Review: 6 of the Best Tire Inserts Ridden & Rated

May 25, 2021 at 10:40
by Henry Quinney  

Welcome to the two-part insert test. First up, some visual comparisons and my initial assessment of how they feel. The second part will feature a data led approach with impact resistance and real-world telemetry testing. Stay tuned for part two!



Tubeless tires have won-out against their tubed counterparts in mountain biking but that doesn’t mean that it’s the perfect system. Not only is it vulnerable to the possibility of burping the air out of the tire at high load or while cornering, it also needs to be a system that keeps damage and destruction at bay while withstanding a whole variety of different forces and abrasions.

How to best keep our tires inflated? And, what’s more, is there a way that not only means we’re less likely to puncture but also includes a handful of performance benefits?

Tire inserts are one potential solution. Maybe you need them, maybe you don’t. How we spec our wheels, tires and even our inserts largely depends on where and how we ride. It’s a really interesting topic. Some people would choose a heavy tire and no insert and some would combine the two for all out protection. What I’m interested in during this comparison is the idea of running a slightly lighter tire than I normally would while hopefully reaping all the benefits the insert has to offer.

Typically, I would run a rear tire weighing around 1200g or 1250g. For this test I ran tires that were around two or three hundred grams lighter. My ultimate goal was to have a tire and insert that was roughly the same total weight as a heavier duty tire.

The benefits of this could be three fold. A more supple tire that was yet further enhanced by running lower pressures to give higher levels of grip, combined with added support from the insert in turns while also offering better rim protection.

The testing involved an initial dry run while I was in Portugal using a Trail casing Vittoria Martello 2.35” tire on some 30mm wide Silt AM 29 wheels. This period was very brief and was largely by way of making the above video. I was due to begin another test period on a new set of wheels, a set of Mavic Crossmax XL, also with 30mm width, and I didn’t want to muddy the water by adding a variable.

During this extended period on the Mavics I ran Maxxis Assegais MaxxTerra 2.5" and Exo+ front and back as a control tire. I chose it because it’s a popular aggressive and wide tire choice, and it's also lighter than I would normally opt for. During this comparison we have inserts from six leading brands.

Before beginning testing in earnest, I acquainted myself with the tires and wheels with no inserts in. They behaved admirably, however burping wasn’t uncommon, clangs and bangs were a running theme and I could often feel the tire roll and squirm in turns. For your reference, I weigh 85kg and wouldn’t say I’m overly aggressive on the bike.

Contents
An Insert System or Merely Rim Protection?
Installation
The Test Track
Table Comparison
Tannus Armour Tubeless Insert
Rimpact Pro
Huck Norris MegaNorris Toast & Sandwich
Panzer EVO
CushCore Pro
Vittoria Air-liner Medium


An Insert System or Merely Rim Protection?

How different could two inserts feel from one to another? I thought it would reasonably clear, but I didn’t anticipate just how pronounced the difference in feeling would be between them. In my mind, I quickly separated the inserts into two groups: a system that uses inserts to maximize tire performance and a device that helps cover some of the blind spots of a tubeless tire such as stability and rim protection.

I think it's also worth mentioning that just because something is quiet it doesn't necessarily mean that it means the rim is impervious to damage. Similarly, if something is making noise it might not be from the insert bottoming out and the rim hitting an obstacle but rather something such as the insert slapping the rim. In the second part of testing, we'll look further into maximum loads for the inserts in a more controlled manner. For now, it's a fool's errand to try and assert which impact would mean what in something that is so hard to repeat.

Because of the dozens of times that I refitted the EXO+ casing tires, I'm not that confident in committing my findings in the article regarding the regularity with which the tire burped when pushing hard in rough terrain. For a relatively light tire, this is a problem I would normally encounter and I feel uncomfortable laying anything, positive or negative, at any particular inserts feet in relation to this because I would struggle to be certain. I think they all helped to a degree, and that's not to say I didn't get the feeling that some were less prone to losing air than others, but because of the constant reinstallations being such a huge variable (by the end I could fit the inserts without using levers) I would feel uncomfortable asserting anything for sure.

Installation

In terms of installation I would suggest that the Panzer and MegaNorris separated themselves as the easiest to fit. The Rimpact, Vittoria and Tannus would make up the mid table while the CushCore would bring up the rear. It’s not that any were particularly hard, or would dissuade me from buying them, but if this is a concern then that’s how I would rank them.

During tire removal I would rank them in a similar way.

I started each test period with 21 psi in the front and 24 psi in the rear before gradually going lower.

Of the inserts, the CushCore and Rimpact require non-standard tubeless valves to work with them. Handily, they’re all provided with your purchase. All the others use regular tubeless valves. Panzer, even go so far as to provide a bottle of sealant with every purchase. The sealant, which is latex and ammonia free, is remarkably thin to make injecting through the valve even easier.

The Test Track

Each insert got multiple days mainly riding the same test track. It had a great mix of rocks, roots and turns. It also included plenty of areas where grip was essential. This meant I could really reap the benefits of running lower pressures in my pursuit of the optimum setup. My initial run on the track with no inserts, while running 21/25psi, left me wincing in sympathy for my rims as the rock strikes made them call out with concerning regularity. It certainly had the terrain to use the full travel of the tire and turns that you could hit hard enough that they’d highlight any deformation and twisting.




Tannus Armour Tubeless Insert
The Tannus uses an interesting two-chamber design. The wings snap onto the bead of the rim and the holes let the air migrate between the two areas.

The Tannus is a tubeless insert that isn’t to be confused with the tubed-protection system that the company also makes. It uses a curious winged, two chamber design and was very different looking to the other inserts on test. The insert, on impact, felt really good. The inserts provided a very linear feel that was consistent, and didn’t just turn on as you got nearer to the end of the tire's stroke.

Tannus Tubeless Armour
Weight: 164g
Price per set: $100
Special Valves? No
Wheel sizes: 27.5 & 29"
Website: tannus.co.uk

The insert feels very smooth in that it feels like a cushioning as opposed to a large rubber bump stop. When I did get down the rim it felt like being parachuted back down to earth. You came down with a bump more than a thud. This isn’t to say you couldn’t damage your rim this way, but rather rimming out wasn’t an unpleasant sensation that would have you pulling over to check your rim.

The Tannus wasn’t the most reassuringly supportive in turns. It was adequate but not as strong as some of the others. I could also get some decent noise from the rim if I ran particularly low pressures. I ended up running a front/rear setup of 20/23psi.

It feels like it’s not to stop you from rimming out, but rather it makes that impact far more pleasant and takes the edge off. It’s very light. I’m not sure about the two chamber system, but both sides of the insert were snapped onto the side of the bead, which would suggest that it does as it promises and would back up the sensations when riding that the air is doing the work, as opposed to riding on the material itself.

I would put the Tannus in the category of added rim protection as opposed to a system. It’s light, it offers a tangible gain over no inserts whatsoever and I consider it to be something to be run with slightly lower-than-normal pressures for added protection, rather than something that can enable you to run extreme lows. The wings of the insert really did snap on to the rim and I think their claim of utilising two air chambers in the tire is very interesting. It could potentially lead to some of the aforementioned riding characteristics but it’s hard to say just how much difference it really makes.

Pros

+ Very comfortable
+ Added support in turns
+ It feels very smooth
Cons

- Not the most supportive
- Not to be used with ultra-low pressures
- Could be noisy



Rimpact Pro
The Rimpact Pro uses two densities of foam. There is the larger, softer arear that sits against the rim and the harder compound strip on top.

The Rimpact Pro is a malleable, dual density, wedge shaped insert that only comes in pairs. You can get sets that mix the Pro with the Original, which only uses one density, or sets that include a 29" as well as a 27.5" insert. Because the insert sits on the well of the rim, a trait shared with the CushCore, special insert valves are needed and are included in the box.
Rimpact Pro
Weight: 150g
Price per set: $99
Special Valves? Provided
Wheel sizes: 27.5 & 29"
Website: rimpactmtb.com

From the first run on the Rimpact and its qualities were very apparent. It's far more of a platform and significantly firmer than some of the other inserts on test. After a few runs, I let down the pressure to 18/21psi. It was so much firmer that it had a noticeable effect on how I weighted the bike. Initially, I didn’t have as much spring in the tire so my weight fore/aft was off when riding drops. This is something you get used to very quickly, but the way you preload the tire seems to be a little different.

The Rimpact’s performance could be summed up in one sentence - the harder you push it the more it gives you. What I would term the corn flour effect where the harder you hit it the more it firms up is very apparent.

It feels like far more of a system. It’s not something to be used with your normal pressures but rather in conjunction with the lower pressures enabled by running the insert. The grip was fantastic. The firmer feeling is not dissimilar to running a heavier compression tune. It thudded through everything it came across and it felt amazing. It rewards you the more you push and I consider it to be a performance product aimed at people who don’t merely want to protect their rims from occasional impacts, but rather people who need inserts to enable them to run lower pressures without them immediately breaking wheels.

I found that the Rimpact could be fatiguing at times. It doesn't feel that comfortable, in that you often feel like you ride on the support of the material as opposed to solely on the tire supported by a chamber of air. It offers huge amounts of grip, but to say that there isn’t a trade off in terms of comfort wouldn’t be true. I also tend to run a very firm spring rate, which could have exacerbated this issue to some extent. I would, however, be very curious to try the Rimpact with a slightly lighter compression tune on my fork.

I eventually went down as low as 17/19psi on a particularly wet day. The grip of the Rimpact is genuinely quite fantastic. Getting onto high lines over off camber roots is very impressive and there is a tangible gain to be had. Going down to such low pressures felt very bizarre and I was certainly a little skeptical. However, the Rimpact supports the tire in such a way that it delivers enormous grip and a great platform in turns. Once you hit something, instead of your wheel deflecting off, it tends to "stay hit". I would liken this to the use of a shot-hammer.

When riding turns without inserts, should you run lower pressures, the tire can almost be left behind as it finds grip, and the rim moves laterally across it. The Rimpact’s support means that although you can get the grip of the low pressure, it’s supportive enough that it can really carve turns and stops the rim running amuck under lateral load.

Through compressions, it took some massive clangs. When striking the wheel against rocks, the noise that came out definitely let itself be known. Although the Rimpact offered a huge amount of support it wasn’t as quiet as I would have liked. It was hard to say if this was the insert slapping against the rim or perhaps the wheel itself transmitting the sound. Either way, I did notice it.

It’s definitely more fatiguing than other inserts but that could also be something to do with the grip - it wills you to hit things harder. To get the most out of the Rimpact you have to crack on to go into the stroke of the insert. And if you do so you will be duly rewarded. If the Tannus is a parachute then this is more like a bungy jump - the freefall is minimal and, much like the chord of elastic taking up the tension, the insert duly picks up the load from a relatively early stage.

Pros

+ A genuine performance product
+ The most supportive on test
+ Offered a transformative change
+ Enables you to run ultra-low pressures
Cons

- Not everyone wants a transformative change
- Could be slightly noisy
- Prioritises performance over comfort



Huck Norris MegaNorris Toast & Sandwich
The MegaNorris is a very different design from the others. It floats inside the tire as opposed to being pressed against the rim. Like the Rimpact, it also uses different densities of foam.

The Huck Norris brand's new insert, the MegaNorris, improves on the original design and now comes in several different flavours. In order of weight there is the Toast, the Sandwich and the Hamburger. They recommend mixing and matching depending upon the application. For light enduro riding, which sounds about right for my riding, the Toast in the front and the Sandwich in the rear is a suggested option. The MegaNorris comes in a 29" length and you simply cut it to size and attach the ends together. There are even markings to make it a very simple task indeed.
MegaNorris Toast / Sandwich
Weight: 127g / 210g
Price per set: $121
Special Valves? No
Wheel sizes: Any
Website: hucknorris.com

The MegaNorris excels in some areas and is a real outlier compared to the others. Just to look at it you can see it goes down a very different route of design. It doesn’t sit on the rim but rather floats within the tire.

The strongest area of the MegaNorris is definitely in the turns. They not only give a reassuring, stable feeling but also feel as if they help you to get the edge knobs of the tire driving into the ground. If you’re not convinced by inserts, either due to the extra process in the installation or because you don’t ride suitably rough trails, then the MegaNorris could provide a very good option.

The way it dealt with compressions left a little to be desired. It feels more like a last defense rather than a full system. I don’t think the MegaNorris is something to be run with sub-20psi or for somebody who is happy to rely on the insert to do the heavy lifting duties for the tire. The MegaNorris feels like you ride it as a normal tire, with normal pressure and it will provide added protection and stability.

Over the rocks it gave out quite a lot of noise and I’m not particularly enamoured by the sensation it provides. It almost felt as if the insert was less of a cushion and more of an interruption. If the Tannus was a parachute to gently take you to the ground, and the Rimpact gradually adds an increasing amount of support, then the MegaNorris is landing in a well placed blackberry bush with a thud.

I think the MegaNorris does have its place and it does offer excellent stability in turns. This is the insert for somebody that rides hard, corners harder and isn’t particularly worried about feel or how it copes with rough choppy terrain. There are lots of people who ride high-load berms and want something very secure that will stop their tire squirming and rolling over, this could well be that option.

The MegaNorris is a very real alternative to the prevailing trends in insert design and having that alternative can only be a good thing for the end user. All that said, this isn’t the kind of riding I particularly enjoy. So, my own preferences might have coloured my overall view of it somewhat. I really tried to find a varied track for these inserts to show their capabilities over a whole selection of different terrain but it was definitely more a natural and battered old-school downhill run than it was groomed and high load turns. If I enjoyed that second type of riding more then perhaps it would increase the likelihood that I would run it on my own bike, but in my bike on that track on that hill in South Wales it wasn’t the pick of the bunch.

Pros

+ Available in different compounds and weights to suit your needs
+ Excelled in turns
+ Easy to install
Cons

- Venturing below 20psi could be problematic
- Doesn't feel particularly smooth through the stroke



Panzer EVO
The wedge-shaped insert means that the widest part of the insert actually sits quite high up within the tire. It also means that special valves aren't needed.

The Panzer Evo is by far the lightest on test and a remarkable claimed 90g. It doesn’t have a distinct feel like the other inserts. Truthfully, it feels the most like having no insert in there whatsoever. This is no bad thing - there are plenty of people who like the feel of their tires as they are, thank you very much. It didn’t particularly have a positive or negative effect in terms of grip, which could be seen as a good or bad thing.
Panzer Evo
Weight: 106g
Price per set: $121
Special Valves? No
Wheel sizes: 27.5 & 29"
Website: ridepanzer.com

The support in the turns was adequate. The place that the Panzer really shines though is how quiet the bike becomes. Its profile is almost T-shaped and it really overlaps the edge of the rims. I can’t say how this would cope under huge amounts of load, and I’m very excited to see how it compares in the test jig. Whatever happens, I can say that this is one area where I was thoroughly impressed.

I know this isn’t a performance thing, but how much noise comes out of my wheels and rims as I smash into rocks does have an effect with how I ride and the caution with which I approach things. The Panzer was muted and a pleasure to ride in that regard.

Some of the other inserts really felt as if they “turned on” as you went through the tire’s stroke. The Panzer is different in this regard. It feels neutral and there’s no place where it really feels like it switches on or times where it makes you realise “that was all insert”. There are other inserts that dominate the feel of the tire but that isn’t the case with the Panzer.

The Panzer feels like the most organic, if you will, and least like an insert. The Panzer was so quiet I almost worried it gave me a false sense of security and under the guise of silence I would hit something too hard, making a cheque my rim couldn’t cash. I got down to 18/20psi on this remarkably light insert and still had a good time. That said, I was mainly riding in wet conditions so maybe I wasn’t pushing it as hard as I truly would have liked.

The “chopping board feel”, as you sandwich the tire between insert and rim, is distinctly lacking in this insert, which is actually quite a nice thing. It does without a lot of the traits that might put you off inserts and subtly goes about its business to still give you the things you may well seek - extra rim protection, a quieter bike, tire stability and the ability to run lower pressures. However I do have doubts how this would cope if you rode somewhere truly brutal.

This is a great insert for somebody who is skeptical about inserts. The weight trade-off is minimal, the installation easy and pound for pound I think this is a very good option.

Pros

+ Very light
+ Comes with sealant included
+ Suprisingly quiet for something so light
Cons

- Not as supportive under load as some
- Probably best not to venture too low with pressures



CushCore Pro
The CushCore is noticeably lower profile than some of the others on the test. It is, however, one of the wider options.

CushCore were one of the first brands to really lay claim to the insert market. They now offer a range of different options for different applications, including XC, gravel and plus-sized bikes. The closed-cell insert has seen the biggest uptake in the professional field on the World Cup and EWS scene and their renowned green valves are a familiar sight of racer's bikes, sponsored or not.
CushCore Pro
Weight: 269g
Price per set: $149
Special Valves? Provided
Wheel sizes: 27.5 & 29"
Website: CushCore.com

Installing the CushCore was arguably one of the harder to do on test. It snaps onto the bead and is somewhat under tension around the rim. This is probably good in some ways as I imagine it means that even if it does stretch a little it will still be secure and not slapping around within the tire.

Over the period of testing I eventually got down to around 17/19psi in the wet. Despite these low pressures, the CushCore offered plenty of support, is great in the corners and makes a strong case for being the most versatile insert on test. It’s reassuringly supportive in the turns and, along with the Panzer and Vittoria, is the joint quietest. This is an overall insert package and works best when treated as such. The grip it enabled was fantastic with the pocket of low pressure to do the grippin’ and the insert to cope with the hittin’.

It has a very different feel to the Rimpact, for instance. The CushCore feelings like something you use on occasion, and you can feel the bike using it, whereas the Rimpact feels like something you use passively and all the time. The stack height of the CushCore is 7mm lower and I wonder if that plays a role. The Rimpact feels like it provides added support earlier in the travel.

Both grip admirably but I personally preferred the feel of the Rimpact. That said, the CushCore was far more comfortable. For somebody who doesn't want the feel of their tire drastically changed but does want all the support they can get their hands on, it's got to be the CushCore.

During those low pressure runs, even when compressing the insert against rock and rim, it was muted and it dulled any impact to a reassuring thud. In some ways, this is what you’d hope for as, at 260g, this is the heaviest insert on test. That doesn’t really bother me but it may put off some. I feel that the conversation around inserts is changing and people are realising that something can weigh more and still be a big performance upgrade. I’m a big believer in “good bikes ride light” and inserts, especially the CushCore, fall into that category, for me anyway.

Pros

+ Incredibly versatile, if you ignore the weight
+ Comfortable with excellent support
+ Quiet

Cons

- The heaviest on test
- Not the easiest to install



Vittoria Air-liner Medium
The Vittoria Air-liner has a channel above and below the insert and holes to let the air pass through and because of this it doesn't require any special tubeless valves.

The Vittoria comes as one long length which you then cut to size. This isn’t dissimilar from the MegaNorris. However, there are a few notable differences. Firstly, the Meganorris comes cut to suit a 29” wheel, but can then be trimmed further with the aid of markings. Conversely, with the Vittoria, you have to cut off an inch or two. This doesn’t make much sense to me, personally. Sorry if there are any 36er riders who Vittoria are catering to with this, but for a mountain bike insert it felt a bit pointless.
Vittoria Air-liner Medium
Weight: 176g
Price per set: $100
Special Valves? No
Wheel sizes: Any
Website: vittoria.com

Secondly, and regarding the length again, my inserts stretched. When fitting them they were tight. But whether it was during installation and removal or, through general use, the insert became somewhat baggy. This was a contributor to unwanted noise. It was strange, it almost sounded metallic as it slapped about and echoed through the rim.

The performance of the insert was very good. It provided a firm feeling not totally dissimilar to the CushCore - supportive yet not as apparent as the Rimpact. Going through rocks and chunder it was very capable at keeping the bike quiet. It is definitely something that can handle the lower pressures, too. I was happily riding it in the wet at 17/19psi. In turns, again the Vittoria provides ample support but it doesn't feel quite so prominent as the Rimpact or CushCore when really leaning the bike.


Vittoria does make a larger and a smaller version of this insert to suit your needs. I think the Medium was great for my style of riding but if you wanted something a little more volumous or slender then there are options. This does give the option of mixing and matching to suit your needs. The larger size is almost a run-flat system and the smaller size is something I've used previously to give me one last layer of rim protection.

For the test track, and my preference of the aforementioned downhill, smash and grab style runs, the Vittoria performed well. For those that really wish to put a large amount of load through their bikes in turns, I think there are better options. It's a good insert and it does what is asked of it but didn't have me getting to the bottom of a run, eyes glazed with admiration. It handles everything admirably but is the Valtteri Bottas of this test, overshadowed and ever so slightly outperformed.

If the CushCore and Rimpact didn't exist, this would be a very strong candidate for the best on test. Sadly, for the Vittoria however, they do.

Pros

+ Adequetly Supportive
+ Quiet
+ Available in different sizes and you can cut to length
Cons

- Seemed to stretch
- A good insert, just outshined by better ones





Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesI've used inserts before but this test made a convert of me. They'll now be on my bike, front and back, for the foreseeable future. I've come to the conclusion that you may well run inserts in the rear for added reliability but, in my opinion, running them in the front is where you really can reap the rewards in terms of all out performance. All of these inserts, to varying extents helped with performance but some more than others. This first part of the testing was about how they feel so that's what I'm going to try and stick to.

Every single one of these inserts improved the performance of my tires. If I were to separate them, I would say the Vittoria, Rimpact and CushCore offer the most support. The other three, while definitely offering a lot, are better used in conjunction with slightly higher pressures. If it’s all out support you’re after then I would say the Rimpact offers an equal amount, if not even more, than the CushCore but both are leading in this regard. The Vittoria does offer a similar feel to these two, but that stability is not so pronounced in turns.

The three quietest inserts on test were the Vittoria, the Panzer and the CushCore.

The Tannus, while not besting the others in any one area does make for a particularly comfortable setup and I really enjoyed riding it. The Panzer, which is far lighter than the others, offers something of a halfway house for those not entirely convinced on inserts. Not only does it drastically reduce the noise from rock strikes but if we were to measure a performance per gram then that could perhaps come out on top. For something so light, the quietness it offers is remarkable.

You can buy most of these inserts individually as opposed to sets. There is of course no reason you’d have to run the same brand front and back, which could open up a whole new vista of performance for your tires. Keep an eye out for part two of this test, where we'll head in to the laboratory to smash things and get some actual numbers to go along with what I was feeling on the trail.
Henry Quinney



410 Comments

  • 829 9
 Insert comment here
  • 21 4
 Ding Ding! Winning comment here
  • 6 1
 @Monsterman156: Hi just put it right in there without much effort.
  • 45 2
 It took me a second to understand this joke. That really deflated my ego.
  • 6 36
flag nickjaco19 (May 26, 2021 at 7:34) (Below Threshold)
 Mung beans
  • 21 0
 What is that old saying, "30 psi in my minions" or something like that?
  • 5 3
 give this dud a prize for a well inserted comment.
  • 20 1
 @Smallbright: “30 psi in my minions and I don’t care about your opinions”
  • 200 20
 "- Not the easiest to install"

Understatement of the f*cking year right here.
  • 55 9
 I spent like an hour with my cushcore and will now make it the shop's problem who sold it. I'll pay as life is too short for this kinda nonsense.
  • 91 0
 With the little buttplug / tire lever tool they make its pretty easy.
  • 40 2
 I didn't have that experience with mine. They installed very easily.
  • 46 3
 First time I installed mine I just watched the install video with their tips and took only a half hour. It really isn't hard, like at all, I just don't get the apprehension..
  • 59 2
 @MikeyMT: wait a minute. Insert a butt plug? I mean I have struggled, sweated, cursed and bled but I never took it that far.
  • 18 0
 I think it's down to whether you have a decent tyre lever - the cushcore one is excellent - and whether you have the patience to follow the guide to the letter, pushing the tyre bead right down into the rim well all the way around.
I managed a full tyre swap in under 20mins the other day and can often get a tyre back on without a lever now I've done it a few times. Rush it and/or cut corners and you'll curse and regret it!
  • 14 0
 The first time I installed Cush Core was brutal. Now I can get both wheels set up in 20 minutes, without the supplied tire lever. Pre-stretching the insert a little and using a large amount of soapy water make a huge difference.
  • 3 0
 @oldfaith: lol. the cushore tire lever might be your ticket...
  • 9 0
 Impossible if you don't read the instructions. Pre-soap and some pedro's levers; otherwise, not difficult after your first one where you snapped all your levers.
  • 12 0
 @hi-dr-nick: I think one should say which tire, which casing and what rim when making these claims AND half an hour is quite a long time for putting a tire on a rim.
  • 4 0
 @ZSchnei: Yes to soapy water
  • 5 0
 @oldfaith: Minion DHR II 2.4WT EXO / Shorty 2.5WT EXO / Magic Mary 2.35 SG on Stans Flow MK3 / EX3.
I can fit a tyre in 10mins if if goes smoothly now I'v had some practise.
  • 3 0
 @sourmix: perfect example!
  • 14 0
 The very first one i installed took me 2 hours.. but once i figured it out how to lock the bead into the center of the rim under the cushcore, the next one was super fast.
ive set up a dozen or so bikes with them now, and actually just installed one the other day. it took me maybe an extra 5 minutes (and thats being generous) more than a regular tubeless setup.

once you get it, its pretty easy to do. Keep paying me to do it, i dont mind easy money!
  • 4 0
 @deepstrut: I keep knocking the rimstrip out of the tire when trying to put the bead in the centre (Continental / Chromag rim). I can get a maxxis rim on in like two minutes, but schwalbe and continental seem tighter. Must be a German thing.
  • 4 1
 I had heard it was difficult to install, and i have a policy of not dealing with Tire related stuff, so I took it to my local mechanic, when i came back for the wheels i notices he was hunching and hurting, i asked what happened and responded that it took an entire day to fit both inserts on both of my tires and it was so difficult and energy consuming that he was hurt from that, he used muscles he had never used before or not to the extent he required to put the inserts on my tires.
  • 8 1
 for guys saying it's been easy for them to install, the tolerances of the Rim and Insert come into play a lot, the people that had a hard time, it is possible that the rim diameter was on the largest side of the tolerance and the insert on the smallest side of the tolerance and vice versa for the people who didnt have problems installing. Manufacturing tolerances come a lot into play when assembling wheels
  • 30 1
 @Narro2: you should find a new mechanic.
  • 5 1
 I've ran both cushcore and tannus. Cushcore IMO was easier to install.
  • 5 1
 @hi-dr-nick: Agreed. They have a video on their website that offers tricks to install. If you follow the instructions, it took me probably 10 minutes per wheel for full setup (cushcore, tire, sealant). Not hard if you follow the instructions.
  • 2 0
 @hi-dr-nick: hahahah, tires have never been his forte, but he is pretty good overall tbh, he is certified by Fox on shock related stuff, he rebuilt me a 2007 talas for my DJ and is as good as new, my favorite fork now.
  • 7 2
 A few tricks I picked up for cushcore: seat the tire first (sans insert) and then pop only one side off, now the tire is halfway on and you only have to deal with one bead when you’re installing the insert. Once the insert is in the tire and you’re working that single bead around the insert will try to push it back off the rim. Use a short bungee cord hooked on a spoke and wrapped tightly around the rim to keep one part of the bead on the rim, now you can chase the bead around the rim towards this spot. And as everyone is sick of hearing, push the bead into the center of the rim. It really does help.
  • 2 0
 @sourmix: is it as easy on the trail, if you can’t fix a flat and need to use a tube..
  • 3 1
 @hi-dr-nick said: "you should find a new mechanic."

Bah. He has made the weakness leave his puny mechanic's body. The pain is progress comrade. Bah!

One more BAH for gargantuan measure I say!
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: It heavily depends on the rim. I have installed countless inserts, and could get assegai swapped on some rims in about 5 minutes. On some, usually carbon rims it can still take 45 minutes and a lot of effort. I try not to use levers to install as maxxis tires easily stretch out and wobble if you do, and on most rims it goes on without levers easily, but some rims just take it to a very different sort of job.
  • 4 0
 Fought with mine for a while, so I watched the install video and had them done in 30 minutes. I was surprised how easy it was following the tips in the video.
  • 2 0
 It's easy if you follow their instructions. I'd say it's maybe an extra 2 minutes per tire for me to change it up now, although it was frustrating before I tried the garbage can/soapy water method.
  • 1 0
 Once you learn the technique and buy the tire levers cushcore makes, installing them can take five minutes or less if you have two people. I’d say getting them out is the real challenge, especially if the tire has been on for more than a few months
  • 7 2
 @dodgerpuppy: Still...30 minutes to change a tire that will leave you stranded trailside if you can't seal the leak and/or wrapping it around your neck like a giant elephant penis and putting a tube in to ride out....that's a lot of time lost.

Has anyone mentioned the issue people have with CushCore causing leaks in the rim tape since it's a PHYSICAL piece of material constantly tugging, pushing & presssing on the rim tape?
  • 2 0
 @MikeyMT: That and a little lubrication...
  • 2 0
 If you follow their instructions it is pretty easy. It only took me 30 min first try.
  • 2 0
 @ZSchnei: that’s really interesting, Zach. Very very f*cking interesting.
  • 7 0
 @oldfaith: I watched the Cush Core factory reps install them at the Northstar EWS. Took them at least that long, if not longer. Installing inserts on other peoples bikes all day in the hot sun. I figured they were Bad in a former life.
  • 3 0
 I run cushcore with doubledown tires front and rear. They get easier with every install. Now if I'm motivated and on a roll I've gotten a tire on in about 5 minutes. That's without the buttplug lever I wasted my money on. I will say some rims are better than others. My DT EX and XM 30mm internal rims are easy straightforward, WeAre1 are tight, and asymmetric rims such as Ibis will have you saying every profanity you know. The offset side of the rim bed won't let the tire bead drop in far enough to give slack on the opposite side of the tire As for uninstall, my tip for cushcore is to deflate the tire as much as possible and then close the valve core. The vacuum inside gives room for the tire bead to drop in
  • 6 0
 get the bead down into the rim channel underneath the insert for god's sake
  • 1 0
 @oldfaith: Thanks for this comment, it made my day.
  • 1 0
 i can install cushcore on my wheels in 5min each.. given, with Maxxis DD casing it takes 30min and two people, not many use thick casing with CC. if you know the tricks its not any tougher to install CC than without.
  • 2 0
 @TylerG96: When are you home? I'll be by later, with my wheels, inserts. And beer.
  • 4 1
 I swore off Cushcore (Cuss-core?) due to level of misery involved in installation. Yes, I've watched every video, had numerous tips on it, own the buttplug, etc. and it still is not any fun. Not to mention the benefits (damping-barely perceivable) for me did not outweigh the negatives (weight, horrid installation experience, if you get a flat that can't be plugged and needs a tube yr SOL on the trail). That said, I recently put a Nukeproof ARD insert in my rear tire for my hard tail. Installation is nearly as awful, but my pal found a great way to circumvent the misery that worked perfectly and would likely also be a plus for Cushcore or any of the others. When you get to that last bit of sidewall that you cannot pop over the rim take a heat gun (not a hair dryer...you need real heat) and warm the tire bead...a lot. It will allow for enough stretch to seat it without damaging the tire. Have some gloves on because the rim (especially if it's alloy) will be very hot and work it over. I did this with Specialized Butchers (last years model; brand new though) which are notoriously a bastard to seat and it was surprisingly easy. Party.
  • 6 0
 I also used the buttplug. Installation was easy. However, I am growing concerned about removal. Currently, no luck with the tire insert.
  • 1 0
 I feel like all of the reviews could have had more information about how difficult the install is. I ride a lot and change tires every couple of months, so how easy it is to install is perhaps the most important question I'd like to see answered. Designs that turn a 10 minute tire change into an hour long ordeal are a no-go.
  • 1 0
 @oldfaith: if its allready gonna be a pain in the a$$ you might as well have some fun while youre at it hahaha.
  • 2 1
 @dthomp325: They dont. The haters here simply did not read the instructions. Once you get the hang of it and have the proper tools (see Cushore tire lever), takes barely any more time than a regular tire change.
  • 2 0
 @Ryanrobinson1984: It wasn't as tight as you...much easier to get in.
  • 1 0
 Tell us you don't ride dirt bikes without telling us you don't ride dirt bikes.
  • 2 0
 @learningcycles: What? I installed my Tannus by only breaking one bead and kept my sealant. No way I could that with cushcore previously.
  • 2 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: oh cmon...it ain’t that bad. Just gotta install a couple sets and figure it out.....right after you can make a fist again.....
  • 7 0
 @PizzaMagician: I got the butt plug in...now what?
  • 5 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: pro tip: let your tires sit in the sun for a few hours on warm day. Get the Butt plug tool too.
  • 2 2
 If I was in charge of the world (not holding my breath), tools and parts for things such as hydraulic brakes, suspension, and bearings would not be available to the public. Instead, you would have to submit a video of yourself installing cushcore pro and a maxxis DD on a decent rim. Then, there would be a panel that would decide if you could purchase said products. Anybody that struggles with it should stick to assembling IKEA furniture.
  • 2 0
 @MikeyMT: I wish I would have known that when I first installed them. I used walmart tire levers which were surprisingly very durable. All of the other ones I used broke very quickly. I used the "buttplug" the second time and it was super easy considering.
  • 1 0
 @MikeyMT: I tried Tannus armor for example and could not successfully mount it on a 2.4 dual ply dh tire. The review states they used an single ply exo+ tire, but there can be quite a bit of difference in difficulty between the an enduro/dh tire and a trail tire.
  • 1 0
 @enduroelite: Same I didn’t have much issue, I wonder if it has something to do with the shape of the rim, mine were on flow mk3s
  • 2 0
 @ZSchnei: Correct! Soapy water on the actual insert makes all the difference.
  • 3 0
 Another pro tip, check and then double check you're putting the tire on the right direction!
  • 2 0
 I struggeled to insert the Cush Core at first, but now that I've got the technique down I can do it with one tire lever and just an extra minute compared to no insert per wheel.

Top tip: Watch the CC installation video and follow it.
  • 1 0
 @Narro2: get another mechanic
  • 1 0
 @Trowel1: I've never had to do that in 3yrs of CC but I know it will happen eventually and I'm dreading it Wink
Seriously though, it will be a pain but there are some helpful you tube vids of how to pop the bead and get one side of the tyre off and put a tube in without having to carry the insert home over your shoulder which are worth checking out! Figure a very rare trail side curse-fest will be worth the amount of trouble free riding time I've had and my wheels are lasting longer too!
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: This. 100000000%. Sometimes tire swaps are easy, sometimes they're a cussing sweaty mess (yes, with bead dropper). Likely chalk it up to DH casings, but F installing these things.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: start twerking!
  • 1 0
 @ZSchnei: Careful using soapy water. It can mess up your sealant
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: The combo MucOff and Orange Seal sealant has presented no problems for me so far. So that combo is true and tested.
  • 99 10
 CushCore is nowhere near as hard to install as everyone makes it out to be. You just need to get your tire bead into the center channel all the way around as you work the bead on.
  • 67 11
 using EXO casings is easy. Try DD or DH casings and carbon rims. youlll change your tune.
  • 28 16
 @moroj82: Genuinely curious why you would use inserts with DD/DH casings. The combined weight penalty must be epic!
  • 6 1
 @moroj82: My experience with DD wasn't that bad. I used CushCore's tire lever, a trash can, and a friend and it popped on without too much fuss. I'm guessing, like other situations, specific tire and rim matter though.
  • 10 5
 @moroj82: I use Cushcore so I don't have to use those casings, so...
  • 13 0
 And, not tear your rim tap in the process
  • 23 2
 @moroj82: I will put on my DD or DH casing tire with a tube on a spare rim and leave it there for a few days. I have also put on DH/DD casing straight out of the package. It's harder no doubt, but still not too bad.

Anyone who complains about changing a tire with Cushcore should try changing a moto tire. You will come out of it with a new perspective that all MTB tires are super easy to change.
  • 10 0
 @sourmix: Bike parks and racing where I really don't want a puncture. Plus the dampened feel from a DH/DD casing combined with Cushcore is like cheating
  • 2 0
 @oldfaith: I have one of those. Super nice. Plus the Baja No Pinch tire tool. They definitely make it easier, but my first few times I changed a moto tire I only had spoons.
  • 14 0
 @sourmix: because jagged limestone and granite rip open EXO casings the same, insert or no.
  • 3 1
 @a-prince: I can knock out a moto tire with tubes in 5 min....CushCore took me an hour! I do like those no pinch devices, I like Rabacondas and mousses even more.
  • 3 3
 Exactly.

I just mounted a brand new (greasy) DD Aggressor to a brand new (warranty replacement) Reserve 30 with a used CushCore with no tire levers in under 5 mins.

Once the CC is stretched around the rim for even a day it's almost a non factor. I imagine people who struggle with it would be struggling without it too.
  • 3 0
 I found soapy water to be very helpful in getting DD installed onto my Reserve rims if anybody is looking to make things easier..
  • 1 0
 Call back after installing it with an Assegai on some LB or Enve rims.
  • 2 0
 @MrDuck: I've installed it with an Assegai on i9 rims, if that counts.
  • 4 0
 Really guys, all you need to do is push the bead into the inner channel as you work it on all the way around. It gives you slack to get the last little bit, which I have found you can do all by hand. I should give props to @jessemelemed for this though, his video was eye opening and made my life way easier.
  • 2 0
 @gally-nh: bead into the inner channel combined with soapy water is what I do. Especially for new tires that have pretty sticky beads
  • 2 0
 @a-prince: yeah try a moto tire w/ bib mousse.... hahaha
  • 4 0
 @gally-nh: I don't think it compares. I agree it's really easy if you do it right and follow the cushcore instructions most of the time, I do it at the shop quite often. However there are a few rims, usually carbon, or the Bontrager with a plastic tape sort of thing they use where the easy job turns into a serious workout even if you make absolutely sure there's as much slack in the tire as possible and using soap or tire lube.
I normally install Cushcore without levers and with little effort using a trash can so I think I've got a good hang of it, but there are combinations usually involving the Assegai and carbon where it isn't as easy as I'd like, though it's still worth the effort!
  • 1 0
 @gally-nh: Curious if the place/ terrain you ride affects that casing comment..
  • 83 0
 Hmmm... A video and an article.... How do we respond to that?
  • 20 0
 win - win?
  • 50 0
 We say, there needs to be an audio book to recite the article. Lol.
  • 70 0
 If pinkbike doesn't start beaming information straight into my brain telepathically I'm deleting my account
  • 8 0
 Ya I was gonna bitch that I wanted a video rather than an article

But there's both

Now what do I bitch about :'( maaaaybe I'll go ride a bike
  • 2 17
flag iian (May 26, 2021 at 8:04) (Below Threshold)
 Lotta dumbasses in this thread...
  • 1 0
 Were ar droings
  • 1 0
 Open a separate tab for each, obviously.
  • 6 0
 This article should have been a table and the video a chart
  • 2 0
 @noapathy: complain in one tab, praise in the other?
  • 3 0
 @BMXJJ327 No audio book and no braille. PB sux.
  • 74 5
 I dont run inserts, i just put 30 psi in my minions
  • 26 6
 I don't care about your opinions

youtu.be/QyTyjQbvylg?t=96
  • 1 3
 Me too. People with terrible suspension think I'm crazy.
  • 1 0
 I used to as well.. then I figured I'd tray an insert, then started charging trails harder. Then I finally had to do a couple runs without an insert due to a massive gash in my tire from a sharp rock. Then in 1 run without the insert running 30psi I hit my rim 3 times... if your just generally riding trail maybe not worth it, but if your racing enduro or DH it's kindof a no brainer...
  • 1 0
 @projectnortheast: I run 35psi rear and 25psi front. I get far fewer issues in a year than my buddies do.

I also have suspension tuned to be able to get up and over rocks and roots. It works.
  • 66 13
 When foam rubber cost over $100 bucks - people should think about how much bike products are out of whack.
  • 8 31
flag pbfan08 (May 26, 2021 at 7:21) (Below Threshold)
 Everyone look at the king of being reasonable! Bow to him!
  • 11 2
 Get out of here Captain Logic! You are ruining my new parts buzz!
  • 48 0
 @henryquinney Really enjoy your content and videos, especially your presenting style. You were one of the best at GMBN and it's great to see you move to PB. Keep up the great work!
  • 15 0
 @MrMediocre What a nice thing to say. Thanks!
  • 4 0
 Agree, video was blast to watch, and super quality content!
  • 29 0
 I ran Cush Core with my WTB Verdict and Judge combo and they were great. After a little while, I realized that I was running DH tire levels of weight on my bike. So I decided to try something new and just run DH tires. I now run Michelin DH34s without inserts and my bike actually lost 150 grams. I'm still running low pressures, just 1 or 2 psi more than my old WTB/Cush Core setup.

WTB tires are heavy AF. The Judge is the same weight as a full blown wire bead DH tire. Add Cush Core and I'm exceeding DH tire weight from the get go. The Verdict light is 1200 grams. With CC, it weighs the same as a DH34, but without the slash protection.

Love inserts and they're great. But I feel that they're more useful for lighter casings and when cut protection isn't a priority. Start moving to dual ply and heavier, more robust tires, and wire bead DH tires without inserts are the way to go.
  • 12 2
 my thoughts exactly: you either run thinner, less supportive tires and inserts, or thicker tires that already have better support and protection. In either case, they weigh about the same, but one is clearly more of a nightmare to install—and especially to remove (eg cushcore). Removing them is the elephant in the room that this article fails to talk about. Also, installing cushcore on carbon rims and, moreover, uninstalling them, is a horrible experience.
  • 1 0
 Good points! I run an insert in the rear wheel to protect the rim. As cushcore in one tire is cheaper then a new aluminum rim and at this point easier to find!
  • 2 0
 @moroj82: so right on removing them, or even just breaking the bead!
  • 3 1
 It is great that there are two routes to go with similar weight: heavy tires with just air, or light tires with inserts. Like you, I've tried both, but as long as you aren't slicing sidewalls, my experience says the lighter tire with CushCore performs better. The small bump compliance is better, rolling speed is faster, rim protection is better, and the CushCore damping is better than a thick tire casing, ime. I only see two advantages to the thicker tire route: easier install and more sidewall slicing protection.

Like others have said, CushCore install is not bad if you follow their instructions. I've done it without even using a tire lever before.
  • 6 1
 @m-t-g: personally I prefer the handling of a thicker casing. I also think they fold more predictably. Cushcore would *feel* more supportive but when the tire folded it was instant and severe. A thicker casing folds at a similar pressure. Also, at higher speeds a light tire at low pressure feels bouncy/under damped.
  • 5 0
 Solving two different issues, at least in my case. DD casings protect against sidewall tears from sharp rocks, etc. Inserts protect the rim from impacts with low pressure and help prevent snake bites, but do nothing to protect the sidewalls. DD without inserts means I need to up my pressures by at least 20% which results in a substantial loss of traction and a lot more vibration through the bike.
  • 2 0
 Michis and no inserts ftw
  • 3 0
 Even with a DH casing you can destroy a rim,the tire would be ok but not the rim. DH tires and something like huck norris,light but some rim protection is the way to go for me.
  • 2 0
 @homerjm: same - and huck norris install is trivial since it floats...
  • 21 1
 When the article you are reading goes from bikes to sex information:

“It feels like it’s not to stop you from rimming out, but rather it makes that impact far more pleasant and takes the edge off. . . which would suggest that it does as it promises and would back up the sensations when riding that the air is doing the work, as opposed to riding on the material itself.”
  • 16 0
 Giggity.
  • 39 18
 Whotf actually runs less than 20psi in their rear tire? I can't run less than 30 w a dh tire in the rear and 25ish dd in the front.
  • 25 2
 Do you run inserts though?
  • 3 0
 I can get away with 28 out back but I also run a heavier casing.
  • 5 1
 I am in the same boat. It makes me wonder if my gauge or my riding is screwed up. 25psi is a guaranteed pinch flat for me even with tough casing tires
  • 10 0
 I run around 17 psi, although all things considered i'm only 140 lbs.
  • 1 1
 I run 20 with cushcore.
  • 19 0
 You are the guy from the "I only ride park" video and I claim my five pounds.
  • 8 2
 @adrennan: I ride rocky terrain with 25psi, minion 2.4, no insert, no pinch flats for the last 9 months. I'm also 200lb. Maybe your gauge is off, or your rocks are dumb gnarly, haha
  • 11 0
 18/20 with Cushore, EXO+ tire (29er). 180 pounds with gear. Been ages since I flatted.
  • 11 0
 @adrennan: Are you using the gauge on your pump or a digital gauge? Pump gauge is usually trash...but so might be your line choice (no offense)
  • 3 0
 i run 20/20 with WTB trail boss tires, but that said I'm only 120 lbs and running tubes.
  • 5 1
 @jacob-idk-jander: Light Privileged people have no say in this! Razz
  • 1 0
 I run 18-19 with the tannus and a double down rear. A bit more if its rocky
  • 24 0
 It's almost like tire pressure should be proportional to rider weight. And terrain, riding style, etc.
  • 8 0
 Ride cleaner and stop mashing everything
  • 4 0
 @hi-dr-nick: Exactly. My buddy is 205# and runs 20/20, trail tires and inserts. Never seen him flat...rocky gnarly terrain around here for the most part. Pinch flats are often the result of bad line choice.
  • 3 1
 @MikeyMT: Come to Squamish, its all blast rock and is very sharp. DH tires for aggressive riding here, and I run 20psi front and rear, NobL Carbon Wheels 5 years old now
  • 13 0
 @hi-dr-nick: no thank you. I will continue riding like the absolute hack I am
  • 1 0
 @onecutmedia: Its that old man strength, Rick. I agree..DH tires are nice to have in your neck of the woods...especially if you're a joey like me.
  • 4 0
 At 190 lbs I run 20 F, 23 R, with CushCore of course. I haven't had a flat or rim ding in a long time in Pisgah.
  • 3 0
 Try riding the utter schlomp that we have to ride in Ireland and I'm sure the UK boys are the same. You wouldn't be long dropping pressure
  • 6 0
 i run 15-20 in my front 18-22 in the rear on my enduro with an EXO tire. never had a problem.
  • 2 0
 @DERPOWaterpig: Same here. With EXO casings or similar. Even on the hardtail. I don’t weigh enough for high pressures. I tried Tannus inserts. Initially I thought they improved my ride because I could run even lower pressures. I was at I think 12 to 15. But that was too low and the tires flexed and washed out cornering. That put me back at similar pressures as without inserts so there was no real point to the added weight.
  • 6 0
 220 lb rider here, riding east coast rox. This year I switched to EXO+ rear tire with Tannus Tubeless insert from the same tire (DHR2) in DD casing. I had been happily riding the DD going through approx. one tire a year, for the past 3 years. DD marked the first time for me I could actually wear out a tire before pinching and cutting the casing of a tire.

At this point, I would say my experiment has been inconclusive. I've had two flats so far this season since running the insert, both from cuts in the casing at the tread. Both times from casing a landing on rocks and puncturing the tread. First tire was caput, second tire seems to be still alive with the help of a Stans Dart.

My operating theory is that the EXO+ has less layers under the tread of the tire. DD doesn't just have the extra sidewall protection, but an entire additional layer of casing. This makes it more puncture resistant all around.

I also am finding that the EXO+ casing is more compliant, despite running the same pressure in the EXO+ (with insert) as I did with DD (29 psi). So there is more grip, but the tire is also wearing out a lot quicker. Whereas before I could run a new tire from spring to the end of summer (put a fresh one on in the fall), now I think this tire will only make it to early summer before wearing out.

so, positives are a slight lighter weight system, more compliant tire for better grip, and better rim protection

negatives are less stability, faster wear, and increased punctures.

Not sure what to do with this information now. :\
  • 1 1
 @slyfink: switch to tubes XD
  • 1 0
 I ran 17 psi in the front, 19 at the back for about a year and then when my rims got beat up, that's when I started using inserts but I might have to lower the pressures now after reading this article.
  • 1 0
 My last ride in the wet I was on 15/17psi with Rimpact and DD casings.

Had masses of grip and didn't hear the rim hit once. Thought it felt slightly squirmy in the corners so I'll probably go up 1 psi for the next ride.
  • 5 2
 Wtf? I run 20 or less with no inserts and exo casing...
  • 6 1
 @edfw: notice how it is mostly Americans having these problems? It is because we are the fattest country.
  • 3 1
 I ride with 19psi back/17 front (Specialized Grid tires). Granted, I only weigh about 160bs with riding gear on.
  • 1 0
 @MikeyMT: Flats next ride....
  • 2 0
 200lbs running vigilante/trail boss combo (the good ones) on 35mm Hope rims. Mixed terrain, mixed riding including park. Run 24/24 psi. No inserts. Never have an issue.....though I just jinxed it.
  • 1 0
 @piranah: nah..already rode since I posted that Smile
  • 1 0
 I'm with @deepstrut: but not quite to that degree. 22 front. 24 rear. Exo. No flats
  • 1 0
 Anything over 20psi feels like concrete. I'm and 18 psi guy fritn and rear with CCxc up front and CC OG in the rear. I go as low as 16 fr/rr for trails/climbs, super sketchy descents where grip is a priority. I'm a 170 lbs.
  • 2 0
 @DERPOWaterpig: how! I have to run at least 23 and I’m only 115lbs! The tires I run aren’t very tough, but still.
  • 1 0
 @dualcrownscottspark: I've got DH and DD casings on them with no inserts, and ride on the rocky east coast. I only run that pressure so I can actually get grip haha
  • 4 3
 People riding slowly on groomed trails........
  • 2 0
 @DERPOWaterpig: ah also an east coast rider, I run xr4s and can say worst tire I've run so far.
  • 1 0
 @dualcrownscottspark: I moved to an SE4 in the rear and it's been a solid tire since roughly August of 2020. I cut the XR4 in 2 rides and scrapped it immediately. I've been running an XR5 in the front since August, and that's also been a solid performer. Overall, no flats since August and I don't take it easy on them. I'm planning on another set when I replace tires.
  • 3 0
 @ZSchnei: I'm planning on getting either some Vittoria Aggaros or Maxxis Rekons soon, I kind of destroyed my rear tire last week.
  • 1 0
 What are you using to measure your pressure? 30PSI on my Topeak pump is like 25 PSI on my Topeak digital gauge, and those are even the same brand. My dial gauge reads about as much different from the digital gauge as as well. I just use the Topeak digital always so I can be consistent, but I don't expect it to be the same as any other gauge including the gauge used in a tire review like this.

I also have tired under 20 PSI, and it feels like the tires don't give the support needed (even with Cushcore). I am totally sold on Cushcore though, and use a mix of XC and Pro inserts on my bikes depending on tire choice etc.
  • 22 0
 What about the nukeproof ARD? You can actually get it and it's cheap!
  • 3 0
 I have the Nukeproof, over time it get a bit noisy but it still works great I think And still a pain to install with a DH tire
  • 7 0
 Scrolled down for this. Nukeproof ARD is a not to heavy and affordable alternative that have worked great for me on my HT. I'm pretty sure they have fixed the rattling issue. First gen was a bit oversized to make installation easyer but the one I got last year sits tight against the rim from the start and have not developed any rattling over time.
  • 3 0
 I'd be interested to also see Pepi tire noodle that's used by Schurter and a lot of XC racers
  • 6 0
 Stretches and makes my sealant coagulate.
  • 4 0
 I have run them on two bikes, two different sets few months ago so I guess there were the latest version.
They all starting to rattle after a couple of months because they stretched. Which you could actually repair by cutting and tie zipping according to Nukeproof but I didn't bother.
I have also weighted them because the inside of my tires seemed to be quite dry and they were all almost 200g a piece instead of 144g claimed: or they were heavier than advertised from the beginning or they have greedily drunk my tire sealant...
I removed them and first following downhill I have exploded my dt E1700 on a rock never had this before so they were probably protecting the rim. Performance wise I didn't notice a difference in sidewall support or about these damping stories.

I have now removed them and I run 30psi behind at least it is silent and lighter and so far I don't break rims.
  • 2 0
 Big fan of ARD, and not ridiculously difficult to fit.
  • 7 0
 @PA-MTB Hi, we reached out to Nukeproof and they were interested but sadly it being in February, in Portugal, Brexit, Covid.... it just conspired against us and sadly they couldn't take part. Would love to try a set at some point though.
  • 2 0
 I was gifted a set of ARD inserts. They made a huge difference in letting me run lower pressure without destroying rim beads. Of course as I started to lower my pressure I started to get case squirm and this makes me realize I want a product that offers more sidewall support. The rattle noise was annoying but I fixed them by removing a small piece of the foam and using Loctite Shoe Glue to stick them back together without zip ties. If you ride flatter, rocky trails without a lot of high compression berms I think they’re a solid option. I’m 210-220lbs depending on gear and riding EXO+ 2.5 DHF on a Ripmo.
  • 1 0
 I ran them, and now I don't. I didn't feel like they gave me enough protection against destroying a rim. I could tell a difference for sure, but I still destroyed a rim with them in running low 20's tire pressure (without an insert I run 30).
  • 1 0
 worked great for me and it was easy to install with an extra set of hands or with zip ties to help you out
  • 18 0
 I have run CushCore Pro, CushCore XC, Rimpact and Tannus. Would agree with most of the sentiment in the article. Rimpact offered the most protection, CushCore the most dampening and the Tannus is the easiest setup to live with. CushCore's weakness is when leaned over in rocky high speed corners. I have flatted with them multiple times in this situation because of the shape. The thinnest part of the insert is being used when cornering, offering very little protection. The bigger issue with both CushCore and Rimpact is stretching the tire casings during installation. The fight to install them can cause major tire wobble even on brand new tires. Have seen this consistently with both setups across multiple installers. For the bench test I would love to see not only vertical impact testing to failure, but also angled impact testing to failure to simulate cornering situations. Awesome that PB has put this test together!
  • 3 0
 Can confirm regarding tire stretching. I first thought I had bent a bunch of spokes wrestling the tire onto the wheel with the inserts in. But then realized it was the casing that was just stretched really bad.
  • 6 0
 "CushCore's weakness is when leaned over in rocky high speed corners. I have flatted with them multiple times in this situation because of the shape." --- EXACTLY my experience too..
I am giving Tannus Armor (with the tubes) a shot.. going to try and run light wieght tubes (like those new Pirelli scorpions)
  • 2 0
 So if I'm looking for an insert with the most noticeable dampening do you reckon CushCore is the way to go?
  • 2 0
 stretching the tires is so annoying! glad i'm not the only one lol
what are you running atm? only in the rear tire?
  • 4 3
 Got wobbles after installing a tannus tubeless. I don't think that's an issue of tire stretching cus wobbles disappear once the insert is removed. I think the tannus tubeless has intrinsic design flaws. The beads (or lips?) of tannus tubeless do not necessarily want to stay centered. I guess this issue causes the wobbles. Tried different installation methods (using soapy water on the insert, sunbathing the insert before installation), but they did not fix the problem.
  • 3 0
 @okavango: same here, maybe a heatgun could help
  • 8 0
 @okavango: I have a Tannus Armour Tubeless in my rear wheel too.

My solution( after I rode behind a buddy and watched his Cushcore XC wobble like crazy on his trail bike for multiple hours) has been to not look at my rear wheel for wobbles in my Tannus.

Logically, there is simply no way that something as pliable as Tannus or Cushcore, etc...made out of unbalanced, semi-stable foams sprayed into a mold and then creased multiple times just to package...isn't going to deform when rotating.

They can't even make tires not wobble.
I simply assume that my bike has a hyperactive little boxer puppy's ass and wiggles non-stop.
  • 1 0
 @okavango: I get wobbles installing the cush core if I am not careful, but can get a pretty straight install by inflating to max tire pressure even after the bead has popped.
  • 7 0
 I'm heavier, ride with poor technique, and in Utah all we have to ride is sharp rocks. After years of tearing up tires, I'd say Tannus is the way to go for everyone.

For 80% of people, the Tannus tubeless is prime. Its the lightest and cheapest of the bunch. I doubt anyone who isn't on the front two rows of a world cup XC start line will be able to tell the extra drag that the Tannus adds.

For the last 20% of people who demand more "support", get the Tannus Armor with tubes. I agree with the review- the tubelesss isn't as stiff as other options, and won't prevent tire fold as much, but if you really need that and want the ultimate damping you're going to have to sacrifice weight. At that point the Tannus Armor is untouchable.

Another plus of the Tannus Armor is if you've pinched through a sidewall and cannot run tubeless anymore with a tire, throw a Tannus Armor and a tube in there. I ran one on a minion with a 10mm long sidewall gash for half a season no problems.
  • 4 0
 The tire wobble is for real. I had to remove the cushcore because it was making my rear tires wobble like crazy. Shop confirmed my wheel was perfect; no truing necessary. Due to this I'm going to run a DH tire on the rear going forward and skip the insert.
  • 2 0
 @JamesKROZ: yes, this will get you the best damping of trail chatter
  • 3 0
 I run the tannus in my rear tire, works a treat. I think what works well is what they do under impact, the wings press into the rim so stabilizes during cornering. It is not a system to be be pushing tightly into the bead all the time all around the rim. It definitely gives a subtle damped feeling and prevents tire squirm for me. It was also easy as to install.
  • 2 0
 @housem8d: currently have CushCore XC rear only right now. They are OK, but I liked the protection that Rimpact offered with less weight. CushCore definitely offers more vibration reduction.
  • 2 1
 @salespunk: i think rimpact for the rear tire with panzer in the front is the way to go. I like the tannus but its giving me the wobbly’s and hasnt been as reliable as classic tubeless.
  • 4 1
 Yep, if you stretch out the bead/casing during a poor/forced install you'll get wobble. Or if you ensure you prestretch your DD casing and make sure its warm and then do a thorough job of forcing the bead under the cushcore and into the rim bed, you might find you can almost force that last bit of tire over the rim with your thumbs. Yeah the butt plug makes it easier, but you might also stretch the casing... Set it up right and it can be done. Also prestretch the CC overnight,
  • 1 0
 @okavango: I've encountered the same issues with multiple tires on multiple rims with the tannus. It's unfortunate because I really like the ride feel of the Tannus tubeless insert. Tannus needs to address this issue.
  • 1 0
 Really solid info. What makes easing through the comments worthwhile. Thx for sharing. I had wondered about damaging the the tire with the CC install. I feel like I'm pretty good at it and don't manhandle the tire, but it still requires some force. Have had two tires develop significant wobble during a few months when I was sharing a wheelset between trail and enduro bikes and swapping tires a bunch. Have fully switched to Tannus Tubeless everywhere but rear of my hardtail. Miss some things about CC, but happier overall for most of my riding. For people getting wobbles with TT, you've got to heat it and get rid of the creases from it being folded.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Not 100% sure about voluntarily running Tannus Armor, but very solid tip to keep in mind re damaged tires while tires are really hard or impossible to get.
  • 2 0
 @muscogeemasher: yup, hitting it with a heat gun while it's mounted around the rim definitely helps get the creases out from being folded in the packaging.
  • 8 1
 Thanks Henry. Just curious why you didn't use DD or DH casings w/o inserts to compare. I am not sure if I missed it but were these ridden on trails or bikeparks? Did you feel any gyroscopic effects in the air? Did you notice any difference on the climbs?

If a company made injectable spray foam that would not stick to anything once cured for easy removal, I might be tempted to try inserts. Vibro Tan Anus said what?
  • 5 0
 NSMB did this test and wrote a good article a few months back.
  • 2 0
 @adrennan: Here's the article for anyone interested:

nsmb.com/articles/cushcore-preferable-heavier-tire-casing

I especially liked it because it justified my lazy approach of just running double downs without inserts Smile
  • 7 0
 Hello there. Well, that was a consideration. I actually spoke to a few different insert brands about their suggestion. I think If we just keep adding weight, both in terms of tires and inserts, then we're going to get to a place where it's absolute bomb-proof but that might not be telling us anything. I felt it was more relevant to include a tyre that perhaps you could only run in conjunction with inserts. The lighter tyres also accentuated the different feels of the inserts which definitely made my job easy so, hey, I ain't complaining. The trails definitely leant on the more natural side of things, however, there were some man made turns towards the end of the test track that really rewarded you if you hit them hard. In regards to the climbs, the sheer low pressures meant I was scrambling up things I perhaps had no right to but apart from that nothing major springs to mind. Cheers.
  • 3 0
 @henryquinney: realize it might have to be at the end of the test Wink but would be cool to see a DH casing or something like a maxxis doubledown with no insert at the same PSI in slow-mo over some of these same hits and hear your take on ride quality comparisons to a lighter tire w/ insert combo
  • 7 1
 When are you going to put Mynesweepers up against all these money grubbing rip offs!?They’ve been around since the beginning, they only cost 60 USD/set, they’re lighter weight, easier installation, and better performance than the competition! And we are actually V AT THE RACES SUPPORTING RACERS, not just throwing product at podiums, and shoving it down the necks of the major bike brands.
  • 2 1
 Agreed!
  • 1 1
 Agreed!
  • 3 0
 I've ran both minesweepers and cushcore for a year each. The cushcore feels like it has more support and am currently riding it. I was able to pinch flat with the minesweepers at 25 psi on exo+ casing but they feel decent jsut not as good as the cushcore.
  • 1 0
 @DavidK4: Thanks for the first hand experience comparison. Did you ever swap out the mynesweepers at all during the year? It does say they're meant to take damage and be replaced. Do you think it's possible you used them past their lifetime at all?
  • 3 1
 My son uses Mynesweepers and is one of the top JR Ex DH riders in the US. I know he can run much lower pressures and his rims last a much longer period of time and the install is a piece of cake. So I give a thumbs up to Mynesweepers.
  • 4 0
 30 psi in my minions eliminate any necessity of tyre insert, never dent a rim, had burps few times, however was not something critical and was able to pump back at the bottom of the lift;

for all day long rides - just had a pump and some bacon ;


It really sounds weird - buy ultralight carbon rim, thin condom tyre and put insert into it - will be same result as regular tyre with all rim in weight, performance wise gains are noticeable when u ride against the clock, when u ride for fun - neglect able difference
  • 1 0
 Some inserts allow you to run much lower psi which can give tons of traction.
  • 4 0
 I've been running Tannus Tubless in the rear (mix of DHR2 2.4 and Aggressor 2.5) for over a year and I've been really happy. Went down LPS/Porcupine with around 18-19 PSI in the back, felt amazing. I noticed a single rim strike after going down to 16ish mid ride as an experiment and put some more air in, no more noise. I also started running the same insert in the front recently. I'm not sure if I really need it, but it seems like cheap insurance vs. what rims cost and I'm not a huge fan of walking a bike back to the car.

Install is pretty damn easy with Pedros levers and EXO casings. Put tire on wheel, get the insert wings mounted between the beads of the rim and work to get it centered. From there, just get the tire bead on the wheel like normal. Getting the last 12" of the bead mounted is a tiny bit tricky. I found that if I put a foot on each side of the tire sidewall that is already mounted, it'll keep the tire from trying to pop off while I mount the last bit. From there, I use a couple of Pedro's levers to work the remainder of the tire on and I am in business. To keep the tire from wobbling, work the insert towards the middle of the rim before putting air in the tire.
  • 4 0
 I don‘t really get it unless you race xc where they use lightweight tires and crazy low tire pressures.
Modern trail/enduro/dh tires are so damn good...
Fussing around with inserts is such a pain in the ass especially when you then have a flat you end up messing around on the trail...
  • 3 0
 I am using a Tannus Armour Tubeless insert on my trail bike and really like it. I can definitely confirm that at the beginning of the ride it is noisy, but the noise seems to go away quickly during the ride. I've installed these on two of my friend's bikes as well and one Tannus Armour Tubeless insert definitely stretched, to the point that it created a bulge in the tire.
  • 3 0
 Sounds like Tannus in the annus
  • 7 1
 "corn flower effect"

kids, don't try too use flour-y prose when righting about MTBs.
  • 3 0
 Whoopsy daisy, you could say. Cheers for the heads up.
  • 3 0
 I've had Rimpacts front and back for a while now, and I am so happy with them ! They are quite cheap and offer tons of protection. One major reason to run inserts was not mentioned in this article : when you get a flat, you can still ride your bike down the track. In a race situation, this can save you a lot of time, cause your bike is still rideable. On Sunday I got a flat at the very top of an 8 minute steep and technical track, and I was able to ride all of it with no air in the back, riding at 90% and still holding the wheel of my friends in the front. I could even pedal on the road !
  • 3 0
 I have adjusted to a hard tire / soft suspension setup. It gives me the feel I like and balances rolling resistance with rim protection. Not the grippiest setup, but I like the bike to move around a bit so it works for me. Looking forward to the technical data on this one.
  • 3 0
 Looks like I'm the one guy still using Schwalbe procore... I'm 220lbs and have grown to love the bead-lock effect on the rear wheel. Don't run any inserts up front and floating around 20-25 psi front and rear depending on the trail.
  • 1 1
 Did you have to drill you rim for the extra valve? I like the idea of Procore, but not that part, or the price.
  • 2 0
 @Jacquers: No it still uses a single valve hole, the valve provides it's own split system by screwing in and out (although to be fair I have had problems with air loss over time when not riding for a week or 2).

But yeah they are pricey, but again, I only use it in the rear tire so it's one set for 2 bikes. In 5 years of riding them across 6 bikes and 3 continents I've only had 2 of the high pressure inner tubes fail, 1 was shortly after install so I think it was just a dud (or install error) and the second was dicking around trying to ride out my DH run after ripping the tire...
  • 1 0
 not the only one. 19/21 exo minions 4 years, one flat because the rear exo gave up during my genius line choice through a rockgarden
  • 2 0
 @Jacquers: definitely not the only one. 4 years riding on a pair (1 in my enduro bike, 1 in my DH) not a single flat. They were a BITCH to fit to my DH bike, but once they're in, they're great. The only issue I've ever had was the valve getting gummed up with tubeless sealant. But you can unscrew them the whole way our and clean it out with a toothpick, good as new!
  • 1 0
 @Sky-hi: thanks, was trying and gave up from the side Wink
  • 3 0
 This is what I've been waiting to see.The rock strike videos were great to watch and see those differences of impact.

Henery no longer with GMBN? Henery is the the Nuclear Physicist of MTB ! Love his methodical explanations looking at things from an angle that is unique and accurate.

Welcome Mate!!
  • 3 0
 I have the tannus inserts. they have been awesome. It was easy to install with a brand new tire too. No tire levers, no soapy water, no sore arms. I used this method when getting the tire beads on the rim www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPWBbDR3oag
  • 2 0
 running 18psi front and 19psi rear. riding north shore trails. i have crappy Sunringle Duroc rims. no dents so far
  • 4 1
 I'm struggling to understand why these inserts cost so much, they cost just as much as the friggin tires. Between wheels, tires, inserts, sealant, and valves your looking at no less than $1000 for a functional wheelset ($3000 if you want a nice carbon wheelset), that's just ridiculous.
  • 1 1
 Experienced foam engineers don't come cheap.
  • 1 0
 @Peally: If they're producing these at volume though that development cost should be a fairly negligible influencer on the product cost, but perhaps that's the underlying issue. Only a small niche of the mountain biking market, which is already relatively small compared to say road cycling, is actually purchasing these. A low volume of production would drive up the per-unit cost. That's all I can surmise to justify the price of these.
  • 3 0
 "corn flower effect"

You mean corn _flour_, or corn starch.

Took me a minute: "What the hell does a certain shade of blue might have to do with anything at all in this context? Oh, they mean "corn starch and water", aka "oobleck", a shear-thickening substance, aka non-newtonian fluid."
  • 2 0
 Great feature, I don't usually bother commenting on stuff but although the video seemed a bit pointless (I get that it'll get some audience from youtube) I enjoyed reading the article and Henry always comes across really clearly (excellent dad jokes, too).

I've been using the original rimpacts for a couple of years and found I only take them out in the muddiest of UK months when speeds are a lot lower, although I'm interested in trying the Pro ones now and going even lower in pressure.
  • 1 0
 Pointless? That’s science.
  • 2 0
 Would be very interested to see how well sealant performs with and without inserts. Anecdotally, I've had Rimpact pros for a year now and have punctured two rear tires - both didn't manage to seal. Great inserts for getting you to the bottom of the track on a flat though...
  • 2 0
 For those looking for a lighter option, Tubolight is great. I use their Evo SL on my XC bike, and Evo HD on my Jeffsy. I’ve been testing them our hard on rock gardens (Mountain Creek) and while not as supportive as a Cushcore or Air-liner, they seem to protect my rim and tires just as well, which is what I need.
  • 1 0
 I have the Evo HDs too, they literally feel like pool noodles. Far be it for me to assume how well they work, but honestly I can't help but be a bit disappointed with what I received for how much I paid for them.
I've yet to use them, but do they make a noticeable difference? I plan on testing them this weekend, hopefully my opinion can change about them.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney it would have been nice to have a couple of control images to compare to of a tire, without the inserts, running a similar pressure while cornering and impacting. Just a thought. Thanks for the article though. Lots to think about. I ran cushcore initially as I was experiencing a strange number of flats in the rear. Ended up building a new wheel and with the new rim the flats went away. However, I have kept the cushcore and added it to the front due to the predictability and stability in cornering. I'm a fan and think it is worth the weight penalty.
  • 1 0
 @snl1200 if the rims have a super sharp square edge that always leads to pinch flats in my experience. File the edge off and the problem will go away or change rim Wink
  • 2 0
 @billbobaggins468: Yeah- with those rims they did not survive long enough to really figure out a solution other than to build up a new set. They were some 2018 e13's. In addition to the strange rate of punctures they also ended up denting really easily. Swapped back to my trusty Flow/DT350 combo. I've heard other people have better luck with the e13's...wasn't my experience sadly.
  • 1 0
 @snl1200 Yeah, that's a fair cop. I was a bit worried about the rim, to be honest. I could have gone back at the end of the day though to be fair. Thanks for the idea though. I'll try and include it in the future. Cheers.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney The great thing about Rimpact is the option of going original and pro in a pair. I run original in the front and pro in the rear. The lighter weight in the front is good and the original gives a slightly better damping effect in my experience. Yes, you might need to dial back your compression damping in your fork and allow it to do a bit more work for you.

Longer term, if you're running Rimpact, I'd suggest this setup.
  • 3 1
 For the record, most all liners suck and have their limitations. Tannus warps tire bad when inserted and terrible rim protection (damaged new wheel bad w/30psi). So, will take heavier 2-ply casing tires over liners any day. If flat, just plop a tube in until can fix of replace tire without getting stuck with these foam things flopping about
  • 1 0
 That has not been my experiment with it. I have ran two tires in it both with carbon light bicycle rims. No warped tires, no damaged rims running 18-23 psi rear). Vittoria Martello 2.35 trail, and Agarro 2.6 trail.
  • 2 0
 At 155 lbs, I haven't found the need for inserts. Just run my E13's at rider's weight divided by 7 for the front PSI. Add 2 to the rear, 150ml of sealant and vamonos amigos! No issues with E13 carbon rims or Crank brothers' synthesis E11. While I'm aggressive on the tech, maybe I'm not a beast as the guys killing corners and sending big jumps/drops. {insert your insert comment wherever you want}
  • 2 0
 "Conversely, with the Vittoria, you have to cut off an inch or two. This doesn’t make much sense to me, personally. Sorry if there are any 36er riders who Vittoria are catering to with this, but for a mountain bike insert it felt a bit pointless."

Apologies in advance for the pedantry, but an insert designed for a nominal 36" wheel would be 22" longer than one for a nominal 29" wheel!

Which does make Vittoria's standard sizing even more strange.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney
Nice article. You should give the Rimpact originals a go. They are likely more appropriate for the average rider. the Pro's are designed for enduro racers hitting shit hard. The Original's forego the extra hard layer that is likely contributing to the negative characteristics you described
Cheers
  • 2 0
 Been running Tannus for few months now and they are great. Good impact protection, sidewall support. light and gives a smooth ride. Super easy to install as long as you get one side of the tire beaded first, then install the insert. They don't allow you to run super low PSI but can drop 3 PSI over running no insert.
  • 1 0
 Great video, looking forward to a non biased long term review, my experience with the Huck Norris was a bit of a let down and the added weight was noticeable and as it is lighter than its counterpart the cush core (that probably better suits my rim abusive riding) I am quite hesitant to invest in inserts even though my back wheels could definitely benefit and I could lower the pressure from the rock solid 28psi that I am running.
  • 2 1
 A friend of mine guilted me into buying some for my new fancy wheels. He's given me good advice before, but after fighting to get an insert in (and losing) I am reluctant to use them again. I've never had an issue, but also really want to save my rims and do like low pressures. No chance I'm switching tires any time soon, though...
  • 2 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: fwiw, I found Huck Norris inserts super easy to install and I'm all thumbs. Mainly looking at it as a bit extra insurance for when I case or smash rocks, but now curious to see if I'll notice any extra support through the turns.
  • 1 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: These ones have the best name in the business - I should have grabbed them.
  • 1 0
 I live in a place where a lighter casing isn’t an option-jagged rocks don’t care about inserts when they slice your tire open.

I want to know how much rim protection each insert offers. More support at lower pressures is nice, but the same rocks that slice tires also destroy rims.

Looking forward to any testing that focuses on how impacts are handled.
  • 2 0
 I have used rimpacts front and rear for about 4 months in janky terrain. I review is spot on! I really like them but you can take a little more abuse in the jank. I will take that for the other advantages!
  • 1 0
 I own cushcore and the airliners and at least for my ridingstyle and the bike i ride the airliners are far better: I ride a hardtail and the protection they offer is far better than with cushcore. I think this comes from the airliners having way more material between tire and rim. They are super easy to install, cushcore is not. If set up correctly you will find yourself using it all the time, as for cushcore you only notice it once in a while. It dampens more than cushcore. It weights significantly less. Yes it streches but you can cut it and ziptie it back together, no big deal. I feel like cushcore offers more burpingprotection but i burp not very often, even without inserts. Rimpact sounds really good though, will try.
  • 1 0
 I think what is missing in every insert article is a bridge to those who have no clue even if they take tubes or sealant. Like this video does not show or talk about installation and tools necessary or why a valve change is needed this is an advanced investigation.
  • 1 0
 I tried out inserts this winter (Tannus tubeless).

So far, I’ve noticed that inserts let me run 5-6psi less pressure in the rear tire than I used to run (seems like 16psi feels about like 22psi used to be without the insert, both being about as low as I’d go on the sloppiest of days, most days I’m higher in pressure).

I tried out the inserts, because in the winter wet roots of the PNW I sometimes get the feeling that I’m “ping ponging” at tire pressures high enough to prevent squirm in berms. So far, it seems to have done exactly that.

At the moment, I’m not sure I’ll keep them in the front year round (though no strong desire to take them out so far either). I may very wellkeep the rear in though, as I’ve dented my rear rim a number of times even through the DD class rear tire I’ve been using, and 25-30psi in the rear during the summers.
  • 5 2
 Why is mynesweepers not being tested here with the others they are lighter than all of these preform better and are easier to install come on where are the mynesweepers!!!!!!
  • 2 1
 #Mynesweepergang
  • 1 0
 I find this to be quite a strange review of the Rimpact inserts. I've got them in my bike with 30mm wide rims, Assegai up front, DHR II at the back, EXO casing. My bike feels really planted, it's quieter because it's getting sent off line less, and I have loads of grip as afforded by the ability to run lower pressures. Those three factors were immediately apparent as soon as I fitted them, and since then the inserts have also done an excellent job of stopping me getting punctures through having the tyre bottom out on the rim, and protected my rims. Feels comfortable and confidence inspiring, as evidenced when friends have a go on it and think it feels amazing.
  • 1 0
 What about the Nukeproof ARD ? I've been using this product for over a year with no issues. Lightweight and easy to install. This product looks a bit like the Vittoria inserts.

nukeproof.com/products/horizon-advanced-rim-defence-ard-pair
  • 1 0
 Do these foam inserts lose their pliability when coated/saturated with tire sealant or can you not run tubeless with these? I'm unfamiliar with how these are used. I personally do not ride aggressively enough to need/benefit from such inserts but I am curious how they are utilized. I do, however, ride a tubeless setup.
  • 1 0
 Did you have any issue with tire wobble after installing the inserts?

I'm running CushCores and cannot get rid of the wobble they introduce to the tire. Its not enough to be a problem at anything other than high speeds, but I've re-seated the insert multiple times to no avail.
  • 1 0
 Been running Rimpact for the past two years. Replaced the rear for a Pro a year ago due to my poor line choices. Rim would've been toast long before if I hadn't used the insert.

I actually find them quiet and the feel combined with a DD/SG tyre is great. Helps a lot with fatigue on long park days too.

Installation of the regular is easy, Pro is a bit tougher but taking your time and pushing the tyre bead into the rim well is key. Haven't really felt like I was going to stretch the tyre or snap a lever, and this was on DD/SG casings.
  • 2 1
 I’ve tried Huck, Cush,& Tannus all in Exo casings. One thing to note about Tannus, is that they feel firmer then you want. 25psi feels like 28 ect ect. The wings feel good initially, but on a big Huck to flat, say into a rock garden... they collapse big time. Removing Cush core an Tannus is a nightmare, so I’m now on DD with no inserts. Was only ever dropping 2psi at most with any inserts, they must work better for people who ride in mud or softer ground.
  • 4 0
 as a Vittoria user - the Bottas comment made my day....LOL.. Keep it up Pinkbike.
  • 1 0
 Done the inserts thing, found ride comfort but nothing else. Now back on conti tyres for 2 years no inserts no problem on carbon rims. Biggest cringe at a race seeing a privateer struggle to sort a fail with inserts on a timed transition
  • 1 0
 I've tried Huck Norris, Vittoria Airliner and Turbolight. After a month or so, all the sealant morphed from liquid into pingong-ball sized lumps of uselessness. Orange Seal and Stan's, and some other brand I've purged from memory.
  • 1 0
 The best I tried was the spin shield. Tested by Dailly/Vouilloz/Vergier, one of the best tyre insert. The ingeneer who made this was very intelligent but a poor seller and he went bankrupt. But, this tyre insert was one of the best, said by some top pilot.
  • 2 0
 Something to note with the Rimpact pro is that most sealants will seperate the two density's of foam, i don't know if it's something in sealant that degrades the glue, but i just run a standard Rimpact now.
  • 1 0
 I've been running the Rimpact Pro insert for almost year now and they are excellent. lighter and cheaper than the Cushcore, and provide excellent grip, support, and protection just like the review said. Fully recommended. They are also not that easy to install, though from what my friends have told me, still easier than Cushcore.
  • 1 0
 I debated cushcore/tire inserts, and ended up using heavier duty tires. I run DD in the front and DH casing in the rear. I am able to run lower pressures & have some additional rim protection with the DH casing tire in the rear. Weight penalty of DH casing over DD was 100g, vs cushcore's 200-250g Riding in BC's interior (much rough) I am so far pretty happy with the DH casing tire @ 25 psi rear & 22 psi front.
  • 1 0
 Currently running Vittoria airliner in rear at 30psi on DH casing Minion SS (i'm 275lb and will still roll the tire off the rim at anything under 29psi in a hard turn) and an old 26" cushcore that stretched to fit my 27.5 front rim with an EXO DHF. Installation wasn't too bad on my old alloy rims but my current carbon rear wheel with the DH casing and vittoria insert claimed 2 DH levers and 45 minutes for the best shop mech in town to get it seated after i ran out of levers....and by then the bead was all worn out and the tire had a nasty wobble.
On the plus side, I can now run a tire from new to bald without having to swap it out...so the grief during install is worth the longevity I get out of my tires. Before inserts, I was constantly buying new tires or just giving in and going with DH tubes but now I can plow through these nasty southern arizona rocks on carbon rims without any worry.
  • 1 0
 Well done! For the record, I literally laughed out loud (which I rarely do from any video), when you talked about how your back was going to spasm, you were going to let out a shriek, the go over the bars 'somewhere down there.' Absolutely hilarious!!! And a really informative article that I think was needed: inserts are the future, and I think 90% of riders are behind the curve for not using them
  • 3 1
 "What I would term the corn flower effect where the harder you hit it the more it firms up is very apparent."

so like a non-Newtonian fluid
  • 1 0
 Well that was somewhat informative.. Bring in the Mad Scientist! How about testing to see which had the best a worst protection in class. From straight hits to angled. Rated from 1-10.
  • 1 0
 I thought the PANZER looked good, they even have a 60g insert for 2-2.3 tires ... but they can't be found in there US, the website has no info about the inserts function other than some fancy scroll-in pictures
  • 3 8
flag ripcraft (May 26, 2021 at 15:18) (Below Threshold)
 More importantly why would you name a company after anything from Nazi Germany?
  • 7 2
 @ripcraft: Panzer just means Tank
  • 2 5
 @leelau: Perhaps. But Google disagrees IMO

The modern Germán use of the word originated from the ww2 tank. And most often the usage of the word refers to the Germán Panzer.

And no I don't know why those accents are there, ffs autocorrect.
  • 1 7
flag ripcraft (May 26, 2021 at 18:26) (Below Threshold)
 @leelau: and one downvote for you sir!
  • 6 1
 @ripcraft: I'm sorry you feel that way. Friends who are native German speakers say Panzer just means "tank" or "armour"
  • 1 7
flag ripcraft (May 26, 2021 at 20:11) (Below Threshold)
 @leelau: cool story bro.
Germany is one country.. To a lot of people(especially those who watch the history Channel and made the websites that come up on google) Panzer means Nazi tank. Definitely doesn't "just" mean tank.
  • 2 0
 @ripcraft: "Panser" in Norway means either the engine cover (hood) of a car, or armour, as in an armoured vehicle. It's written with and S instead of the Z of course, but I believe the word has the same origins. Wouldn't surprise me if it's the same in several other countries.

On the other hand, a tank is always plural here - "tanks". A Tanks. 8/
  • 4 0
 As a native german speaker: panzer just means tank, armour... There ist no german word for "nazi tank". You would have to use "Nazi Panzer"
  • 7 0
 @ripcraft: google serves you what it thinks your interested in. If i google "Panzer", there is no "Nazitank" -homepage on the first page. It means "tank" in German as well as "shell" -like turtle shell. If you think about it, the company may even have thought about the insert as "shell", makes sense to me.

It is true that back in WW2 Germans already called their tanks "Panzer" so technically your right, you can call a WW2 German Tank a "Panzer". I am not sure what a "Nazi-Panzer" is to be honest, is there a ranking of good and bad tanks according to who opperated it ? -maybe, but which name is ok and which is not ?

Cane creek double barrel- sure
Intense- M 1 , M16 -sure
Intense Uzzi -hard one
Madonna RAAW V2- is V2 ok?-just google it
Vorsprung Luftkappe -German and close to "Luftwaffe" -yikes

I guess we live in a world where a lot of people wants to misunderstand things just to be outraged - i am pretty sure said company(s) did not want to glorify any Nazistuff whatsoever- just think and chill.
  • 5 0
 @ripcraft: you are ond stupid human being...
  • 2 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: And don't even mention Tony "Der Panzerwagen" Martin.
  • 2 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: luft waffe = air weapon. Literally. It shouldn't trigger reasonable people.

The same for Kriegs marine = war marine

Source. Friend of mine from Germany. Thanks for confirming
  • 4 0
 @ripcraft: just effing stop. You have not been damaged by some company's use of a word you apparently want to misunderstand.
  • 2 0
 @leelau: "Luftwaffe" is the German "Airforce" back in WW1,WW2 and even now. Nothing naziesque involved.
(Luftkappe - Aircap)
  • 2 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: apologies if I wasn't clear. I totally agree!
  • 1 0
 I've used the non-pro rimpact on my rear tire of my Enduro hardtail running about 1bar /14 psi for about half a year now and didn't have one flat tire or rim dent yet. I am ~95kg. So I am pretty happy with the setup.
  • 1 0
 Hi everyone, today, I tried, in every way, to install the tannus tubeless insert, but there was no way, I used, in the past, other inserts, without major problems, but this time, I gave up ...
  • 1 0
 I agree its a bitch. Try seating the bead of the tire with out the tannus in there first. Then remove one side of the bead while keeping one side seated. At that point you should have more room for the Tannus to fit in there. You will probably need a tire lever and make sure Tannus and tires are not cold. Hope that helps
  • 1 0
 I can totally understand the frustration, but it seems like everyone else can do it, so clearly it's possible. I was able to do it on my first try.
  • 2 0
 Install and bead the tire before installing the Tannus insert. Then install the Tannus and the second bead of tire and Tannus insert together. REALLY super easy if you install that way. You need one side of the tire beaded first.
  • 1 0
 @alwayslivingthedream: after you seated one side on the bead into the rim. Push the bead into the middle of the rim when trying seat the second side. It went on pretty easy even with a brand new tire. www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPWBbDR3oag
  • 3 0
 High-quality article here, can't wait for the full results....just went and bought some Rimpact Pros
  • 1 1
 Cushcore is honestly not that hard to install with most tire/rim combos. It takes patience, but I typically do it without tools with a normal casing tire. It is harder with a smaller volume tire I think, I run them on my XC bike also, but still very manageable.

That said, it is definitely harder than installing a tire and is probably still the hardest to install of the inserts tested. Look forward to seeing where this goes!
  • 1 1
 I had a set of the Rimpact Original inserts. Both failed in the same manner within a couple of months - the join came apart so the insert was no longer a continuous hoop. I was told I could rejoin it with zip-ties and keep on using them but I just decided to throw them in the bin instead.
  • 1 0
 Mine must be a couple of years old now and still going strong. I did have to rejoin one with a ziptie, you can just drill a hole each side of the join.
  • 1 1
 installed a tannus with DH casing tires, DT rims, which whas quite a hustle.... once installed, the tire refused to propperly pop into the rimbead, and i couldn't inflate the tire. tried it two times, same experience. removed the insert, tire popped without problem. insert was inserted right into the bin.
  • 2 0
 I think this is one of the most thorough and informative tests I've ever read on Pinkbike. If I was looking for my first insert I would be well educated after reading this.
  • 2 0
 Lots about support, but very little mentioned about the damping a good system can add to the tyre?
  • 2 1
 Personally big fan of cushore (pro in read, XC in front)...big benefit I've found is the sidewall stiffness increase...its been ages since I rolled off a tire running it.
  • 2 1
 I have had a good riding experience with CushCore. You can run crazy low pressures safely and the quieting sensation is immediately noticeable. However I have recently switched to the Tannus inserts because I was tired of wrestling with CushCore at tire swaps. So far so good, they aren’t easy to install, but they are easier. The Tannus offer good protection and support, but not as drastic as CushCore, but also not as heavy.

The benefits of inserts are real. I try to balance them out with lighter casing tires EXO+ to offset weight, and this works well for my 175lbs and PNW terrain.
  • 1 0
 DH or DD casing tires don’t need the extra sidewalk support. you only need that on shitty EXO casings. also, people run their tire pressures so low with cushcore to get that extra “wrap-around” grip, that it negates the support and makes the tires feel squirmy. I was an early adopter of cushcore and good friends with their first sales rep.
  • 1 0
 @moroj82: On a bicycle the only thing that really makes a difference in rollinspeed (or climbing ) is tires. If you have big mountains around DH tires may be an option, but if keeping momentum is the name of the game, there is no way i am gonna run DH tires. On said terrain inserts are a great option, you have protection and support without the immense drag of DH tires. On my parkbike i run no inserts because the DH casing does the job just fine. Horses for courses.
  • 1 0
 @moroj82: I dont know man...have you ever schlarped a berm in the bike park...? DH Minions pop off rims on the regular...
  • 1 0
 how can any inserts review be complete without the 5$ ghetto PE expansion joint? pool noodle wont work because its open-cell and will soak
  • 4 2
 Rumors say that there is someone who installed Cushcore without breaking the rim...
  • 4 1
 Use both tannus and rimpact in each tire...tampax for all day protection
  • 1 1
 Cushcores work very well on the nasty, sharp limestone of central Texas. As others have noted, installation is a bastard, but if you can stretch the tire out by premounting it to a spare wheel, that seems to help a lot.
  • 2 0
 Woulda liked to see a pool noodle thrown in for testing just for sh!ts and giggles.
  • 3 0
 my 5lbs of DH tires laugh at ur inserts.
  • 2 0
 But which one offers the most protection? I think that is a key review point that is missed...
  • 2 0
 I don't care about support. Which product is best at preventing pinch flats?????
  • 1 0
 From video I was more surprised how front wheel bounced over the first rock, comparing to the rear, I would expect 180 bike will plow through that small rock, not bounce
  • 1 0
 Pay day today too, had cushcores in mind for a long time but decided to save myself £100 and buy the rimpacts based on this review, cheers Henry
  • 2 1
 No one talking about Flat tire defender (FTD)?!? Better performing than kush core, easy install, costs less, made in USA. What’s not to love?
  • 1 0
 Were any of the noisy ones noisier than rimming out on those tires alone? Or even something beefier like DoubleDown or Grid Gravity?
  • 1 0
 Love to see MegaNorris compared to a kinda-light tire designed with extra sidewall support but not a full double casing, such as Conti's Apex or Spesh Grid Gravity
  • 2 0
 A control DH casing tire would be appreciated to see how the inserts stack up against the simple solution.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney awesome to see you putting that charisma to good use! A long way up from eating whole blocks of cheese and living in Absoloot dorm rooms!
  • 1 0
 Haha! Hope you're well man. Hopefully will get back over for another season when the world calms down.
  • 1 1
 Cush Core XC works really well. Run it in both my bikes (Patrol and TR500) , rear wheel only. Way easier to install and remove compared to Pro model. Saves a bit of weight as well.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney flattiredefender.com/product/ftd-ii everything I have read about these should make them a contender for top 3 let alone top 6.
  • 2 0
 @tobias-323 We reached out to Flat Tire Defender. Sadly, however, the world being what it was in January we weren't able to organise the delivery of any inserts in time. I would love to try them though.
  • 1 0
 If you have skinny internal rim width and your sealant hasn't turned to super glue, cushcore can be taken off with not a bit more a touch tad too much more effort
  • 1 0
 I generally try to avoid any kind of Rimpact... not that there's anything wrong with that!
  • 2 0
 Glad to see Henry back on the air.
  • 2 0
 What happened with GMBN?
  • 3 1
 I still can't get over $100+ for some foam strips.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney At 4:36 what is the tire pressure here? Is it at the initial 21/25 or lower?
  • 3 0
 Hi Paul, for the video all tyres were ran at 23PSI. In the write up the pressures varied a lot as I found the right balance. Hope that clarifies it. Cheers.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: Thanks Henry, that's very useful. Also a bit scary to see how easily the rim is impacted at 23 psi which is not super low.
  • 2 1
 My tannus split after 7 rides with no gnar what so ever. Sent DM with pictures directly to tannus with no response back..
  • 3 1
 I just run pool noodles I bought at Walmart for 5 dollars
  • 2 1
 I used to run flat tire defenders but switched to mynesweepers and love them way more.
  • 1 0
 The Vittoria was super easy to install and allows me to seat the tire using only a floor pump pretty consistently.
  • 1 0
 Also easy to install, doesn't absorb sealant and you can use it with tubes if you have an emergency
  • 1 1
 Pool noodles are the best. $5 and can trim them to whatever size you need. Been running them for the last 4-5 years can't see why you would need any of these.
  • 2 0
 Henry is the British Levy
  • 1 0
 No inserts for me. 20/22 psi in regular EXO Maxxis tires. Don't care about the rim... Lifetime warranty on Reserve wheels.
  • 1 0
 Lots of comments on this one! Nobody’s got anything to say about Pepsi’s? I’ve been curious
  • 1 0
 Come on when we go to have mousse tubes Like A Motorcycles time to forget about tubeless and go mousse inserts
  • 1 1
 I´ve never seen the need to run any tyre insert. But then i dont ride around thinking i am "insert EWS racer name"
  • 2 1
 960g 2.3" tire is "middle of the road"? Frown
  • 1 0
 So which one we all gonna buy??
  • 1 2
 go to www.sessioncomponents.com and get their Defenders.
Easy to install, doesn't absorb sealant and you can still use it with tubes if you have an emergency. ($42 each)
  • 1 0
 Need a PB review of the Schwalbe Aerothan tubes in rocky, rooty tech.
  • 1 0
 Anyone else double take to ensure they weren't on GMBN?
  • 1 0
 What happened to Flat Tire Defender?
  • 3 3
 The main problem with cushcore, rimpact, and Hucks Norris is that they aren’t Tannus armour
  • 1 0
 I have to agree with you. Very happy with Tanned anus.
  • 1 0
 OK, so does anyone know how to get the Panzer's in Canada?
  • 1 0
 PB is here to pump you up!
  • 1 0
 Has anyone tried cushcock?
  • 1 1
 I use Session's Defender www.sessioncomponents.com and love it. Great price, easy to install, doesn't absorb sealant and you can use it with tubes in an emergency
  • 1 1
 I use Session's Defender, they are lightweight and cheaper ($42 each) than all in that video.

www.sessioncomponents.com
  • 1 0
 octa mousse?

Looks light, like 100gms.
  • 2 0
 Still running tubes...
  • 2 0
 No baguette test? Dang.
  • 1 0
 "rimming out wasn’t an unpleasant sensation" welp
  • 1 0
 or I don't know... maybe.. you could just run 30psi?
  • 1 0
 Why is he walking down a hill? Wouldnt it be more fun to ride down it?
  • 1 0
 I would say that air is highly underatedcasxa tire insert.
  • 1 0
 Want to see Cushcore XC vs Tannus comparison.
  • 1 0
 Life is too short for Cushcore.
  • 1 0
 A very well-written, informative article.
  • 1 0
 What the hell is light enduro riding?
  • 1 0
 Toaster
  • 3 2
 Or pump up your tires..
  • 3 0
 no one seems to care about rims any more like that are made from kryptonite. Almost every Pinkbike drop to flat test makes me cringe knowing I could not afford to replace my hoops so 20 psi is a pipe dream I will never have. I have no wheel sponsors.
  • 2 3
 @madmon: Tire inserts are a joke imo. Yes I ve tried them. Getting flats? Destroying rims? Buy a burlier tire/ rim set up! And pump up your god damn tires!
  • 2 0
 @Bushmaster123: Ya I use 2.35 Minions and Mary's along with nice rears and I use about 28 psi+. Just the idea of adding a full pound to the spinning mass riding uphill for 70% of the day stops me dead in the H20. I do see the benefit riding rough terrain and racing with them but I have seen the carnage live on TV they are not bomb proof.
  • 1 2
 These are all useless. All you need is a Schwalbe Magic Mary and 35mm Ibis alloy rims
  • 1 1
 I just throw some bubble wrap in that mafucka and call it a day
  • 1 0
 But then your "foam" only works one time. Once the wrap is popped it's worthless.
  • 1 1
 I love cushcore
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.035101
Mobile Version of Website