2 0
 Nice looking bike. Tons of sizes, well sorted spec, lifetime warranty, hope they do well with this!
  • 3 0
 Can I be super picky and ask for a shorter travel coil version please?
  • 1 0
 They do a carbon 150 and a 130, but I don't think the weight saving is huge and the long travel ones pedal well, so you should probably try before you buy!
  • 4 0
 I'm sure I read they are releasing more S-models in the fututre. You'd assume they'll do a 130 and 150 as well.
  • 2 1
 For all the peeps worried about the bonded aluminum that haven't heard of the 90's trek ZX aluminum frames; it's been done and it works just fine.
  • 2 1
 Stack is whack. Good stack for 5'11" riders and then doesn't get any taller for the riders up to 6'4" or so where the reach would top out.
  • 2 0
 Tall head tubes don’t look “cool”. Raaw’s Madonna V3 is as close as it gets to a consistent stack to reach ratio across the sizes.
  • 1 0
 Yer agree, I went with a Madonna. Atherton will do custom stack, but given they do so many std sizes, baffling that they don't even offer tall stack as std 'tall option', especially given their manufacturing process. I did ask them but they just push you towards the std sizes.
  • 1 0
 I like it! It looks like similar geo to my Specialized Status 160 with different shock linkage, but about double the price... I'd definitely ride it.
  • 3 2
 This is one of the sexiest bikes I've ever seen. Seriously drooling over here. I think I found a replacement for my Slayer.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: would it be possible to provide weights in kg in addition to lbs? This way only one person would have to do the conversion. Would be well appreciated!
  • 2 0
 Weights are always provided in both units of measurement - just look in the Details section of the article.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: sorry, got up early and it's been a long day...
  • 1 1
 it only takes one person to do the conversion and I bet that person (you) has a fancy smart phone they could do it with in less than 30seconds.
  • 8 1
 @workingclasswhore: me, and most people out there who use the metric system. We use it because, wait for it...it is objectivly better. There's not even an argument to be made for imperial. But that's a thing for another day.
  • 2 0
 I do appreciate that they have a Fox build available. Rockshox just doesn't do it for me.
  • 2 0
 how do they cnc the lugs for double lap shear?
  • 1 0
 A really thin router bit, I suppose. Never thought this was possible indeed.
  • 1 0
 Custom tooling / boring bar style arrangement or a small dia / long endmill?
  • 2 6
flag sam125125 (Mar 19, 2024 at 5:32) (Below Threshold)
 might not need to, aluminium's got high surface energy so good for bonding
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Yeah a small diameter endmill could handle that with flood coolant no problem. I use endmills as small as .030" on some projects and they can do alot of work in aluminum.
  • 1 0
 Probably a trepanning tool of some sort. But maybe a very small end mill at very high RPM.
  • 1 1
 CNCing man, just use a small drill like end mill and precisely spin the piece.
  • 2 0
 @Notmeatall: Thats not a spun part, it's on a trunnion and interpolated with a small (2mm?) Endmill.
  • 2 0
 Agree @Tambo, like this: www.bigdaishowa.com/en/products/cnc-boring-tools/face-grooving-tool

Some of the wording on here is funny....

Could still be an endmill though, looks bigger than 2mm, more like 3-4mm, one of the machines we have could eat that as it has 26k RPM available.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: But that's a lathe toll, that part would not be made in a lathe
  • 2 0
 @Tmackstab: Its not a lathe tool - its a face groove tool in a boring style body used in a cnc mill.

Don't want to be blunt, but you don't know a lot about this kinda stuff, do you?

One being used: www.bigdaishowa.com/en/blog/cutter-change-reduces-process-time-75
  • 4 0
 @justanotherusername: Whoops I've been served lol!
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Actually I retract being served. The max depth of cut I can see for the deepest tool is .200". That's hardly enough to get a sufficient bond imo. Also grooving tools are great however if I had to guess, you'd need at least an inch of depth for the tubes which would start galling from chip evacuation etc etc. It would be interesting to see how they actually do it but I'm still going with endmill. Cheers.
  • 1 0
 To be honest I'm also curious why they bothered with the double lap shear joint. For the carbon tubes I understand they use it to avoid delamination in the tubes. But this isn't an issue for aluminum tubes. To avoid warping you may want a (hollow) plug inside the tube but the load transfer could much more easily be done over the outer face of the tube so with a possibly longer outer shear lap there. Sure router bits can be made thin and long but it would make them both expensive, vulnerable and they won't last long.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Nah Garr makes 4mm carbide endmills for like $10 if you buy 10pcs type thing.
  • 2 1
 Long reach end mills for this application won’t be £10, they will be £50+ but irrelevant as high value product and aluminium so low wear rate.
  • 1 0
 @Tmackstab: That was an example of such a tool, others available.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Not arguing, it just wouldn't be my first choice for a tool for this application. Endmill will have a much better evacuation of chips plus ability to control diameters with wear offsets PLUS the ability to do a finishing pass.
  • 2 1
 @Tmackstab: read the article where they literally replaced an endmill / interpolation, this kind of tool is much more precise, almost no need to adjust as in aluminium it will hardly wear, and cycle time hugely reduced.

Care to tell me how you run a finish pass on a 3mm groove with a 3mm endmill? Or would you undersize the endmill then finish both walls separately, for a 25mm deep groove that will be quite some cycle time, not to mention horrendous chatter and surface finish.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Yeah I would use an undersized endmill. I hear what you're saying though and are probably correct with their tool choice, without knowing any actual tolerances or dimensions we're just talking in circles.
  • 3 0
 @Tmackstab: @justanotherusername there are many ways to do this, I'd use an annular cutter / precision hole saw.
  • 2 0
 @saylortwift: I didn’t think precision (0.02mm tolerance?) and ‘hole saw’ went together - got a link to something like that, always happy to learn something new.
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: image search for "annular cutter", they're like precision hole saws. I don't know if this is what they're using to make these lugs, but if I had to I'd give these a look.
  • 1 0
 @saylortwift: ah yea seen those, just not aware of them being used for this kind of work, thought welders / fabricators used them, I wouldn’t put one near my machines but could be completely wrong there.
  • 1 0
 @saylortwift: Interesting! I'll have to keep these in my back pocket for future projects. Could be a quick way to rough out a groove even if the tolerance isn't awesome.
  • 1 3
 @Tmackstab: don’t be silly, not unless you are going back to manual mills and tolerances +- millimetres
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: This is what I'm saying yes. Could be a useful tool in some regards.
  • 3 2
 Atherton marketeers to the engineering team "You couldn't make the name of the crankset any longer?"
  • 12 11
 I love the aesthetics personally. Poor time to be a glued and lugged frame though.
  • 2 1
 If you’re Pivot…
  • 3 1
 @MikeKazimer How does it compare to the Raaw Madonna V3?
  • 2 0
 I absolutely love it. Good job.
  • 3 0
 Wow this is great.
  • 1 0
 lol, my 2017 Session 88 with so so components and heavy ass Marzon Bomber 888 ( pretty much a moto fork) is 38 LBS Big Grin
  • 1 0
 The details, it looks great! Carbon tubes in the front triangle could look
  • 2 0
 sickest bike i have seen in a long time, craftsmanship is insane
  • 1 0
 I wonder how carbon lugs would work in areas where you want to be stiffer or change characteristics of the frame?
  • 1 0
 It is pretty hefty. I guess it helps with a lifetime warranty to vastly over build.
  • 1 1
 Funny how these boutique brands market “price friendly” bikes.

“For those shopping on a budget, we made a bike that only costs $5000 and weighs 40lbs”
  • 1 0
 I’ve been waiting for this to be released .
  • 2 1
 looks mint, i need to try one!!
  • 1 0
 Nice little flower beds along each stay too.
  • 2 1
 This thing looks incredible. Imagine this with a red Zeb
  • 1 2
 The flush hardware for the rear calliper is a nice touch. Its a heavy beast for riding around, but as a mini Dh bike with big tyres on its not too bad.. I guess.
  • 1 0
 Twin Snakes over gummy worms
  • 2 0
 Dual crown forks?
  • 1 0
 Sick news – promised and delivered
  • 3 2
 those seatstays...hell no!
  • 2 0
 would rag in mini mullet
  • 7 10
 I'd love it as suspension looks to have good characteristics and the program is what I usually go for. But 440mm chaInstays on the bigger size is a big no-no, that belongs on a S or M size, not the biggest size, 450-460 would be the minimum really.
  • 14 3
 Yeah! Who are these Atherton chumps anyways? They are prob fat dentists with no real riding experience. They def should consult us on frame geo from now on.
  • 2 0
 @speed10: maybe there are some brothers they could learn from?
  • 1 1
 @speed10: you mean like these GT Fury and Force that they developed with 440mm reach in size XL and that were the pinnacle of geo for DH riding and enduro, yeah right ...
  • 1 0
 edited: Nevermind, this doesnt have any printing... the lugs are machined.
  • 1 1
 I’ve never trusted the bonded lug design and after seeing what happened to BK I’d defo swerve this design
  • 1 0
 Rad, hopefully they do some shorter travel ones.
  • 3 4
 Come on atherton, stubby chainstays on a smash park bike, give me 445 minimum on the middle sizes and at least 455 on the larger, makes the 161 look even better
  • 2 1
 Dump the hump!
  • 2 3
 What size is the headtube? Seems like they could have gone for a ZS56/66 headtube and used reach adjust cups rather than spamming people with so many sizes
  • 2 0
 Ugly!
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer I'm 5'11 too. How is size 8?
  • 1 0
 Can anyone explain the positives/drawbacks to DW 6 vs DW 4 link?
  • 1 0
 lets wait till its battle proven and maybe in couple of years......
  • 1 0
 thats 19kgs with all the voids filled with mud
  • 1 0
 MTX red brake oads in my Diminions never rattle.
  • 1 1
 Atherton bikes should setup if you can land Gee’s rampage drop you get a frame hookup
  • 3 2
 Sexy as fuck
  • 5 1
 remind me not to take you to ann summers
  • 2 1
 UDH?
  • 1 0
 yeah has one
  • 4 4
 If only this had an lightweight ebike motor
  • 1 0
 Where's the motor?
  • 3 3
 Looks like a...Ghost Riot.
  • 1 3
 Looks immer noch like a Ghost Riot, Herr DaveGo. Mimimi...
  • 1 0
 I want this.
  • 1 0
 Atherton sLUGger
  • 1 0
 Ahh you big lug!
  • 1 3
 At least no issues with the accumulated results of dissimilar expansion like we saw in NZ!
  • 1 2
 Looks like a Ghost/Pivot but I dig it!
  • 3 6
 Just when we all thought nothing this year can beat the XL size Privateer v2 in the ugliest Aluminium Enduro Frame conteat, there came Atherton with this bike.
  • 5 7
 Another short chainstay pos
  • 8 10
 do you need all that distance out back to make up for lack of skill?
  • 3 5
 @HeatedRotor: LOL its the other way round, people who are scared like long front ends, then the rear gets lopped off by everyone afraid too much wheelbase is hard to turn.
  • 3 4
 @englertracing: long front ends are scarier 100% because you cant move the bike as easily.
  • 1 1
 @HeatedRotor: scarier? You mean they turn worse? They are comfier on fast, and or rough therefore less scary... in exchange for less front grip, particularly when paired with short stays.
  • 2 4
 @englertracing: They have less grip when ridden by... im assuming... you - doesnt make it wrong or bad.

All good if you cant Ride bikes well and need that chainstay to keep balance.
  • 2 0
 @HeatedRotor: its a known fact extending front center reduces weight on the front wheel... this is true on any bike or motorcycle.
and longer wheel bases require larger movements from the rider to shift weight... movements that take more time.

all good if you cant hammer down in the rough/ steep/ fast and you need that long front end as a crutch so you dont otb

Riddle me this.
Whats the difference in a 1250mm wheel base bike with a 475mm reach but more importantly 820mm front center and 430mm chainstays

And a bike with 1250mm wheel base 465 reach 810mm front center, and 440mm chainstays?

When standing... your feet are 10mm further forwards on the second bike... thats it! For some its importat to get the feet mote under the hips than having them way back behind when trying to load up the front end....... much harder to perfom the ol pull out manuver with your feet too far back when you need to quickly shift weight back.

Get yourself a bike with 1 1/2" cups for 12mm reach adjust and 20mm chainstay length adjusment and perhaps you might arrive at similar conclusions
  • 1 8
flag HeatedRotor FL (Mar 19, 2024 at 15:47) (Below Threshold)
 @englertracing: Well luckily for me, i've had more frames in the last 4 years than you're probably going to ever have. I've ridden so many bikes from 500+ reach in a large, down to 460. for reference im 6ft on the dot.

I've ridden bikes with 430's and bikes with 450+ chainstays.
The most sketchy bikes i've ridden are medium reach bikes with long stays, They often pitch you very far forward on steep stuff and you wear the tyre in your rearend often.

the worst thing about long CS bikes is how lazy they feel, especially long travel bikes.

I wont be reading anymore replys because either your just talking rubbish or you just suck.
  • 4 0
 @HeatedRotor: sick brag broseph. Ill raise you with one.
Ill nose manual switchbacks you dab on.
  • 2 1
 @HeatedRotor: you never actually know whos faster or who sucks on the internet. Or whos is bigger or makes more money. Opinions are opinions... not talking rubbish ive experimented with "reach" "front center" head angle, offset and swing arm length on road race, supermoto, and sm motorcycles and on mtb quite a bit more than a normal person. So my opinions are formed from this.
  • 1 2
 @HeatedRotor: not sure why I should pay a premium for a bike that rides worse
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 @MattQEkBp1: nobody said you had to - Theres alot of expensive bikes on the market that ride like ass... lol
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 37.5lb fuck off
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