Poll: Has Climbing Become Unfashionable?

Jul 19, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
Mike Levy testing the Specialized Enduro 29er in Sedona. Photo by Colin Meagher
Mike Levy scratches up a foolishly steep pitch, just because.


"It's mountain biking," says Mike Levy. Pinkbike used to spend a few weeks each year testing bikes in Sedona, Arizona, and it was on those trips where Mike Levy first earned my respect as a rider. For most, sessioning the myriad of tricky downhills and drops highlights the red rock experience there. Levy, however, spent at least as much time working on his climbing game and he's aced a number of the zone's most infamous pitches. I looked forward to the inevitable climbing contests that ensued, although I can count my victories on one finger.

There's an art to technical climbing that requires well-honed skills, one-hundred-percent concentration and, especially here, where exposure is always a danger, a level of commitment that rivals the muster you'd need to attack any black-line descent. Beyond bragging rights and a sense of accomplishment, technical climbs foster confidence and bank skills that can save gobs of energy when you're riding chunky trails at any gradient.

Mountain bikers who ride in the mountains will spend on average, 51 minutes of each hour going uphill, and that figure becomes much more lopsided for skilled descenders. That's right, the faster you ride, the larger the percentage of your riding time will fall into the climbing column. Look no further than the EWS, where the winner's total time for eight stages of downhill competition after two full days of pedaling uphill amounts to about 30 minutes.

Schurter pulling away from Kerschbaumer on the final lap.
Nino Schurter is probably the only athlete who could manage a genuine smile on a grueling World Cup XC climb.

It could be argued that climbing, not descending defines the sport. Homo sapien-sapiens are inherently lazy, preferring to populate river valleys and seaside retreats where accessing food sources and mating opportunities are rarely farther than a minute's walk. Mountains are wild and unpopulated because access requires effort. The harder it is to pedal to the top, the more likely it will be that you'll escape average humanity's noise, litter and situational numbness. The return for a few thousand pedal strokes and burning legs cannot easily be purchased: silence and solitude on the way up - and few reasons to hold back on the way down. Mountain biking is wonderful because it's not easy.

Steffi Marth image

The satisfaction that awaits a successful climb is not easily explained. We're not conquering mountains, as is so often written. We're conquering self doubt - overcoming inertia that's been hardwired by a lifetime of setting readily achievable goals. "Could have, Should Have and Might Have Been" are the daemons we fight with each rhythmic breath and revolution of the crankset, and while there are rare moments when the body and mind revel in the experience, climbing is mostly an uncomfortable, but all-consuming conversation between the two that comes to an abrupt end at the summit. Reaching it never gets old, but maybe that's just me.

Bikes have become gravity specific these days, and if you believe the marketing hype, climbing is out of fashion. Media reviews and bike brand PR's wax on about gravity-friendly geometry, 1200-gram tires,
suspension nuances, and how weight shouldn't be an issue - and we give high honors to trail bikes for efficiency as long as they don't make us suffer to an extraordinary extent.

bigquotesNewbies could be excused for believing that Mountain Biking was a downhill sport.

The nail in the climbing coffin, however, may be the once-proud Big Brands who battled for years to win the pedaling efficiency war and are now falling over each other to sell e-bikes with tag lines like: "More of what you want, less of what you hate." Newbies could be excused, then, for believing that mountain biking was a downhill sport, or for searching for an "Uber Shuttle" app after discovering that the trailhead was inconveniently located at the bottom of the mountain.

Ride of the weekend from Yoan Deniaud The young Frenchman took some big scalps and ended up 12th.
What you see...
Finale course 2018
...What they actually do: climbing vs descending at Finale Ligure EWS.


That's where I stand, but I'm more interested in knowing your take on the subject. Today's poll is:

Has Climbing Become Unfashionable?




406 Comments

  • + 308
 I really like climbing...on singletrack. I also really hate climbing...on fire roads. But for some reason that seems to be "cool" now. Put your full face on the handlebars, put your goggles around your neck, and grind up the most boring thing ever in the hot sun because that's what the pro enduro riders do. I see more ride logs on trailforks of people choosing to do the fire roads vs the excellent single track climbs that were purpose built to avoid riding the road. Someone explain why. I don't get it.
  • + 313
 It's faster
  • + 9
 This^
  • + 34
 Enduro, brah.
  • + 219
 In defense of fire roads, you can ride 4 or 5 across and chat with buddies a little easier. Sometimes the fire road is a quicker way to the top as well. However, single track is more fun most of the time, you're right.
  • + 26
 people choose the path of least resistance, unfortunately its the times we live in.
  • + 36
 Because I'm in terrible shape and it's easier to spin up a road than hike up technical single track. If/when I get in better shape (a work in progress), I'll definitely enjoy that singletrack more, but for now, a steep, rocky, rooty pitch is a signal to get off and push and ends up being pretty demoralizing. If the single track climb is pretty steady, and not super pitchy or technical, I'll do that all day over a road.

Also, sometimes a road is more direct and less winding, which can mean quicker access to the descents.
  • + 19
 While i agree, the majority of single track climbing is way preferable to FSR's, it generally takes longer if you don't have the time to spare, and sometimes can be more of a grind depending on how the trail was designed. I for one will avoid at times "climb trails" that lose too much altitude along the way (extended grade changes because IMBA says so...*eyeroll*). I find these xc style climbs also often include punchy grades just because. Give me a single track climb trail that gets you top the top without feeling way more bagged than the road, and i'll take it every time.

Edit: Basically what everyone else said while i was typing this Razz
  • + 33
 I've definitely noticed the opposite down here in Bellingham. 6 years ago there were far more FR and DH rigs being pushed up the hill and nowadays you see way more people pedaling their trial bikes up in addition to our local hill having more up trails than it ever has.
  • - 26
flag gbeaks33 (Jul 19, 2019 at 15:03) (Below Threshold)
 So are all of you pro e-bikes, then? They also get you to the top quicker and easier.
  • + 8
 @gbeaks33: No. Or at least not until I get senior discounts.
  • + 23
 @gbeaks33: If you're gonna extrapolate in that manner, then apparently we are all pro-rocket launcher as well.
  • + 2
 @gbeaks33: Who cares!? I know I wouldn't if people weren't so ignorant and it didn't cause more land access issues...
  • + 11
 @millsr4: Strangley, when i ride the south side of galby, i'm always surprised how many people opt for the road over the 3 pigs. I would say anecdotally 75%+ riders grind the gravel. Such good climb trails too, but i'm secretly happy they don't get busy or beat up at the same time. .
  • + 9
 @millsr4: yeah true, didn't consider the land access issue. Just seems interesting that pinkbike commenters hate on e-bikes so much but are interested in the quickest way to the top. I don't care if anyone wants to ride an e-bike - go for it. But seems that those anti-e-bike are also anti-many-other-things about our sport. Including climbing. Which, as richard said, is MOST of our sport.
  • + 3
 I love climbing fireroads or even better paved paths. Makes getting to top of the trail a lot faster and well that is what I'm all about if I'm on an enduro bike. If i wanted to have fun on the climbs, I take my XC bike...
  • + 26
 In some places, like where I live, singletrack is very limited. I ride up fire roads because I think it's trail courtesy. I want to go have fun going downhill, and since there are only 5 legal singletracks in this 20,000 acre park (yeah, it's insane) I don't really want them to be two-way even though they are. I think most riders here tend to agree. So yeah, fire road climbs in the hot sun for us.
  • + 20
 @gbeaks33: I think the majority of people are mostly in it for the descent but can still appreciate the fitness benefits of the climb wether it's on a gravel road or not which is why they don't exactly enjoy climbing as it isn't the fun part but don't support e-bikes. Also, by that logic, you could say that most of the sport of skiing is waiting in the lift line and riding the chairlift.
  • + 1
 @myleskow: If you go skiing at Whistler on a weekend, you are correct. Almost your whole day waiting in lift lines.
  • + 18
 @ the title of this article: I've really observed the opposite. 2007-2012 or so, a lot more people wanted freeride and DH bikes, until the "enduro" blast. Now we have 180 travel forks on bikes with dropper posts and full range cassettes. Those same bikes get taken up chairlifts. Far fewer people are out running shuttles (ok, there's still that one group who each have their own blaring bluetooth speaker in a backpack, piled in the back of a truck throwing back PBR's between runs). But I think a LOT more people are willing to pedal nowadays, and campfire stories are told in terms of mileage and vertical feet climbed, instead of "I finally cleared that last double"
  • + 3
 @NMK187: Right on, the fire road is a social spot. That being said, I love turning the screws on my buddies on the way up some singletrack after they have smoked me on the descent.
  • - 24
flag tomasinbc (Jul 19, 2019 at 16:06) (Below Threshold)
 Fuck climbing who likes that , the only fun part of mtb is going down
  • + 1
 Delete
  • + 12
 @saskskier: agree that the more in shape you are the more fun mountain biking is but the fastest way to get better at tech climbs is practicing them. I'm climbing stuff that I literally thought was impossible one or two years ago.
  • + 12
 Fire roads would be perfectly fine if they weren't so horrifically boring and completely devoid of anything that requires rider involvement.
  • + 5
 Bang on. For me it doesn't matter what I'm climbing, I do look forward to the end of it. Probably because I'm a little fatter than I should be. But somehow I love it. However, when I'm climbing beautiful single track and nobody else is around I'm pretty happy with my grief. Fire roads can suck ass.
  • + 2
 @burkawitz206: Fireroads are very trying, I do the march. Similar to hike a biking up a mega steep mountain. Conserve energy and don't panic basically. Some tech up and down always keeps you in great shape, just soo freaking hot lately. I come home hallucinating not in a good way.
  • + 10
 @waxman: I have 2 athletic boys. You have to twist their arms to ride and they have top dollar FS bikes that I maintain in perfect shape.
None of them has friends who ride either. I know of one kid who graduated 2 years ago from the HS who was a competitive MTB racer , but not expert. We live in the east bay area a supposed hotbed of MTB.
I go to the trails and ride 4 days a week. Only riders I see are as old as dirt like me 40's to 70's.
I went on a organized moto offroad/dual sport event a week ago with my KTM. Youngest was 39. avg age of participant was at least 55.
That movie Wall-E that I hated. May be spot on. Control of the masses has begun.
  • + 2
 @gbeaks33: most pinkbikers also only ride 3-4hrs a week...
  • + 2
 @lostlunchbox: I think your perception is skewed by the increase in the numbers of people who visit our trails along with the increase of out of town riders we have visiting also. I can tell you with confidence that far more than 25% of the locals prefer trail over road up at Galby.
  • - 1
 E-Bike DH rig is what I need in my life just about now!
  • + 11
 @chasejj: I dunno how it is in east bay, but here on the east coast it's much more mixed. I'm 37, ride mountain bikes and dual sports, so it looks like our scenes overlap. Most of my riding buddies are in their early to mid-30s. Every dual sport even is booked solid, with waitlists, and it's certainly not just old dudes. The trails are a mixed bag too, but plenty of younger rippers out there. All due respect, there's nothing more tiresome then boomers complaining about "kids these days".
  • + 1
 @lostlunchbox: 3pigs is a grind for what it is LOL. It,s in the open a fair amount so sometimes the road is better as it's shaded more.
  • + 1
 This. I live in Whistler, so deal with the climbing as it's an evil that is made up for in the downs. WORCA is killing it with building climbing trails but for the most part, is putting your head down and grinding up a fire road...
  • + 6
 @gbeaks33 - My good lord! Who cares what path people choose to go up or down? That’s fewer people on the single track for you to deal with. Stoked! Besides, sometimes a m’f’er wants to go full enduro and run a full face and do transfer stages...because that makes the climb more fun maybe?!
  • + 4
 Grinding up fireroads is miles...riding great uphill trail is Enlightenment . Angel Fire
  • + 1
 Or you can ride single file chatting and pushing each other until you can’t chat anymore and then Just ride together pushing each other ! @NMK187:
  • + 2
 @millsr4 ... i did say anecdotally... and that i was surprised. Granted the gate change a few years back changed things on that side of the hill, but still, that's what i've seen when i've ridden there lately. @cheetamike: I'm not sure if we're talking about the same trails. 3 pigs (on Galbraith) is in the trees the whole way. And it's definitely not a grind compared to anything in the Fraser Valley. Maybe on par with Sunnyside Up, or Blazing Saddles, but i can't think of anything else as climb friendly off the top of my head.
  • + 2
 I ride fire roads all the time, the trains by my house have FSRs I dive up then my wife, 4 year old son and I ride down and I pedal back up to retrieve the car, sometimes 5 laps... dont hate on the FSRs bud
  • + 10
 Strongly agree with this. Climbing singletrack is just as satisfying as ripping downhill on singletrack. There's a real sense of accomplishment when I can finally smash a long tech climb without stopping.
  • - 2
 Why would you ride a difficult singletrack climb when there's an easy fire road available? I genuinely don't get it.
Don't get me wrong, I enjoy climbing to access the trails, but I'm also not a fan of making my life unnecessarily harder. I'd rather save energy by taking the easier climb so that I have more energy for the descents and/or can ride for longer.
  • + 4
 100% agree. I don't enjoy riding fire roads to get to the good stuff. I would prefer to ride single track the whole time even if the descents aren't as good.
  • + 4
 @lostlunchbox: Totally. Love that climb and don't get why people avoid it. I find for the most part fire roads are tougher as they are daunting looking forward and seeing no end. Singletrack keeps me sidetracked for the most part.
  • + 3
 I bet for the most part that the guys with a full face on the bars grinding up the fire road aren't riding the same trails down that you are.
  • + 4
 Love techy uphills. Loathe fire roads. Techy uphills are often more challenging than the downs, and are enormously rewarding to conquer. It takes fitness, stretch, finesse, balance, timing, skill and sheer grit. Every but as good as the descents.
  • + 4
 I always prefer going uphill on singletrack even if it is takes longer, especially if it is technical. Nothing like sessioning some uphill tech until you clean it. Unfortunately, there isn't much uphill singletrack where I live. I hope to go out and build some in the near future.
  • + 2
 Too often you climb a single-track only to be almost run over by someone descending it at light speed. And no, most trails are no up/down only Smile
  • + 2
 @waxman: Are you saying that there was a time in history when people intentionally made things harder for themselves? I doubt that.
  • - 1
 @waxman: Are you saying that there was a time in history when people intentionally made things harder for themselves? I find that hard to believe.
  • - 1
 @waxman: Are you saying that there was a time in history when people intentionally made things harder for themselves? I find that hard to believe.
  • + 9
 Where I ride, I avoid the single track climbs because there's a very good chance that someone is trying to have fun coming down the single track and I don't want to hinder that when there's another access point to the top. I do it out of consideration. It's annoying when it's you having a blast bombing down a trail only having to stop and make way for someone going up when there's another way to access the top without creating congestion.
  • + 4
 Despite what the MTB hype machine claims, climbing up single track that's even somewhat technical on super slack, 170-180mm mini DH bikes with large volume tires and flat pedals is awful. It was awful when we called them freeride bikes, it's still awful when they are called enduro bikes. I don't blame anyone riding these tanks for taking the fire road if they have the option and it's easier.
  • + 2
 @lostlunchbox: Rode it last summer , pretty sure they have cut blocked part of it. It even states on TF the last 3rd is closed due to logging.
  • + 1
 We have 99% fire roads here ..so it is what it is.
  • + 3
 @Ktron: Same. I especially can't understand why people gravitate towards fireroads as a standard - who wants to pedal endlessly up an annoying, tractionless gravel scar through a beautiful forest? Roots > tire tracks lmao
  • + 4
 Climbing single-track? Any round my way is pretty much for descending. There's gonna be pain for someone if you climb it...
  • + 1
 I like the shade the single track provides.
  • + 2
 @peterman1234: I have seen this trend at trestle in Colorado too. A lot of enduro bikes on the lifts. I myself alternate between a demo 8 and a tracer 275. It's great to be able to mix bike park with pedaling to the local winter park trails and viceversa.
  • + 1
 What?? How old are your kids? I live in Cupertino, but twice a week I head over to Santa Cruz. Start at Golf club drive or highway 9. I see so many kids out there, especially if I have to ride on a weekend. @chasejj:
  • + 0
 @actually I think riding up on a pedal assist is enlightenment????
  • + 1
 @gamblor: It isn't awful it is a tad harder but that just adds to the challenge!
  • + 1
 that is a thing?
  • + 4
 Here in the Alps there aren‘t many climbable „singletracks“ because they are hiking paths... so climbing fire roads is a real pleasure instead of pushing or carrying your bike on the back
  • + 2
 Locally for me there are a couple of spots with fantastic purpose built climbing trails that I prefer to the fire roads (Tiger Mountain and Ragin River specifically). In fact I tend to think fire roads are pure hell since they just take a direct path up the hill. Another local spot, Tokul, has decided to dedicate its limited space to mostly downhill trails (some are two way but if you have ever climbed them it is apparent that climbing wasn't in mind while it was built). There I will happily take the fire roads because A) I dont blow up attempting to go up them B) it keeps me out of the way of people who are coming down.
  • + 9
 This is the weirdest article and thread of comments to me. In what world are there not way more people buying enduro/trail bikes instead of DH bikes...it's cool to climb your ass up the hill now. Way fewer people are shuttling and it's happening in skiing/snowboarding too: human powered is all the rage, whether you individually do or don't fall into that category. Bonkers to me that so many people on here see it differently.
  • + 4
 I much prefer climbing on interesting tech single track than a long gravel road any day. I really hate riding on smooth terrain. It’s boring.
  • - 3
 It doesn't make sense to climb single track with a road nearby. Being able to sit and spin saves energy for the fun riding. Many times that means being able to do an entire extra lap. fireroads and real road climbs are a pretty obvious choice.
  • + 2
 I like a bit of both but really dont mind the head down and spin approach to getting to the top. More so now that my knee took and impact and I lost a lot of strength and stability, techy climbing is even more difficult than it was.
  • + 3
 @thesharkman: Climbing tech singletrack is fun too!
  • + 1
 Here down in the south east of France we have the culture of climbing fireroads.
First 90% of the singletracks are impossible to climb because there are too steep.
Then it's way faster to climb on fireroads so we can do more descents in the same amount of time. For someone with a good training the average climbing speed on fireroads is around 600m per hour.
Most of the people always choose the fireroads to the singletracks because it's easier to climb.

So at the end, we climb fireroads and we don't complain about it. Climbing singletracks here, we will make people complain.
  • + 1
 @hpman83: Obviously if the local singletrack is too steep then it makes sense to climb the fire roads. I have that "problem" here in the French Alps. However, if someone built decent singletrack that wasn't too steep I'd ride that over the boring fire roads.
  • + 5
 The very simple answer to your question is who dreams of going to all of the greatest destinations out there (Whistler, Moab, Finale, Kingdom, etc.) for the epic climbing?
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: Moab in my experience is the epitome of XC and if you don't climb in Whistler you haven't done it, properly.

I take your point though, minimal people are buzzing off the climb but its nigh on necessary.
  • + 2
 @JDub713: you know what's really annoying? Getting almost to the top of a super technical climb while cleaning everything and then having a couple guys heading downhill not even budge to give you room to finish your climb on a two way trail just because the choades think mountain biking is only about going downhill.
  • + 1
 Having grown up in the Midwest (where there are no mountains to be seen) all of our trails were rolling up-and-downs by necessity, and the ups were just as interesting as the downs. It's the thing I miss most about living in the PNW: where did all my good technical climbing go? Why are (almost) all of the up trails so boring?

@SlodownU: My favorite trail in Whistler (Comfortably Numb) is my favorite in part because of all the great technical climbing.
  • - 2
 It’s the easiest way up?! Why would you ride up your supposed to be riding down? What if someone was coming the other way came around a corner to find you wobbling about with your seat up your arse. Most inconsiderate post of the year.
  • - 1
 @islandforlife: agree with this. his profile it littered with this kind of crap. he needs to be banned
  • + 1
 @justinsp: haha, I just left the word delete because I didn't want to bother commenting... but once you've left a comment, you can't delete your comment, nor can you leave it blank.
  • + 1
 @gbeaks33: ebikes have motors, so should be allowed where motorized access is allowed and not where motorized access is prohibited. I don't understand why this is perceived to be any more complicated of an issue. Learn to love the climbs or don't, I don't care. Just don't F with singletrack.
  • + 1
 @gamblor: I love climbing on my 170/165 megatrail. Wish I could afford more than one $4K bike (I'd get and XC, trail, and DH) but can't so gotta learn to love my one do-all, otherwise I'm wasting my precious time and money.
  • + 1
 @drivereight: cannondale has you covered
  • + 1
 @thesharkman: This explains why so many people can't make it over easy technical obstacles when going uphill.
  • + 157
 Climbing? You mean UpCountry?
  • + 69
 It's upduro
  • + 7
 Pinkbike's having an off day, leave em alone, they just need to ride their bikes... however that may be.
  • + 3
 @Scotj009: Up-slalom
  • + 6
 @Upduro: r/beetlejuicing

oh wait, wrong website
  • + 0
 @matt-15: enduro is so 2015. Downcountry is the present and future.
  • + 5
 @matt-15: take my PB silver!
  • + 5
 @me2menow: no no, hillcross is where its at.
  • + 121
 An interesting thing I've found when riding chairlift access vs. my normal "enduro type" rides is that when I don't climb, I don't feel as in the zone on the descent. A nice long climb is important for warming up and getting mentally prepared to shred. I've seen pro DH racers on stationary bikes warming up for their race runs which makes a lot of sense, but as a rider I figure I may as well just get that warm up with a climb.
  • + 8
 so true!
  • + 8
 Couldn’t agree more
  • + 39
 That’s how I feel when I pedal from parking lot to the lift on my DH bike, just sayin....same same...lol
  • + 1
 Some of the loops I ride either go down into a valley or trailhead at top of hill. I find the first decent is sloppy and first climb is torture. Second lap always better. Always kick myself for not spending time warming up before first lap.
  • + 8
 @chinaboy: hey man, some of those parking spots are really far away. Make sure you stay hydrated on those long climbs Big Grin
  • + 2
 @bobosume: lol! Well for all those who have ridden whistler....the struggle is real when pedalling up from lot 6! Ha!
  • + 1
 Nothing warms up the legs like riding a bike. There is a reason professional athletes of all sorts warm up on stationary bikes.
  • + 3
 @bobosume: Stay hydrated with Brawndo.... It's got electrolytes.
  • + 54
 I don't do mountain biking because it's easy! Climbing is the best way to get to the top of things, go places, and get that exercise. Why do I hike? Just for the views? No it's the meditative action of putting one foot in front of another to go seemingly unreachable distances.
Bikes are the same. I am hypnotized by the rotations of my cranks and the trail in front of me, and when I look up I am in a new place, somewhere I have gotten myself to despite gravity trying its best to hold me back
Downhills are a different meditation, as I am so completely in the zone, communicating with my body, bike, and the trail. I ride in a microcosm of risk and reward and get a wonderful high afterwards of mixed endorphins and adrenaline

Sometimes I really need a climb, and I don't want it to be any easier, lest my thoughts find themselves back into my consciousness
  • + 4
 I think you explained it perfectly.
  • + 2
 I will occassionally get out to lift serviced bike park but for the most part every inch of descent I ride is preceded by an equal climb. It can be gruelling but it is truly nice to be out in the woods for an extended period of time. I work in front of a desk all week and getting away from it all (even though Im only 30 minutes from home/a major city) for a few hours is one of the major reasons I enjoy biking. Doesn't matter if its climbing or descending as long as its in the woods.
  • + 50
 A well thought out, dedicated climbing trail is what a good number of trail centers are missing! Yes, climbing the logging road is dusty and boring, and yes, climbing a two way trail with descenders barreling down on you is stressful. A good up track = good times, and less for the general public to winge about.
  • + 7
 This is one thing Bentonville, AR does really well. The descents are what you hear about in that area but what surprised me was how much fun I had on the climbs.
  • + 4
 Yep. Skilled trailbuilders can make a climbing trail fast too; I barely feel like I'm climbing when I ride up Prime Cut at the 18 road trail system in Fruita. Then the descents there are ripping and last quite a while.
  • + 9
 So true. I live in Oregon where everyone obesses about how rad Canada is (they are not wrong!) but no one wants to build climb trails or climb anything other than a fire road. All of the good stuff up north has climb trails because they are ridden by mountain bikers who still like to clean a tricky bit of climbing and not just suffer to the top for the "good" stuff. I love the downs but I am so sick of riding roads to get to them.
  • + 3
 @JockoJones: Oregon has plenty of climbing just not at Sandy or Post. You got to get out of the trail centers and ride the backcountry.
  • + 1
 "A Grand Traverse" - Mount Tzouhalem, Duncan, Vancouver Island, BC... is a pleasure to climb and just makes that awesome mountain just that much more fun!
  • + 2
 @iantmcg: Post Canyon has three great climbing trails! Mobius, 8-track, and now El Dorado.
  • + 7
 I completely agree with this. If ever there was a place to build "flow" it's on a climbing trail. A properly built trail can really hide the altitude you gain and keep you grinning (mostly) for more than the descent. Add in a few techy challenges and you're golden.

Then while you're at it, put back all the chunky rocks, roots, off camber corners, sandy patches, cactus and other natural disasters on on the descent.
  • + 1
 @iantmcg: Post has plenty of excellent XC too.
  • + 1
 @bulletbassman: maybe it does, I haven't been there in a while since the new climbing trail opened. I only really ride it in the spring cause it is not that close and that is usually on weekends and on weekends you'd have to be a dick to climb the 2 way trails.
  • + 1
 @iantmcg: Phils in Bend has some fantastic climbing trails.
  • + 2
 @mtmc99: That is true the nice thing about the Bend climbing is you generally get a little recovery after the big moves. Over here in the valley you hit a tough technical bit and then you are spent and got a big grind still to go.
  • + 46
 laugh now with your e-bike, shuttle, or chairlift, but I'll be the only one riding after the EMP!
  • + 2
 Apagando las luces!
  • + 3
 Dont go for wireless shifting then.
  • + 34
 Climbing makes you stronger.
  • + 2
 So does weight lifting. And road biking.
  • + 19
 @ADGproductions: so does a bucket of other things... but very few of them are on a mountainbike
  • + 41
 @ADGproductions: road biking is so freaking tedious mixed in with brief moments of terror as cars nearly end your life.
  • + 19
 So does trail building
  • + 8
 @rrolly: Agreed. That's one of the reasons why I don't road race or ride long distance. It's sooo boring after a while.
  • + 1
 @mybaben: my new go to for long distance conditioning is pedal drive kayaks.
  • + 1
 @sweet-bike: #trailfit is what I call it. I truthfully have more hours digging than riding this year.
  • + 3
 @rrolly: Gravel bikes are a MTBr's best friend. Turn a "boring" stretch of gravel or green ST into a fun challenge when ridden on a gravel bike vs a MTB. Get in your miles without worrying about becoming a hood ornament.
  • + 1
 @TrailFeatures: gravel bikes are not appealing to me at all. I had my years of running a fully rigid frame. I'm glad those days are behind me.
  • + 1
 @rrolly: I love my gravel bike!
  • + 29
 Thank you Richard Cunningham, very well said! I see you left out the "E" word...

This has been my argument against those things which shall not be named for a long time, that climbing is an intrinsic part of the sport. There is no feeling like grinding for what seems like an eternity to reach the summit and enjoy a view and peacefulness limited to those who are willing to work to achieve it. There's a life lesson in there somewhere but in the age of instant gratification I'm sure it is lost on many.
  • + 5
 You missed where he did reference the e word in the last paragraph but I still agree with you 100%.

Great read RC.
  • + 1
 @tsn73: You are correct!
  • + 4
 Yes, I find that riding down hill give me that instant buzz, but the greater satisfaction when I think back on rides is from the achievement of making the climb.
  • + 22
 I wonder if we will ever get to the point with mountain biking where it is currently with skiing. Skiing is 90% lift access now (10 years ago it was closer to 99%) and it is the normal way to go skiing. Going uphill is uncommon in the grand scheme of all things skiing (but definitely a growing category) but for hundreds of years, it was the only way to go skiing. If you wanted to ski down, you had to climb up first. But then chairlifts became a thing and for the vast majority of skiers nearly wiped out the need to go uphill on your own. It is now 100% normal to think of skiing as a downhill oriented sport first, going uphill called "touring" is a very distant second. I wonder how many people think that climbing is an intrinsic part of the sport of skiing that has since been lost and all downhill oriented skiers are missing out life's lessons. For sure, I enjoy touring but I don't think I am cheating the system by taking a chairlift for resort days. I just think of them as two different sports and two different ways to enjoy the sport of skiing. And I definitely apply that same reasoning to biking.
  • + 0
 @ka-brap: That is quite the observation, I have never thought of it that way.
  • + 1
 @ka-brap: That is an interesting thought. I see mountain biking like surfing - you have to earn your turns.
  • + 3
 @ka-brap: Correct me if I am wrong, but it seems to me that ski touring requires vastly more effort than climbing on a mtb. You need to chart out the route first, be aware of today's avalanche risks, might need to switch clothes at the top and climbing on skis is much slower than climbing a bike.

In short, the effort gap between lift and climbing is much larger with skiing than it is with biking, which explains the overwhelming success of ski resorts.
  • + 2
 @Ttimer: But you can also tour within the resort (in many places in central Europe at least). Part of the recent surge in touring isn't in the backcountry, but at the resort itself. Many people (in Austria for example) tour up the piste and ski down, especially after work in the evening. It's a great way to stay in shape over the winter.
  • + 4
 @ka-brap: I used to race DH way back in the day, and used this exact comparison between skiing and MTB riding when talking to all the mtb'ers that were traditionalists and rode XC. Those same XC mtb'ers we're riding chairlifts all winter DH skiing, none of them were backcountry guys skinning their way up. It's interesting, I have seen a huge growth in lift accessed mountain biking in the past 20 years. So much so, that summer lift lines look like winter ones. I'm personally happy more people are riding, however they choose to do it. For me though, I have ridden enough chairlifts in my life, now I want to ride my bike... Climbing it is, on singletrack, and the occasional fire road Smile
  • + 0
 @ka-brap: Its not quite an apples to apples comparison for me. Riding your bike up the hill and hiking to the top of the mountain to ski down are quite a bit different IMO. When you climb on a bike you are still riding the bike.
It requires pedaling and bike handling skills. When you are touring or splitboarding, etc, and you throw skins on, you aren't really skiing or snowboarding on the way up. You are simply climbing the hill with your skis or snowboard on. I feel like this is more like getting off the bike and simply pushing it up the hill.

You could take someone who has never snowboarded before, throw them on a splitboard/skis with skins and they could probably start making their way uphill without much issue. Throw a person who has never ridden a bike on one and send them up a technical climb and they will no go anywhere.
  • + 29
 @Mike levy earned my respect when he downed 6 jelly doughnuts then cleaned the climb up Debecks
  • + 2
 We’re they all jelly? I thought he was “A person of cruller.”
  • + 24
 Nice article, I think manufacturers' marketing is pretty out of touch with what most mountain bikers actually do. Yes, descending is a riot, and a lift or a shuttle day is always a good time. But the challenge, the physical hurdle of climbing up to earn my gravity is also part of what I love about this sport.
  • + 10
 Manufacturers? Let’s be honest, popular mountain bike media outlets have been hyping slacker, lower, screw climbing suspension kinematics for years. The term “progressive geometry” has become a synonym for “slack descender” which suggests that’s it always better regardless of your actual riding situation because, you know, progress! Readers eat that shit up because it isn’t blatant advertising. It’s far more influencial than any Specialized or Giant ad would ever be.
  • + 8
 @ninjatarian: agreed. Almost every review claims that they didn’t even have to switch the suspension because the bike climbs so well.
Maybe the reviewers should take a CX/gravel bike up a fire road just to show what acceleration you can get.
  • + 4
 @mitochris: Yes, this me. I have never ridden anything but a trail or enduro type bike. I have found some that climb better than others but have never compared them to a XC bike. Probably a good thing. It will ruin what I think of as a good climber.
  • + 1
 @mitochris: When I get on my road bike I am always amazed by how quick it is. I then get reminded of the tradeoffs involved every time I hit a small bump in the road.
  • + 3
 Somewhat true. I'm always surprised what kind of bikes I see in the shops in regions that really don't have the terrain for enduro bikes or burly trail bikes. But people seem adamant on buying slack 150+mm machines. Even if it means they will spend 95% of their time slowly grinding up the hill and and 5% blasting down at light speed.
  • + 17
 The older I get the more I realize that I have maxed out the risks I want to take descending. I’m over forty and my biggest jumps and sketchiest drops are behind me. In other words, I’m getting soft. However, the more I ride these days the more I take pride in being able to get up pitches that others can’t. That’s my new challenge, and the only avenue I really see for growth in my riding at my age.
  • + 4
 I was at trestle the other week and met a 67 year old man who took up downhill 5 years ago so he could ride with his grandson. Dude was in full kit and admittedly stuck to blue trails with hopes of one day doing blacks but was still worried. Hes broken some bones but surprisingly they healed in a normal amount of time. I just thought the dude was awesome, I'm half his age and the thought of broken bones already makes me want to play it safe.
  • + 17
 Clearing a tough, techy climb is still right up there with the coolest lift assist descents - for me. The satisfaction of clearing a challenging climb is hard to beat. Low angle trails made easy "just to get you to the top" suck and simply become things to "get past" on a ride. Keep the climbs steep and techy and part of the challenge.
  • + 2
 @MikerJ totally agree. Who can't look at a skilled rider figure out a complicated uphill section without envy, and consign themselves to pushing-up? When I started riding the downhills were not where the bragging points were to be found. Granted the bike world is different now, and 6" bikes can climb really well, but back then if you were a 'good' rider you could clean anything going up. Meant you were fitter as well. And in a race situation there's way more time to be gained/lost on the uphills.
  • + 20
 Anyone who says they have as much fun going up as they do coming down is lying. Change my mind.
  • + 8
 I do sometimes. At Canberra's biggest trail centre a few technical climbs are excellent, and sometimes I go there just to do them and the descents are secondary.
  • + 15
 It's different fun. It's more fulfilling. The climbs keep me coming back because I deeply want to clean them.
  • + 10
 Rode a trail the other day at my local that I had always avoided, it just didn't look like my thing. It wasn't necessarily a climbing trail, but you do end up higher than where you started and it gets you across the mountain a bit and higher up. There are faster routes though. Anyway, rode it the other day and holy shit, it was so much fun! Turns out it was full of ups and downs... you'd have to scramble up a technically challenging climbing section, followed by a bit of flat, which followed by a cool rock slab descent with maybe a drop thrown in. Then you do that again and again... after repeating 5 or 6 times, you were done. It was so much fun, it didn't even feel like I'd actually climbed!
  • + 6
 I’m a fat downhill turd and I still appreciate good technical climbs.
  • + 17
 Show me one pro DH racer that doesn’t do gag-inducing climb intervals in the training season... there’s a good reason for that.
Fit is fast, and fast is the MOST fun. Don’t forget- injuries usually happen when people are tired, and those unfit people get tired right away. Anyone who says injuries are fun is lying. Change my mind.
  • + 6
 What about people who do things like this?
www.strava.com/activities/2472485925
  • + 3
 @g123: I am more tired on the downhill after a big climb than when I drive to the top in a truck sipping a cold one. Facts.
  • + 3
 @sweet-bike: hah well different strokes I guess, if beer shuttles are your thing then have at ‘er.
But I’d rather ride park non-stop all day, snag some shuttles with buds after the lift stops and then pedal an all day epic the next day... and be stoked on it all.
Fitness makes you a better rider. Fact!
  • + 3
 @g123: non-stop laps in the park is where it's at! Not like your typical park rats, stopping for a chat (aka catching breath) after every section...
  • + 0
 @islandforlife: These have turned out to be my favourite kind of trails...but a fitness minimum is required in order to enjoy them. I'm thinking of a particular one that I wish would go on forever!
  • + 2
 @g123: However none of what you said at all has to do with climbs being more fun. You just listed off reasons why someone should\does do climbs.
  • + 1
 I'm sure there are some people out there who find climbing just as fun but I do know the downhill parks are more crowded than the local fire roads\up hills so its obviously not a majority.
  • + 0
 @andrewbn42: one question: why?
  • + 1
 @sweet-bike: Yes officer, this comment right here.
  • + 5
 Uphill climbs =runner's high, better sleep, as much beer and food as I can intake with no weight gain, muscle tone, and warms me up for a great downhill.

Now, apart from "It's easier", why WOULDN'T you ride up?
  • + 2
 I definitely have more fun going down and its pretty hard to argue with that. We ride roller coasters for a reason. Maybe fun isnt the right word for this poll. The climb can be very rewarding and enjoyable in its on way.
  • + 1
 @andrewbn42: wasn't there a Pinkbike article about this. I remember thinking it was crazy and something I would never attempt.
  • + 1
 Going up first can make the down more fun. Sometimes it's about quality, not quantity.
  • + 1
 Real talk. Why do I want to waste my time and legs on boring climbs? I get that it can be a challenge but that doesn't make it fun. Much rather be chilling on a lift.
  • + 2
 I would agree that climbs aren't the highlight of the ride, but a well-made, singletrack uphill can still be incredibly fun. certainly more fun than many downhills. but roadies definitely disagree
  • + 16
 It's clear that the general trend in increasingly-sloping top-tubes reflects that standing around and posting selfies to social media defines the sport, not actually riding your bike.
  • + 2
 Hey, I don't stand around and post selfies just for fun. Its just something I do as I'm catching my breath after the commute from the parking lot to the lift.
  • + 14
 I don't get the notion of avoiding the climbs. You know guys if you don't enjoy riding your bicycle uphill, motorcross really is a much better sport for you. You get to do all the jumps and shred all the turns without all that annoying peddling.
  • + 14
 Imagine an Anthill's film where it is just people climbing....but it's like real time. So its just following some dude (or girl) climbing up an uphill trail for like 4 hours. Then they get to the top and begin to carefully and safely descend down a gravel road....cutting edge stuff.
  • - 21
flag ADGproductions (Jul 19, 2019 at 15:24) (Below Threshold)
 Exactly! Climbing ain't cool. Want the work out...get a road bike! That is cool! You can't do nearly half the trails we ride with a smaller than DH bike. Downhill is way cooler looking and a hell of a lot more fun. There will be the people "Oh it can both be fun!" but I guarantee you that us guys who spend 99% going downhill have WAY more fun Smile
  • + 7
 @ADGproductions: I'd love to see these mythical trails you speak of. Trails where my Pivot Firebird falls to pieces on the first feature, but a Phoenix would get me to the bottom at Strava KOM speed. If only I had one... (sigh)
  • + 1
 @ADGproductions: Come on man, even pro DH racers aren't riding DH "99%" of the time.
  • + 14
 Everything is short where I live. If you don't have fun on the climbs, there really isn't enough descent to make it worth your while. I wish we had big out and backs around here, but I quite enjoy the the short climb short descent riding I've got.
  • + 9
 This article was published just today and judging by the number of responses, @RichardCunningham I'd say you struck a nerve. Couldn't agree more with these passages: "The return for a few thousand pedal strokes and burning legs cannot easily be purchased: silence and solitude on the way up - and few reasons to hold back on the way down...We're conquering self-doubt - overcoming the inertia that's been hardwired by a lifetime of setting readily achievable goals...The nail in the climbing coffin, however, may be the once-proud Big Brands who battled for years to win the pedaling efficiency war and are now falling over each other to sell e-bikes with tag lines like: "More of what you want, less of what you hate." On this last point, although I think that most suspension platforms can generally be manipulated by shock tune and placement to be decent at climbing, if you look at suspension graphs, some seem to perform better than others. My next bike will be purchased based more on its climbing efficiency on paper than what marketing says.
  • + 9
 Climbs being hard is not the problem. Climbs taking time is the problem. I've grown to hate climbs a lot more than I did was I was an unemployed college students with tons of free time on my hands. Now with a family and a full time job, the prospect of spending my entire ride climbing sucks, not because its hard, but because the longer the climbs, the longer the ride, the more time I'm not at home helping out.
  • + 12
 This is why responsibility and children scare me.
  • - 5
flag ranke (Jul 19, 2019 at 22:46) (Below Threshold)
 Yep. Another reason e-bikes are badass. Climbs are way quicker and you get at least double the DH in the same time frame. Plus, they're the new punk rock. When closed-minded mtn bikers complain about them more than hikers complain about mtn bikers, you know it's the new cool.
  • + 3
 This! I don't get why people go to places like Finale Ligure and then climb all day. Such a waste of energy and time in my opinion. Back home i need to climb, and i will do it on my own, most of the time i'd rather be going down though.
  • + 2
 @Muckal: Some people enjoy the satisfaction of having conquered something. I prefer going down, but clearing a long or technical climb gives me a fantastic feeling of accomplishment.
  • + 1
 @topherdagopher: i know, and i have that feeling myself sometimes. But when i'm on vacation with a limited amount of time, i don't want to waste it for climbing, but use it for riding awesome trails. I'm not saying climbing is or per se.
  • + 11
 "Mating opportunities are rarely farther than a minute's walk." I wish that were true..
  • + 7
 climbing is one half of riding. I love riding so I had to EMBRACE climbing as I was never good at it. Now I can honestly say after decades of riding I like to climb and find it the biggest challenge of my days on the bike. Being the owner of a Jamaican Tour and Trail Building outfit I had to build slow XC climbs to the trailheads to avoid ROADS. Unfortunately for every 45 minutes we climbing the DH payoff is short lived and then its climbing time. Also Jamaica has the most ridiculous steeps even on major roads. Every trail I build ends up with XX linking bits that are rife with rocks, off camber and general gnar.

never turn the front wheel you lose 1/3 of your power
slide yer ass forward with elbows out
breath out slow and long with short intakes
NO TALKING=EVER ON ANY UPHILL
DRINK...DRINK...DRINK
  • + 9
 You are not a real mountain biker if you can’t climb. Even the DH pros climb hills in training
  • + 1
 Your not a real mountain biker if you can’t hit a jump.
  • + 6
 I really enjoy technical climbing, rock crawling, difficult moves just add to the fun. Sure, going downhill is fun, but I’ll take a good climb any day over boring flow trails.

People are getting lazier, it’s not just biking, it’s life in general. No one cooks any more, few people know to build or fix things, the disposable society has dumbed people down.
  • + 2
 This is so true. God forbid you pedal uphill and increase your heart rate to get some cardio in. I ride my bike to get out into nature and away from people, as well as for exercise and the fun of going downhill. Ill take a secluded backcountry ride with climbing over a day at the bike park 9 times out of 10.
  • + 9
 Pedal, push or carry I’m 59 & like the challenges of climbing
  • + 5
 I really enjoy climbing. I can see why some people see it as the most boring thing in the world but maybe it is because they lack of technical uphills. Climbing a stip hill, full of roots, wet, can be as much fun as going downhill. A lot of things are involved: choosing the right speed, body position, pedal work. Big satisfaction once you make it to the top. You guys don't know what you are missing.
  • + 3
 They hate it because they're unfit and dont understand that fit riders dont huff and puff and wheeze at high effort. They dont understand the great feeling of a hard effort. They're soft people and they dont comprehend hard men.
  • + 7
 @JohanG: fit people huff and puff the same. To get fit you have to train hard - that makes you suffer. It‘s the hard fact that Nino Schurter is superfit, but suffers much more than any of us to be. Its only easy if you ride with people less fit.
  • + 5
 I just turned 50. I love riding park, love riding downhill directional trails and am still pushing myself towards more jumping and drops...and drinking beer. But at 50 years old you start to really need cardio unless you don't care about having love handles and a gut and being generally unhealthy. Climbing single track is the best cardio ever invented for folks that are done with trail running. Just like backcountry skiing: earn your turns. You'll probably live longer.
  • + 6
 The most satisfying thing I did on a mountain bike was not on my enduro bike.. But on my xc. Surviving an uphill I would have never imagined doing.
  • + 6
 Clearing a tricky, techy climb is as much fun as sending a clean line. It's definitely becoming a lost skill.
  • + 3
 I don’t climb trails because they are easy but because they are hard. Completing a hard climb is satisfying and I get rewarded with a descent. I think I still see most bikes being sold for both their climbing and descending abilities. Certainly some bikes like say 175 ish travel rigs are descent oriented but often we are told that they climb well too, for what they are. After all the vast majority of riders go up under their own steam and then descend. I’ve been riding off road for 36 years and the climb was always something I and my group of friends enjoyed. Lots of us had longer travel bikes that weighed a lot a few years back but we’ve all gotten rid of them for more all round bikes that may not climb like a 100 mm xc rocket but they climb acceptably and are more fun and safer to descend on. I see it more like a mountain climb where you have the approach to the climb then the actual mountain climb.
  • + 3
 I'm firmly in the "earn your turns" camp. I like climbing tech singletrack as it challenges both mind and body, and clearing the whole thing without a dab feels great.

However, climbable singletrack is not always an option where I live, so there's plenty of fireroad ascending. I find I can somehow enjoy this,as the rythmical turning of the pedals puts me in a kind of trance where my mind goes blank and there's only the motion of pedalling. A nice view always helps. The bonus is that you start the descend properly warmed up.

But, there are a few cons to climbing everything all the time. One is that a ride with proper elevation takes a lot of time to complete. Not so convenient on weekdays, unless you have a very understanding significant other. Second is, you spend most of your time pedalling up and you don't really practice your DH technique/stamina as much. My mates who occasionally or partly shuttle in order to spend more time going down have become much faster than me. I can no longer keep up with them going down, esp. on rough trails that are more than 6-7mins long.

So maybe you have to do a bit of everything in order to be an accomplished allround mtb'er.
  • + 5
 Once again, great article Cunningham. Thoughtful and accurate. This made me want to go out and pull some techy climbs on my local skill-checker trails. Sweet!
  • + 3
 Throwing my hat in the ring with the old men. I'm 60 in December but love a good, technical singletrack climb. Here on the east coast US (PA) they're simply part of the predominantly XC landscape. Roots, rock gardens, bring 'em on. I absolutely hate fire roads - deadly dull and boring - makes half your workout a waste. I don't get up the hill quickly any more, but I can still grind slowly to the top and to me cleaning a hard technical ascent is way more satisfying than descending.
  • + 3
 It used to be that "freeride" and then "enduro" bikes capable of blasting downhills just plain sucked to climb, so riders had to choose between up or down oriented bikes, but the latest crop of steep seat angle enduro and trail bikes climb so damn well that they make climbing fun again.
  • + 3
 I think modern bikes reflect most people's view: climbing is fun, but not as fun as descending. Modern bikes climb well but shred down. My new "enduro" rig blew me away with how well it climbed. I started having way more fun climbing.

It's still way more fun going down.
  • + 6
 How many videos are there on Pinkbike showing climbing? And how many tutorials? I love a good climb.
  • + 4
 For you SoCal people - I climb Echo (Altadena), not the Chaney road climb. On purpose. It’s steep, technical, lots of switchbacks, etc. I really dig the challenge. But then, no-one ever mistook me for cool.
  • + 2
 Got me motivated to give that climb a shot. Usually just grind up the road.
  • + 1
 @solar-evolution: the road climb is long, steep and boring. Echo is long, steep and at least interesting with many places to challenge you technically. Just be patient with the hikers who’ll think you’re insane.
  • + 8
 I climbduro everyday.
  • + 1
 Hahaha, so much pain.
  • + 6
 I’d rather climb up a hill than read a debate about it.
  • + 2
 In colorado springs where I ride fire roads to access trails are almost non existent. The ones that are there are full of motorcycles side by sides and jeeps. I dont like breathing dust or exhaust fumes. I climb the single track to avoid the crowds and get peace. Would climb more fire roads if they were here but they aren't. So tech climbs it is And it's a blast.
  • + 6
 I turn 49 tomorrow, so I’ll climb 2,500 feet to celebrate.
  • + 2
 @polarflux Happy birthday
  • + 2
 This part of the article sounds like the bikes this guys Write about all the time on this site. “Bikes have become gravity specific these days, and if you believe the marketing hype, climbing is out of fashion. Media reviews and bike brand PR's wax on about gravity-friendly geometry, 1200-gram tires,”
  • + 5
 @GatoGordo
Yep, can't call out the media without calling out ourselves.
  • + 4
 It's a pity there aren't more riders out there like Chris Akrigg. Seriously, watching that guy makes me want to go out just to hit the tough climbs
  • + 2
 Αkrigg's climb in "Five"! So much power, such great skills!
  • + 2
 Look back at the very beginning of mountain biking and you’ll see the first big events that got people’s attention was racing down hill on clunkers or cruisers. It’s a simple fact that the sport has changed as a direct result of improvements in bike technology and this makes it seem like possibly a generational issue.
I’ve had an mtb since 1986 and yes I loved it but it couldn’t be ridden in the way folk expect nowadays but that doesn’t mean I wouldn’t have liked it to be more able but it would probably have just broken.
I still like climbing and personally believe it’s a massive part of the game that improves fitness and skills but my two sons don’t see it that way, but they’re 30 years younger than me !
Mountain biking is no different from any other aspect of life, it’s changing with technology, the important thing is to enjoy it while you can and follow your own path.
  • + 2
 The way I see is, using the word "fashionable" to describe climbing is incorrect. Not everyone, or everywhere there is easy access to shuttle or lift access. So for a lot of people, in order to get to the downhill, someway & somehow, need get to the top. And there are times, people just want to do some climbings to be as part of their physical training, OR simply want to do something diff, hit a reset button, before going back shuttling the next day.

With that said, I don't "mind" doing the climb, as long as there is interesting, quality downhill after that. Also, I ride the right bike for the right purpose.
  • + 2
 I'd say the opposite. 4X Got me back on an MTB in 2007 an it was pretty much 4X an DH leading the media. Since the Enduro boom it seems like XC has snuck back in on the popularity coat tails an therefore climbing became cool again
But, FK it. I ain't "to posh to push"
  • + 1
 I don't mind climbing trail for skills practice but I really don't enjoy feeling worn out before I hit the slopes. I'd rather have as much energy as possible for serious decents so monkeying around uphill does me no favors for that. If I wanted to enjoy climbing and descending I'd get an xc bike but I ride for the thrill of fun dh so my bike is designed more for that. Occasional tech trail climbs to hone skills but riding road up and bombing fun trail down gives me a workout and thrill abs satisfaction I'm aiming for.
  • + 3
 If it's out of fashion then why are 120 mm travel bikes so popular right now? All I see at my local trail now are Sparks, Trances and Epics.
  • + 1
 I originally chose the “maybe” option with climbing being a necessary evil, but today I went and rode a tech XC loop with a constant up and down through rocky, rowdy terrain and I have to say I changed my vote. Cleaning each climb as they came was just as rewarding as the rush of the descent. Weird.
  • + 1
 The big burly bikes of today are focused on the downhills, but the reason why we own them and not rent them is because they all climb great now. I am surprised how well a 31 lb 160mm bike can climb, I don't think I lose much over a 24 lb 100mm bike, maybe about 5 minutes at most on a 45 minute climb? It is not like I really need those extra 5 minutes to do something else, the more time on the bike the better!
  • + 1
 I've gotten super lazy recently, mostly riding uplifts. I'll still climb on my xc loops, something like 500m-700m in my normal 35km trail loop... However during the summer these have got pretty rare (non-existent), with me riding the local bikeparks at the weekends instead. Come autumn I'll do this again more frequently.

For my usual bikeparks, it'd be a 1600m climb to get to the lowest gondola - this is too much for me do and then ride a full day on the descents.
  • + 2
 Climbing is the only way I get in shape. Sure it sucks, but most workouts that kick your ass are gonna suck a little bit in the moment, but after, when you're done, ya feel great! Not to mention you get to descend too!
  • + 2
 Where I live, 99% of riders go up on the fire roads and ...... listen to it: Roll down on the same path!!!!!!! Even though I built a few very nice and enjoyable single tracks going down.
That puzzles me every day,????
  • + 1
 Climbs are hard, but training during the week and following a healthy diet is even harder and nobody is talking about that.
Nutrition and Fitness articles represent less than 1% of Pinkbike content.

So yeah, climbing is not fashionable, training with a roadbike is not fashionable, dieting is not fashionable, sleeping well is not fashionable... And the only way to avoid all that is getting an E-bike, but that's not fashionable either.

On the other hand walking up a climb is "normal", shuttling is really nice, Bikeparks are amazing, and eating like a pig and drinking a beer after a ride is really cool...
  • + 5
 All I care about is climbing. Descending is boring.
  • + 0
 You are lying ????
  • + 3
 @JSW07: I am honest. It's good that descents don't take long. There's no pleasure if I'm not pedaling.
  • + 2
 @JohanG: I heard somewhere you can pedal on descents, too.
  • + 1
 You can pedal a bit but hardly. In a post about climbing, surely you guys expected the weirdos like myself to show up, right? I also pedal my road bike downhill.
  • + 5
 For me it's always been a means to an end.
  • + 3
 HTFU. They're called bicycles and are meant to be pedaled everywhere. Also, the most badass DH & Enduro guys will crush you on a climb.
  • + 2
 Best way to make climbing a fire road entertaining is by flicking rocks and pine cones with your front wheel, at each other. If you shoot a rock or pine cone between your opponent’s wheels, it’s a goal.
  • + 1
 I love single track technical climbs. Give me a challenge. Give me something to conquer. One little win after another over and over. I hate droning up a diet road, or worse an asphalt road climb. Note. I also don't like to pedal downhill. I like to drop in and let my speed carry me. Find the flow. If you have to pedal you're doing it wrong.
  • + 1
 Why even care? Ride what you enjoy, dig on what you enjoy and just ride bikes. I would take a shuttle to the top everyday if all the trails around here were shuttle accessed, but they are not, so I pedal. Riding with friends that climb like maniacs and could care less about "sending it" is just an add on for off-road cycling. What's cool is being out on a bike, not how you ride, what you wear, how you look, what trails you enjoy, or what the internet says.
  • + 1
 Haha! Couldn't agree more. But I'd write that middle sentence in a different order-
"Riding with friends that send it like maniacs and could care less about "climbing" is just an add on for off-road cycling.
  • + 1
 The 51 minute figure per hour is even more than I ever figured.

I have been always yelling around here that a bike that is meant to pedal (anything other than a DH/park bike) HAS to fit the rider well when pedalling, regardless of the effects that has on downhill performance and regardless of the ideas the rider of the bike has ('yeah, i want max DH performance, i'll manage the uphill suffer' -> shut it, buy a DH bike then). It also has to pedal well without any pedal bob, again regardless of any impacts it has on bump absorption (pedal kickback or anything similar). But it's possible to make good bikes that do both of the spectrums well so why the hell bother with bad bikes??
  • + 4
 Wtf is your point? Climbing is part of bikes. Going down is part of bikes, and your mom.
  • + 1
 I have an extremely difficult climb on my local loop that requires so much power, skill, ballance, timing and the patience to save energy and burst it out where you need it. It’s a place where I crash regularly (kip over, hook a pedal, or wheelie out off course) and I find it much more of a head f*ck than any of the technical downs. It’s the part of my ride I look forward to the most. The sensation of making the climb is so huge with lung busting euphoria pumping through the system there is a super sense of achievement. I ride park most weekends so you understand how much I love the down but I have spent more of my time dreaming and pondering about that piece of trail over any other.
  • + 2
 social desirability is what you get with a poll like this. Of course everybody ist fit, loves the uphills, never enters bike parks or shuttles and hates E-Bikes.

I believe in reality it’s the opposite.
  • + 1
 Richard - cutting my teeth on a Mountain Bike in the late 80's early 90's meant you had to climb to descend. Still enjoy climbing today. And yes waxing a tough uphill techical section is very satisfing, plus it has taught me how to descend at higher speeds with more confidence.
  • + 1
 Instead of sweating and suffering in armour with a full face helmet, I bought a CX bike and now I can enjoy my favourite climb in comfortable lycra clothes, while leaving my Enduro bike for parks and races. The problem is that I like gravel and CX more now...
  • + 1
 Out in eastern Canada, a lot of great trails require going up before getting any down. There has been a marked improvement in areas and builders constructing bench-cut and accessible climbing trails. This is probably trickle-down from many other areas (like Squamish) where no lifts made "easier" non-logging road climbs a better and safer way to access the goods.

But I have a soft spot for really difficulty, old-school fall-line climbs that were never intended for bikes. That is my favourite way to access trails. Climb something absurd, using skills and power. Then savour the usually equally difficult fall-line descents.

I have been using a friend's Specialize Turbo Levo on the odd ride for a few weeks, and although it helps on climbs, it still requires an assload of rider input to work well in tough and technical terrain and on hard climbs. It makes fire roads and double track easy. (I find it boring on the downs due to the weight)

For me the experience of climbing is key to enjoying everything about MTB. But then I like gravel riding in the spring and bikepacking too.

Ain't nothin' wrong with a 30t x 50t easy gear.

M
  • + 1
 Found out today that most of the Swiss are still loving the uphills. Uphill mtbers are litterally everywhere in Switserland, the older, the better. Seems like when a Swiss retires, he/she buys a carbon fibre (e)bike and does nothing all day but grinding up some climbs.
Either that or they are 30 year olds ageing super fast, because, you know, mountain folk or something.
  • + 1
 I say no, for me it seemed like more people shuttled/ pushed / chairlifted in the past perhaps more than they do now, heaps of DH people just have a enduro bikes now and realise you need to climb. Climbing is as much mtb as descending.
  • + 1
 Well, as a rare commenter here (okay, never), I'll say that I don't really enjoy climbing. And for the most part I'd rather climb a fire road than a climbing trail. I'm in my late fifties and have really, really bad knees. Like really bad. BUT, that said, I find a weekend like today where I went to Fromme with some buddies on Sat and Sunday and rode Executioner, Dreamweaver, Lower Oilcan, Lower Crippler, Lower Digger and even Bobsled (and some of the climbing trails) to be more intrinsically satisfying than a day at the Whistler bike park. I need the cardio and that's why even though I don't enjoy it that much, I do it, and will be sorry when my knees are finally so bad I have get one of those e-things.... There are health benefits to climbing that at my age are really important.
  • + 3
 Humans are not evolving, we are devolving, and the attitude of so called mountain bikers not wanting to climb is further proof of it.
  • + 1
 As someone who has moved from SLC (super smooth, easy singletrack ups) to BC, I enjoy the challenge of techy uphill trails. I'm fortunate to live somewhere that I have the option to choose either fireroad grind or interesting, twisty ascents. Currently shopping for a hardtail!
  • + 1
 I built a hardtail up just for that reason. More than capable on any of the down tracks, and fantastic on the way up. I’m a glutton for suffer though apparently. Find the right frame (mine was NSbikes Djambo Eccentric- slack, HT, and nailed the price point) that suits what you want from it and you won’t be sorry. Sore maybe, but not sorry! I’ve ridden mine more in the last 2 years than my FS, and am yet to find a trail it isn’t at home on. Granted, there is a learning curve on DH-ing on a HT. Ride the trail, not the bike.
  • + 1
 Also made me realize that the bikes I liked the looks of in print, articles and videos weren’t actually suited to what I’m typically riding. Next build will be a FS, but ignoring all the ‘enduro brah!’ Hype and planning for a vary capable trail build. Spend hours on hours on the bike, and up trumps down in the time ratio so may as well have the right setup for optimizing the saddle time.
  • + 1
 Mike levy keeping it real. every ride should have a climb where you have to focus on the way up and if you're not 100% your tire tosses you. Every ride should have a section where you're all the way up on the seat and about to have a stroke and you're not positive you can clean it. Mtbkg isn't really "fashionable" anyway, so climb on and bomb down!
  • + 1
 My local riding place the trails aren't really climbable so I just grind up the fire road rather than push my bike up a trail. Then when I ride with mates on the weekend we climb so much that I usually end up pushing a lot to conserve energy so I have something in the tank to finish the ride (talking big backcountry rides). It is fun to nail a technical climb for sure and there are one or two local trails I climb on but for the most part it is grinding up fire roads for me and having a hoot on the descent. I just don't get how people are fit enough to bust technical climbing moves on 5k+ climbing days, that gasses me so fast, but maybe some day I will get there... might need to hit the weights or something.
  • + 1
 Living where there's not a huge amount of elevation change (300 feet or so is typical), we have "return trails" for getting back to the top of one-way DH trails -- no boring fire road climbs. I enjoy a well-designed trail that gets you to the top and throws in the occasional techy section and sections where you can catch your breath. I find it rewarding to fail a techy climb over and over again and then finally make it. But, here it is a part of riding, you gotta earn your downhills.
  • + 1
 Look at what bikes people are buying. You can't say that climbing has become "unfashionable" when hardly anyone buys downhill bikes anymore. Modern long travel trail bikes climb amazingly well, and that's why they sell.
  • + 1
 It’s all in the hype. Enduro and Freeride is the new DH. Buy now! All-mountain is dead, but Trail is capable for DH parks! Hardtail are for XC, grandparents, and granola crunchers.... but slopestyle is cool (love my hardtail, looking forward to building a killer capable trail bike)
  • + 0
 TwinLock is a Scott only feature.
Last Fox XC fork has no handlebar block lever.
Coil shocks have no handlebar block lever.
Climbing on a bob horst link bike is beyond my comprehension.
Climbing on a Tantrum bike must be fun...what do you think Richard?
  • + 2
 I love the challenge of climbs be it road or trail. But specially long technical climbs that take tens of tries to conquer and then the descent is the cherry.
  • + 1
 Mountain biking is just as much about going up as it is going down. Unless you have lift access or a shuttle available, the only way your getting to the top of a trail is by pedaling.
  • + 0
 If my body could handle it, I would ride lifts everyday; 3 hours of lift rydn at Deer Valley equals an entire week of XC descent vertical and anyone who thinks who don't get in shape rockin lift laps doesn't know the sport.....
  • + 1
 Oh please...the reason you can't handle more than three days is because you are out of shape from taking the lift.
  • + 2
 climbing has never been fashionable. its one of those things you have to do to have fun. if I could uplift everywhere I would.
  • + 3
 But.. if there was no down, would you go up? I wouldn't, that would be dumb..
  • + 0
 the downhill is WHY we have to get to the top of the mountain. i definitely don't look forward to doing it, i just get through it. would i rather have party laps all day or maybe two loops and be exhausted? i do climb 95% of my rides but i shouldn't feel like i get looked down upon if i am stoked for lift/shuttles by fellow riders, i would never turn down a shuttle so i could climb instead
  • + 0
 I'm just going to say it... climbing sucks... my legs hurt and for no sort of adrenalin rush what so ever... I might as well just stab my leg with a fork on my couch.

Cross country skiing was cool in the 60's... but I think 95% of people ride a lift nowadays to ski down... I don't know why.

If i could, I would take a shuttle, helicopter, gondola, chairlift, or tug rope to the top every day... just my humble opinion... in the end though, I pedal up because I do like the down... and I can't find someone to shuttle me.

flame on!
  • - 7
flag ADGproductions (Jul 19, 2019 at 15:26) (Below Threshold)
 But how do you pedal a DH bike up? You don't. And a DH bike is way more fun than any trail or enduro bike.
  • + 1
 I prefer to skin to the top anymore. You get more downhill riding in that way. Back in the day before they had powder skis and you had to be good to ski powder you could get in a bunch of runs. Nowadays any Joe blokefskin can ride powder and you get 1 untracked run. I can get 3 or 4 untracked runs climbing.
  • + 0
 @ADGproductions: I pedal my DH bike up...I like smashing the downhills, but I will gladly add elevation gains to my rides.
  • + 2
 @KavuRider: I give you a lot of credit. I'd rather throw my DH bike into a volcano than pedal it up hill for any extended period of time.
  • + 1
 I used to like climbing. Then age happened. And knee problems. I still climb most of my downhills, but with less enthusiasm. But then again RC is very young, check his photo: www.pinkbike.com/photo/17485494
  • + 1
 Isn’t that the photo they also had for him in the +50 years later article? If this is him in 50 years, what does he look like now?
  • + 1
 Climbing isn’t even a part of it to me. Biking isn’t ski touring, your not getting better snow because you went further. You can still “earn it” without climbing just pick up a shovel.
  • + 1
 I love climbing single track, roads not so much. I feel very lucky that our local trail org has and is building way more climbing trails to access the goods. Good job Evergreen!
  • + 1
 Master Link and Quick Link at Tiger were total game-changers. Shady and somewhat enjoyable and still not super-duper easy due to the length.
  • + 1
 @twozerosix: yep! Wish we could extend the climbing trail at raging.
  • + 1
 Here in Vermont , we have some of the best single track climbing trails I have seen anywhere. Our downhill trails are pretty good as well. Up or down it's all what you get out of it.
  • + 1
 e-bikes at this point = pro-life or pro-choice.
Forked over 5k for a real bike, never gonna buy an e-bike unless I get a serious tax break for commuting to work. I’m warming up to a motorcycle with pedals.
  • + 1
 Uphill climbs =runner's high, better sleep, as much beer and food as I can intake with no weight gain, muscle tone, and warms me up for a great downhill.

Now, apart from "It's easier", why WOULDN'T you ride up?
  • + 1
 If you don't have the time to keep in shape.... aka. ME lol. In all seriousness though, it's probably the progressiveness of slope style and free ride that are leading people to bypass the climbs more.
  • + 2
 No matter how much I like climbing, whenever I'm pedalling up a nice singletrack I'm always thinking how awesome it would be to ride it downhill.
  • + 1
 That’s why chair lift were invented, not that much skiers going uphill...

Till recent changes in geometry majority of bikes where crap to pedal uphill since you whether have 8 inch stem or rounded back
  • + 2
 The serious skiers I know all spend a majority of their time skinning up to backcountry runs. Seems like lifts are more for the casual tourist.
  • + 1
 however majority enjoys ski lifts, I only recently start climbing, because of place where I leave; I would not mind shuttle or ebike, since that will allow me to have more downhill rides
  • + 1
 I like riding up singletrack and not moving for the people descending because I have the right away. You suck anyways and you're not having fun on the DH because you're a tool, It's all about me!!! (sarcasm people, sarcasm)
  • + 2
 No matter the situation, bikes are a compromise between climbing and descending, but I feel that manufacturers have gone a little far to the descending side.
  • + 2
 The poll doesn't reflect the idea that, climbing has become unfashionable but I still enjoy it
  • + 1
 I live in Domodossola, extreme northern Alps, even fireroads are 20% degree climbing. We have to climb to join our super trails !
  • + 3
 Climbing is a challenge and downhill is a reward.Am i the only one.
  • + 1
 Humanity has turned into oversized pathetic oversensitive emotional blobs that's the climbing issue. E toys for the pathetic underperforming excuses of humanity.
  • + 1
 But how do you really feel?
  • + 1
 Excessive heat warnings today, 2l of water this morning, helmet strapped to that pack, gloves soaking wet, bugs in my eyes, I love this S$&@!!!!
  • + 3
 I don't ride to be "fashionable"
  • + 1
 Feel like this poll is about 15 years too late. Back in the day when we all had a Balfa BB7s and Big Hits and you either shuttled or pushed up.
  • + 1
 "The harder it is to pedal to the top, the more likely it will be that you'll escape average humanity's noise, litter and situational numbness" Love it!
  • + 3
 Don't be a sally. Ride up the hill.
  • + 1
 Technical climbs are a decent laugh and a good challenge, fire road climbs are from hell and should never be spoken of again.
  • + 3
 If you get strong, you can have fun even on the climbs.
  • + 4
 uphill tech forever.
  • + 1
 I prefer climbing, throw in a lot of rocks and make it technical and you have made my day and if the descents have a lot of big drops it's just an added bonus.
  • + 4
 Reverse downhill?
  • + 1
 Your bike has reverse? If you can do DH backwards you've made it!
  • + 2
 I hate, hate, hate climbing. But it's a necessary evil to get to the good stuff.
  • + 2
 Let’s face it, enduro has made biking so damn much better. Life has ups and downs, enjoy them both for what they are.
  • + 2
 Climbing a good technical trail is a blast if you aren't hiding your belly under a comically oversized troy lee jersey!
  • + 3
 The Stronger You Are, Trails Can Get Even More Fun. Get up to get Down!
  • + 1
 Yeah being fit is more fun at the end of the day.
  • + 3
 Fuck that! I crush the climbs! The more tech, the better!
  • + 1
 Thatta boy!
  • + 2
 I've never met a descent that inspired me to be a better, stronger rider. I've done plenty of climbs that kept me up at night strategizing on how to be better next time.
  • + 3
 When was climbing ever fashionable? You do it to hit the goods
  • + 1
 Maybe if I got back into shape.... with all my spare time. Back in 02 I did the Jean Chin Memorial Hillclimb race in Ashland...
  • + 1
 Did my first backflip on my eBike today. Freeride is not dead - and i didnt use a shuttle to get to the jump Smile
  • + 1
 Funny, nearly 90% or riding in climbing. If it wasn't we'd all be riding DH rigs
  • + 2
 its fashionable to not be fashionable.
  • + 2
 "Homo sapien-sapiens" this doesn't exist.
  • + 2
 The 90’s wants there uphill back.
  • + 0
 How about you all mind your own business and ride your damn bike in whichever way makes you happy. People need to mind their own God damn business a little more.
  • + 1
 the mopeds are making climbing less challenging and more lazy. like everything else. damn millennials
  • + 3
 Uber is a human shuttle service. Fools can't even get they ass from Point A to B on their own anymore.
  • + 1
 I spotted a scooter with a DIY 2x4 mountain bike carrying rack the other day at the bike park
  • + 1
 Maybe if I was in better shape mating opportunities would be never more than a minute away, hell I'd suffer an hour away
  • + 2
 Glad to see I'm not the only one who still enjoys climbing...
  • + 1
 It depends on what you call climbing. 100 feet per mile is nice compared to 400 feet per mile which just hurts.
  • + 2
 haha.. you don't live in colorado obviosly.. 400 feet per mile is mellow..
  • + 1
 I dunno if it was ever cool, but you can't go down unless you go up. Plus its honestly the challenging part of riding.
  • + 3
 Agree and disagree. It's challenging, but not the challenging part of "riding." If you're in shape from another cardio sport, you can climb on a mtn bike. Granted, cleaning a techy climb is the anomaly. Takes skills related to trials riding, but 99% of all the climbing most people do doesn't require bike skills. It just takes determination and being in good cardiovascular shape.

Riding downhill well is where the skill of "bicycling" becomes apparent. All these people upset about ebikes and lifts and lazy people bringing the world to an end? Their strong suit is climbing.
  • + 0
 @ranke: "All these people upset about ebikes and lifts and lazy people bringing the world to an end? Their strong suit is climbing." Bullshit. The mountain bikers I know and respect kick ass climbing and descending. Beware of sweeping generalizations you can't prove.
  • + 1
 I would much prefer to ride a road down to the bottom so I can get back to the climbs asap.
  • + 1
 I love technical climbs more than any other type of terrain. I dont usually love 2 hour fire road climbs though.
  • + 0
 I freaking am bad at climbing. We used to always walk up the steeps. It's another instant gratification thing. I liked climbing as a child, but climbing is pretty hard.
  • + 1
 Climbing can be fun under the right circumstances, like I went to this place in Ontario, and the climbing was legitimately fun at the time. I think you just need the right type of climbing.
  • + 1
 @Kramz: How much climbing is there in Ontario? Honest question.
  • + 1
 @woofer2609: Canadian Shield is the best place I've ever ridden.
  • - 1
 I hate people who act like elitist pricks because they climb uphill. Gold for you. I couldn't care less. I mostly shuttle or chair lift. I'd rather do 9 to 12 descents in a day rather than 2z maybe 3 climbing.
  • + 1
 Elitest pricks suck everywhere, people who like the ups aren't in that category any more than the shuttlers
  • + 2
 @SPKeen: all the anti shuttlers I know look down on park rats and people who shuttle. Most absolutely do act like elitists. I have yet to meet someone who thinks they're an elitist because they shuttle. If anything we know we're lazy and need to pedal more.
  • + 1
 @ThunderChunk: Nah, the amount of hate I see/hear towards "lycra wearing XCers" is surprising, including in the mtb media. The funny thing is, in the two largest local weekly group rides, the pack leaders are always the lycra guys, including downhill. Even if the endurbros are slightly faster going down, they can't get up to top fast enough to show it.....

Full discolsure i'm a back-of-the-fast-group-front-of-the-casual-group semi-endurbro riding all-mountain on a 6" travel 29er wearing gym clothes, just calling em like I see em. Shuttling is fine and I'll do it at a ski resort but, if you're at a trail network you're riding a whole lot more singletrack if you're climbing tech.
  • + 1
 @Frzrbrnbass: ah I get what you mean. But this goes for any mountain biker. They all hate on xc/roadies. Somehow most of them think they deserve elite status cause they send gnarly lines. If you ride a bike you're cool with me and I couldn't care less how you get to the top of a descent.
  • + 1
 @ThunderChunk:
The best mountain biker is the one having the most fun ????
  • + 1
 Aw come on, you know the answer and this is just a bait poll.
  • + 2
 I blame e-bikes
  • + 1
 Gravel bike are massively fashionable, and those guys love climbing
  • + 1
 STA engineering has got to come to something
  • + 0
 I wish everyone took their daily nutrition as a high value escapadé as they do mountain biking
  • + 1
 I can climb like a goat on bad crack...
  • - 3
 I feel like I'm certain parts of the country eagle and wide range cassettes are ruining the sport. I live in a River valley area so we have these short punchy climbs. And short steep descents. I. E. 100-200 feet tops up or down at a time. I single speed because it makes me work . There is nothing more frustrating than getting stuck behind some dude spinning a 52 for 100 feet and killing all their momentum
  • + 2
 Eagle cassettes aren’t to blame for this, everyone has different fitness levels. Just be glad you’re able bodied and enjoying two wheels.
  • + 2
 Dude did you ride bikes when 22t chainrings were a thing? Why pick on wide range cassettes? Silly argument!
  • + 1
 Don’t get caught on a $10k 29er bike being out climbed by a 26er!
  • + 1
 some people love climbing... others don't... each to their own....... ..
  • + 1
 Pretty sure what comes down must first go up.
  • + 1
 I use the lift to go down and only do the climbs ????
  • + 1
 my wiener fell asleep when im climbing fire roads
  • + 1
 Make it cool. Hillclimb exibition like at moto rallys..
  • - 1
 Climbing has never been cool. Rather walk and drink a beer and shoot the shit with the bros. Freeride
  • + 1
 What he said..........
  • + 0
 If i had lifts i would never climb.
  • + 1
 The climbs in the midwest are pretty short. Lol, so are the downhills!
  • + 1
 Earn your turns
  • + 1
 Ya i earned the money, and it bought me a bike with a dual crown. Now I’m going to ride it. If i eat shit and try again thats called earning it. If i dig for three years to build a line of jumps thats over in 45 seconds I’d say thats earning it. If i peddled up some trail someone else built im just peddling a bike.
  • + 1
 I miss climbing!
  • + 1
 DO YOU BUD.
  • + 1
 Out and back FTW
  • - 1
 Climbing is only fun on an Ebike. Otherwise its the pain you have to go through to get to a great downhill section.
  • + 1
 I only ride park.
  • + 1
 It always was.
  • + 0
 With yoann barelli it has! ????????????
  • - 2
 I hate pedaling. Even down hill. Just ruins the pump/flow of riding. but I ride a dj.
  • - 2
 phucK phashion
  • - 3
 Who the f uck wants to peddle up a hill !!!!!
  • + 4
 From reading the comments I'd say Americans want to !
  • - 1
 Crazy people
  • + 3
 @BedsideCabinet: well, we actually have hills instead of just mud puddles.
  • + 3
 I don't want to peddle, but I'll gladly pedal.
  • - 3
 Hard to climb on today's "Trail" bikes, with their 50" wheelbase 12" BB height and 63 degree HA.
  • - 1
 I win!
  • - 2
 For what is leading the poll, are we still talking about mountain biking?
  • - 1
 What was leading the poll when you made this comment?
  • + 0
 @boozed: poll seems like fake news
  • - 2
 I blame the Uber and Lyft mentality
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