First Ride: 2022 Trek Session - Nope, Not Going to Say It

Apr 8, 2021
by Dan Roberts  



“Looks like a Session”. What started out as simply an observation quickly escalated through the ranks of funny joke to end up as a low hanging fruit of a comment that inadvertently actually got someone a free Scott Gambler. I’m still trying to wrap my head around that, and as such that will be the sole uttering of the phrase from me.

Back in 2019, the Trek development team asked some of their racers, fresh off the podium from the Snowshoe World Cup, to come and try something new out at the Mountain Creek Bike Park in New Jersey, US. Since that summer, Trek has been working away on the next iteration of the most winning DH bike of all time, and that racer feedback turned out to be critically important in defining what is now released - the 2022 Trek Session.
Session Details
• Full 29", full 27.5" & mullet adaptable
• All aluminum construction
• 200 mm rear travel
• High pivot suspension system
• Adjustable geometry & suspension
• Sizes R1 - R3
• Bike Weight: 16.32kg to 16.87kg or 35.98lbs to 37.19lbs (claimed)
• Frame Weight: 4.12kg or 9.08lbs (claimed, w/o shock)
• Bike Pricing: €4,999 to €6,999 or $4,999 to $6,999 USD
• Frame Pricing: €2,999 or $2,999 USD
trekbikes.com

The new bike is another step forward for Trek with the Session line, with a bit more of a focus for them on refinement rather than starting from scratch. Yes, there are some very apparent changes that we’ll get into, but the lineage of the bike can still be clearly seen in the new version. And before you ask, no, I didn’t just say it.


Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The new Session is available in aluminum only, after an overwhelmingly positive feedback from the racer's feedback from testing early aluminum prototypes.


Frame Details

The two most immediately noticeable changes to the new Session are the suspension system and the frame material. We’ll go into the high pivot design in a minute, but first we can start with the material.

As with most frame prototypes in development, Trek did this with aluminum. Alongside this they were indeed working on the development of a carbon fibre composite frame. However, that development was halted after the overwhelmingly positive feedback about the aluminum prototype and its ride characteristics that Trek received from those early tests. It's something that Trek is actually full speed on trying to fully understand and quantify, by opening up the Pandora's box that is chassis stiffness. If a racer tells you that they are ready to take a prototype bike directly to race at the highest level, then you know you’re onto something.

The aluminum construction of the new bike was also accompanied by a conversation with Trek about aluminum perhaps being the right material choice for them for the demands of downhill. Trek’s racers also tested with added weights placed on the previous Session’s frame in different positions to understand its effects.

The second biggest change to the new Session is the switch to a high pivot suspension system. The origins of the change coming from a mix of looking at the competition in the world of DH race bikes while also looking internally. Some racers had also cottoned on to the competition’s success and also dropped the question about a high pivot design. Trek’s history already includes bikes with the same suspension ideas dating all the way back to 2003 with the Diesel and 2006 with the Session 10. Looking back to this, Trek asked what was good about those old high pivot bikes and if it was something that they would like to bring to the new Session.

How high does a pivot have to go before it’s a high pivot? According to Dylan Howes, Advanced Concepts Engineer at Trek and also the man behind every single Session there has ever been, once the pivot goes high enough that the use of an idler to change the chain line is needed, then it’s a high pivot design.

Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
Cables enter the mainframe high on the forged head tube.
Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
They then poke out of the top-tube before routing around and down the back of the seat tube.

Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
With not much room on the rocker link for a bridge, there's a pinch bolt connection to tie the two individual sides together securing the axle.
Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
There's ample frame protection, including the entire length of the down tube with this bolt on, dual density protector.

While the previous bike never had pinpoint problems coming from chain stretch, it was certainly one of the much-liked traits of the old high pivot bikes Trek had done before. By the same token, making sure the pivot wasn't too high was also a driver in development. Once really up there, the axle path of the bike starts to become exclusively rearward, and this is something that Trek were wanting to avoid for the drastically changing chainstay geometry as the bike went through its travel.

More into the suspension side of things, Trek racers have often had custom links to adjust the suspension and that adjustment is something that is now offered to the public. Down at the lower shock mount is a small flip chip to adjust the bike’s leverage ratio progression between 20% and 25%.

The adjustability doesn’t end there, and with the inclusion of the Mino chips at the back of the rocker link the entire bike’s geometry can be adjusted. Out of the box the Session is a full 29” bike with the Mino link giving a High or Low setting.

There’s also the possibility to run a mullet wheel size setup by swapping the rear wheel out and running the Mino chip in High. The geometry is brought back to within a gnat’s whisker of the full 29” geometry. And with the addition of a longer bottom headset cup, it can even run a full 27.5” wheeled setup. Lots of rental stations use the Session and some are a bit apprehensive about making the switch to full on 29” DH bikes. It’s also good as lots of individuals still enjoy the full 27.5” wheel setup over a mullet or full 29”.

Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
Geometry adjustability is done with the Mino chip at the back of the rocker link. It also enables the use of multiple wheel sizes in the new Session.
Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
Suspension adjustment is also present on the new Session, allowing a change in leverage ratios and progression between 20% and 25% with a simple flip chip.

Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
Probably the biggest change in the new Session is its move to a high pivot suspension system, quite the hot topic at the moment. But Trek took decisions to actually not put the pivot too high.

Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
That high pivot layout did require the use of an idler pulley to adjust the chain line to account for the increased chain stretch. It's also mounted on the chainstay, and not on the mainframe or concentric with the main pivot, so its position moves as the bike goes through its travel.
Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
Trek's ABP system is again used on the new Session. In the case of the change to a high pivot system, it actually allowed them to reduce the anti-rise levels compared to a system that would leave them at the mercy of the high main pivot.

Cable routing is internal in the mainframe, entering at the forged head tube, travelling down the top tube and exiting just before the seat tube. There’s then a stretch of external routing down the back of the seat tube, which continues external for the brake along the chainstay and internal for the gear cable. There are also provisions on the underside of the top tube for external routing. Some people like the aesthetic of internal and others the functionality of external, so the two solutions can make everyone happy.

Accompanying the raise in the main pivot, the rocker link had to shrink to maintain the desired leverage ratios and progression. That meant that there was much less space for having a bridge connection from right to left sides of the link, as seen in a lot of Trek’s other bikes. So, they employed a system that locks the independent sides to the axle with pinch bolts.

There’s a 250mm eye to eye shock, which allowed Trek to use the bearing eyelet on the shock, connect the front of the link with one solid bolt and also make it a bit easier to work with for the customer.

There’s a pretty extensive bolt-on downtube protector that covers both the area’s most prone to rock strikes and damage from shuttling and certain chair lifts. Frame protection continues to the chainstay, with it now being in closer proximity to the chain and encountering it a lot more often. It uses a now almost industry wide style with raised softer sections dampening chain slap. It’s secured with a bolt up front and a zip tie at the rear.

Out back, the Session uses SRAM’s UDH derailleur hanger and a 157mm wide rear hub. On the full bikes the Bontrager hub actually does away with the spacer on the 7-speed cassette and widens the hub flanges both left and right to make use of the space in the wide hub.


Trek Session 29 Geometry

Geometry & Sizing

With the new Session, Trek shifts over to an R sizing model, with R1, R2 and R3 based around the reach numbers of the bike. Those three sizes have reach numbers of 440, 465 and 493 mm respectively. That’s a growth of between 25 and 32 mm per size compared to the previous carbon Session. With that growth, and there only being three sizes available, it does mean that the previous bike’s S size is kind of dropped.

As that reach, and front centre, lengthen, so too does the chainstay length. But Trek actually just shifted the bottom bracket position to achieve the change and, in the process, managed to keep the number of individual parts down to a minimum. Chainstay lengths are 439, 445 and 452mm.

There’s a 63° head angle in the low Mino chip setting and a 22.5 mm BB drop, giving an on-paper BB height of 350 mm.

The Session uses a 117 mm head tube length for all sizes, resulting in the same stack height across the board. That does increase though with the addition of the extended lower cup for the full 27.5” wheels setup.

Keeping the 29” wheels and moving to the high Mino chip position, the BB raises just under 9mm and the head angle steepens to 63.6°. The chainstays also get around 4 mm shorter and the reach grows by between 6-7 mm depending on the size. Travel has also increased slightly, to 204mm.

Trek Session Mullet Geometry

In the mullet setup, which needs the Mino chip in high, the geometry is very damn close to the full 29” bike in low Mino chip, with only one or two millimeters and a fraction of a degree making the difference.

All Sessions come with a 46mm offset fork and use a 72.5mm stroke shock.



Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Suspension

The new Session uses the same single pivot system as the old bike, just with it all moved up a bit. The shock is driven by the linkage of the seatstay and rocker link.

With the two leverage ratio progression options the new Session can have 20% or 25% of progression. In the 20% option the bike is quite similar to the previous bike, albeit with a slightly higher starting ratio and a touch more travel. In the 25% option the starting ratio is raised to around 3.25 and gives slightly higher leverage ratios all the way through travel until it arrives at the same ending ratio. That would translate to needing a different spring rate to achieve the same shock sag or, say, if you were all setup in the 20% setting and moved directly to the 25% setting, then you’d have more sag. The inverse is true if you started in the 25% and moved to the 20%.

Trek Session Leverage Ratio
Leverage ratio. Orange is the new Session with dashed being 25% progression and solid being 20%. Blue is the previous Session for comparison.
Trek Session Axle Path
Session axle path. Orange is the new Session and blue is the previous.
Trek Session Pedal Kickback
Pedal kickback. Orange is the new Session and blue is the previous.

The high pivot design does indeed make the rear wheel move more rearward, 12mm to 25mm more on the new Session compared to the previous. But looking at the axle path it’s clear to see that Trek actively limited how high they went, with the new Session having almost equal parts rearward travel to forwards.

The inclusion of the idler pulley reduced the chain stretch of the bike as it goes through its travel and, as a result, one of its possible manifestations – pedal kickback. Depending on the gear ratio, the new bikes has 10° to 19° less pedal kickback than the previous bikes.

Trek maintain their ABP system, mounting the brake on the seatstay, and so on a system that rotates around an Instant Centre, or IC, dictated by the chainstay and link. This allowed them to actually reduce the anti-rise values quite considerably despite raising the main pivot of the bike. This very high anti-rise is often a trait of high pivot bikes and with the ABP system Trek reduced the values to around a third of what they would be if the brake was mounted on the chainstay.


Options, Price & Availability

Trek Session 9
Session 9 is available in Deep Deep Dark Blue to Alpine Blue fade.
Trek Session 8
Session 8 is available in Satin Trek Black.

The new Session is available in two full bikes, Session 8 and Session 9, and a frameset. Prices are country specific so it’s best to check here for the correct pricing in your country at the time of launch. Availability is from the 8th April, but that starts out not completely uniform throughout the world. It’s best to check in at your local Trek dealer for more detailed information for exactly where you are.


Session 9 - RockShox Boxxer Ultimate fork and Super Deluxe Ultimate DH shock. SRAM X01 DH drivetrain. SRAM Code RSC brakes. Bontrager Line DH 30 wheels with Bontrager G5 Team Issue tyres. Bontrager carbon bars, stem, grips, seat post and saddle. 16.32kg or 35.98lbs (claimed). $6,999.99 USD, €6,999 (DE, FR, ES) or £6,300.

Session 8 - RockShox Boxxer Select fork and Fox Van Performance shock. SRAM GX DH drivetrain with Truvativ Descendant DH cranks. SRAM Code R brakes. Bontrager Line DH 30 wheels with Bontrager G5 Team Issue tyres. Bontrager aluminum bars, stem, grips, seat post and saddle. 16.87 kg or 37.19lbs (claimed). $4,999.99 USD, €4,999 (DE, FR, ES) or £4,500.

Session Frameset - Fox DHX Performance shock, FSA Orbit headset. Available in Deep Deep Dark Blue to Alpine Blue fade. 5.22 kg or 11.5 lbs with shock (claimed). $2,999.99 USD, €2,999 (DE, FR, ES) or £2,750.


Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Ride Impressions

As is the current normal of product launches, Trek sent out a Session prior to the launch, so I’ve been out riding the new Session all around my home trails of Switzerland for around four weeks now.

First things first, it’s a damn fast bike. And one that lets you know what’s going on quite nicely, allowing you to hit sections at ridiculous speeds and commitment levels only to get away with what you thought was pushing the risk just that tiny bit far. It’s been nothing but grin-inducing to get to know the Session so far, for precisely that character trait.

Initially, when we were organising the bike the sizes on offer did make me a little worried. At 188cm tall I saw myself falling in between the R2 and R3 sizes. But I knew that singling out the reach is only one aspect in bike fit and feel. So, I eventually decided on the R3 size and crossed my fingers that there was adjustability in the system and a similar philosophy in suspension feel to Trek's previous session. As it turned out, my luck was in.

The R3 size does feel big, but comfortably big. And then when you get the bike rolling and in amongst the roots and rocks it does actually ride shorter than that on paper number would suggest. I’ve only had the bike in the low Mino setting and full 29” guise for the moment. Moving to the high setting would increase the reach a touch, but it’s something that I will be testing out, along with the mullet setup, as more tracks and variety of terrain opens up as we roll into the summer season.

Suspension-wise I like to start out with 25% sag on a new bike. Although on the Session this felt a little too soft and made the bike wallow a touch more than I’d like, sapping some of the rider input into the bike that is much needed when a bike wants to go this damn fast. Upping the pressure, and so reducing the sag down to around 21%, has got the bike feeling nice and supportive both to the terrain and rider inputs while not really having the biggest of impacts to the suppleness of the system.

Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Out of the box I have needed to make a couple of changes, mainly swapping out the 180mm rear rotor and trimming the bars down from their initial 820mm width, but these are mostly preferences and something that every rider would need to do to make the bike their own.

Our R3 isn’t exactly a featherweight, at 17.2 kg or 37.93 lbs out of the box; there is a bit of heft there that is noticeable on the trail. While I’m not an advocate for lightweight being the number one priority, it still is an important factor in a bike. But there are a multitude of factors and it was nice to discuss these in detail with Trek and in relation to the Session. Its weight no doubt does have a role to play in the stability and steadfastness of the bike's character.

One character trait that I am having to figure out is when you grab the brakes; there doesn’t seem to be the feel of the tire knobs really getting in there and aiding the slowing down. Instead, the Session sometimes seems to skid across the top of the ground. I am still early on in the testing of the bike, and with so many tools for adjustment on the bike, I’m not overly worried that I can’t get to the cause of this feeling.

The 46mm offset Boxxer has been making turning a little tricky. Granted not so much up on the hill, but it’s a bit embarrassing to almost fall over at walking pace because you can’t turn your fork enough. And while most of the early season riding has been gloriously dry, there have been inevitable stints of wet and muddy riding. The cable routing at the back of the seat tube, along with the big chainstay bridge, has been acting like an anchor for the mud. I’ve also had to pay attention to the cables passing over the rocker link and keep them from rubbing away too much, which has already seen quite some wear from just four weeks of riding. An additional zip tie to pinch the cables has been working well so far.

All in all though, I’ve found myself at home incredibly quickly on the new Session and with the coming months I’m looking forward to not only riding it more in different terrain, but playing around with the adjustment options in the bike for the geometry, suspension and wheel sizes and seeing if its veracious addiction for speed continues throughout the entire test period.

Trek Session Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot












330 Comments

  • 1270 38
 Looks like a Session - oh we said it.
  • 133 5
 ur even better for embracing the meme
  • 235 5
 @timotheysski: With open arms
  • 19 8
 @trek: can trek u send me my slash as a early birthday gift next Wednesday..... jan 2021... so excited for it tho
  • 119 0
 Will you send me a Session if I say it looks like a Gambler though?
  • 35 17
 Shoud have made two different models: Session R (standard pivot) and Session GT (raised pivot) .
  • 31 0
 @timotheysski: when the internet does your marketing departments homework for the next 20 years
  • 37 1
 Looks like a GT?
  • 501 2
 @JCO: probably not.
  • 4 2
 Looks like a minion.
  • 86 11
 @SCOTT-Sports: Genius!
  • 2 1
 It looks awesome. Wow.
  • 36 5
 What if Trek wins the most upvoted comment of the year?
  • 14 0
 @JCO: So you want to spark controversy eh?
  • 23 1
 @SCOTT-Sports: trek is really gambling with that design eh
  • 2 1
 Looks like a Trek comment Razz
  • 32 9
 We need @troyleedesigns and Leo Kokkonen here... REP FIGHT!
  • 2 21
flag BenTheSwabian (Apr 8, 2021 at 8:48) (Below Threshold)
 I mean, it quite literally doesn't.
  • 6 0
 Looks like a shore.
  • 5 1
 It's my birthday, send me one Smile
  • 11 0
 But does it ride like a Supreme?
  • 8 0
 @SCOTT-Sports: Oh no. The titans of industry are clashing
  • 3 0
 @trek Hell, you even said it in the Trek U video...
  • 5 1
 @theedon: I was going to say the same thing. I think this looks more like the GT Fury than it does the prior model session.
  • 5 0
 Hey Trek, I need some black touch-up paint..... Big Grin What's the paint code for the trek black?
  • 14 0
 @dazlad: Ask this in the 2021 Slash thread - there's a trek employee who watches that thread and has been really helpful with off the wall questions.
  • 3 0
 @nouseforaname: Thanks dude
  • 33 1
 @nouseforaname: That is also me.

@dazlad Slide in our DMs.
  • 3 1
 Looks like sexy.
  • 7 0
 @trek: yo Mitch ! Slash owners group is sick cause of ya!
  • 21 0
 @dazlad: Fun factoid for @trek too - shortly after I bought my first Trek way back in 1991 - a neon yellow 830 Antelope - I'd crashed and scratched the TT. I went to my LBS and asked if they had touch up paint. The scraggly and surly rasta hat wearing shop dude looked at me flatly and said "It's a mountain bike". I didn't understand, so I asked again. He repeated himself. Then I got it. Haha. Since then I've been basically unconcerned with scratches and nicks and such. No problem if others seek to make cosmetic repairs... but my early experience with that shop veteran changed me for life. Smile
  • 9 6
 @sngltrkmnd: Is a mountan bak me man!
  • 10 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Now we can just cover our frames in 3lbs of clear tape.
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Yeah, I agree. For the most part, I don't really bother about nicks and dings, but I got a couple that are kinda ugly after an OTB at Mont Saint Anne, so I just want to touch up here and there.
All my other bikes are dinged as can be, but this one is my pride and deserves a little tlc.
  • 9 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Yep. Patina adds value
  • 1 0
 I feel like "where's the motor" is going to make a come back in the next few years.
  • 4 0
 No junior PR's in here Troy Lee. High quality, classy banter from the PR staff at Trek and Scott.
  • 1 0
 That was nice impression
  • 3 0
 I knew a guy who won a bike saying that line.
  • 7 0
 IFHT nailed it - DankBike T-Shirts Please
  • 1 1
 I wish it looked more like a session.......... The 2018-2020 model just looks cleaner, and was alot lighter. How am I ever gonna beat Dangerholm's 29 Lightest DH build with the new session, my current one is at 12,47kg complete, but with this one I have no fighting chance.......
  • 1 0
 @jollyXroger: this IS the question we are all asking!!!
  • 1 0
 @justwaki: no its definitely a gambler
  • 1 0
 @justwaki: ZING
  • 3 0
 @trek: Multiple accounts Mitch? How many PB Advent calendar prizes did you get? Thanks for being helpful and representing Trek well.
  • 1 0
 @justwaki: yeahhh R for revised pivot !!!
  • 200 3
 Only Trek could completely redesign a bike with a new suspension design, and still have it look exactly the same as the previous model.
  • 29 0
 #mtbindustryinnovation
  • 13 14
 And a paltry 10mm rearward axle path for less than 50% of the travel? I can (kinda) understand wanting to keep the rear wheel from moving around too much, but this just seems like it's not worth the 3k for an aluminum frame.

Full Disclosure: I ride a Commencal high pivot.
  • 27 4
 To be fair, it manages to look much duller than the old one. I mean, look at the First Ride article for the old one and tell me which one you lust after

www.pinkbike.com/news/trek-session-99-275-first-look-2017.html
  • 22 0
 We joke but "looks like a Session" probably creates serious brand value for Trek. They may even have done extra work to make the new suspension design look like the old bikes so that we'll keep saying it.
  • 2 0
 Well they were focusing on refinement of the previous Session.
  • 2 0
 @honourablegeorge: I think the red really stands and looks unreal!! Maybe in person this looks better?
  • 22 0
 Porsche have been doing it for years
  • 2 0
 @gaffney92: Yeah, love the red. Am sure the new one rides better but I'm not sat here trying to talk myself out of buying it.
  • 5 0
 @DC1988: as well as Jeep with the Wrangler.
  • 3 0
 @whambat: that’s different, jeep literally make no changes to the design!
  • 2 1
 @honourablegeorge:

to be fair that is probably mostly due to the sick fox/shimano spec vs a meh sram one
  • 1 1
 "A new suspension design"? It's the same suspension design with the pivot raised slightly.
  • 1 0
 @Altron5000: every so many years, they claim an all new design, but it still looks exactly like an old Wrangler.
  • 2 0
 @boozed: cough cough Split Pivot cough cough
  • 3 0
 @Lanebobane: Yeah, the phrase brings you back to when Gwin started demolishing everyone on that red and black session, then Rachel did the same thing on hers. Those were real good times in Downhill in general too. Things were exciting back then. We had Freecaster and a loose Rob Warner, Ratboy, Sam Hill and Stevie Smith were always on the cards to put in a loose run. That period was awesome and that bike really started it all.
  • 2 0
 I would like to know the origin (who/when/where) of this caption that is sweeping the nation.

Investigative journalism at its finest.
  • 120 2
 You have to watch this ad for the session from IFHT: www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNTqjpL3TqY&t=1s
So epic
  • 26 0
 UNGA BUNGA
  • 14 0
 Holy shit that is amazing. They have gotten so good.
  • 4 0
 Brilliant!
  • 10 0
 Nominate this for whatever awards are in the ad industry. Gold
  • 16 0
 Man I'm so glad I'm not one of those commenters on Dankbike.

The browser bookmarks and desktop icons at 1:51 are worth a look too Big Grin
  • 7 0
 "This session is over"
"Pun... intended?"
  • 3 0
 Melons! Big, juicy melons!
  • 2 0
 That is amazing
  • 3 0
 PinkBike staff liked your suggestion: m.pinkbike.com/news/video-looks-like-a-session.html
  • 2 0
 They even got @justwaki in for a cameo
  • 1 0
 Thanks for posting way funny !
  • 1 0
 I have an ob.. Session
  • 59 0
 Nice that they specified it was an MTB on the downtube! Thought it was a TT bike for a second.
  • 7 1
 Dh tt?
  • 21 1
 In 10 years someone will be commuting on one of these, with a Bafang motor bolted to the downtube...
  • 3 0
 @alexszabo It really is a time trial bike, though, if meant to race Wink
  • 1 0
 @lehott: Dhteetay?
  • 3 0
 @Caiokv: Laugh as you may, but a old neighbor of mine had an old Giant Glory that came east with him, and since there isn't any good lift access around here he put a crazy big hub motor driven with an 104Vdc battery bank. It was fast, like 100+kph fast, and it had a ton of torque and power. I took it for a spin and saw 92kph, but that was after it laid roost and fish tailed for about 20m.
  • 2 0
 That's for the cheap labor in the factory not accidentally mistaking the frame for a road bike and installing dropbars on it.
  • 3 0
 @Caiokv: Theres a guy in our town delivering food on an old Specialized Demo. No motor though.
  • 5 0
 Speaking of downtubes... Remember when Trek pushed straight-shot and knock block for a "stiffer" frame, which was pulled from the old session, and now the new session doesn't even have a straight downtube.
  • 2 0
 @rustiegrizwold: Remember the Y frames? How Trek recovered from that amazes me.
  • 44 3
 Looks like a gt
  • 52 12
 $4000 for an aluminum DH frame. LOL
  • 13 0
 That's Nicolai prices.
  • 17 0
 It's 3k. Total bargain now, right?
  • 1 0
 3000...
  • 3 0
 @DERPOWaterpig: It says 3,999 USD in the article? Is that an error?
  • 6 0
 @DERPOWaterpig: with some odd magic it translates to 3k € in europe
  • 4 0
 @ivcrider: It says 3k at the top of the article in the stats and then later in the article it says it's 4k. Don't know which one's right
  • 17 0
 Apologies for the error, it's $2,999 USD.
  • 7 0
 Almost as ballsy as the price tag on the demo 29
  • 2 1
 @ivcrider: $3kUSD on Treks website.
  • 9 1
 3000 euro for a frame... 7k for the ses 9?, did they check the build before releasing it at that price?, asking because, to me, it looks like a 5k build.
  • 4 0
 @bashhard: hopefully Spez will launch these days the kenevo prime for the minimal amount of 18k and the, really, 3k will look like bargain.
  • 16 0
 I'm just digging this trend back to metal frames.

"available in aluminum only, after an overwhelmingly positive feedback from the racers"

Back a few years ago, Minnaar was asked what the greatest innovation in equipment had been, and he said it was his carbon frame, Enve carbon components, etc. It sold me and I went out and bought a carbon Enduro bike.

Now its clear that since carbon layup and hydroforming aluminum can get you a variety of shapes, the tubing geometry has a much bigger impact on performance than the choice of (high end) aluminum or carbon. Yes, carbon will have a better weight to strength ratio, but its also becoming clear that once you reach a certain weight threshold, that doesn't meaningfully affect performance.
  • 4 4
 @eugenux: boxxer ultimate and xo dh look like a 5k bike in a no discount covid world? fork msrp is 1600ish. I'm not saying it's a good deal, but thats not a cheap build out
  • 4 2
 @ICKYBOD: commencal supreme team is 5500€ with full ultimate suspension, code rsc brakes, fr560 rims laced to 350 hubs and you get %10 off if you get it in porson from andorra
  • 3 3
 @Noeserd: still xo vs gx. like I said, I don't think it's a good deal- but the supreme has gx and 5k for a gx dh bike for 5k is about normal. It's a good deal because of the ultimate. Saying the 9 should be a 5k bike with that kit just isn't consistent with other xo dh kit bikes.

The Session 8 has GX but only select suspension and code r's. It's 5k. That's consistent with other GX dh bikes. I agree the supreme is a better buy though since I don't know why you'd care about going from GX to XO on this kind of bike. just a waste of money. but no way you're going to match the 9s spec for 5k- even mail order.
  • 5 0
 @ICKYBOD: the step up from GX to X0 isn’t worth 1.5k in my book, you can’t single down a DH bike spec only to it’s drivetrain which is probably the least important part. Also, house brand wheels on the Trek, DT Swiss wheels on the Supreme.
  • 3 0
 @Upduro: Surprisingly those Bontrager wheelsets are actually really good...
  • 2 0
 That price is more than a Kavenz HP frame and comes close to Nicolai frames. 3k for an al frame- nope.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: Don't you see a pattern here? Sponsored riders say that the current new product is the best.
  • 2 2
 @Aptlynamed: Not in this case. Trek would love to do a carbon frame and sell it for $4k. They also would prefer that their entire sponsored lineup is on carbon, to push their carbon manufacturing process. But their rider feedback must have overcome that impulse.

I bet we will see a carbon version soon.
  • 1 0
 #PLATINUM_ALPHA_ALUMINUM

"Look at it closely"
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: Or they were hesitant to drop the $$ on a full set of carbon molds considering current global environment? Let this one sit a year, see how well it sells, then drop the 'finally in carbon' frame that is 2lbs lighter .....
  • 37 3
 All the effort and then it looks like a Fury!
  • 1 0
 The blue Fury is gorgeous! Almost takes the crown from the early Wilson.
  • 30 3
 You could get two Commencal Supreme DH 29 frames for the price of one Session frame. Both are aluminium and the Supreme is one of the most successful DH bikes of all time. Something is very off here. Trek needs to work on their ridiculous pricing.
  • 5 6
 Lets say we both own a bikebrand and pay the same chinese sweatshop 500coin/frame. I sell one for 3000coin an you sell one for 1500coin. We both use 500coin/frame for shipping, r&d and marketing. You sell 2000 frames and i sell 1000 frames. Who makes more money?
  • 3 1
 delete
  • 4 1
 @toaster29: I get your point. But..... Trek still sell more then Commencal
  • 4 0
 @polvelok: should be bying their stocks then i guess... Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @toaster29: This doesn't make their product any more appealing to potential customers though? At a typical national DH race all the privateers ride Commencal where as only a few factory riders ride a Trek, if even.
  • 1 1
 @BenTheSwabian: propably not, but the reason trek makes bikes is because they want to make money out of it. I might be wrong but i am under the impression dh bikes sell so little theyre basicly marketing for smaller bikes, a bit like F1 is for mercedes. My whole point though is that if you sell a frame with 4000€ instead of 3000 or 2500 the difference in price is pure profit. They would have to sell A LOT more frames for 2500 to make the same amount of money.
  • 2 1
 Lol. Commencal Supreme DH frame doesn’t come with a shock. Session does. Pretty similar pricing then
  • 25 0
 Local trek dealer shows april 2023.....
  • 3 1
 Have two on backorder - estimated arrival in Canada was(last week) 23.02.2023 for the Session 9. The 8 GX around March 2023 - Frame-Kit in July/August this year!
  • 11 0
 @DoctorWatson: WHAT!? Two years?? Why even announce it
  • 6 0
 @PTyliszczak: Seriously. What is the point of making a bike that can't even be purchased? This industry makes no sense.
  • 1 2
 @jwdenver: It can be purchased now! So you can get in Spring next year! Money will get you in line and get it first. My shop has 4 on backorder Smile
  • 5 0
 @MrDiamondDave: it's not next year, it's in the spring/summer of 2023. That is 25+ months from now.
  • 3 0
 @PTyliszczak: We had the same happen to the Slash. They announced the brand new Slash, we had 5 on order and still haven't seen them(some canadian shops have and some got none). We ordered the slashes before they announced them to public in may 2020 and estimated arrival will be December '21 to Feb. 2022!
Selling a Trek(some other brand too but those guys are the worst in terms of delivery) is next to impossible. From Hybrid to E-Bike to DH Bike most ETA's are 2022 or Project One Build-Kits are 250-280 Days out. Welcome to the bike business these days.

P.S.: GX Derailleur in Canada are hard to get(as a BS) - ETA December '21! I could go on with that. Stock up on brakepads and easy wearable parts is the only thing i can recommend these days!
  • 22 0
 Can Dan just review everything from now on
  • 20 0
 I accept your offer. - Not the Dan you intended
  • 3 0
 Yeah, he seems to be really honest in his writing.
  • 5 0
 I really love how thorough and thoughtful his reviews are. My main reservation though is that he seems to run a much firmer, much less active suspension setup than most people, so I wonder how much his feedback on bike feel is representative of what most users will experience, vs what his sort of different personal preferences.
  • 6 0
 @emarquar:
Sometimes it would be nice for these reviewers to post some track/lap/strava times so we can judge how relevant their recommendations are compared to us average joes. I get the impression there is a really broad range of skill levels and speeds with reviewers but it’s hard to know where you are relative to them. There’s a reason I wouldn’t copy Loic Brunis suspension settings...
  • 2 0
 @gafoto: Not a bad suggestion though I suspect that many editors may not be willing to reveal their testing locations as they're on embargoed equipment when their runs are taking place. But I hear ya - I sometimes wonder how much faster these riders are than me.
  • 17 2
 "One character trait that I am having to figure out is when you grab the brakes; there doesn’t seem to be the feel of the tire knobs really getting in there and aiding the slowing down. Instead, the Session sometimes seems to skid across the top of the ground."

Thats just what the G5 tyres do, they are crap. nothing to do with the bike. I had exactly the same issue when I got my Slash. Swapped out for maxxis and the problem was gone.
  • 13 0
 I had it with Schwalbe Magic Marys in Ultra Soft, though. Most of the riding I've done so far is in more steep, lose and damp conditions, so I've been running something with more bite.
  • 1 0
 @dan-roberts: Interesting...I wonder then if maybe the high pivot/axle path could have some effect on braking and grip?

It makes sense that a bike with a more rearward axle path would dig in less under braking, but maybe that's not necessarily a bad thing, it might just require a different technique to get the best out of it

Edit: I've just thought, the ABP could actually have an effect on this, keeping the suspension more active during braking. This also sets it apart from other high pivot bikes
  • 5 2
 @dan-roberts: Magic Mary's in Ultra Soft in loose and damp conditions and still a lack of grip? 3 options:
- Severely worn tires
- Very bad riding (although even my shameful lack of riding skills is good enough)
- Some seriously wacky thing going on with the bike...
  • 6 0
 @dan-roberts: Intended feature = not being able to slow down makes you faster!
  • 15 0
 Looks a GT Fury.
  • 13 0
 Not convinced by that cable routing
  • 1 0
 i can see a sharp rock severing the rear brake line or derailleur cable for sure
  • 1 0
 They could have extended it to go out part way down the seat tube atleast. It looks pretty damn weird as it is and definitely susceptible to rubbing
  • 14 4
 When Commencal is doing better then trek...
  • 13 1
 Commencal's been killing it for a while now. They just need to bring back their 27.5 Meta TR.
  • 1 0
 @rezrov: and their balanced geo on the enduros instead of just following long reach, short chainstay
  • 4 0
 @Stokedonthis: we need more balanced geo in the industry! Drives me nuts with this short chainstay bullcrap and riding an XL. Its incredible and mind blowing how well a bike rides when you are taller and finally get a fairly balanced bike
  • 9 0
 Wow, that cable routing... yikes.
  • 5 0
 Only thing I would change is the cable routing and that pinch bolt design Would have been easy to just run the cables up through the frame instead of over the rocker links like that, and as far as the pinch bolt I guess only time will tell
  • 5 0
 How long it will be before they release the carbon version with SCW (stabilizing control weights) and TCC (tuned carbon compliance) that perfectly mimics the feel of aluminum?
  • 6 1
 So when DH bikes started going carbon they were trying to convince us that carbon felt better. Now DH market is super down, brands don't want to go carbon anymore, and suddenly aluminium bikes feel amazing again!
  • 1 0
 I wonder if it's not more that the rearward axle path rides so well and such a difference relative to the previous bike, some of that was attributed to the frame material vs. the axle path and rear end kinematics.
  • 7 0
 >37lbs
>dh bike
>"Heft"

What.
  • 13 0
 @dbxrace: if 37lbs is hefty for an alloy dh bike, mine must be just unrideable at 42lbs
  • 5 0
 It would seem my 160mm bike was a DH bike this whole time, who knew?
  • 1 0
 my Commencal Supreme FR with Float 40's and a DB Air was 36lbs. flat from 6 years ago. Going the wrong direction.
  • 5 0
 Seriously. 37lbs is on par with a Commencal Meta AM 29 or Pivateer 161.
  • 7 0
 If you listen closely, you can hear Levy bitching about the idler pulley.
  • 1 0
 Why? I think it’s a really interesting implementation of it and I would like to hear more technical information why they chose its location on the chain stay and not concentric to the main pivot.
  • 2 0
 @cwatt: probably to increase anti squat. Having the idler on the pivot should give around 100% anti squat, but putting it slightly lower than the pivot will increase the anti squat ( I think...)
  • 3 0
 Interesting they ditched carbon for straight aluminum, which seems to be more common these days. I listened to Vital's inside line sam hill podcast yesterday and he said the worst bike he'd ridden was the first carbon demo and that the aluminum bike was great and he didn't understand how it didn't translate over to carbon.
  • 1 0
 Weird to hear that there's that much of a difference. I'd expect one to be better but for one to be awful and the other to be great is surprising.
  • 6 0
 Lateral frame flex is actually kinda important for handling. A few years back, Ducati made an unbelievably laterally stiff MotoGP bike that handled like garbage as a result.
  • 6 0
 @GTBicycles is this you???
  • 2 0
 im really interested in hearing more about experiences with the fork offset too, low offset makes a lot of sense to me and im willing to pick the front of the bike up navigating to the lift line if it means i have better handling on the downhills.
  • 6 0
 oooffff that cable routing
  • 2 0
 Listens to Sam Hill podcast about people running their bikes too firm.
Comes to Pinkbike and sag was stiffened to make a dh bike 21%.

Thinks back to the tone of Sam's voice and laughs to myself.

I also liked the... a medium sized persons still a medium sized person quote when talking about the brage fashion that is around just now for certain areas.
  • 5 0
 aluminum frame with objectively one of the cheapest shocks on the market for the price of carbon... Nice!
  • 2 0
 What suspension progression setting were you using for testing? I'm curious because the 25% progression setting would've required more shock force at 25% sag compared to the 20% progression setting. Maybe try riding in the lower progression setting, with more sag. This will increase mid-stroke support and slow down the rear wheel without having to add pressure or compression damping.
  • 5 0
 Cable routing hurts my head.
  • 2 1
 The biggest gain here hardly mentioned is a Propper dh hub with widest possible flanges amd 7 speed. Previously only options were ethirteen integrated cassette hub or a 148 or 142mm SS hub with custom cassette Would be nice to hear more about that hub and cassette
  • 1 0
 I wonder if trek used mostly single-sgear pivots for the rear end on purpose. At least with the small crop of bikes I have rode, the single shear pivot points seem to give the rear end a much more compliant/noodley feel that bikes with all double shear pivots. Maybe this is coincidental and has mostly to do with the stiffness in the seat/chainstays themselves? Idk.
  • 2 0
 Definitely on purpose, the single pivot (active braking pivot) means the suspension rotates around a rearward point concentric to the rear axle. So under braking the sudden deceleration of the wheel doesn’t load up the suspension. Pretty sure they have a patent on the ABP too which is why it’s almost solely seen on their bikes
  • 1 0
 @Roandb:
Not talking about single pivot suspension systems or ABP systems. I'm speaking of the way each link is connected to the next, via a single shear or double shear. Engineers send help.
  • 1 0
 is the 1983 KX250 unitrak rocker link obsolete yet for the F1 of MTB? ironic that their suspension designer comes from moto and is using a 30 year old design while others are doing more sophisticated stuff.

live.staticflickr.com/6126/5991597917_18a2c16cf9_b.jpg
  • 2 0
 Perhaps this one is in aluminium only as only team riders will ever get to ride one. By the time bikes are back in the shops they will have released the 2024 carbon version. This is a public prototype
  • 1 0
 “Trek racers have often had custom links to adjust the suspension and that adjustment is something that is now offered to the public. Down at the lower shock mount is a small flip chip to adjust the bike’s leverage ratio progression between 20% and 25%.”

I guess this ends the Cascade Components aftermarket links debate lol
  • 5 1
 Woo! $7000 for an alloy bike with all alloy parts (excluding bars)
  • 1 0
 A good additional to the details section at the top of bike reviews would be the availability of the bike. It's hard to get excited about something that is either not available or only in very limited quantities.
  • 4 0
 3149€ for a aluminium frameset with a Fox VAN shock? Hahah, seriously?
  • 4 0
 $ 3,000 for an alloy frame and shock? That's really steep....
  • 4 0
 If we are being totally honest it looks like a Fury.
  • 3 0
 Get one boat stuck in the Suez canal and prices skyrocket. Who do they think they are? Rocky Mountain?
  • 3 3
 [Talking in old man’s voice] Back in my day, a complete downhill bike could be bought for $3,000.

Oh wait. I’m 27 and that was a Trek Session 8 in 2010! Prices are outta control.

But unlike Giant, at least you can contact Trek and get a wonderful, American or Canadian human on the other end.
  • 3 0
 This type of down tube protector should be on EVERY dh and enduro bike. Current designs are useless.
  • 1 0
 Not only does it look similar to the the current GT Fury it also has similar geometry for Session's size R1 and Fury's size medium (both in high settings). It'd be no surprise that the timers will be the same.
  • 1 0
 I really appreciate Trek's confidence in this bike. It takes some guts to decide there will be no carbon version, and we're still gonna charge 5-6k for the bike. The old session is still great, this one will only be better.
  • 8 5
 Leave it to trek to copy everyone else
  • 3 0
 Idler's, so hot right now.
  • 3 0
 Scrolls to the comments to see if someone said it.
  • 3 0
 *doesn’t see it*
*scrolls to below threshold*

“Ahhh yup there is it”
  • 4 1
 The session isn't available until 2023 Smile seriously
  • 2 0
 I think it looks awesome, and being able to switch wheel sizes and tinker with the suspension is really cool!
  • 3 0
 That seat tube angle looks remarkably similar to the current Slash
  • 4 0
 High-ish pivot
  • 4 1
 Nice to see good builds coming back with alloy frames.
  • 3 0
 Aaaarrgh I wanted a pivot as high as Gary Fisher!
  • 1 1
 So basically the primary market for this bike is rental stations. And it happened to work for racers too. And if a few people buy their own they will be able to say aluminum is just as good.
  • 3 0
 $3,000 for an aluminum frame? lol
  • 3 0
 Options: many
Price: high
Availability: after pandemic
  • 1 0
 Normally not the biggest fan of the larger brands but damn that looks really awesome! Love the blue/black and the kinematics of the bike look absolutely solid. I'm impressed!
  • 1 0
 We have been so spoiled lately with cable routing that those cables coming out under the top tube bothers me. Nice bike though. Performance is what really matters.
  • 2 0
 I'm confused as to why you would decrease sag rather than increasing compression damping and stay in a 28-30% sag range?
  • 1 0
 the whole cable routing seems kinda cheesey to me especially on the back of the seat tube. other then that it looks pretty sick, especially all that amazing adjustability
  • 1 0
 haha that cable routing.. If you have the cables out all the way up to the top tube why not just make it external all together?
  • 2 0
 Is no one else going to mention how god damn ugly and awkward this thing looks compared to say Commencal, norco, Canyon etc?
  • 2 0
 2023 for an r3.... we shall wait
  • 6 5
 brakes not felling right maybe attributed to the Bontrager tires. They are not comparable to Maxxis or Schwalbe
  • 8 1
 Or something to do with 21% sag....
  • 4 1
 Looks like a norco
  • 2 1
 Annonce the 2022 models while most of the bike ordered end of 2020 have not yet been delivered.
  • 2 0
 It doesn't look like a Session.
  • 3 0
 Looks like a fury
  • 2 0
 Came straight to the comments for this one
  • 3 3
 Would PB ever review a bike in a 27.5" version when both wheels size (or a mullet) are present? I'm getting bored of all reviews being done on a 29ers.
  • 2 0
 2022 session, maybe you can get one by 2023.
  • 2 0
 Still looks like a prototype...
  • 3 0
 Looks like a kona
  • 1 0
 2014 kona tubing, with 2018 linkage. Nice to see everyone else start to catch up!
  • 2 0
 anyone else triggered by the cable routing??
  • 2 0
 Still looks like a session
  • 2 0
 Those broomstick handlebars look really 2010ish.
  • 1 0
 It looks good, got the right numbers and all that... But, can it do it on rainy Wednesday evening in Snowdonia?
  • 2 2
 Does this mark an end to downhill bikes?

Seems like enduro bikes are so good these days bike manufacturers are putting less and less into DH bikes.
  • 1 0
 "You know that gym flooring with the speckles in it? Yah, make my bike look like that."
  • 2 1
 Well, it was a good run, the Session will be missed. That hunched over dog top tube is just horrible Frown
  • 1 0
 Can someone explain to me this new thing of putting a low spec rear shock on a 3k€ frameset?
  • 1 0
 Excited to see the new Gambler... rumour has it 10% lighter, 10% more rearward axle path and better colours!
  • 1 0
 actually now "looks like a GT fury 29" there i said it.. no suprise the big trek could not be original and had to copy GT.
  • 1 0
 Glad to see it back. Now to find an excuse to buy a dh bike.....
  • 1 0
 Are you sure that's a session?
  • 1 0
 article lists two different prices for a frameset.
  • 6 0
 Trek lets you decide which of the prices you prefer.
  • 2 0
 why do you like pressfit
  • 1 0
 You sure do write purdy reviews @dan-roberts
  • 2 0
 carbon... sad face
  • 2 0
 Looks like a fury
  • 1 0
 Wonder if Treks freeriders will be on this bike?
  • 2 0
 Looks like a GT
  • 1 0
 Im going to say it... It looks like a GT Fury
  • 2 1
 Aaron Gwin is kicking himself for leaving
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Kavenz! Also.... steeper seat tube angle than the Slash
  • 1 0
 9lb frame? Is it filled with water? Wtf
  • 1 0
 The 2022 Trek Session!!..... coming to stores in Spring 2023
  • 1 0
 it may be fast, but it ain't pretty
  • 1 0
 Looks like the four bar dvp suspension design has the pivot in the axle..
  • 1 0
 Sure its great to ride but wow its boring
  • 1 0
 CARBON IS DEAD. *I mean carbon frames not carbon bike prices
  • 1 0
 The Trek commercials are so fucking good
  • 1 0
 I didn't even read the review, I just came to the comments...
  • 1 0
 they specced 180mm rotors an a DH bike? Are you kidding?
  • 1 0
 I swear I saw this at mountain creek that year
  • 1 0
 You had to do it
  • 3 3
 looks like a scott gambler
  • 4 0
 Nice try #prayforsagio
  • 2 0
 @NickBosshard: Looks like a GT Fury, FACT, haha @FabioSager
  • 2 1
 nice
  • 2 0
 no it legit is for the r3
  • 1 0
 Looks svelte.
  • 3 2
 ALU FTW!
  • 1 0
 Brand identity is strong
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Supreme
  • 1 1
 LOOKS SYNONOMOUS TO A SESSION
  • 1 0
 VERACIOUSER
  • 2 1
 No water bottle mount?
  • 1 0
 And they had so much space to do it...
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: makes me angry :-(
  • 1 0
 @Matthewsturner: it's an aluminium frame, so I guess there's nothing stopping you buying one, drilling a couple of holes and fitting rivnuts...
  • 1 0
 Looks like a gambler
  • 1 0
 Is that a ... Legend?!
  • 1 1
 Hehe lol looks like a session. Can I have a free bike now?
  • 1 1
 Doesn’t look like a session
  • 1 1
 Does not look like a session. the high pivot point looks weak.
  • 1 0
 Looks like the new KHS
  • 1 0
 Looks like a gt fury
  • 1 0
 Looks like a session
  • 1 0
 How does it climb?
  • 1 1
 That seat angle has me cringing.
  • 1 1
 Why? This isn't an enduro bike
  • 1 1
 A 6 year old could have done a better job at the cable routing
  • 1 0
 Kaz called it...
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Fury
  • 1 0
 Aluminum for the win
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Mondraker.
  • 1 0
 looks like a ghost....
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Fury!
  • 1 0
 looks like a GHOST 9000
  • 1 0
 160 rotors?
  • 3 3
 Looks like a Ghost DH
  • 1 0
 Exactly what i thought. They had the high pivot 8 years ago
  • 1 1
 Aluminum is back eh
  • 4 5
 Death to internal cable routing.
  • 2 0
 what is your reasoning
  • 3 0
 @mior: it's a pain in the ass as a home mechanic
  • 2 3
 @adrennan: You're doing it wrong then.
  • 2 0
 @timmigrant: it is an unnecessary extra thing to deal with and adds no performance benefit.
  • 3 0
 @adrennan: 100% agree man, I prefer external and I printed some 3d guides that attach to certain parts of the frame depending on frame and bosses.
it's just anther thing i can quickly swap out, My remedy for e.g when im at home i only use 2 piston brakes aswell as differnt wheel sets vs what i put on it for friends to borrow at park(zee brakes, enduro tires etc)
  • 1 0
 As said in the article, you have the option of external cable routing as well. There are even some pictures about it on vital.
  • 1 0
 @Archimonde: i missed that part it seems... im sold, external options, full 29/2.75 options... now can i have a mid travel trail/enduro bike like that... think GT is only current enduro bike with external? shame it weighs as much as a bus.
  • 2 3
 like the new paint but i hate 29ers
  • 4 0
 You can run mullet or straight 27 if you want..
  • 1 3
 @DERPOWaterpig: yeah but then thats a lot for a downhill wheelset and tires
  • 2 3
 157x12 rear end and nary a comment?
  • 2 0
 Sessions were always 157x12
  • 1 1
 Session Look-a-Like
  • 1 2
 Looks like a session
  • 7 10
 I have seen Kade Edward doing tailwhips on it.
  • 4 2
 Tailwhips with a dual crown seem rather challenging
  • 4 7
 @labrinsky: that was the joke man
  • 1 1
 @Chridel: nobody's laughing.
  • 2 4
 This new demo looks sick
  • 2 5
 hehe...hehe...looks like a session.
  • 2 5
 NS and Norco and Trek had a gang bang ..... Trek was the female.
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