Pinkbike Poll: How Many Derailleurs Have You Actually Destroyed While Riding?

Jan 31, 2024 at 2:05
by Jessie-May Morgan  
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Gearboxes for mountain bikes are like Marmite: people either love them, or they hate them. Or, to be more true to reality, people either love the idea, or they hate the idea of them. After all, the amount of abuse that the traditional derailleur-operated drivetrain gets relative to the number of people actually buying bikes with an alternative drivetrain feels somewhat disproportional.

After all, it's incredibly easy to both literally and figuratively bash the derailleur. Yes, it does hang out at a point in space where it's liable to picking up sticks and chunks of heather. It is objectively at risk of, at the very least, getting scratched up or bent out shape. On tight, rock-strewn trails, full derailleur detonation feels like it's lurking around every blind corner.

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The Starling Spur runs a gearbox from Effigear
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Lal Bikes Supre Drive is one of the more interesting alternative drivetrains out there. This one is only intended for high-pivot bikes, and only the Nicolai Nucleon 16, for now.

But we like to catastrophize, don't we? Especially when the cost of replacing certain electronic derailleurs is now in the region of $800 USD.

Though I've been around friends of mine who suffered the misfortune, I've never actually blown up a derailleur myself. Sure, I've bent a hanger or two over the years, but i've never ripped a cage in two, or hit my derailleur so hard that it ceases to be functional. Am I simply not gnarly enough? Or do we generally not break derailleurs as regularly as the internet makes out?

I'm interested to know whether i'm in the minority here.

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A sad end for this Shimano derailleur

It's also occurred to me that the risk of hitting one's derailleur may be associated with stance preference - i.e. whether you ride with your left foot forward, or your right foot forward. I fall into the former category, so my right leg is the trailing leg, occupying the space just fore of the derailleur while i'm descending. I have always wondered whether that alone gives me an improved awareness of that side, thus making me less likely to scrape the derailleur off a rock while making tight right-hand turns.

Let us know how many derailleurs you've killed over the years (answer the poll that best describes your preferred riding stance). I'm not talking death by wear and tear, or death by clutch seizure - i'm talking about those "I was just riding along" incidents.

Riders with their left foot forward: How many derailleurs have you destroyed in the last 10 years?



Riders with their right foot forward: How many derailleurs have you destroyed in the last 10 years?



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368 Comments
  • 332 2
 There is also an important difference between "catestrophically destroyed" and "slightly bent so it never quite indexes properly but I really don't want to buy a complete new mech". I've had the latter waaaay more than destroyed.
  • 36 100
flag onawalk (Feb 2, 2024 at 12:51) (Below Threshold)
 The difference is, you can simply bend it back so it does index properly, and its likely youre hanger, not yer derailleur
  • 17 1
 Yes! This is me. I’ve crashed and merely “tweaked” my hanger before. Even with a hanger alignment tool I just couldn’t get it perfect again, so I dropped another $15 on a new hanger and moved on with my life. Not a big deal. I would say between me, my kids, and my wife riding, this has happened much more often than a catastrophic failure. Enough to the point that I make sure we always have a hanger for a bikes when we travel so if we do “tweak” the hanger, I just swap it out with a new one for perfect shifting again. Between everyone that rides in my house, I would say we replace 1 hanger every year.
  • 18 0
 @onawalk: Sometimes yes, other times definitely not, trying to bend it back just makes it worse. So annoying when the mech looks perfect.
  • 8 2
 Picked up a stick into the chain once on a steep climb at just the wrong second, when it went through the derailleur you could actually hear metal pinging off the rocks as it exploded.
  • 17 1
 If it never works again correctly, its broken beyond repair aka destroyed.
  • 9 0
 Yeah, I've destroyed three catastrophically, and also had a couple just get to the point that I couldn't get them to shift right anymore. I've also had them fail where they destroyed my wheel.
  • 3 0
 Same. I’ve def bashed mine and never got it shifting as good as new… Even straightening the hanger properly.
  • 2 0
 Very subjective and wide range of outcomes. Destroyed a few, but my last incident involved pushing the whole thing into my rear wheel, locking up the rear wheel and skidding for about 5 meters (was luckily on flat ground) and destroying about 3 spokes. And a new hanger later its working fine at about 98% of new condition. Does that count??
  • 1 0
 I have fully exploded 2, but bent a 3rd out of whack so it's never quite perfect so I put 3.
  • 5 1
 This. Anybody interested in buying my vast collection of derailleurs, ranging from 9 to 12 speed that are all ever so slightly off?
  • 3 0
 How ironic this article was today?! Before today I was at zero, but now 1. Laid the power down to sprint on a section of trail and heard metal breaking. Didnt feel a stick flick up or anything, but ripped the top jockey wheel off and tore the cage apart. Bearings still there.
  • 42 4
 This is my biggest frustration with derailleurs and why I want a gearbox.

Do I have a slightly bent derailleur or is my hanger slightly bent?
Maybe both?
Or did my chain get slightly bent?
Maybe a chain link got damaged?
Or could it be because my derailleur or cassette is slightly loose from all that rattling?
Do I just need a new cable?
Maybe new housing too?
Is my b screw adjustment right? Could the clutch in my derailleur be dry?
Surely my limit screws aren't out of adjustment?
Maybe my derailleur pivots are worn out? Or a worn chain?
Or maybe a pulley is slightly damaged?

Screw all that BS and the rear derailleur is also the fugliest part on any bike.
  • 5 4
 aka the sram issue
  • 4 2
 @bigtim: Maybe my tolerance threshold is different, but I've honestly never had a slightly bent der that I couldnt get back to working perfectly for me (again, maybe differences in what we think is perfect)
I've definitely spent more time than a replacement der would have cost, but if its my own rig, no ones paying me to work on that.
This is going back to fragile 8, 9spd stuff as well, unless it was a dangler of a derailleur, I could get it back to alignment.

If you ever have the issue again, send me the der, I'll see what I can do for ya
  • 15 8
 @hohmskullkrishten: So go through the list, and systematically check each thing. youre talking minutes worth of work and effort here. Youll learn, you can pass that along to friends and family, you'll feel proud of yourself, others will say, fack yeah, that is a genius when it comes to fixing bikes!
Youd like to replace that with a heavy, draggy, bloated mechanical contraption, thats likely non-servicable, or replaceable at home, and wildly more complicated and expensive?

As a society, we used to take pride in ownership, maintain, troubleshoot, invent, fabricate, and help others do so as well.
Now people feel its unacceptable to have to lift a wrench in order to keep things going. This is partially why manufacturers create and engineer things that cant be "fixed", so that consumers have a more pleasant experience.

Owners manual for my first truck detailed how to adjust valves, new ones tell people not drink blinker fluid,

We have strayed too far...
  • 10 1
 @onawalk: the old 8/9/10 speed stuff was waaaay more tolerant to knocks and bangs than the current 12 speed stuff. I think it's because they keep squeezing more gears into the same space so there is less tolerance space.
  • 1 0
 @Pusher5000: I have spare hangers for all my bike's but have never once damaged hanger's or Derailleur's, to old to slow! 90% of the bikes I ride are beyond my skill/fear level to do any damage, even though I have crashed a lot over the years the only thing getting damaged is me.
  • 8 3
 @onawalk: Working on my derailleur is the last thing I want to do on a ride, especially if I'm with others. I also don't want to have discussions about derailleurs with other people, other than telling them how much I hate them and how absolutely ridiculous it is that they come on high performance e bikes in the year 2024. You shouldn't have to stop and work on your bike just because you ran over a stick and it got caught up in your drivetrain. You shouldn't have to stop your ride and inspect your derailleur just because you slid out and laid your bike down on the right side. You should be able to lay your bike down on the ground on its right side in the year 2024, without damaging the drivetrain.

Yes, I would like to replace this horribly placed, highly exposed, outdated, ugly, unreliable, high maintenance contraption of exposed springs, levers, pivots and misguided technology with something more reliable and better looking, even if it is slightly heavier and less efficient. It would also be great to have a drivetrain more centered on the bike, without an ugly contraption hanging and rattling around off the back.

As mountain bikers we have a tendency to stick with stupid road bike ideas for too long. Look how long we rode with 71°head angles, tubed tires, and narrow bars.

Derailleurs are just a fundamentally stupid idea for mountain bikes and it compromises too much time and energy to maintain them when the rest of the bike is already complicated enough. Did I also mention they are f'ing ugly?
  • 4 0
 Thanks for calling out this point - I went back and changed my response after realizing, yes… I’ve damaged the b-knuckle on two SRAM 12 speed GX derailleurs to the point where shift quality significantly degraded.
(And I subsequently replaced them with Shimano XT which seems to not suffer this issue to nearly the same degree)

I haven’t ridden the newest iteration of GX, or Transmssion which ‘fixes’ this issue by removing the hanger. If you’re cool with electronics and batteries and much higher cost.
  • 2 0
 I catastrophically destroyed two derailleurs, within 2 rides in 2 weeks, right after purchasing a SC Nomad Alu bike. The frame turned out to be crooked and was just eating up the rear mechs in situations where it absolutely shouldn't have. SC have not made it right for me in the end, I wasted a couple of months arguing with them about a frame that was obviously not welded together properly.
  • 2 3
 @bigtim: Oh i whole heartedly disagree.
9spd shimano was essentially cheese grade aluminium, I have a whole bin of LX ans XT 9spd ders that I scavenge parts off to keep old things, and kids things working.

I have replaced exactly 1 12spd rear der in the last 4 years, and it was 100% rider error.
  • 6 1
 @hohmskullkrishten: I get ya,
The beauty part is you can buy a gearbox bike, I can only assume that you do currently ride, and have for years now....
We both want, and are terrified of change, and in our frustrations we can sometime blow things out of proportion in our mind.
I have been riding, racing, wrenching on mountain bikes for about 25 years at this point, I'm pretty handy, and time spent in the shop is therapeutic for me. When you understand and work with mechanical things on a regular basis theres a possibility your are a little more "in tune" (get it) with the mechanical contrivances around you. I know pretty quickly when my things feel "off" which is rarely due to wear, and more typically due to poor situational awareness.
Now I spend a tonne of time on my bike, and lay it down on the expensive side all the time. I have little mechanical sympathy, and have very high expectations of my bikes. Derailleurs simply are not an issue for me, and the added weight, bulk, complexity, and lack of serviceability of gearboxes are a no beuno for me, but if thats your thing, let your freak flag fly my man.

I love being able to see the mechanical, oily bits of my bike, truck, mechanical systems in general. They are a sort of kinetic art to me, and I appreciate the different interpretations that are developed (have you seen an Ingrid rear der, or an old Campy record, absolutely stunning)

We all have our preferences, I hope that one day you get your wish fulfilled, but maybe this is your opportunity to help in its advancement. However Im cool with what is available now, and look forward to the next iteration of rear mechs, and chains, and exposed oily bits!
  • 1 1
 @FuzzyL: I know a guy making replacement parts new pins and plates also new pulleys
  • 1 0
 Check out www.derailleurguard.com
For $30.00, they may have a solution to the problem, it’s a great product and they are coming out with another option SOON!
  • 2 0
 @Pusher5000: @Pusher5000: even with new derailleur hanger there is no saying that your frames hanger mount is correctly faced in relation to the axle. i quite often have to use the derailleur hanger alignment tool even after fitting new hangers and rds
  • 126 3
 For me, dishing out 800$ for a derailleour is a catastrophic failure.
  • 94 2
 You really need a "I don't ride that foot forward, but I want to see the results" option.
  • 42 0
 And a derailleur hanger option. I broke 1 hanger once, but I never broke a derailleur.
  • 69 0
 Or just don't read the title properly and vote on the wrong poll first, like me. Sorry pinkbike
  • 9 54
flag sherbet (Feb 2, 2024 at 12:35) (Below Threshold)
 People have been asking for a "show results" button for years. Pinkbike will never offer it. This is a free product, aka you are the product, aka they are trying to get information to pass along to the industry at large. They want to force participation in this.

I get it, they have a bottom line, but by god I wish I could just see results.
  • 50 2
 @sherbet: You should click the option that says, "I just want to see the results".

What exactly is the industry going to do with this information lol? Take over the world?
  • 10 0
 @warmerdamj: PB just added the button in response to comment demands.
  • 4 13
flag sherbet (Feb 2, 2024 at 12:41) (Below Threshold)
 @warmerdamj: That a joke? It isn't a conspiracy, drivetrain companies would likely enjoy knowing on average some data regarding how often their systems break. It's well known that most polls are used for data collection.

And thank you, that button did not exist until recently.
  • 21 8
 @sherbet: You ok man?
If you need to chat, or someone to loosen that tin foil hat, just let someone know.
Youre loved, youre not alone, someone cares about you...
  • 1 3
 @vincd: you mean once a week? Since 11s they are just butter
  • 16 1
 @sherbet: Yes, it is a joke. Given how long derailleurs have existed I'm sure this isn't the first time this data has been considered. You think just now in 2024 SRAM and Shimano are like, "hmmm, I wonder if our systems ever break? Lets pay pinkbike to exploit their user base and finally give us some insight because we have just been blindly manufacturing drivetrains for 50 years with no idea what happens to them after."
  • 4 12
flag sherbet (Feb 2, 2024 at 13:09) (Below Threshold)
 @warmerdamj: No, but I think updating the dataset every so often is something that many players in the industry want.

Source; I'm in the industry, this information is wanted.

Why you two think this is a tinfoil level world takeover is lost on me. Yes, Sram may want to know how many derailleurs average riders are going through to level if other technologies may be desired. Yes, this data changes over time.
  • 8 3
 @sherbet: So you do think this is to take over the world?
  • 13 2
 @sherbet: source: trust me bro
  • 15 17
 Both of my feet identify as they/them.
It's a disgrace that you only allow 2 foot types
  • 3 13
flag sherbet (Feb 2, 2024 at 13:34) (Below Threshold)
 ...You're incredulous that people in the bike industry go on cycling websites? I'm at a loss for words.
  • 6 0
 Well I did both polls cause I ride switch 25%.
  • 15 2
 @sherbet: you don't seem at a loss for words.
  • 2 0
 @vincd: I have always carried a spare hanger in my save a ride kit, but never have had to use it
  • 5 3
 I think you need a zero option! I have not destroyed any because I ride a zerode
  • 5 2
 @sherbet: "It's a well known fact that polls are used for data collection".

Woah, my mind is blown.

Other well known examples of things being what they are include that: dollars are money, apples are fruit, and water is H2O.
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: thats awesome, theres some great technique hiding in practising riding switch!
  • 3 0
 @sherbet: The data from these pinkbike polls would be less than useless. The PB audience isn't remotely representative of the overall riding community and because the results are untethered from any other demographic info about us, they have no way to weight the results to make them more representative. This is one of the major things that good pollsters do well.

Online polls like are a highly atypical, self selected subgroup of consumers who's answers would be utterly useless for market research.
  • 2 1
 @Tanglefist: Dont bring your logic, and clear experience to this, how absolutely unprofessional of you!
Let the people "in the industry" tell us how exactly PB's clearly scientific, well thoughtout, and unbiased poll drives the mountain biking trends and models of the coming years!

Nonsense

Lies
and
half truths are the glue that binds us!
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: That's very kind. I'm actually just a huge politics geek so end up reading a bit about polling techniques.
  • 1 0
 @Tanglefist: More GD Lies I bet!

A little levity, and actual intelligence is always appreciated by the larger PB community I think. It can get drowned out by silly opinions, and non-sense as those are generally the louder voices in the room.

Good on ya sir!
  • 64 2
 Who ever clicked on 18 - 20 should better stop working themself on the bike.
  • 10 12
 @stevemokan: eh if you ride rocky, narrow tech trails it is like cost of doing bussiness. Or ungroomed trails with deadfalll. For me if a derailleur lasts me for more than a year it is a mirracle. While cathastrophic failiures are rare, they just get so bent that the shifting is completley off.
  • 2 0
 Especially interesting when you review a previous poll on how many rides per year people are getting. My curiosity needs more data! Who's got the highest percentage of rides resulting in broken derailleurs?
  • 10 0
 @malca: Damn man where are you riding? I ride all over BC and thought breaking 2 over the last 10 years was a lot. Deadfall can definitely catch you off guard but still, one a year?
  • 3 3
 @tvan5: local trails are kinda wild ungroomed mess of perfect loam, add to that quite a lot of hiking trails and trips to finale ligure and you get a recipie for broken derailleurs
  • 33 0
 If you are doing 2 derailleurs a year.......the problem is'nt with SRAM or Shimano.
  • 6 2
 @tvan5: I grew up in the PNW and never broke derailleurs up there. Then I moved to Utah and the way the rocks sit right at derailleur height everywhere here usually means 1-2 destroyed a year. I don’t consider myself a hack, but maybe the fact I had to buy Hanger straightener this year says otherwise…
  • 2 1
 @malca: what is it with Finale? Lost at least 2 mechs to that place.
  • 2 1
 @BenPea: f*ck if I knew Big Grin especially more less known techy trails are just littered with rocks waiting to snag your derailleur.
  • 2 0
 Vente a Mallorca y ya me cuentas
  • 1 0
 @malca: check your chain length while cycling the suspension (let the air out of the shock or remove the coil) in the largest cog.
  • 1 0
 @tvan5: Also in BC.... I went though 5 in 2023... A lot of this falls on my haphazard carefree smash riding style but I dont think all of them were. Like... one brand new Deore derailleur snapped in half on a compression... first ride out. That shouldn't happen.
  • 1 0
 I don't think BC is the kind of place you particularly would smash derailleur. Think more of a dry rocky place with narrow hiking trail. There obviously you have move you rear end a lot to navigate rock but will hit pretty frequently. High altitude works too.
  • 46 0
 So if I check it off that I've only broken one, is it going to jinx me into breaking more?
  • 38 0
 it stressed me out so much clicking zero
  • 13 0
 Your derailleur just quivered in the garage
  • 3 0
 Couldn't agree more!
  • 1 0
 I’ve broken hangers galore. The derailleur itself if never damaged catastrophically.
  • 2 0
 update: never responding to a poll again www.pinkbike.com/photo/26200992
  • 55 27
 SRAM Transmission: A solution to an almost non-existing problem.
  • 14 13
 what do you mean "almost non-existing?" did you look at the poll results? Way more people have broken derailleurs than haven't.
  • 13 10
 You spelled Gearbox wrong...
  • 14 1
 Transmission also removed the hanger, not derailleur. Im sure almost everyone has bent a hanger. I just ripped one off last week.
  • 12 2
 Not even a solution, broke mine in the first season I had it. transmission isnt a solution for anything, just a mild improvement
  • 6 0
 @Austink: @jessiemaymorgan: Bent hanger would be another interesting poll. I'd love to see that.
  • 6 2
 The one and only derailleur I have broke was a SRAM transmission!
  • 2 1
 @danielfloyd: because pinkbike polls are the litmus test for all of mountain biking.
  • 5 1
 Theres a slight possibility you dont quite understand the "why" and "what" of transmission.
  • 2 2
 @wolftwenty1: I just threw up in my mouth a little
  • 4 0
 12 speed GX Eagle and SLX are real hard to beat for $/performance/weight/durability if you need 12 speeds and you're a 2-3 times per week rider. Maybe not for e bikes though.

XT 11 speed and a gucci Wolf Tooth 28t front chainring is looking real purty lately though..
  • 4 3
 @Austink: and now SRAM’s Transmission provides you with the opportunity to wreck a frame every time you bent the hanger in the past.
  • 2 2
 @FuzzyL: the mounting point of the derailleur will break first, it's basically an integrated hanger. Still replaceable.
  • 1 0
 @dale-m29: the best shifting solution for ebikes tho. Except for the Sram EX1...
  • 1 0
 100%. After riding it last year I hate it, but I could see how it'd be perfect for my e-bike. Not ready to upgrade my commuter to XX yet though...
  • 27 1
 All 18-20 votes are from Pinion.
  • 6 1
 Me and my Zerode say you're not wrong.
  • 2 1
 I voted "1" for the number of Pinion Gearboxes I've worn out.
  • 20 3
 I have a big bag of dead derailleurs in my miscellaneous parts bin that look like Salvador Dali stopped painting melting clocks and moved onto derailleurs. I always have one SLX derailleur on standby. I just think of them as a wear item like a tire.
  • 16 16
 Sounds like you should probably reevaluate the way you ride bikes.
  • 2 1
 @stevemokan: Sounds like he rides hard and pushes himself. It’s not necessarily a bad thing. Yes, he could find easier terrain and/or push himself less, but that would probably take the fun out of it.

…and I’ll bet he’d prefer a more durable option if one were available.
  • 15 1
 MTB riding since 1987, every week, XC, DH, Raced good results, Trees Bush Rocks. MotoTrials skills. Zero breakages. On the day I bought my first MTB the sales/mechanic said "Be Careful of THAT" pointing at the rear derailleur. So I have been.
  • 3 0
 Agree. Give it a little room, like an inch, on those rocks, roots, and ruts, and it'll last a while.
  • 3 0
 We all know it's there. Be careful. I've only bent hangers from crashing, on and off road, never really because of a clearance issue.
  • 16 3
 I've broken maybe one 9/10/11 speed derailleurs in about 20 years. I've roasted three 12 speed derailleurs in about 2 years because they need to be so f*cking big to be able to shift into the dinner plate size upper cassette teeth that we "need" now.
  • 3 0
 Makes me wonder how the derailleur’s ground clearance compares between 11spd, 46T cog on a 650b wheel and 12spd, >50T cog on a 700c wheel.
  • 1 3
 @pmhobson: I don't know on that but in theory a 27.5 wheel is 0.75" closer to the ground and I bet a 12sp long cage is about that much longer than an 11sp cage so it may be about the same. I have very little experience on 27.5 though.
  • 15 1
 Nothing is stopping you from using 11 speed if you dont need the "dinner plate", XX1 11speed is still insanely light and has the nicest feeling shifter ever made
  • 1 2
 That's why I went/go back to 11 speed generally. Been running the same di2 setups since they came out. Very dependable.
  • 4 0
 @dividebyzero: this is true. But speaking for myself, the dinner plate is nice with the larger wheels, which effectively give you taller gearing for the same gear ratio.

Add to that suspension layouts that are optimized around 32T rings and it starts to feel like we* have been painted somewhat into a corner


We* = folks who live near climbs that are very steep, long, and often both
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: how do you figure the 0.75”?

If that’s half of 29” - 27.5”, then that’s definitely an over estimate as the 27.5 has not basis in the actual dimensions of the tire’s outer diameter (27.5 is much closer to 26 than 29)
  • 3 0
 @warmerdamj: I’m an idiot. If you look at the bead seat diameters (622 vs 584), you’d expect the axle of a 650b wheel to be 19 mm — or 0.75” — lower.

You were completely correct.
  • 1 1
 @pmhobson: I did just guess based on 1/2 of 1.5" but I just measured a 27.5 rim and it was 23.5" and then measured a 29 rim and it was just under 25" so with the same tire that's still pretty close to 1.5" difference overall. I don't know if OD for all rims is the same though. This is as exact as my science can get given what I have laying around. I have no 12sp derailleurs around currently.
  • 4 0
 @dividebyzero: Cassettes are the problem in 11sp.
Sram has always been shit, making an 10-36 and adding a 42. The jump between gears is terrible to the point that I'm wondering if they just randomly picked the cogs size.
E13 has a 9-46 but it's also not good. Gear changing is precise but noisy and not efficient. Also the jump between gears is massive and who needs a 9t cog - probably just to brag about the range percentage.
Shimano has an amazing XTR but it's 11-40, meaning that on a 29'' with a 32 you'll suffer in a lot of climbs, and you'll be spinning like crazy with that 11t cog.
Tried also Garbaruk which is also crap spacing and the shifting is crap.
So yes, the worst part about 11sp is finding a well executed lightweight cassette, I would have never changed to 12sp if that was the case.
On the other side Shimano's 12sp 10-45 resolves all the issues mentioned above and the jump between cogs is just perfect and allows you to always find the right cadence which is impossible with any MTB Sram cassette.
  • 1 0
 Shimano 45t 12s cassettes exist...
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: I don’t think the OD really comes into the play much. For a given rim profile and tire combination, the BSD is all that really matters for axle height, IIUC
  • 2 1
 @pmhobson: yeah that would be the more consistent measurement for sure and likely why my measurements didn't put the difference right at 1.5" like yours did. Looks like you aren't an idiot like you claimed.
  • 2 0
 @dick-pound: 11s deore is what you're looking for. 11-51, nice gaps, cheap, lasts forever.
  • 1 0
 @dick-pound: if you go the heavy route, sunrace make an excellent spaced (teeth count) for 11s and 12s. They even make a 11s 11-50 tat you can use to push a XT Rd-M8000 to its most absolute limit
  • 1 0
 Wait, who forced you to buy 12 speed?
  • 1 0
 @downhiller900sl: this! I ride a 10s MX3 11-46 and it's totally fine with a 32t up front. Spacing is better than the Shimano option. Works nicely with a Rdm7000 and Zee Shifter. Climbs here are usually between 15 and 30% grade.
Speaking of Zee, on some suspension designs you can get a Zee Fr derailleur to work with a 11-42 cassette, which should be fine for most on 27.5 rear wheels.
  • 15 4
 I want a gearbox. Not because I smash derailleurs but because of:-
Better weight distribution. Lower unsprung mass for the win.
Resistance to mud/rain. In the winter you've got maybe half an hour before your chain is making horrible noises and after a couple of hours the shifts will be crap too, just due to the mud in the way.
Resistance to snow/ice. When it's cold and there is snow on the ground jockey wheels clog up with ice and you have to stop and clear it.
Ease of maintenance. Having to carefully wash, dry and then re-lube after every winter and many Autumn and Spring rides is a pain.
Cost of maintenance. £400+ for a cassette, chain and sprocket then fill them with grinding paste? Yeah that's a really great system.
  • 2 2
 There are a few gear box options on the market. What’s keeping you from buying one?
  • 3 0
 All this, and other pros like the bike staying clean. You still have to wash off mud and dirt of course, but having no oil flinging around makes it a quick job. And if you think a clutch on your derailleur and STFU on your stay makes a bike quiet, you'll realize it doesn't once you (don't) hear a gearbox with a belt. Get one. You won't regret it.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Efficiency mostly for a muscle bike. I've only ridden a Pinion but the additional drag was significant. I'm also mainly riding lightweight ebike these days so very interested in the MGU but efficiency and weight are a question. Once these actually start turning up in the real world I'm keen to try one.
  • 1 0
 @G-Sport: Yeah, there are trade-offs for sure.
  • 3 0
 I have never hurt a derailleur in 30 years of riding, BUT... my next bike will have a Pinion gearbox. I am done spending money on dinner plate size cassettes with foot long derailleur cages with all their weight and vulnerability being in the worst place possible. Plus having to oil the chain every ride with awful smelling lube. I get it, gearboxes have more drag but so do unmaintained, worn and dirty chains/cassettes.
  • 3 1
 @islandtrader: Don't worry, the 'drag' people (who have never tried one) go on about is a non-issue.
Unless you are racing XC at a high level, you will not be able to discern a difference.
  • 3 0
 @islandtrader: Totally reasonable response. Having an entirely open drive/gear-train is ridiculous. I would also suggest trying wax instead of oil on chains though, just using the squirt stuff has been an eye opener for me.
  • 3 0
 @CarbonShmarbon: I'm really excited to ride one for the first time to see just how "bad" or not bad the drag really is. I've been searching for just the right used Zerode for a while now.

@G-Sport: It really is! The waxes do smell better but it's still the point of the constant maintenance. Last time I checked, there's no part of my car that I have to lubricate everytime before I drive it anywhere.
  • 1 0
 I’d be a bit cautious regarding gearboxes and snow/ice. You need to make sure the gearbox seals are impervious and/or stay on top of internal maintenance. Our commuter bikes had small amounts of water get into the internally geared hubs and freeze there. Put an end to any kind of shifting action.
  • 1 0
 @G-Sport: Yep, Squirt convert as well!
  • 10 1
 derailluer smashing and having to occasionally maintain it aren't huge problems for me. I'm more interested in gearboxes because on paper it's a better weight distribution for a full suspension mountain bike.
  • 2 1
 What’s kept you from buying one of the several gearbox options on the market?
  • 1 0
 @TheR: haven’t seen one on a bike that’s worth spending a few thousand dollars on
  • 7 0
 Either way, I have been riding for 25 years and never liked the way derailleurs look. It wasn't so bad when they were short but terrible with how long they are now. If someone could figure out low friction, light weight, strong, pinion gearboxes with good shifting mechanisms, we can say goodbye to derailleurs forever. Similarly, if someone can ever come up with puncture proof tires or airless inserts that ride well that aren't heavy and hard to change, two of the things that need improving the most will have finally been solved. Especially for racing, someone losing a race from a puncture and not because they weren't fastest is always such a bummer.
  • 2 0
 I agree on the tire part, how tf have we not figured that out. Big rubber will never let that happen.
  • 2 0
 @warmerdamj: it's a fundamental property of friction. If you want it to have a lot of friction, the durometer has to be soft. If it's soft, it's going to wear faster than the harder durometer material. Until there's some sort of breakthrough with molecular 3D printing (or something similar), we're going to be stuck with the sticky stuff not lasting.
  • 1 1
 A lot of conditions you have there for gearboxes. Makes you wonder if there might just be advantages and disadvantages to any system. And if, based on those trade-offs, gearboxes are really the answer here.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: They will be the answer when they meet these conditions, IMO. Right now, they aren't.
  • 7 0
 I break several 12sp shimano derailleurs a year- they're now a wear item which pisses me off. Broke and bent many hangers back in the day on 26" wheels but never a derailleur. Went to 29" with a medium cage sram derailleur and never a bent hanger or broken derailleur for 7 years. I think the 29" wheel with the shorter cage was the sweet spot for derailleur longevity.
  • 5 1
 I'm surprised no one else is jumping on this, thought it was going to be controversial. I bent 3 derailleurs in quick succession about 8 years ago, all Shimano, then bought a new bike which happened to have SRAM and the problem stopped. Been on SRAM ever since and despite having some horrific gouges in them they still work great. I think maybe Shimano went through a particularly bad patch when I did, with the outer parallelogram plate being very easy to bend but still...
  • 12 2
 Several? You break several derailleurs a year? How many is several and what planet’s year? Cuz like that’s too many.
  • 3 0
 @owl-X: It’s normally Scottish heather that kills mine, the bottom of the cage where it protrudes out past the lower jockey wheel axle, snags, which either bends out the plate so the lower jockey wheel derails all the time (you really can’t fix it), twists the cage as a whole, or snaps the parallelogram. I do 2-3 a year normally, one will be snapped.
  • 1 0
 @owl-X: I broke 2 SLX 12spd mechs in about 3 months, and also broke a third not long after. All somewhat freak accidents, but these Shimano 12spd mechs really don't seem that durable to me.
  • 2 0
 @owl-X: My question is, if a person keeps breaking them, why keep replacing them with the same thing? Being generous, I’d be done with the third one. I don’t care if they offer a warranty replacement or not. I’d take the warranty replacement and sell it to offset the cost of something else. I wouldn’t want the headache of breaking several a year.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: your question deserves an answer! I predict it’s wilder than breaking several derailleurs a year. How bad does he hate sram that he’d rather stay with 90 day derailleurs???
  • 1 0
 @owl-X: Some people just break stuff. Give them a gearbox and they will still manage to break it in the course of a few months.
  • 6 0
 "I ignored all the warning signs my derailleur was out of alignment and proceeded to shift into my lowest gear, hence wrapping my derailleur in the spokes like a tool" button missing.
  • 3 0
 Ya, thats probably a lot of those votes. Problem is most of those votes, the people are to dense to realize thats what happened.
  • 4 0
 Maybe you should add a question about which brand derailleur have you broken. Never have I ever broken a SRAM derailleur, even though that is what I ride a majority of the time. Shimano, on the other hand, I have some that look like the pics above completely split in two.
  • 1 0
 I had a BOX derailleur that broke while casing a jump, other than that Ive never had a shimano or sram break. My bike accidentally fell off the back of the truck the other day and landed on the derailleur side and the shimano XT didnt even shift funny afterwards.
  • 4 0
 I just did my first one last season after 15 or so years of riding. I was kinda surprised more than upset, like i knew that could happen, but it never did in so many years. Fortunatly just a deore derailleur, 56 dollars for a new one. Folks running xtr or xx1 or whatever mechs are absolutely insane.
  • 3 0
 Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm not entirely convinced in any practical situation when riding whether a riders preference for left or right crank forward makes any difference towards mech's getting smashed into rocks/tree's etc.
  • 6 0
 I believe that what they're inferring is that maybe your trailing heel out there near the derailleur might offer some protection.
  • 8 0
 Or the way you manage the bike. Your body knows where your heel is and will try to protect it from impact - if the right heel is far from the derailleur, as a right-foot-forward rider's would be, the derailleur is less likely to be in the "bubble" of reflexive protection.
  • 3 2
 @Bluefire: Thats a cool thought, thanks for that!
I try to get clients to practice both, it makes for some really interesting downhill switchback moments!
  • 2 0
 @canderson9220: based on paint wear I know my heel was getting pretty close to that area on my Spectral (432mm chainstays) so its definitely in the realm of possibility for my heel to make contact if it slipped.
  • 3 0
 I ride left foot forward and have US size 13 shoes, my derailleur is fairly well protected.
  • 3 0
 0 have been totally destroyed like in some of those pictures.

Though I've put a lot of effort into breaking them, but I tend to try to not ram my bike into rocks or friends.

Honorable mention goes to the Sram XO shortcage (9 speed?) on an old DH bike. That thing was clapped; the clips on the parallelogram were shaved off from Bromont's rox. Teeth might have been missing from one of the pulleys. But that thing kept going like it was new.

A stick fileted the cage open like a fish on a Deore 12 speed derailleur last summer, midway down Martha Creek in BC. I thought it was cooked, but its still on the bike and being used....

Dishonorable mention goes to a GX Eagle derailleur. Second ride on it and a stick went in the cage. I saw the stick and immediately stopped, didn't pedal through it even a quarter turn. But the thing was bent and had to be used for parts. You could not tell visually that it was bent though. Garbage.
  • 1 0
 9 spd x0 short cage for the win, I still use one on the hard tail, such a bomb proof set up
  • 1 0
 @dicky1080: or Zee short cage
  • 3 0
 Would be great to see this survey for edr/xc riders (non strikes) as pedalling increases risk of damage. Trail conditions plays a big part too. I ride singletrail edr/xc style in the bush in australia (not maintained bike parks etc) and the type of trees we have out here are constantly dropping twigs (think the size of an old car antenna with 3-4 smaller off shoots), not leaves. I do alot of trail care but removing these is an endless task, so we just ride over them and they occasionally get caught up in the drivetrain. I’ve average 3-4 derailleurs/year over a decade. Would be interesting so see a survey on derailleur destruction based on riding discipline and trail conditions. Actual location might be interesting as well.
  • 6 0
 What?!? No single speed option lol
  • 1 0
 Beat me to it... though while riding a single speed exclusively for almost 10 years I broke all kinds of *other* things like a seat post, a couple of saddles, a pedal and several chains.
  • 3 0
 Coming from over 40 years on bikes and was there in the early years of MTB. Before science and clutch derailleur.... More than my fair share of em.... Hangers...... Pffft..... Easier to count how many I haven't broken...
  • 3 0
 Yep. I was going to put a number and then saw "... in the last 10 years."
  • 2 0
 When I first got SRAM AXS, that I spent a pretty penny on-I smashed a rock so fricken hard I thought it was over (was so far from car too, 20 miles)...and it made a bunch of robot sounds, I am assuming fixed itself (realignment?) and was perfect. Thats when I knew that shit was strong and awesome.
  • 2 0
 I've been riding since 1994. Trail and dh mostly. Living in a very rocky area, Santa Barbara, for 23 years of it. I'm also bike mechanic managing a service department in Reno, nv. I've destroyed 7 or 8 derailleur in that time,with the last one being in 2010. One year I went through 3 sram x9 short cage mechs on my dh bike. All were done in by bending the B knuckle and screwing up the parallogram geometry. Most of derailleur kills have been bending the jockey cage though. Honestly derailleurs seem to be holding up far better than they used to. Clutches may be partly responsible as the stabilized jockey cage has less chance of whipping into something. I am worried about the sram transmission derailleur. While modular replaceable bits and no hanger seems like a good thing for longevity, some of the parts are really expensive and it can be difficult to diagnose what bent.
  • 1 0
 I think prior to the era of Sram x9's etc- Shimano used to have that stupid little pin that would snap if hyperextended leaving the derailleur flaccid and useless- something that is not ideal for humans or derailleurs. Not a problem though with all current makers from my experience. So last 10 years- not many- last twenty years... yep...lots. There was this one rock on the Switchback climb in Victoria, BC that alone probably claimed 4 for me.
  • 3 0
 When your Shimano derailleur goes flaccid, remove your chain and spin the cage all the way anti clockwise and hold it away from the cassette while you refit the chain. Then you have spring tension pulling in the right direction and fully functional gears again. Works fine until you remove the wheels and it spins back around to the wrong place. Top tip for anyone riding a 90's MTB. You're welcome.
  • 1 0
 @TommyNunchuck: Yep- this was however, as I recall and not a mechanic or engineer, an actual small pin that would snap and despite many questions to shops as to why we could not replace the pin or repair don't remember anyone being able to do so. Potentially I was being fleeced for my lack of mechanical knowledge at the time but I recall others having the same issue with those early Shimano derailleurs. Many causes for flaccidity... some fixable and others not.
  • 1 0
 The only one I've thrashed was due to going off trail on my fatbike through some scrub and having a stick get caught up and jammed up in the chain and derailleur, broke and bent the derailleur and the hanger. had to strider bike it out. otherwise 1 hanger bracket incident on my trail bike.
  • 1 0
 Had a jamis divide with a shimano tourney. I replaced 19 derailers on it, and then the bike was sadly retired. I then upgrade to a canyon spectral. Only broke one derailer in the time I’ve owned it(1.5 years). Hopefully I never run into the issue again!
  • 1 0
 I destroyed one last year but it held up quite well considering. I had a m8000 11sp which apparently is not designed for 50tooth cassettes. That did not stop me from using the 50tooth sunrace for 3 seasons until the derailleur had enough and took a journey into my spokes. Maybe I remember the hell of 3x front derailleurs too much so modern 1x all seem great to me.
  • 1 0
 Left foot forward, have killed 1 derailleur. I don't think the foot position had any effect... there was just a chunk of wood on the trail that got kicked up and lodged in between my spokes and the derailleur. It broke 2 spokes and totally destroyed the derailleur (both the cage and the upper parallelogram).
  • 2 0
 I've Ran alot of drivetrains, I only seem to break Shimano RD's. I feel like it only takes a Blade of grass and they break - Most ive broken are from Shuttling and bumping into other bikes. Never broken a Sram.
  • 1 0
 Posted the same thing.
  • 3 0
 I haven't smashed a derailleur in about 20 years ..but now that I have clicked that pole it's more or less a final destination situation for the gx on my stumpy
  • 1 0
 I don't understand how people can vote for 1 derailleur in 10 years. Since 1x drivetrains are out there, I'm ruining at least one per season. I don't completely wreck them, but a lot of them just stopped working. Had them breaking at the hanger bolt, bent cage plates and primarily pivot bolts working lose, which you can't always fix, especially on lower-end models.
  • 1 0
 I've never busted a derailleur, but I go through about 2 hangers per season. They haven't been easy to come by always. Also, knowing that I've got a relatively delicate point on the back right side of the bike influences my line choice, and always makes me think twice about trying out a skinny. I can't just coast home either if my drive train fails.
  • 4 0
 I ride with a prosthetic leg and ride with this foot forward does this still count since it’s not actually mine?
  • 1 0
 Standing by for the next poll where we answer how many legs we have torn off while mountain biking, and whether it was the forward leg...
  • 1 0
 I have however broken the clutch lever off my SLX derailleur TWICE in the last two years. Thank goodness Shimano sells replacements for about $7, and they're pretty easy to replace, once you figure out what's actually going on under that little clutch case cover.
  • 2 1
 The pic of that destroyed Shimano mech shows how pointless Transmission is. Do another poll about how you broke the ones you broke, I'll bet the vast majority are like that one shown, and when the hanger does break, it's because of this failure and then getting snagged in the wheel. I know I've seen waaaay more busted cages and p-knuckles, which Transmission still has, than busted hangers or b-knuckles.
  • 1 0
 I have broken derailleurs before, but only after I have send the bike tumbling down the track after I have decided I wanted to take a dirt sample or a quick 2 minute dirt nap. Has also resulted in broken body parts and/or cracked frames. Rarely catch my derailleur on obstacles though, have given them a bash in rock gardens, but not enough to break them.
  • 1 0
 ONE... & it was in the late 90s... On my way home at night I hit a pothole... My derailleur shook itself into my rear spokes & a lockup manifested... The sudden brake launched me off my seat & onto my feet, where I scrambled to stay upright as I slowed myself & my bike... & now, ever since that incident which I survived undamaged, I ALWAYS RIDE WITH A REAR WHEEL COVER TO PREVENT MY DERAILLEUR FROM 'TONGUE KISSING' MY SPOKES EVER AGAIN... >.>
  • 1 0
 Everyone loves a dork disc
  • 1 0
 @DaveRobinson81: Too small... In fact I probably had one on when it happened... A rear derailleur hangs lower than the spoke protector, which was not much larger than my 28T(largest cog - so it was about the size of a 32-34T cog) - so when the trauma of the pot hole shook it there was plenty of space for the cage to contact the spokes... Again, it was the late 90s so Shimano 8 speed 11-28T cassette & because I use gears like a car, I was in first gear - so the derailleur was BOTH extended AND very close to my spokes... Viva la wheel covers(pic of replacement bike with said cover now in my pics)...
  • 1 0
 I think it really depends where you ride. Most of the trails me and my friends enjoy are just hiking trails that are not maintained at all and have rocks, twigs and all kinds of debris just waiting for you derailleur to have a bad day. I think it's fair to say that a broken maybe 10 derailleurs in the course of 15 years mountainbiking but I never broken one on a bike specific trail.
  • 1 0
 actually I’m hoping to smash mine just enough for perfect shifting. Anyone else have issues dialing in your AXS? Ive had issues in the smaller cogs since I got it. (going from 12th gear to 11th) I’ve tried a new hanger, micro adjust, reassembled the crankset, chains lubed. I dang near taken apart everything- only thing I can think of is if there’s a problem with my actual frame. drives me crazy
  • 1 0
 Tulio would be happy with this poll. Crazy he won't be represented at TDF this year.
The tech is reliable enough considering the torture that brilliant little (rear derailleur) gadget is exposed to.
I suppose I would consider gearbox bike if I destroyed 18-20 derailleurs in the last 10yrs.
  • 1 0
 Plus....clutch and rivets wearing out, bent hangers, constant wear and tear drivechain parts replacement, spending ages cleaning out gunked up jockey wheels, having to index gears regularly, having a system that becomes significantly less efficient when muddy, having to design chains that work with poor chain line rather than being durable, having to ay thousands extra over the life of a bike if you want to keep drivechain light and high end. It's all these things that make me curious about gearboxes...not just the occasional smashed mech.
  • 1 0
 I broke 5 derailleurs my first year mountain biking after decades of trail riding BMX. I learned to think of derailleurs as a second set of testicles hanging off the back of my bike and to always be acutely aware of the consequences of even a small impact. Personally I think the sport of road biking would benefit from a better solution.
  • 1 0
 Any well designed dropout system (e.g. Syntace X-12) will snap a replaceable hanger/bolt before you ever bend a derailleur cage. It's like a $10/10-minute trailside fix. I've killed dozen hangers/bolts but absolutely zero shadow plus derailleurs.
  • 1 0
 Still riding XT 11 speed here, those derailleurs last about .75 season riding lots of park, then the arm between the mounting location and pivoting bolt fatigues and snaps off, or cracks and allows the mech to get sucked into wheel; have had 2 die this way. Dh derailleurs (short cage) of the GX and Zee variety last about a season before they rattle limit screws/pulley wheel screws and are bound/bent beyond repair. But I’ve never had them fail due to breaking the mech metal itself, because the cage is much shorter, I think the leverage/fatigue is much smaller over time. Gx 11 spd on the trail bike seem more durable, but also, gentler use case, and the clutch spring gets so weak/loose after a year or so of semi/rough trail, you either need to remove link off chain or get used to LOTS of chain slap and dropped chains unless using a pretty tight guide. If 11 spd GX had a clutch adjustment like Shimano, it might be the best mech ever
  • 1 0
 Older Sram 11spd had adjustable clutches. Definitely my favorite derailleurs ever. The new Srams pretty much don't have clutches and the jury is still out on Shimanos. I have broken about a cable a month on my XT 11spd...
  • 1 0
 1: GX 11 - wrapped a stick info my rear wheel and mech. Bent the mech out by hand and rode on with naff gears, used a large wrench to straighten it at home after replacing the broken spokes. Rode it for a couple of months until i broke proper. The forged bit had a crack from the violence I applied to straighten it.

2: NX Eagle, first gen. Last stage of an enduro race, it tossed the top cogwheel, and buried itself in the spokes.

That's it, averaging 7-8 hours per week all year for the last 12 years or so. Esp GX 1x11 could usually be repaired with a big hammer.
  • 1 0
 In the past 10 years: None.
Before that: Too many to count.

In my experience, the destroyed derailleur issues ended when 11sp XX1 came out. I have absolutely no problem with using derailleurs, provided they are from the upper-tier. I once got a "self-tweaking" NX derailleur on a rental bike: I always ended up with a crooked derailleur after a few runs, without direct impacts on it...just from riding the brake bumps in Saalbach! Smile
  • 1 0
 Been riding since 1994, raced dh for a bit, enjoyed dirt jumps and freeride through the early 2000s (when bikes were shit)
And I've never broken a derailleur from striking an object.
I've had a couple hangers bend slightly (that's their job) and had a few overshifts into the spokes - but then I put my brake on to not tear the mech off.

I think if you're going through derailleurs, you're a munter and/or ignore all the warning signs that things aren't alligned.
  • 2 0
 I answered 1, but that was probably 12 years ago? And it was a Rival 10 speed derailleur on my cyclocross bike. The pulleys got so caked with mud that the cage detached from body of the derailleur and ended up in my wheel.
  • 2 0
 Broken so many derailleurs in Tahoe in spring. So much debris down after winter sticks are usually what jump up and snag then snap instantly. Dont break them on rocks as much as you'd think.
  • 1 0
 1 derailleur.

It was 10 miles out.

Had to bail to the river/highway, literally attacked by angry homeowner dogs, (on public right o way) and hitchhike home.

One big drawback to full suspension. Break the chain, pull derailleur, rebuild single speed to get out... but suspension needs changing chain size.

Chucked the chain and foot paddled the mostly downhill after 2 attempts.
  • 1 0
 I don’t get why the numbers go up at the end? 18-20 picks up When you would expect it to be consistent with the downward figures. Are the gearbox mafia fiddling the figures?
Havent read all the comments as I’m on my phone so might have been answered already.
  • 1 0
 Precisely why I don’t find the need to spend nearly 1.5k on SRAMs new transmission!!! The average workhorse 12spd XT derailleur cost 150 bucks! I would have to break 12 of them to make up the cost of the SC.
I run XTR, average cost 280 bucks. I build a new rig every 4-5 years which means I would have to buy a new mech once a year to average that cost of SC. No way Jose! thank you but no thank you. I do however love their suspension products but a $1500 tranny doesn’t make sense to me.

Oh and I’ve NEVER catastrophically broken a derailleur, if you busting a derailleur that often your riding style sucks!
  • 1 0
 I answered 1 but really the only one I destroyed was just riding alone, well commuting, on a road bike. And I believe I broke only because that old aluminium frame's derailleur hanger thread gave up and launch the derailleur in the rear wheel. I guess most people who broke several time a rear derailleur in a 10y lifespan are just breakers and would manage to break a pinion gearbox all the same. Some people just break things. I am the same but only in the kitchen.
  • 1 0
 I'm going to be downvoted to hell, but the one in teh picture is a perfect example of failure mode of Shimano 12s derailleurs. They snap like that really easy, you can see the cross section of that fibre reinforced plastic area, not surprising at all. Another typical failure, mosty XTs and XTRs, is the B knuckle, between the frame attachement bolt and the parallelogram pivots. SLXs and Deores are not so prone as there's a larger cressection and the material is softer but more ductile.

That leads to another problem: SLXs ad Deores are more prone to bend as the B knuclkle and the parallelogram arms are softer. Once they're out of allignment, the top pulley will be slightly out of plane relative to the cogs, and due to the big offset of that pulley with the cage pivot, the pulley will not travel the distance it is suppossed to travel for each shift. Result: indexing becomes unreliable.

Another typical problem with Shimano SLXs and Derores is they get play at the inner link top pivot (the one on the b-knuckle), rattling around and again contributing to luosy indexing. XTs and XTRs are less prone to this, although they will eventually develop some play if they don't snap before.

Shimano 12s works really smooth when the transmission (no pun) is fresh and clean. After that though....
  • 1 0
 I splashed out on an XTR once. Turns out they are made of toffee. Fortunately I met someone on the trails who had one at home with shattered carbon plates. Sold him the bent XTR with good plates and the money paid for a new SLX that never faltered and snapped many sticks.
  • 2 0
 Ive had t -type sram X0 for 2 weeks now. Ive completely demolished it, apparently i need to replace the lower cage or the whole drivetrain. Truly sticking with XT is possibly the best option...
  • 1 0
 Broke a road derailleur in a fall on concrete because of low tire pressure Had nothing to do with foot position. Never broke a mountain derailleur. Wiped out on dirt and rocks a ton and only scratched the mech or bent the hanger.
  • 1 0
 LOL!
What a disastrous poor setup of a survey. Most people miss the second question, hence there are more results for the first. Even though a lot more people lead with their left foot. (See also analogy in snowboarding.) A really good survey would first ask which foot you lead with and then show the other answers…all in one window!
  • 1 0
 I’m at 13 in 8 years of riding
Xt 10 speed, sucked into spokes and destroyed
Xt 11 speed, sucked into spokes and destroyed
Gx 11 speed, tweaked, will never shift right again
Gx 12 speed, tweaked
Gx 12 speed, destroyed
Gx 12 speed, lower pulley fell off and destroyed (bolt backed out, maybe user error)
X01 12 speed, tweaked
Xt 12 speed, tweaked
Slx 12 speed, tweaked
Slx 12 speed, tweaked
Sx 12 speed, literally fell apart on the third ride
Nx 12 speed, destroyed
Slx 12 speed, tweaked

I still have all of them!
  • 1 0
 Some preliminary stats (as of Feb 6, 11:20 am EST):

Left foot forward: 54.3%
Right foot forward: 45.7%

I would have guessed left foot forward would have been higher. Are right-handers slightly more often left-foot forward and v.v.?

Left vs Right stats. Note that I did not include the just results responses in the calculations:

Just results: 19.8% vs 43.5%
Never: 39.9% vs 44.5%
1: 22.7% vs 20.6%
2: 15.0% vs 13.0%
3-5: 15.2% vs 14.2%
6-8: 3.9% vs 4.2%
9-11: 1.5% vs 1.6%
12-14: 0.7% vs 0.6%
15-17: 0.3% vs 0.4%
18-20: 0.8% vs 1.0%

Initially, it doesn't appear that footedness has a significant impact on mech. destroying. The graph is easier to interpret but no way to paste.
  • 1 0
 Some preliminary stats (as of Feb 6, 11:20 am EST):

Left foot forward: 54.3%
Right foot forward: 45.7%

I would have guessed left foot forward would have been higher. Are right-handers slightly more often left-foot forward and v.v.?

Left vs Right stats. Note that I did not include the just results responses in the calculations:

Just results: 19.8% vs 43.5%
Never: 39.9% vs 44.5%
1: 22.7% vs 20.6%
2: 15.0% vs 13.0%
3-5: 15.2% vs 14.2%
6-8: 3.9% vs 4.2%
9-11: 1.5% vs 1.6%
12-14: 0.7% vs 0.6%
15-17: 0.3% vs 0.4%
18-20: 0.8% vs 1.0%

Initially, it doesn't appear that footedness has a significant impact on mech. destroying. The graph is easier to interpret but no way to paste.
  • 1 0
 The reasons to go to a gearbox are way beyond just breaking derailleurs. The main one for me would be moving the half kilo cassette from one side of the back wheel to the bottom bracket. Also in theory a gearbox should last for a shitload more KMs with bugger all maintenance. I guess the big 2 drive train companies aren't ready to part ways with their almost disposable drivetrains (which work fine). First we have to add extremely over priced electronics and a few other cash cow ideas but I think we will get there eventually - at least with gravity bikes. Pinions look sweet, anyone with first hand experience?
  • 3 0
 One derailleur in 30+ years of riding MTB...and it was way back in the day. I have broken tons of cassettes/freehubs though!
  • 1 0
 about 15 in 35+ years for me. A bunch were 6 and 7 spd XT's. Back in the day the RD failed to protect the non replaceable dropouts. Bending one on an aluminum frame could kill the frame. That said a stick going through the pulley cage has bent the shit out of a fair number of my 10 and 11 spd XT's
  • 1 0
 Me too, broken two 20+ years ago, both due to random sticks getting flicked at just the right angle to catch the derailleur and then get jammed against the ground at just the right angle to destroy the derailleur.
  • 1 0
 At least one of the mechs I've broken was due to piss poor set up and it being dragged into the spokes off a drop. Other than that it's been piss poor line choice, once or twice. 18 years of riding.
  • 1 0
 It's honestly been awhile for me since I went to the X01. I've only had to replace it once in the last 5 years. But back in the x9 days I'd be lucky to make it through a bike park season without killing 2 or 3.
  • 1 0
 I'm usually about one per year. In 2019 I detonated something like four Shimano 12sp derailleurs in one summer. When I complain about derailleurs, I have a pretty good basis for it.
  • 2 2
 Based on the results thus far maybe the problem is being regular footed (left foot forward) since those folks seem to destroy more derailleurs. The goofy footed folks (right foot forward) seem to damage far fewer rear mechs. Why is this—anyone have a guess here?
  • 5 0
 Theory: regular riders can’t ride straight Razz
  • 15 0
 Probably many didn't read the title and answered the first poll, then noticed there was a second poll, then realized there was a foot orientation in the title.
  • 4 0
 More right-handed riders leads to more derailleur destruction. You have to see if the percentage of failure is the same, not the raw number.
  • 3 0
 As a right foot forward rider, I'll take a guess. When I whip I poke the bike out to the left, I'm better at turning right--bikes pokes out to the left, I feel more comfortable with the bike drifting to the left, left moves the body towards facing forward like skiing, and happens to be out of harms way for a derailleur. Maybe more comfortable getting closer to stuff on the front side than the back side and gives it a buffer
  • 1 0
 Right for back, higher energy right hand turns which puts the derailleur down in harms way.
  • 1 0
 @mrmizzle5: I ride right foot forward but feel so much more comfortable and faster (whether I am or not is another matter). However, I’d say 90% of my slide outs are on left corners leading to the derailleur pointing to the sky rather than ground when I do slide out.
Only broken one in 12 years of riding and that was when a stick got caught into between the seatstays and chainstays, snapping back and breaking the derailleur
  • 4 1
 In my book, Goofy footed means you prefer to spin towards your front foot not just being left foot forward.
  • 2 1
 Yeah dude goofy doesn’t have anything to do with which foot’s in front on a bike. It’s how you spin (for mountain bikers, think of it as which almost-a-hip you prefer to barely jump).
  • 1 0
 @G-Sport:
Confused, I skate and snowboard right foot forward (goofy), ride mtb right foot forward but that’s not necessarily goofy?
  • 1 0
 @TamCal: Not in my book. Skateboarders and surfers seem more judgemental than BMXers maybe? ;-) I think it's fair enough to have left and right footed people prefer to lead a certain way. So in BMX it was usually just spinning towards the forward foot that was labelled "goofy" (which is what I do). I'm just assuming MTB will follow the same rules but it doesn't really matter does it. It's definitely a disadvantage for some stuff to spin towards the leading foot, but then when I was learning 360's opposite it was fairly easy because I'd probably been doing it wrong before :-)
  • 1 0
 @TamCal: yup. If you prefer to spin opposite you’re a goddamn shitfooter, and your style is pure butt. This is way less important in MTB, bordering on inconsequential, so don’t worry about it.
  • 1 0
 Sorta. Maybe. I posted the % for left vs right for each category from yesterday's data.

Don't use the overall numbers. They would be misleading. As of today, for the left-footed, there were ~ 20K responses but 4K just wanted to see the results. So only 16K valid responses.

For the right-footed, there were ~ 17K responses but 7K only wanted to see the results. So only 10K valid responses.

Then calculate the % of responses per category using only the 16K and 10K responses.

I didn't calculate today's %s but not much difference yesterday. A few % points for left-footed in the never, 1 and 2 derailleurs. Very little difference as the number of derailleurs increased beyond 3-5.

Left-foot forward riders generally turn better to the left and aren't as good turning right. Unless they either work on back-foot turns going right (Simon Lawton at FluidRide on youtube does a great job explaining this). Or they work on switching feet. i.e. left-foot forward for left turns and right foot forward for right turns.

Conversely, right foot forward riders generally turn better going right but are less proficient going left.

So it's possible that left-foot forward riders may crash a little more going right vs right-foot forward riders going right. And the derailleur is on the right.
  • 1 0
 In the modern era of clutch- and low-profile derailleurs, zero. But in the 90's thru early 2000's... .dozens literally. Not sure if that's a commentary on the equipment, or my riding skills, but there it is.
  • 1 0
 haha i destroyed a derailleur cramming it into the back seat of my tacoma (wheels off) because i had couple of days in the city affter buying it and didnt want to leave it in the bed
  • 1 0
 I've never broken one mountain biking - and current bike has over 5K KM's. Last one was ~2000 when riding along a path (commuting to work) and a stick kicked up and broke off a beloved short cage Shimano XT
  • 1 0
 For me they don't really break, but they develope so much play, they don't work properly and get noisy. G.e. my last Gx 12 speed lastet about 1 year, the old X9s (no damping) died super fast on my old dh bike...
  • 1 1
 I answered 3-5 in both cats because I have no pref, foot-forward is more a function of terrain and tempus. Most recent incident, 1yr GX mech, ate a stick and twisted itself. Bought SLX to replace, and second ride did same, ate stick, twisted but repairable. F#(^ing sticks! There oughtta be a law against'em!
  • 2 0
 Lots of loose rocks = lots of rear mechs. Short cages have survived the best...bad news for mechs for long range cassettes...Saint on an 11-42 works best for me.
  • 3 0
 I have to know: the people that destroy 18-20 mechs in 10 years...how? Or are you goofing on the poll?
  • 3 3
 this poll makes no sense to me because I am not a left or right footed only rider, I alternate both while riding. what is this, skateboarding ? I used to smash my bike more when I first started riding but after a while you learn how to handle your bike properly.
  • 1 0
 It's like being right or left handed. People subconsciously have a dominant side/ foot forward, and usually stick to it. I would only ride wrong foot forward if something has gone wrong (cranks spin mid tailwhip etc), and I have to wait until the next chance to switch it back. I wouldn't say it is "normal" to be ambidextrous, but it isn't a bad thing at all.
  • 1 0
 absolutely WRECKED one in sedona.... I think the rock pushed the derailleur into my spokes, then my wheel twisted it around the casette area... It cracked, and that was my introduction to chainless riding.
  • 1 0
 Can't remember the last time I broke one on my Amish bike but I've ruined 2 SLX 12sp ones on my E bike. 1 broke in half and one spread the cage to the point of no return. Is that common for SLX, E bikes or both?
  • 1 0
 Way too many. Some insane catastrophic ones where it ended up in multiple pieces multiple times and a bunch of others where it tweaked the body just enough to become a pain to index.
  • 1 0
 Every exploded derailleur in my case (2), was directly preceded by smashing a chain on the bottom of the ring, and then pedaling that sad mangled bit of metal into the derailleur with some good force.
  • 1 0
 I have broken one derailleur in 10 years of riding…when another rider ran into me at just the right angle to hit the derailleur! Otherwise I’ve never seen anyone break a derailleur, either racing or group rides etc…
  • 2 1
 All of my broken derailleurs were lshimano slx and they were all made out of cheese!Sram derailleurs seem to be a bit more resistant to my incompetence as do deore 12sp…..go figure
  • 1 0
 I haven't destroyed a derailleur while riding in a long time but worn a derailleur over a season is not hard, especially the 12s Shimano derailleurs which get loads of play in every joint very quickly.
  • 1 0
 In the last year, I have catastrophically destroyed 1 rear derailleur… XT 12sp on a UDH (on a borrowed e-bike). I have witnessed two other catastrophic destructions in the same year… both were XT 12sp on a UDH.
  • 2 2
 A bunch of these people must ride like a bull in a china shop? Just blundering around on the trail like they want to smash derailleurs? Breaking one every so often is going to happen, same as pinch flatting a tire. Its going to happen. Otherwise, you either have extremely bad luck or you need to learn how to pick better lines.

As for the "gearbox" debate, never going to happen. Everyone wants it but they have no idea. A standard transmission in a car loses 15-18% of the power put into in. A bike "gearbox" would be the same. No ones willing to give that up compared to a chain the sprockets that loses 1%. Gearboxes are not coming so learn to pick better lines. Well, maybe on ebikes that have a motor to compensate for that 15%?
  • 2 0
 Exactly. It seems fairly obvious that the rear wheel follows a different path than the front around corners, especially after the first few instances rubbing rocks with your mech. Practice small stoppie pivots people! Doesn't need to be much to noodle your way through tight sections. The gearboxes I've tried felt like riding through mud or sand in the lower gears. Not optimal for hard climbing moves.
  • 1 0
 I've never destroyed one, but I have to straighten a ton of hangers at the shop. I have had 2 friends over 10 years ago break 1 derailleur each, but they were both on cheap department store bikes so that doesn't count.
  • 1 0
 Also UDH, doesn’t seem to be any more durable or stronger than any proprietary hangers I’ve had, but a lot cheaper and easier to find; however, if you want the toughest hanger out ther @northshorebillet. !
  • 2 0
 Love my Pinion equipped Reeb, no worries about derailleurs, chain links (Gates belt drive) Have not had to adjust the shifting once since building it. Absolutely love it.
  • 1 0
 There is a DERAILLEUR GUARD available right now for $30.00 made by GEO HANDGUARDS and they have another option coming out soon!
Available at AMAZON and www.geohandguards.com

youtu.be/MoL9cuQ1Sps?si=fFOoFRS7rG_e7h83
  • 1 0
 Apparently it has happened to me enough that I always carry a spare hanger. And enough that I know how to make my bike into a single speed if necessary. It really is a ride-ending situation.
  • 3 0
 The Entrails entrance (Squamish) has taken two from me!
  • 1 0
 I can see how that would happen. Pile of Rocks loamer on Fromme claimed at least a couple of mine.
  • 3 0
 Does this include front derailleurs?
  • 1 1
 No because the poll stipulates "in the last 10 years"
  • 1 0
 We need a percent of total answers for those of us too dumb to do mental math. Seems close but maybe more likely to destroy if you’re left foot forward.
  • 1 0
 I did.

Left. Right
Never 39.9% 44.5%
1 22.7% 20.6%
2 15.0% 13.0%
3-5 15.2% 14.2%
6-8 3.9% 4.1%
9-11 1.5% 1.6%
12-14 0.7% 0.6%
15-17 0.3% 0.4%
18-20 0.8% 1.0%

In the never, 1, and 2 categories maybe a bit of an increase in left-footed. Once it gets above 6 mangled mechs, doesn't seem to be much difference.

But seeing as how ~ 75% of people only destroy 2 derailleurs in 10 years, the rationale for a non-derailleur drivetrain may be less compelling. For the other 25%, maybe so.

Having said that, I would absolutely consider a Pinion or Rohloff gear-box with a Gates belt drive in a long-distance bikepacking rig + mechanical disc brakes.

For an enduro full-squish, doubtful.
  • 1 2
 It's not that I'm destroying derailleurs, it's more that I can probably get 1-2 rides before it needs maintenance/adjustments. It is incredibly inconsistent shifting. The gearbox is appealing for that reason to me, I'm in. Would love a gearbox bike and even better, gearbox ebike.
  • 2 0
 What on earth are you riding? That cant be even close to possible. Ive worked on hundreds of 12spd systems both Shimano and Sram and they work/shift great. If youre doing your own work, I'd suggest taking it to a trusted shop and letting them get after it for you. If youre using a shop, theres a possibility they arent doing a very good job.

How do you store your bike?
How do you transport it?
I've seen so many people load theyre bike into the back of a car, or truck, smashing around on the rear der, only to tell me that their bike shifts like shut....shocking
  • 3 0
 It could be the bike, my old 2014 GT force had incredibly weak shifting until I rerouted the cable through the shock hole to avoid THREE tight radius 90° bends.
  • 1 0
 I blew up my friends xtr950 derailleur in 99. It simply disintegrated when I stood up to pedal. Definitely not down to a strike though.
  • 1 2
 Maybe it’s the Shore, maybe it’s me, but I’m around 10 for sure. At least 6 12 speed deraileurs. I’ve started buying Deore because it’s just a matter of time before it snaps in half, directly where Shimano makes them out of plastic. Exactly like the photo.
  • 1 0
 I've hit mechs plenty of times, but usually wear them out or bend them enough to be sub-optimal and will replace at that time. Have never killed one catastrophically.
  • 2 0
 Oh man, all you left foot forward people need to chill with your right hand corners!
  • 1 2
 Gearboxes and electronics in general are better suited to motorized bikes. No way normal mountain bikes will see the benefit of a complex proprietary enclosed transmission in my lifetime. If you spent 800 on an E-railleur for your trail bike then tough shit for you if you bash it to smithereens, ya kook.
  • 1 0
 I answered the survey for me, which is 0 ever broken riding 3-4 days per week in Laguna beach, CA. My son has broken too many to count on his DH bike. 5-10 a year for sure.
  • 1 0
 It's not the number I've been through that's the issue (only 3 in last 5 years). But every time it's happened it's been a rubbish way to cut a ride short.
  • 2 0
 I originally answer "1" but saw my answer changed the count from 666 to 667.... so I changed my answer
  • 1 0
 It's the right thing to do
  • 2 0
 1 time, and it was the same (plastic) part of the same (Shimano) derailleur in the photo...
  • 1 0
 The problem isn't that I totally wreck them but slowly knock them into a state where I somehow have to admit I need to replace yet another...
  • 2 0
 does riding include crashing? I've never broken one riding but i have crashing.
  • 1 0
 Been riding mtbs since 1989. 1 derailleur wrecked. Until I posted this. I'm sure I've just asked for another one to be busted at any time now.
  • 1 0
 pre ten years ago, definitely a few, but mostly derailleur hangers and why we always had a few replacement hangers in our backpacks.
  • 1 0
 Yes this is all well and good but I don't see no how many gearboxes have you broke over the last 10 years? How many belts of that have slipped in mud, pine needles etc.
  • 3 0
 The real mystery…Who are all of these left foot forward weirdos!?
  • 1 0
 Like everyone, I was born righthanded, but overcame it.
  • 2 0
 I have had a pinion gearbox for the past 2.5 yrs. Damn near indestructible.
  • 1 0
 The only derailleur I’ve blown up was a Dura Ace on a road bike. Just riding along and it decided it was time. Shimano warranty covered it no questions asked.
  • 1 0
 Done about 6 in the last 4 years, having to index gears on a semi regular basis sucks but gear skip sucks too. Probably next bike will be a zerode
  • 1 0
 I kicked up a branch last year on a high speed downhill fire road section between single track and bent the cage and destroyed the pulley wheel. Kind of my fault
  • 1 0
 It's always the sticks that get'em around here, Can't always back pedal fast enough to save derailleur detonation. So many...
  • 2 0
 I destroyed my xt derailleur TODAY Frown Hit a rock, ripped it in two pieces. The hanger is ok though. Damned!
  • 1 0
 The polls missed on the option 0!
I have destroyed a mech before, just not in the past 10 years... yeah some people are older =D
  • 2 0
 I destroyed 2 in one riding season, 2 weeks apart, none since. 1998 8 speed XT's. So 2 in 26 years, not too bad
  • 1 0
 Just one in the past decade, a Shimano 12s on the composite knuckle part. C'mon Shimano, you used to dog on SRAM for their Grillon plastic junk. Don't go down that road...
  • 1 0
 Check out www.derailleurguard.com
For $30.00, they may have a solution to the problem, it’s a great product and they are coming out with another option SOON!
  • 3 0
 0 -knocks on wood-
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I gotta go riding today and clicked in 'never'.
  • 1 0
 The only things I have broken so far were saddles and dent handlebars and rubber grips.
  • 2 0
 Since I ride left-foot-forward, I wreck rear brake disks on rocks.
  • 1 0
 But what if I have I have "catastrophically damaged a derailleur while riding", but not in the last 20 years? Hmmmm...
  • 2 0
 not letting me count shimano alivo from the 90s is cheating.
  • 2 0
 Old LX and X9 used to break like they were made of cheese.
  • 2 0
 Does SRAM NX just existing count as a catastrophic failure?
  • 1 0
 SRAM SX def does
  • 1 0
 So it’s scientific to say as of now right foot forward riders destroy less derailleurs?
  • 1 0
 3, but two of those were on the same rock last year at the bike park. My fault for taking the same crap line...twice.
  • 1 0
 Only 1. A Shimano ZEE short cage. But it wasn't from being hit or a crash. It just fell apart.
  • 1 0
 Only derailleur I’ve destroyed…so far… was from poor adjustment and I shifted the chain into the spokes.
  • 1 0
 I think I'm ambidextrous. Pump track trained me to swap feet. I'm sure I've broken shit with each foot forward.
  • 1 0
 Went back to 11 speeds, a shimano derailleur is cheaper than a tyre, setting is easy… I am happy
  • 1 0
 It had been a couple of years ... then 3 rides on Sram Transmission later boom. True story.
  • 2 0
 Replacing derailers sucks think I'm gonna run single speed on my next bike
  • 2 0
 I don’t think I have ever destroyed one and today I ripped one off!
  • 3 0
 Before or after you clicked 'never?
  • 1 0
 Back in the days of ladder bridges, this poll would’ve looked much different
  • 1 0
 Only one for me, and the stick that did it also took out some rear spokes leading to a ruined rim too.....
  • 1 0
 I ride with my feet perpendicular in a parallel universe and I've never mashed a derailleur in the 37 yrs I've ridden MTB Smile
  • 1 0
 Riders don't destroy derailleurs. Derailleurs destroy riders!... OK, so I bent a parallelogram or two back in day!
  • 1 0
 1 But I still want a gearbox bike as they're freaking cool, plus better rear suspension.
  • 1 0
 Not enough. There’s a saying you aren’t riding if you aren’t breaking.
  • 1 0
 I destroy a few each month Trash bin full of rear mechs Gettin a pinion asap !
  • 1 0
 Anyone else breaking the 11s shimano deore? Mine busted like cheese. Seems like it’s made of pot metal
  • 1 0
 I once bent the link between the derailleur and mech hanger on XT 11s. The part is cheap,love good old 11 speed
  • 2 0
 I ride too awesome to destroy a derailleur.
  • 1 0
 Conclusion we can make: People who ride with their left foot forward are more likely to fill in Pinkbike polls
  • 2 0
 never damaged one in 30 years of riding.
  • 1 0
 Really depends on how many rock gardens with tall rocks you ride. Flow trails will likely never destroy one
  • 1 0
 For those of you who have destroyed more than 45 it’s time to get and gear box.
  • 1 0
 I've only destroyed 1 and that was due to badly adjusted limit screw, destroyed a DT Swiss wheel at the same time
  • 1 0
 I've destroyed a grand total of one.. but it was on a road bike, so does that count? lol
  • 3 0
 so many lefties out here
  • 1 0
 Hangers blown up: Yes
Derailleurs: No
Now when I ride later today mine will explode.
  • 1 0
 The last one I broke was an XT 12 speed, it cracked through the middle of the body from fatigue after about 3 years of use
  • 1 0
 To the 127 people who've destroyed 18-20 derailleurs: How? What are you doing wrong?
  • 2 0
 Does bending count?
  • 1 0
 I don't think so. I believe the aim of the poll is "catastrophic" in that you had to buy a replacement.
  • 1 0
 Was it able to be repaired?
  • 6 5
 Why would you ride with your right foot forward?
  • 1 1
 Right? That's like pushing Mongo.
  • 2 0
 Strong leg in front for snapping out of the gate. #bmxbackground
  • 1 0
 I'm goofy foot - always pushed sk8 with left leg so it's stronger. #oldmanDS I don't get how it really matters for MTB riding otherwise, though
  • 2 0
 goofy gang wya
  • 1 1
 yet last year i had 2 gx eagle dereilleurs with a worn out clutch that i had to throw away. sram is trash
  • 1 0
 I ride with my cranks in the 12 and 6 o’clock position. I can’t vote.
  • 1 0
 how many pedal strikes do you get?
  • 1 0
 Just 1 in 2009. A twig got lodged in the ol D.
  • 1 0
 50% of the time, I am right foot forward.
  • 1 0
 Derailleur: 1 - Gearboxes:0
  • 1 0
 One Sachs Plasma DIRT. long time ago.
  • 1 0
 One cheap, 12 speed Deore after 14yrs of riding!
  • 1 0
 In sram years 18-20 destroyed In shimano years 1-2 destroyed you choose.
  • 1 0
 And people won’t invest in good apparel for fear of damage….
  • 1 0
 Anyone else feel the need to knock on wood?
  • 1 0
 @brundon:
I did as soon as I hit the submit button..lol.. I know tomorrow morning I will be 12 miles in and suck a stick up in a full sprint.
  • 1 0
 I have not destroyed a derailleur since skinnies were en vogue (pre2007?)
  • 3 0
 We at Lal Bikes will make skinnies great again.
  • 1 0
 I went through 3 in a year in my DH bike from the insane rock gardens.
  • 1 0
 I spent more time reading about Marmite, than derailleurs.
  • 1 0
 240 stories about breaking derailleurs, great content, Pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 me-2. my wife-3 last year.
  • 1 0
 Maybe practice picking better lines? Thats not normal.
  • 1 0
 Where is the "I only ride single speed" option?
  • 1 0
 Tell me you're a bike park frotha without telling me
  • 1 0
 There is a question missing:

How many have destroyed a Pinion gear box?
  • 1 0
 it was a stick and any bent derailer stick any slowed derailer stick
  • 1 0
 0 in the last ten years, probably 2 in the last 15, and 4 in the last 20.
  • 1 0
 I use a front mech with GS rear derailleur, so I don't have this problem.
  • 1 0
 Last 2 years 4 derailleurs on an ebike.
  • 1 0
 never destroyed a mech in 34 years of riding bikes with mechs.
  • 1 0
 UDH will def up the dead derailleur count..
  • 1 0
 Been riding since 1987, I've had to replace one derailer and one hanger.
  • 1 0
 So left foot forward is worse for derailleurs by the looks of it
  • 1 0
 Never while riding. It's usually after ejecting.
  • 1 1
 I answered 2 but that's over the course of like 25 years.
  • 1 0
 not enough..
  • 1 0
 after all,.....
  • 1 3
 Had a bad day 9 years 364 days ago.
Since then all good.
So 10 rear mechs in 10 years. Wink







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