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First Ride: Classified's Electronic Two-Speed Powershift Hub

Apr 4, 2023 at 0:16
by Matt Beer  



Remember when we ditched front derailleurs for wide-range 11-speed cassettes? For some riders and brands, that 10-42-tooth range wasn’t enough, so along came a 10-50 version, and then one by one, we reached a massive 520% range with SRAM’s Eagle. Wireless shifting was added to the mix, but there was no replacing the quick drop in gear reduction that you’d get from actuating a front derailleur.

Luckily, those have virtually disappeared in modern mountain bike times, although a brand from the Belgium has cleverly found a way to incorporate all of those benefits, like a massive 530% gear range, instantaneous shifting under load (up to 1000W), and a wireless actuator, into a nearly invisible system hidden inside a hub. Although there are some unique components on the wheel, a standard Shimano or SRAM 12-speed chain, derailleur, and front chainrings work with Classified’s cassette.

PowerShift 148 Hub Details
• 0.7 gear reduction
• 530% gear range
• Shifts under load
• 150-millisecond shift time
• Bluetooth wireless, remote ring shifter
• Proprietary 12-speed, 11-40-tooth cassette
• 28 straight pull or 32 J-bend spoke count
• 148mm Boost hub spacing
• Hub or wheelset options
• Weight: 858g - PowerShift hub, hub shell, cassette, 2127g- complete wheelset
• Price: €1,449 - 2,699
classified-cycling.cc

The major gains of the PowerShift hub are that you can shift while pedalling under full power sprints, but also, and possibly more important for mountain biking, without turning the cranks - no more getting stuck in high gear suddenly at the bottom of an abrupt climb.

The system was first introduced to the road and gravel market, so the concept isn’t brand new, but this is the first time we’ve ridden it, and the first debut of the PowerShift in a 148 Boost hub spacing.

Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media

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Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media

Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media
Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media

How Does it Work?

Classified’s PowerShift hub hides a planetary gear system inside the hub shell to provide a 0.7 reduction ratio. The components consist of five main parts: a proprietary 11-40-tooth, one-piece steel cassette and hub shell, the actuator body, a Smart Thru axle, and the wireless ring shifter.

The sensor at the Smart Thru axle picks up the Bluetooth wireless signal from the two-way ring shifter to the actuator located inside the hub shell. Classified wouldn’t reveal what’s inside the actuator, but presumably, a small servo moves the planetary gears in and out of engagement to change the main ratio. A traditional pawl spring design is used for the freehub which engages in under 10-degrees.

Due to the size of the actuator body, Classified’s own one-piece cassette comes into the equation and quickly slides onto the actuator. That’s held in place by a standard cassette lock ring, hence why the smallest cog is limited to eleven teeth.

The actuator body can be quickly removed via a Centerlock rotor nut and placed into another hub shell without removing the cassette. The actuator and cassette are modular, making it possible to transfer to Classified’s 142mm road hub shell too.

The discrete ring shifter can be placed on either side of the bar, in any orientation, and both that and the axle sensor are rechargeable.




Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media

Specs

Hold your breath because there are a lot of numbers to digest when talking about the Classified PowerShift hub. We mentioned the 11-40-tooth cassette and 0.7 gear reduction which give a 530% range - 10% more than SRAM’s 10-52-tooth Eagle cassette, but what about the weight?

The actuator body is the heftiest component at 485 grams, but the rotating mass is kept close to the 29g Smart Thru axle. That one-piece steel cassette weighs 248 grams, nearly half the weight of a Shimano XT 10-51-tooth option. On the handlebars, the ring shifter weighs an insignificant 24g.

Two hub and rims options exist in either a 28-hole, straight pull, Centerlock build, or a 32-hole J-bend, 6-bolt option. Classified’s own M25/30mm width carbon rims are 680/685g.

Given the increased range and highly beneficial shifting bonus, it’s important to look at the system as a whole, because it’s quite impressive. The full package is only 73g heavier than a Shimano XT drivetrain on DT Swiss XRC1501 wheels, or 2127g with the M25 rims.


Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media

Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media
Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media

Pricing

There are three ways to purchase the PowerShift Hub system. Classified’s own M25 or M30 carbon wheelset, with either spoke type and count will retail for €2,699. A hub shell and shifting component combo lets you start your own wheel build for €1,549. Then, there’s the option of buying just the actuator body, in case you decide to go for another brand of hub.

It’s clear that the PowerShift system is not a gimmick. Large brands, such as Atomik Carbon, Nobl Wheels, and Reynolds, see the value in the concept. They’ll be building their own rims and hubs for the PowerShift actuator to slot into.

All warranties will be taken care of by Classified, should something go awry.


Classified PowerShift Hub Photo Mirror. Media

Ride Impressions

Classified’s PowerShift hub is one of those special products that brings a new experience to the way you think about shifting. Everything from the overall packaging, to the instantaneous shifts, to the undetectable friction of the rotating gears is impressive.

Riding the PowerShift hub is like being transported back in time when we regularly used front derailleurs, except there’s no racket coming from the front chainring, dropped chains, sketchy shifts, or cables. It’s almost eerie how stealthy the operation is. There’s no noise, other than the sound of a solid hub engagement when you do shift and the clutch, which is very similar to the feel of a DT Swiss 36-tooth Star Ratchet.

The ability to jump back and forth between the two ratios with the blip of a button is a profound experience. This really helps you out of a jam when you botch a climb or want to grab a handful of gears for a sprint - it all happens seamlessly and you can pedal right through the change. I can really see this taking off, not only for XC and enduro racing, but simply everyday riding for the average consumer.

Personally, I could do with larger jumps with fewer gears because there is so much more, and easier, shifting going on in the hub. That of course would require their own derailleur and shifter though. I found myself using the PowerShift hub as the main source of gear changes first, and then adapting the rear derailleur, particularly when bouncing around undulating trails. On climbs, you can really fine tune the cadence you’re looking for. If you do happen to mis-calculate when to make a PowerShift move, you can simply keep pedalling and revert the change without missing a beat.

On the road and gravel side, there have been armchair engineers who have scoffed about the efficiency loss in the reduced ratio, which is claimed to be less than 1%. Classified has battled critics with their extensive testing. Honestly, I found it tough to notice any drag and would be surprised if any rider blindly hopped on the system and complained.

As for the proprietary cassette, the shifting is very adequate, but not quite up to the same performance as SRAM Eagle or Shimano Hyperglide+ standards. Our test bike was equipped with a SRAM GX AXS derailleur and further fine tuning could possibly have tuned out what we were missing. Overall, it wasn’t a concern, just a note that the two drivetrain giants still battle it out for the best shifting cassettes. The long-term durability of the electronics through regular mud and washing has yet to be thoroughly tested either.

The last concern, which goes for any component that dangles off the bike in a dangerous zone, is the Smart Thru axle wireless pickup. That may be susceptible to damage if you were to take a digger. Like the rest of the components in the PowerShift, this could be swapped quickly.

Classified’s PowerShift reincarnates the benefits of a front derailleur in a neatly packaged wireless system. The practicality of this system is evident for all types of riding and we look forward to putting more miles on the PowerShift hub in a long term test.




Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
389 articles

263 Comments
  • 157 2
 Price aside, this plus a short cage Shimano derailleur seems like it could be a great set up. It'll be interesting to see if they end up offering any different MTB cassette options.
  • 69 2
 Which Kazimer quote is the kiss of death:
"Price aside..." or "...the shifting is very adequate."
  • 38 0
 That is what I was thinking, would this work with a DH 7 speed group? Still give good gearing, but shorter derailleur options.
  • 19 0
 I was hoping to see something like an 11-36 or 11 -40 10 spd cassette that could be used with a short or medium cage Shimano derailleur. Could the road cassette they produce be used on the mountain set up?
  • 60 3
 Would this work with a single speed set-up? There is a growing cadre of single speed mtbr's... even on the North Shore. Seems like you could pair this with a single speed, put the shifter on the right and... Bob's your uncle?
  • 22 1
 @Vudu74: For a park DH bike for me, I just want this with a 1x. Slow and slower would be fine with me any time I'm actually pedaling.
  • 5 0
 @islandforlife: Wasn't there a BMX racer with a shifter in the Olympics? Possibly a better / more reliable way to achieve that goal
  • 4 3
 "price aside"- said only Mike.
  • 8 0
 @solidautomech: the Saint or Zee dérailleurs, short cages of course, can both work with a 42 teeth cog, in their extended versions though, which officially advises a 32T maximum.
No Goat Link or any hanger modification needed. Tried and approved.
  • 26 0
 @islandforlife: Dingle speed?
  • 56 0
 Prediction: Classified will be purchased by SRAM in the next 18 months.
  • 20 1
 @bikewriter: "proprietary cassette" = kiss o' death. Matt Beer's "shifting very adequate" = pulling eyelids closed w/ thumb & forefinger... Kaz's "Price aside..." = no one comes to the funeral.
  • 1 0
 Getting closer to digital drive...hopefully DD eventually works for mtb. Ditch chain/c.ring
  • 3 0
 @cjeder: I spoke with our SRAM rep a few months ago and told her the same that I expected SRAM to buy it. All they need to do is change the frequency of the receiver to work with AXS and eTap. I'd even go so far as to believe that Classified had SRAM in mind from the beginning.
  • 2 1
 @cjeder: lots of investors (like Tom Bonen) and cash dropped for this new company... It wouldn't be a cheap operation at all for Sram now... Sure they'll wait to see if it grabs but it's going to be tricky if Shimano also is interested... But seems Shimano never buys others inventions...
  • 6 0
 With the buzz this is getting (currently being used in WorldTour by some teams) I have to think prices will come down significantly in the next year or 2. Personally I'd love to run this with a compact cassette on all my MTB and gravel bikes, but it's gonna need to cost about 1/3rd what it does now....
  • 20 3
 Not sure whether they still have it, but I recall Sachs/SRAM did/does have a hub with their S3 (three speed) internal geared hub with a cassette body. So you'd have a wider range too without using a front mech. Though fair enough, the S3 hub probably wouldn't survive mountainbiking. But that seemed just a matter of putting in the effort as if you can make it for commuting and trekking, you can just as well make a stronger and better sealed one too.

I hope that "proprietary" cassette standard takes off as a new standard. Please downvote me right now. But I always thought it was daft to have cylindrical cassette bodies with a lot of heavily loaded finicky mechanics inside and then build a big spider to transfer the huge torque from that body to the big cassette sprockets. The cone shape makes much more sense. Sure, a big cone limits how small the biggest sprockets can be. But especially in case of the Shimano Microspline, it was pretty much only introduced to be used with huge cassettes that (yet had to be small only for that single 10t sprocket).

If you dislike this post, please don't forget to downvote!
  • 2 1
 @islandforlife: There is a sturmey-archer kick shift hub that I would like on my single speed. When you back pedal it shifts up or down. There are also no shortage of 3 speed internal gear hubs with a shifter.
  • 6 0
 I find this interesting. While far from ideal, thus seems way cleverer than the new transmission stuff...
  • 1 0
 Everything you mention is coming, being tested and maybe being raced on at EWS
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I have a Dahon with this setup and it works fantastic, better than 2X or 3X.
  • 1 1
 @vinay: Yeah, it was called "Dual Drive".
  • 4 1
 @bikewriter: The shifting is very human
  • 6 0
 @solidautomech: Looks like they have gravel cassettes in 11-32, could run this with a saint der for a sweet setup
  • 2 0
 Find a Zee AM derailleur and its happy days.
  • 6 2
 So now we need to simulate a front derailleur? This sport is so ass backwards. Whats next? 3spd hub and 7spd sram dh setup?
  • 1 0
 @vapidoscar: Yup the S2K, compatible with 6 bolt disc brake rotor, and 135mm width. I've been looking for one to try for a while. Unfortunately, I've heard it's been discontinued... and they also didn't hold up well to MTB use and would blow up... they may have been fine if you were just cruising around the neighbourhood.
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer I knew there was a good reason why I have been storing a box of Zee mechs all these years...
  • 3 3
 Who runs long cage derailleurs anyway?
  • 2 0
 @Vudu74: I was thinking 10-speed short derailleur. While Matt mightn't be concerned with efficiency losses, it is a valid question. But MTB I would be concerned with how well the hub is sealed. Also, an indication on battery life and charging would be good. It's a really interesting product and I hope there's a version that takes hg cassettes
  • 1 0
 @Drew-O: If it's well sealed it's not in harms way like a fancy derailleur
  • 2 0
 Interesting to see more people are calling for shorter cage rear mechs now. I was actually surprised to see so many people willing to accept these longer and longer cage rear mechs in recent years just for a bit more gearing range. For years I've been running Shimano Zee with a 11-36t cassette and it worked fine. I just felt those 10sp chains are pretty expensive to replace (compared to 9sp where I was coming from, with SRAM X9 mechs) so recently got the Microshift Acolyte kids groupset which I'm going to install once it is time to replace my current chain. With their own cassette I can get up to 11-38 of range with 8sp chains that are about as expensive as single speed chains. Plus I expect these will be less demanding to adjust as the sprockets are further apart. If I really don't like it for whichever reason, the Zee mech goes back on but I trust I should be fine. Only the Zee shifter may be a bit more refined as it releases in two directions. But the SRAM X9 combo I used 2018 also had a trigger shifter that released in one direction and it didn't bother me.
  • 1 0
 @cjeder: Transmission 2X ...
  • 4 0
 @stubestrong: More likely: Garmin buys it, impressively integrates a GPS sensor in there and makes it specifically for pedal assisted bikes on indoor trainers. Watch this space, this will be booming.
  • 1 0
 @solidautomech: that would be awesome... if that ever worked.. if they managed to make the hub fit with a normal 10-11 speed short cage Shimano setup, to increase the actual gearing, then this would be the next thing I'd buy....
  • 2 0
 @number44: This was my first thought, what a great option for a single speed for the park!
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: Everyone's free to do whatever they want, of course, but... that wouldn't be single speed anymore, technically speaking.
  • 1 0
 @titaniumsprucemoose: Good information. Glad my cheapness has saved me once again.
  • 3 0
 Awesome would be if this was added to the chainring side of things. If this was made, it would kill these dinner plates of cassetes and super duper long cages, chainslap would be even rarer AND would be compatible with what we already have. It would be more sucessful than it is.
  • 3 0
 @Notmeatall: Truvativ had the Hammerschmidt a couple of years ago. I never had it on my bike but it seemed like a good idea in the era of front mechs. You had a "front mech", chainguide and bash protection in one.
  • 1 4
 @islandforlife: um, then you are no longer single speed.

Besides if you really want mt bike cred, fixy baby.
  • 1 0
 @cjeder: negotiations have probably started.
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: wrong they bought Egs synchroshift some decade ago…
  • 1 1
 but...
  • 1 0
 @powturn: They seem to be doing just fine with their road/gravel offerings.
  • 3 1
 @arek: Ha, true, but I think most mtb single speeders out there do it for the lack of maintenance, durability and less complexity. Having a sort of "bail out gear" without impacting any of those would probably be very much appreciated by the single speed mtb crowd.
  • 3 2
 @islandforlife: Well, I rode single speed mtb exclusively for 15 years and with a group of single speeders. And I can tell you none of us thought of "solutions" to "improve" single speed. Contrary to what you wrote, I think most single speeders want to keep their single speed bike strictly single speed, no matter the reasons they got into it in the first place. If they feel the need for a bail out gear, they have another bike for that, with gears.
  • 1 1
 @arek: Exactly. Everyone interested in "solving" their single speed problem just bought a bike with gears.
  • 1 0
 @cjeder: On thing I'm always wondering about single speed full suspension bikes is, is the hassle worth it? I've already got gears on my hardtail so if I'm going to invest in a new full suspension bike, I don't think I'm going to bother with gears there too. Starling has their Little Beady Eye single speed fully and they have a lot with a hanger for a derailleur, like the Swoop. The thing is, the Little Beady Eye is a whole lot more expensive and it requires a (admittedly very cool and good) Profile crankset whereas the Swoop will happily accept any generic Shimano crankset. I could still install a tensioner on the Swoop and run it single speed. But does that make it a worse single speed bike? Alternatives I've seen use an eccentric bb. Nearly everything I've seen seems more complex and more expensive than bolting a basic tensioner (or even an old blocked rear mech) to the hanger. So yeah, what's the advantage of these dedicated single speed frames?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: It's the single speeder's paradox. The bikes have less stuff, but involve constantly and fiddly problems like the one you pose. The point of a dedicated ss frame is to eliminate chain growth so the chain can maintain tension throughout travel. Without a dedicated frame, you need a derailleur or something like it. At which point, what's the point?

I'd be really interested to hear from someone who has ridden a full suspension ss. It would seem that a bb pivot wouldn't provide enough anti squat for the torque you produce while climbing. But maybe these are more park focused bikes anyway.
  • 1 0
 @cjeder: The ones I've been looking at are the DMR Bolt Long and the Starling Little Beady Eye. Both have a bb pivot. I think the DMR (which has been discontinued) required a lot of compression damping. Those who had the X Fusion O2 shock didn't like it, those with the X Fusion Vector shock (with more adjustability) did. The Starling is supposed to be set up with zero sag. So I think they both have their ways of dealing with the anti-squat challenge but it also means these bikes will ride very different compared to full suspension bikes with sag.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: hipster cred, rather
  • 1 0
 @vinay: The point of a single speed is to cure boredom or impress your friends. The Beady Little Eye would do both. It’ll make riding harder and more entertaining. Which if you are already a great rider, might be exactly what you want. If you want easier or faster, or aren’t really dedicated to the novelty of it, I’d just get a boring suspension bike with gears.
  • 1 0
 @cjeder: Ah, I don't fit the scene I suppose Wink . I don't care about impressing anyone. I only care about cheaper wear parts for those situations where I don't need the expensive parts (which is, when I don't necessarily need gears anyway). But yeah, maybe the bike that has the potential to run gears would be the more versatile option. Actually, a wireless derailleur would actually make sense there. Install the wheel, shifter and chain when I need them and install the other wheel, chain and tensioner when I can do without gears. It is just thoughts and dreams at this stage though. I'm pretty happy with my hardtail now and I'm aware that another bike might "improve" the ride to some extend, but it will never mean more time riding. Getting something else will just mean using less of what I have already.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: In fact, as 'better' seems to always indicate 'more capable' and as a result 'faster', you'll spend LESS time riding, as you'll be back from your ride a few minutes earlier ;-)
  • 1 0
 Anyone interested in this for dinglespeeding a single speed, check out the manual, page 10

A standard shimano splined version is on its way

global-uploads.webflow.com/62c40b4caed47f5c484af01b/643d505f9a03d44916b29c90_classified_powershift_hub_LQ3_en.pdf
  • 83 8
 Matt,
Classified's 530% range is less than a 2% increase in over a SRAM 10-52: (530-520)/520 --> 10/520 --> .019
A 10% range increase would be 572% (520*1.1).

Basically like having a 10-53t cassette that adds, (quick estimate) 1/2lb, requires charging, re-introduces redundant ratios, and reduces efficiency in half the available gears.

Sold.
  • 14 0
 Sorry, 1/3lb as in response to @KJP1230 below
- With DT 350s coming in around 240g and an XT cassette at 470 you're adding ~150g or 1/3lb of unsprung weight.
  • 7 1
 Thank you... good to see someone who understands basic math.
  • 16 0
 Quick note that some people have calculated that potential efficiency losses when in the "climbing" gear of the classified hub is around 10%. While fine for winch and plummet style riding, loosing 10% of your power while climbing could REALLY suck for faster climbing and flowier riding.
  • 5 0
 The comment I was looking for. Quick mafs
  • 19 1
 @rideordie35: Now to get people to stop using "Inside Diameter" or "ID" for rim widths...
  • 5 0
 But you get to brag about having a classified hub at the trailhead parking lot. Can't overlook that feature.
  • 3 0
 All this while not solving hanging bits in the wrong place and the added weight being also located in the worst place for suspension performance. LOL
  • 5 9
flag CheddarJack46 FL (Apr 5, 2023 at 11:20) (Below Threshold)
 The difference between 530% and 520% can be said to be 10%, just as the difference between 530lbs and 520lbs can be said to be 10lbs. The difference is 10(%) and the ratio is 1.02, or 102%.

Maybe there's a clearer way to state the difference between %s but I don't think Matt was technically wrong.
  • 1 1
 @drapeau: what about internal dimension?
  • 36 2
 Should I go dust off my old Hammerschmidt?


All joking aside, its a better idea than this. Electronics can be optional. Theres more room in the spindle & cranks than in a hub. No additional unsprung mass (less if you can downsize the cassette & derailleur). An overdrive is going to be more efficient than an underdrive. It can be cheaper, stronger, lighter (not that the Hammerschmidt was light but it was a gen1 product)
  • 10 0
 And you could use your same wheels/hubs, and cassette, and it worked on any frame with ISCG mounts.

The article/release neglected to mention that this new system needs some way to get a reference torque, same as the Hammerschmidt needed the ISCG mount. On the road and gravel systems the torque bar uses part of the flat-mount disc caliper mount. What's this one using? Why is the demo bike a seemingly custom frame?
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: Good points, I missed the need for a mount completely.

As much as I loved the Hammerschmidt, I'm not sure anyone outside of a 1st row XC racer needs more than about 450% range. My trails are all winch up drop down, where a wide range is the most beneficial. The Hammy gave a 1.6 overdrive, so a normal road cassette + hammy gives you roughly that. I'm not sure the reduced unsprung weight of a road group is worth having a non-standard drivetrain plus the extra cost & weight of a crank mounted overdrive.
  • 11 1
 Hammerschmidt was horribly draggy in the multiplied gear, it’s the single reason I moved away from mine (although I absolutely loved everything else about it), that drag was an absolute dealbreaker, felt like pedaling through sand. Anybody who discounts the drag of gearboxes as irrelevant, I have a real hard time believing them when they say “weird I didn’t feel any drag what are these roadies going on about lol”
  • 8 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: I didn't think the drag was that bad. But the point with an overdrive instead of an underdrive like this hub is that in your lower gears its fixed, so no efficiency lost. I can deal with some drag in the higher gears since I'm pointed downhill at that point.

But it was also a gen1 product; I want to know what it would be like if they iterated on it for a while.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: Don't worry, just wait long enough and it'll come back around.

This is also a 1st gen product, but so many are ready to discount it right away, strange. Like it doesn't immediately fill every single conceivable wish and desire so we just complain about all the potential issues it might have, much like Srams t-type stuff

And yeah, Hammerschmidt was draggy as frig, and hopless to maintain, but like you said 1st gen stuff
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: it was maintenance free. Three seasons on mine with 0 maintenance other than having to replace the cable and cable housing.

This adds unsprung weight, and requires electronics. Both deal breakers for me.
  • 1 2
 @fewnofrwgijn: this. dead giveaway its a blogvertisement. all the best to the creators, but damn come on. its like ppl saying 45mm allroad tires are faster than 25s or 1X N/W doesn't increase drag...
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: My fully rigid MTB has a 600% range with a trekking crankset but the lightest gear would be a bit too heavy for a heavier bike. A 700% range would be good for a true do-it-all bike.
  • 2 0
 @mm732: I’m waiting for an efficient gearbox to come around, I’m ready to believe it. I just need someone who can admit that current gearbox offerings have significant drag, and can point out why this system is different. Not someone dismissing the single biggest obstacle in bicycle drivetrain development as “roadie armchair engineers who refuse to believe the science might have the incorrect opinion that gearboxes have drag”
  • 1 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: The best hope we have for a relatively efficient drivetrain outside of hub-based solutions like Kindernay is something along the lines of Effigears design. As well engineered as Pinon is, its essentially a four speed gearbox with two overdrives. Each overdrive adds drag, and all the gears always mesh even when they aren't selected.

Effigear has a true 11 speed gearbox, but again all gears mesh at all times, and they all move. This is a bigger source of drag than most people realize. The Effigear also requires one extra stage or fixed gear to flip the rotation back to the direction needed by the wheel so you don't have to pedal backwards. If something like Effigear could have two gear selectors, one on each array of gears, then only the powered gears would spin and efficiency could be improved. RIght now only one side has free spinning gears with a selector using pawls on the inside, and the other gear set is one solid piece. The added complexity and reliability makes having two almost impossible to do tho, since they both have to select at precisely the same time.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Extra small derailleur. Imagine that all you need is a 10s ZEE instead of the gigafuntic eagle transmission.
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: Yes, that would be cool, but having two different transmissions increases complexity, weight, moving parts, cost, and requires two shifters and different shifting technique. As stupid big as Eagle cassettes and derailleurs are, they fundamentally aren't any different than a road bike or downhill groupset.
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: Unless you are a moulded cheese, this inner hub transmission won't add complexity.
  • 1 1
 @Notmeatall: won't add complexity? A planetary gear that's electrically shifted? Are you high
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: Are you manufacturing or overhauling these hubs? They are sealed from the enviroment and the only active thing you need to do is charge a dam battery. Even a single speed needs more maintenance than this.
  • 31 1
 530% is a huge improvement for €1.5k over the tiny 520% on Eagle. Gonna order it straight up
  • 3 3
 And it adds 1200g to my rear wheel. Sign me up

I’m sure the quick shift under load is a benefit for some people but that is a lot of drawbacks for that one benefit
  • 2 0
 @rudymedea: We checked this in my post above. It looks like this system adds about 1/3 lb. to the total difference between a conventional hub and Shimano XT cassette.
  • 13 0
 @rudymedea: Its only gonna add 1200g to your rear wheel if you take their front wheel and duct tape it to the rear wheel.
  • 3 0
 @robw515: doesn't sound illegitimate
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230:

oh yep, my bad for reading over it quick, thanks for pointing that out

My point still stands though, huge extra cost, extra complication and extra weight for not much benefit

I will say it’s a cool system though, maybe as a bailout gear on a singlespeed bike though?
  • 32 2
 this is actually really really cool
  • 1 0
 Yea, other than price, the only downside I can see is the hassle of having to build up a wheel.

Really cool idea. If replacement parts were are reasonably cheap it would be a great option on full build bikes. (Not something I would ‘upgrade’ to due to the hassle).
  • 1 0
 @rich-2000: lets not forget batteries, the n+1 humaan ressrouces for life.
  • 21 0
 I wish they'd figure out how to execute this well with a 6 speed cassette giving you 12 speeds but keep the 12 speed spacing so the chainline is always pretty good
  • 7 2
 This will give enormous and non-usable gap between 6 and 7 gear. You would need to shift inner gear + click through all cassette. This system works as long there are major overlaps in gears
  • 5 1
 @MI-Corey,
With a .7 reduction you're never really going to see that work out- there would be loads of ratio overlap (and very little range) or mahoosive steps between each cog.
  • 7 0
 @Alexanderskh: Yea, I was thinking 9s with some overlap would be happy middle
  • 3 0
 @drapeau: yeah I'm not saying the ratio would stay with what they have but potentially with a 6 speed cassette, every other shift is the hub and and every other shift a gear.
  • 4 0
 Like shifting during the 10 speed (2x5) road bike era!
  • 7 1
 @Alexanderskh: Here me out,
this, coupled with an AXS style der, with only one single shifter. the system would be automated, so you could run essentially a "High" and a "Low" in the hub, with a 6-7 speed cassette. the jumps on the cassette would be the equivalent of two gears on a regular cassette.
So when you are in 1st gear, its the largest cog, and Low on the hub, 2nd gear is largest cog on the cassette and High on the hub. 3rd gear is 2nd cog Low in the hub, and so on. could be integrated with a Sram AXS so the brain does the work of deciding which combination to use, so it could be seamless.
This is where I believe Sram purchasing Classified would go, add in that ring shifter, and a Switchgrade integrated into a Reverb post, and youre off to the races. Add Flight Attendant, and the opportunities are endless for some really interesting integration.
  • 2 0
 To implement a ~500% range with a six speed cassette on a two speed hub, with more or less even steps between ratios, and not having to run back up or down the cassette in the middle of the range, you would need the hub to shift between its two ratios constantly as you step up and down the cassette. Something like a 10-13-18-24-32-43 cassette and then a difference between ratios in the hub of 15.7%, so the shifting would be 43*1.157, 43*1, 32*1.157, 32*1 etc. etc.

In this setup there's one gap of 12% and one of 20% but the rest are 15-16%.
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: Exactly how SRAM already (can be configured) do it with AXS on the 2x Road bikes, just a continual up or down shifts through the whole range - in lieu of SRAM buying them out, would be good to know if this type of integration was possible, [insert tech geek comms protocol translation gargon here]
  • 2 0
 @GLOB-2018: Shimano's Di2 has a single shifter "sync" mode that sounds pretty much the same.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: that's how I run GRX, one shifter, two derailleurs, it's seemless and smooth.
Shifts perfect every time and you can use a normal 11-40 XT cassette.
2x also stops chain line issues with wear and noise, something this does nothing to address.
They'd have been much better of making a lighter, more efficient electronic version of Hammerschmidt.
  • 1 0
 @Bahh: patents and all that I’m sure.
Willing to bet SRAM has that wrapped up.
  • 21 1
 What's the old phrase? Heavy, expensive, unnecessary, pick all three?
  • 15 2
 "It's like Hammerschmidt but without all the hassles."

The hassles of having a bike with ISCG? Versus a custom hub, a custom cassette, and a maybe a custom frame?

The custom cassette is the weirdest thing. If they needed a special hub already, why not put everything in the hub and not try to compete with SRAM and Shimano on the cassette front? Classified wants to talk about being better than a front derailleur, but if the rear shifting doesn't match up with the best of breed currently, _and_ requires a bunch of special incompatible parts, then it's one step forward and two steps back.

The second weirdest thing, is that the "torque bar" is not mentioned at all in this article. On the road and gravel systems, it mounts to an existing flat-mount disc caliper location. There _is_ something extra on this bike, you can just barely see it in the pics in the article, but it's even more obvious on Classified's site. Is this thing even compatible with all frames?
  • 3 1
 I can't find the photo you're referring to on the Classified site, but the lead photo Bikerumor used today gives a somewhat better view--looks like the left hub endcap has an appendage that just presses against the underside of the chainstay? If true, seems like a sh!t design to apply pressure where the frame designer never intended it..
  • 1 1
 @barp: it's not an appendage, its a thru-axle cap that is a bit bigger to house BT electronics
  • 2 0
 @barp: yup, that pic from Bikerumor shows it distinctly. Yet no mention of it in their article either.
  • 12 0
 I got to demo the gravel version for several months. The set up was finicky, I needed some spacers to get the axle lined up with the actuator in the hub, which was not in the instructions though the spacers were included. Once it was working it was flawless and very cool. I put a few thousand miles on it with zero issues. I wasn't super fond of the switch ergonomics, but that's a quibble.
  • 2 0
 Did you notice any power loss?
  • 4 0
 @Speeder01: Nope, but I'm not a scientific instrument, there probably was some. 10% I'd think I'd notice though.
  • 14 1
 Just ride a 1x11 system with a 420% gear range and train harder so that range is enough.
Cheaper, simpler and you get the training effect as well
  • 2 0
 420% is the perfect range for MTB
  • 2 0
 What is this "train", you talk about?
  • 3 0
 "just train harder",the go-to comment of days of old when everybody went 1X with 11-36 cassetes.
  • 1 0
 @4thflowkage: I like trains
  • 5 0
 @nozes: 1X with an 11-36 cassette was my bread-and-butter for a little while. After having kids and not being able to ride as often as I'd like that now sounds like suicide.
  • 1 0
 @4thflowkage: “my uncle also trains man he is driver. sometimes he get death threats but never rape. stay strong trains is hard job”
  • 3 0
 @nozes: I think many of us even used 1X with 11-34 cassettes in the right conditions with a 32T front chainring. While my cardio is still good for that ratio, the joints in my legs may not be up to the task.
  • 4 0
 @nozes: yes but I also did that in my 20s, if I did it now I'd have a heart attack
  • 15 1
 Belt drive single speed, please! Trail gear and getting to the trail gear
  • 2 0
 So glad I'm not the only one dreaming of this. May be the market will produce something one day.

I wonder how easy it would be to make some sort of mount that fits the proprietary Classified cassette system and adds a section of Shimano freehub splines just big enough for a single speed cog?
  • 2 0
 @overconfident: Good catch! Sure looks like a Gates cog!
  • 12 0
 the industry will do anything but put a gearbox in a bike
  • 6 0
 Pinion: team up with Classified and make your gearboxes have a slick electronic shifter that controls both and have a smaller lighter gbox (less gears) so we can run straight drive belt/chain with enough range to rule the world. (500%)

I'll wait by the phone. Call me.
  • 1 0
 Yah pretty much. Lets just keep hanging mass on the sprung parts of our suspended bikes though, that'll be cool.
  • 2 0
 @webbmaster: pinion has terrible efficiency. Rohloff is king of efficiency, but it doesn't shift under load.

420% range 9 speed gearbox that shifts under load with electric buttons please.
  • 2 0
 @Bahh: Man I've ridden a pinion and I just don't see what people talk about efficiency wise. Never really noticed any drag. Maybe over a longer ride id have seen it? As far as the load part its just relearning how to shift. Id rather shift out of load then hard on pedals myself. Kind of like running a dirtbike really.
  • 1 0
 @Bahh: I don't think Pinion shifts under load either? (I've never ridden one, but thought I read that).

I have just got a Rohloff, and the shifting is the only thing I'm having to get used to -- I don't notice the weight and barely notice the drag (not at all in the higher gears). Damn useful to be able to dump a load of gears without pedalling though
  • 2 0
 @overconfident: I also have a rohloff and only notice the drag in one gear (I think it's 7); there's a chart comparing efficiency of gear hubs kicking around, but I don't trust it because it shows gear 11 on a rohloff (which is direct drive and the same as a fixed hub) as being less efficient than gear 8.
Pinion can definitely shift under more load than the rohloff; though shifting force is proportional to drive load.
  • 13 5
 Downvote me into oblivion, but I never had problems with my front derailleurs. They were a tad noisy and added weight, but they never dropped chains, never needed much maintenance and generally just were super reliable.
  • 4 0
 Ditto for me, also my 26 inch wheels with tubes in the tires work flawlessly too. Manual height adjustment seatpost also super reliable.
  • 9 1
 I can’t stand the fancy new 3x and 2x drivetrains. Drivetrains in general are a pain. So much hassle. My direct-drive penny-farthing has never once needed the derailleur tuned, cables replaced, never dropped a chain, no worn out drivetrain components. And the full metal wheels have never once flatted like modern wheels and their fancy pneumatic tires.
  • 1 0
 Still running 2x on my mountain and gravel bikes and see no compelling reason to change. I have zero problems. I know getting rid of the front derailleur allowed some suspension designs to come forth, but those giant cassettes look kind of silly IMHO. My gravel bike in particular has a super wide range and I generally ride it big ring on road/gravel and little ring on singletrack. I'd never EVER give up 15% efficiency though. Might as well drag a dead raccoon behind you on the climbs.
  • 1 0
 @pixelguru: it would be more drag than a dead racoon, I can guarantee that!

Regarding 2X--I've never had any issues either. I was running 3X on my hardtail until 2018, then I gave in and converted to 1X the following year. Still running 2X on my gravel and road bike, and probably will not change that for the sake of "simplicity".
  • 8 0
 Can't wait until I need to fix this, take it apart after a few shop beers, and then try to remember how it goes back together.
  • 3 0
 ..most bike repairs are going to require a computer science degree or geek squad support on speed dial Razz
  • 6 0
 As someone who's actually ridden a bike with one of these fitted (It was a curly bar bike), I was blown away. If you think AXS or Di2 shift quickly and smoothly, this is on another level.
Sure, I think the best application for it in the MTB world is XC riders or those who tour who want to be able to have close ratio gears and a wide gear range at the same time, but that doesn't make it an invalid product. IF I could justify the money, I'd run it on my bike.
Close ratio gears are underrated IMO.
  • 5 0
 The idea of using the hub as the primary shift and RD for fine tuning absolutely melted my brain... my first instinct with this system was "oh an internal front derailleur", but based on this review it's totally opposite of how anyone actually uses a FD (avoiding front shifts, planning them in advance, fear of dropping chains, slow/softpedaled shifts). It sounds so amazingly different that now I really want to try it.
  • 1 0
 @bkm303: Yup, none of the unreliability of a FD - shift anywhere in the cassette range at (pretty much) any power output and without worrying about chainline.
  • 1 0
 Yes they are and not sure why we don't see mtb cassettes with less range but closer ratios....like a 13-46 12 speed cassettes. I'm guessing cost vs demand.
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: The demand isn't there. Look at Shimano's 10-45 cassette - that would have been outsold AT LEAST 10:1 by the 10-51 version. And their 2x drivetrains - I feel like they clung to that for a VERY niche market. Appreciated by those that wanted them, but they were few and far between.
For those with enduro bikes, they generally want a super easy gear (as one such person), because the trails are often winch-plummet. I used to live in the PNW, and that was the norm.
  • 8 0
 Classified: Sram I see your $1600 “transmission” and raise you a $1800 hub.
  • 2 0
 the only thing you see, you know it's gonna be, the ace of spades, the ace of spades
  • 1 0
 But what if we could combine the two
  • 4 0
 I am going through a long recovery and have to spend a year riding road only (cautiously, no crashing) so I spent some time building a project gravel bike and I strongly considered adding one of these. My cost benefit spreadsheet showed that swapping in this hub added about $1900 and 10 grams to my build versus a GRX double. It also adds a battery dependency. It seems cool, I couldn't justify it.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. Reasons di2 2x is very popular for road/gravel training even with crossover 1x mtb racers. The customization, speed and reliability of the FRONT derailleur is perfection in every situation, and there's no honking big cassette gaps.
  • 8 0
 I'm stoked to try this to turn my singlespeed into a double speed.
  • 2 0
 This is honestly the best/only use case. If you already have gears, FD/RD are clearly better. But a belt drive singlespeed with a 50% downshift would be absolutely amazing.
  • 1 0
 I'd be so happy if this were possible
  • 3 0
 11-40t cassette = you could probably run one of the XPLR rear mechs that SRAM makes to run a 10-44t cassette on the gravel side of things. Slightly shorter cage, a bit lighter, could be cool.

Then again given the downsides to this hub, what's wrong with a "regular" 12 speed drivetrain?
  • 2 0
 Downsides of regular are:
- bad chainline
- long cages
- big jumps on heavy gears where it matters the most
- not as robust as 11sp
  • 2 0
 @GZMS: is that true? Hub and cassette widths didn’t change with 12 speed, so the maximum chain deflection would be the same, so how is the chain line worse than before? Unless you run a front mech the chai line stays constant between any 1x drive train, the only way to change it is get a different offset chainring.
  • 3 0
 We have a huge range with 1x, an even bigger range with a Pinion 12 sp, so really this is only good for folks who ride a single speed?

and wow the price ... yeah, super cool, I could see it's benefits for unicycling, otherwise nope.
  • 2 0
 This makes all kinds of sense for road riding and racing where folks currently run a set of 52/39 front chain rings and a 11-28 rear cassette. You could get rid of the front derailleur, have great gear range, and maybe be a bit more aero. For mountain bikes I don't see how this very compelling. With the older 2X and 3X systems there were a whole bunch of near duplicate gear ratios that no normal person knew how to shift in order. With a 1X system as you go up the cassette, the easier it gets. For a 2X system you might start in the big front and small rear gears but at some point to go to the next easier gear you have to change the front and rear derailleur. You have closer ratios in theory but in practice is nearly impossible find the exact next larger gear.
  • 2 0
 If I am doing the math right... The PowerShift turns the 11-40t into a 11-57t. Put another way, to match the range of a typical 32t front with 10-52t rear, the PowerShift 11-40t would need to be paired to a 35t front ring (obviously does not exist). Those with the legs to push a 36 tooth front ring would need to move up to 40 teeth.

Front ring clearance may actually be one of the bigger problems with this setup.

I think I'll just keep going with my 10 speed Shimano/AdventX hybrid setups.
  • 2 0
 Just make a 0,8 reduction ratio Hammerschmidt, nw chainring compatible, and pair it with an "old" 11-42 cassette.
Kick it in only when you need that bailout gear.
- no weird proprietary hub
- smaller cassette
- shorter mech cage
- less weight on the hub
- added weight is around the bb.
  • 2 0
 We seem to have lost sight of the importance that unsprung mass plays in suspension performance. Whilst I get the benefits of removing the front mech, adding dinner plate cassettes, e-mechs, and now geared hubs, is detrimental to rear suspension performance.
  • 2 0
 a lot of people crying about "unsprung weight" but they were all silent when SRAM introduced the new HEAVIER drive train.

if I've done my math correct its like 68g heavier than the new SRAM drive and 272g heavier than an old XO1 using a 10s sram mech
  • 2 0
 Biggest advice. Do not sell this to SRAM or SHIMANO. Finally the cassette size is getting smaller. This will just give them an excuse to keep riding the bigger is better cassette instead of more compact gearboxes
  • 3 2
 I could see this on a hardtail, but there is no way I'd want an extra 485+ grams of usprung mass on my enduro bike. That mass is budgeted towards a heavier tire/insert setup, and a stronger rim. No way I'd get rid of those. An extra 485 grams would really hurt suspension performance. Even 200 grams (NX vs Microshift advent X) in the cassette is very noticeable for suspension performance.
  • 9 5
 I guess my 40lb enduro rig is unrideable.
  • 7 0
 Most of my pseudo-enduro bro neighbors don't know what unsprung mass is because "weight doesn't matter...just take a dump before the ride."
  • 1 2
 @bikewriter: and somehow they still ride their bikes
  • 7 0
 @zmums: A 40lb bike with 7 lb rims does is not equivalent to a 40 lb bike with 3lb rims.
  • 1 2
 @nickfranko: as long as it’s vertically compliant but laterally stiff.
  • 1 0
 I could but a 90mm stem and single pot ebay brakes on my bike and still ride it, that doesn't mean it's performing anywhere close to what it could do.
  • 5 0
 @4thflowkage: I’m mostly just being a troll. I think it’s pretty funny when people talk about a light cassette and unsprung mass problems when they ride 6 miles every 3 weeks in the summers only. IMO performance matters where it makes a difference and in my experience with a pile of different bikes/weights/wheels/cassettes etc it’s mostly about functional parts, making sure what you do have is actually set up well(sus pressures/tire pressures/brakes), and just riding more and tinkering less to figure out what actually works. 475g of unsprung weight is just not gonna matter all that much if it means that it’s a nicer pedal.

All that said I’m not the target market for this thing. I’d rather harden up a little and keep my cheap drivetrain.
  • 1 1
 @zmums: you have a point and all but bro 475g is an entire tire
  • 3 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: show a decent tire that weighs 475g. my tires weigh 1400g and I’m happy about it. I’ve run a 800g tire and it’s just not as fun on the downs. It doesn’t affect how much I pedal either. Not saying there isn’t a use case for light tires, but people try to save grams where they shouldn’t.
  • 2 0
 @zmums: I’m just saying, take off your 450g GX cassette and tell me you don’t feel a difference. Weight savings aren’t pursued for no reason
  • 2 0
 @zmums: Oh I'm totally on your side about ride frequency and I can't blame you for trolling because it's exactly something I'd do.

I think I still disagree about weight. I've run 1000 gram tires and 1400 gram tires and like you, I prefer the 1400 gram tire because of grip and support etc. Rotational mass isn't even bad, the extra momentum can be useful. BUT, i still hard disagree about pure unsprung when it's that many grams. I think if you put a 1lb weight on your rear, you would absolutely be annoyed by it.

Of course, none of this matters if you don't ride, and it won't make a difference if you don't have the ability to use much of your bikes capabilities.
  • 2 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: can’t pedal w/out a cassette. I’ve ridden chainless and single speed a bunch. It just isn’t that big a deal. Go ride your 475g tire at Whistler and tell me that the suspension performance justifies no grip and a broken wheel.

@4thflowkage: I guess you’re just proving my point. You added 400g in tire weight and it’s a better ride. That’s about 1lb. I wouldn’t count something as bad purely based on weight, you’ve got to try it and judge the weight vs the performance. This lil gizmo could be worth it for the short cage der advantages. Sure less unsprung mass is theoretically better, but to me the gains are irrelevant/not perceptible in the real world.
  • 1 0
 @zmums: I’m just saying I’m really questioning what kind of person doesn’t notice an extra pound at the axle. Sure, benefits and compromises and whatever, but if you say it isn’t noticeable you’re kinda discrediting the rest of what you say, because it is noticeable. I’d be shocked if a complete beginner didn’t notice 1lbs different tires back to back on a trail. You can also ride with no cassette, giving real tangible gains in suspension performance because of the lower unsprung weight, it’s kind of the entire basis of DH bikes having 7 speeds
  • 1 0
 @fewnofrwgijn: what and where do you ride?

I just swapped a 1400g tire for a 800g tire on my stumpy a couple months ago and a notice a grip and rim protection difference, not a suspension performance difference. I’ve also ridden aluminum and Carbon wheels back to back and can’t feel a real difference in that weight savings or even really in ride feel. Just for reference I ride about 5x a week averaging about 10 miles 1500 vertical feet a ride. I’ve had 8 bikes in the last two years from Carbon hardtails to full DH bikes. There a plenty of people out there who ride way harder longer better than me, but I do have a little experience.

DH cassettes are small bc you don’t need to pedal uphill and a shorter cage der does better when smashing laps and gets hung up less. That’s exactly the same issue this doodad solves. Just by your logic everyone should run super light wheels and tires bc the sus performance would be so insane. I just don’t buy that at all. 500g is negligible.
  • 1 0
 @zmums: I htink we might be arguing past each other. I agree that weight isn't always bad and the function of the part comes first, but there is a point where it becomes a problem. If we imagine standard as 1000g from a tire, +400 is good. I noticed that +600 had some suspension and handling effects I wan't thrilled about, and +800 could be enough it be actively annoying.
  • 1 0
 This is pretty cool, but...
a 24 speed drivetrain?

To me, that sounds like way too much shifting for mtb.
I already went down to 10spd because I found myself shifting up or down a thumb-full of my 12 gears every time the trail changed pitch.
Super neat though.
  • 1 0
 Is it a usable range? How many eagle rider’s actually use the two highest gears in their range? I tend to use my five lowest gears quite a bit but the 10 and is 12 cogs don’t ever wear out. If one of the manufacturers came out with a 12 or 13 to 50/51/52 that would be interesting.

I mean this is nifty and all but expensive, more complex heavier and pricy. Not a new idea either. When I was a kid some local had a European bike with a I think 4 speed freewheel and either a 3 speed or 5 speed hub. That was late 60s IIRC.
  • 2 0
 It's because they convinced people that you need a big front chainring. Most people should be on a 28t front to use a full 10-50 cassette. People who use the 10t number in the sweet f a. Frankly a 28t with 10-42 11s is all you need and wins on cost and reliability every time.
  • 3 0
 It's Belgian, so it's probably going to be underpayed and marketed too expensively by a Dutchman who promised it to a customer but was too stupid to develop it himself.
  • 2 0
 This should be coupled with the AXS system to double the gears and sync in the shifts based on the ratio order. Smaller cassette would enough with a smaller derailleur cage for better ground clearance.
  • 1 0
 Can we get one of these that's burly enough to run with a single speed setup? I'm not down with the complication of going back to two shifty thingies but if we can get to one shifty thingy that is inside the hub I am down. 1 speed for climbing, 1 speed for cruising.
  • 1 0
 If you want to know how this new thing works....

patch.com/new-york/syosset/how-it-works-3-speed-sturmey-archer-aw-bicycle-gears

Its a wireless Sturmey archer, shimano Alfine is a geared hub and the posh version is Rohloff speedhub

www.sheldonbrown.com/sturmey-archer_tech.html?utm_content=cmp-true
  • 1 0
 It's impossible to not read this and recognize it's an updated version of the Truvativ Hammerschmidt moved to the hub vs front ring. I've been running a Hammerschmidt [2-speed] front end with a Shimano Zee AM 10-speed derailleur on a Pole Evolink 1.4 for the past two years and it's pretty magic. I've been hoping someone would take this concept to the next level so kudos to them! The ability to quick-flip back and forth when you crest a hill &/or hit a quick climb is amazing! Much more intuitive than shifting two to three gears up and down on my other XTR 12-speed set up. I'm inSmile
  • 2 0
 What is the total weight difference between this hub + cassette system, and a typical SRAM GX or Shimano XT cassette + conventional hub?
  • 5 0
 With DT 350s coming in around 240g and an XT cassette at 470 you're adding ~150g or 1/3lb of unsprung weight.
  • 2 1
 @drapeau: Thank you! Not too bad, all things considered.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: It is more than that is you compare with XTR level.

Claimed at 485g for the Powershift Boost MTB internal gear hub, 72g for the Smart axle, 125g for the 28-hole straight-pull centerlock disc brake hub shell OR 165g for the 32h j-bend 6-bolt disc shell, 24g for the Bluetooth Ringshifter, and 248g for the 12-speed 11-40T cassette.

So total is: 485 + 72 + 125 + 24 + 248 = 954
Shimano XT + DT 350 = 0 + 43 + 293 + 0 + 469 = 805
Shimano XTR + DT 240 = 0 + 43 + 209 + 0 + 367 = 619

So, more than 300 grams when used with a drivetrain that still costs half.
  • 1 0
 @dododuzzi: yikes, I didn't realize that the axle was listed separately. Not sneaky... But not not sneaky.
  • 2 0
 Love the idea of this. I would love to back to a normal size cassette and short cage but still have a range similar to Eagle.
  • 1 0
 I have yet to see info on the axle when it needs to be replaced. It hangs way out in space and is no doubt going to get blown up by a rock. What is the cost of this axle to replace it?
  • 4 0
 Put this thing into the crankset, if its possible.
  • 2 0
 The instant shift under load of this combined with a Pinion gearbox? Even I would go electronic for that.
  • 1 1
 Hammerschmidt, Schlumpf, Patterson, Efneo come to mind. But they use the gears for high speed. Not the most favorable arrangement considering average efficiency. I mean that I think most people spend more time at high speed, so that is where the best efficiency should be. Maybe these two-speed crank inventors couldn't figure out how to use the direct drive for high speed, as Classified does. Not that I like this Classified hub. Cost, special rear wheel and parts, weight in the worst place, that's not all.
  • 2 0
 @garthpool: you can have the schlumpf drive in both ways, gears for high or low speeds (speed drive 1:1.65 or mountain drive 2.5:1).
Having the gears for high speed is nice for a folding bike e.g. to avoid huge chain rings.
My dual speed mtb is running a schlumpf speed drive. 27chainring up front, 22 in rear, good for uphill.
  • 1 0
 @Muellbeutel: That clears things up.

Do you notice the drag when you are in low speed on your Mountain Drive? Some people won't use a gearbox of any kind because of the lower efficiency of gears.

Some say they never notice the drag. As I wrote above, for two-speed cranks with direct drive for one speed and geared drive for the other, I think it is better to use the gears for low speed. The drag would be less noticeable. Comparing the geared crank to one with two chain rings, the reduction in average efficiency would be less.

Some say the higher weight of a geared drive is trivial. I have never tried one. It is all I can do to own a standard 3x8. It works fine for me. I am too old to be doing any mountain biking, and anyway, doctors and dentists are expensive. But I am interested in gearboxes and would like to know what you think.
  • 1 0
 @garthpool: well, it is still a nice singlespeed-like strait chainline. So, there is already an advantage in mud etc having that. Drag is not extreme, much less than the difference between tires, or being tired.
For mountainbiking i put much more power during climbing compared to transfers.
With the high gear I can reach 25kmh, bit more with fast spinning. So thats more on the easy side… and no issue with any drag Smile

I also have a bike with effigear gearbox, however the drag there is noticeable, not huge though to be fair.
  • 1 0
 I don't really get it, the only benefit I see is a slightly more efficient chainline range. then you have to remember to switch the ring back-N-forth. it kinda reintroduces 2x for well over 1000 bucks
  • 4 0
 Can I use it with my Hammerschmidt cranks to improve gear ratio even more?
  • 1 0
 Yes! Classified comes to Mtb finally. Now put on a 9 speed cassette that doesn't stop shifting when the derailleur is slightly out of true, a short cage derailleur and take my money! (I will start saving now)
  • 2 0
 Sooooooo the front derailleur is a nice thing to have? That big immediate jump of gear ratios? Ya, I use the front derailleur ALL THE TIME on my gravel bike.
  • 1 1
 Why not just do a Shlumpf crankset? You get your extra gear ratios and weight but you just click the button with your heel where the crank bolt is. Worked beautifully in my opinion, aside from feeling like an internal gear hub when you were in gear reduction. I’m a weirdo that rides full suspension recumbents though. Feels like sledding except your front wheel might wash out and you eat hardcore shit…
  • 2 0
 This is cool. I think I remember seeing an early prototype a while back. Nice to see it entering production.
  • 3 0
 What if... you pair this with pinion gearbox
  • 5 0
 2million% range

But f*ck all those unsprung weight improvements from having a gearbox.
  • 6 0
 Why stop there? Put a Pinion and a Rohloff on the same bike for 168 speeds: www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-ig-R65yHg
  • 3 1
 Somebody needs to combine this with a Shimano 2 x 12 system to make a 48-speed bike.
  • 4 0
 I run 3x11 on a touring bike. This would give me 66 gears!!!
  • 2 0
 @VtVolk: yippeee even more time spent wondering what gear you are in!
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: yes, but 46 redundant gears....lol
  • 5 0
 @andrewbikeguide: my normal move is to hit the downshift lever 4-17 times on a climb AFTER I have hit the lowest gear. I never wonder!
  • 4 0
 What's the point?
  • 1 0
 What's the market? OEM - no, XC Race - no, Enduro - a stretch, DH - no, Gravel - maybe
  • 2 2
 I've heard Transmission is incredible, but this is way more intriguing—shorter derailleurs, smaller cassettes, and instant shifting with or without load is the future I want.
  • 1 0
 Love this innovation! Only 2 speedbumps to mass adoption; the price, and having to use a proprietary cassette. Alter those, and these would sell like proverbial hotcakes.
  • 1 0
 More mass on the rear suspension, might as well have a 24 speed cassette! This energy should be directed to a low weight centered gearbox, that's what mtb's need......
  • 3 0
 This is pretty bloody cool.
  • 1 0
 Been thinking for a while they was going to be a product like this, but with one gear shift in the bottom bracket. The idea is good, but definitely pricey.
  • 1 0
 Yeah that price can go fuck itself. Hahahahahaaaaaaa. A shit tonne heavier than a top end cassette. GIve me something that reduces unsprung weight with range.
  • 1 0
 Cool engineering, not cool price. But that's usually how it goes when things start out. Hopefully in years to come it will lower in price drastically.
  • 5 4
 Shift under "full power sprints"....max wattage is 1000.....the BMX, Enduro, DH and roadies or LOLing....
  • 3 0
 Also gets a reaming on Hambini for power loss of 8-10%. Undoubtedly a clever bit of engineering but not something I’d put on my bike.
  • 3 0
 @Hairyteabags: But did you read Classifieds' articel about testing their efficiency (link in the Text)? I would rather trust a proper test setup than anything coming from him, THE Armchair-enginner #1
  • 2 0
 @wiesejunge: Yes I read it and not convinced tbh as looking at the design I struggle to see how there is no impact on efficiency.
  • 1 0
 @Hairyteabags: i mean, there's math(s) in there, right? And the efficiency losses show up when you'd want to avoid them most: when you're roasted at the end of the day? on that one final climb? Just knowing that would definitely make me feel it...

I don't doubt the efficiency losses would be undetectable for lil old me, but unless you can make me forget they're present, I'm not sure why I'd pay MORE for them!

cyclists gonna cycle...
  • 2 0
 Why am I thinking ETap front derailleur.
  • 2 0
 what does the hub sound like on a scale of Hydra to Onyx?
  • 12 0
 rumor has it you mostly hear the vacuuming sound of money leaving your wallet
  • 1 0
 I would like to see a smaller cassette with this and think it would offset the weight, definitely really cool idea.
  • 2 0
 Could you use this on a singlespeed?

That would be sick
  • 3 0
 No, because then it would be a doublespeed

My friend has a "tringlespeed" - SS with a triple crank, and 3 rear cogs sized to use about the same chain length. Shifting gears only takes like a minute or two! So it's like this, but way worse Smile
  • 4 0
 In the Hammerschmidt days we called them "dinglespeeds"
  • 2 0
 Interesting concept, terrible performance, terrible value.
  • 1 0
 Small (national pride) comment: the company is based out of Belgium, Antwerp. Close to Netherlands, but different country
  • 1 0
 Actually, it's based out of "the Belgium" if you read the edited version of the article.
  • 1 0
 By the way, big fan of your country's waffles, fries, and road cycling.
  • 1 0
 that wireless knob hanging off the axle is really in an unsurvivable position for trail riding.....it's not an axle slider.
  • 2 0
 Can I stand on it without it breaking?
  • 1 0
 I am hopeful that standonit will become a standard metric of testing in future product tests.
  • 2 0
 Should have made it 8 or 9 speed
  • 1 0
 Kind of like having a low range gear in a truck! Cool. No risk of cross chaining either.
  • 1 0
 I just would not want to lose sequential shifting and having to go back into the 2X memory banks to recall how we did that
  • 1 2
 Hambini already eviscerated this thing. cool engineering project, but those loses in the reduction gear are insane, for a negliable benefit on a MTB.


can we just fast forward to Neurolink-enabled CVT already? Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Nice to see someone challenging White Industries' near-monopoly of the dingle-speed market.
  • 1 0
 Now we can have it all: the price and drag of internal gearing and the maintenance and precariousness of external gearing
  • 1 0
 NO! not even on my road bike
  • 1 0
 Too late for an April fool joke! Didn’t get me!
  • 1 0
 MORE weight and complexity on the rear wheel. Perfect.
  • 1 1
 Did anyone see Hambini’s roast of this hub for the road bikes? I’d imagine the same applies to the MTB version.
  • 1 0
 I haven't found aby warranty info
  • 1 0
 If we know all about it, then it is no longer classified
  • 1 0
 Double post
  • 1 0
 Ebike compatible?
  • 1 1
 Hard pass.
  • 1 2
 Pinion terrible friction but this has negligible friction? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 2 0
 If you were to look at the components inside each respective "gearbox", do you think you might figure out why?
  • 2 4
 Hey y'all, is Alicia ok?







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