How to Not Feel Stupid Walking Into a Bike Shop

Jan 13, 2023 at 13:44
by Christie Fitzpatrick  
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Every year we see an influx of riders keen to get into mountain biking, and we know that for newcomers looking at forums and media is to be overwhelmed with information and opinions. So we're launching a series of articles called MTB Explained, where we help navigate some of the basics of our sport. If you're new, welcome to the best damn sport in the world, and if you're a long-time rider, consider adding some useful information in the comments to welcome fellow riders. Cheers!




Words: Christie Fitzpatrick

Bike shops can be intimidating. There's no question that some shops are less-than-perfect (you may even have met an employee that is under the illusion that you are the dumbest person on the planet), but the vast majority are full of amazing people who are way-too-excited about bikes. Still, all that knowledge and excitement can compound an intimidating situation and make you question every bicycle-themed decision you've ever made. Obviously it would be better if nobody needed to worry about that, but for better or worse, the bike industry is largely filled with bike nerds rather than professional salespeople. I am here to give you tips and strategies to have the best experience possible when bike shopping in person today.


Tip 1. Be confident, but leave your ego at the door.

I usually give myself a mental pep talk to approach the shop with humility and excitement about nerdy bike stuff, which helps avoid feeling like a job interview that I'm tanking and will go far in building relationships and trust. Name-dropping local trails and bike components might earn the shop bro's respect, but if you're new to the sport and honest about your level of knowledge, you'll have a more enriching educational experience that's well tailored to your ability and skillset. If you're clueless, own it, we all start somewhere. This does, however, mean that your experience (and ultimately, your purchase) hinges on the expertise of the employee. Which leads me to...

Tip 2. Do some research beforehand.

Yes, in a perfect world, the bike shop should be able to tell you everything there is to know about bikes. But narrowing down your needs and choices beforehand will help you feel more confident in parsing their recommendations. Are you looking for something to explore your local trails on a casual ride, are you looking to train for an enduro race, or are you looking to give it all up and move to Whistler and become the next big name in DH? You can use our handy guide here to help choose what kind of mountain bike is right for you. Once you’ve got an idea of this, the conversation will flow easier, and you'll probably avoid being upsold a bike or part that you didn't want or need.

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Tip 3. Be realistic with your budget.

In mountain biking, it's easy to be the customer that walks in with comically unrealistic expectations. "I wanna race enduros, but it should be 25lb, and maybe do some bike touring, and I have $500." It's worth your time to get clued up on the market and decide how much you’re willing to fork out before you go. It’s useful to have an idea of how much your new bike is going to cost, so it isn’t so much of a shock in-store (and you don't have to have you dreams crushed by the shop bro). The pricing of different bike types - and their spec - varies wildly. You’re better off knowing before you go rather than being met with a half-smiling, half-mocking ‘well that depends’. But once you have a working figure, feel free to pick the employee's brains on what they believe is the best deal, as after all they are the trusted experts.

Tip 4. Be honest about your abilities and goals.

When you are just starting out with a new hobby, you may not need an overly expensive bike with the latest, high-end components. Conversely, you don’t want a cheap, low-quality bike that you will outgrow quickly. Everyone has different approaches, and some might be better off buying cheap to start, then spending more when they're more familiar with the sport—while others should buy once and cry once. Buying from a shop is a great opportunity to present your case and say “this is where I am now, and this is where I want to be.” It is the shop employee's job to help you find something that aligns with those goals. Approach the shop with a solid appreciation of your own ability and where you aspire to do, so you can answer any of their questions with confidence.

Tip 5. If you're not feeling it, don't give them your business.

If you're in a shop and don't feel good about it, leave. Take your time and think about it, and if you don't have a great shop experience you can always try the next one down the street.

And if the idea of going to a bike shop still fills you with dread, then don't go to a bike shop. We love some of our local shops, but despite what bike shop propagandists have said for years, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with buying bikes and parts online. If you can figure out what you want, go for it. Just be respectful if and when you need in-person service (for example, it's not the junior shop tech's fault that you could find cheaper brake pads online, there is no need to remind him of that).

The bike shop will still be there to help when you hit technical bike hurdles, so don't feel like you have to hand over $5K for shoddy service just because you feel rushed or flustered.





What other tips do you have for positive interactions at bike shops? And don't say "bring everyone beers/donuts/cabbage" because, while that might be true, it's ridiculous to have to bribe your way to adequate service.

Author Info:
christiefitz avatar

Member since May 21, 2017
109 articles

470 Comments
  • 1257 15
 Itd be cool if the shop employees left their ego at the door too
  • 311 6
 Tip 6 - Don't assume the employees know everything and are right about everything, but don't argue with them about it because they have massive egos

I've heard so much absolute horse shit peddled by bike shop employees it is astounding.

My favorite was in Georgia, the shop employee was telling someone their fork being sucked down (overpressurized negative) into 20% of the travel was for "top out protection". Yea dude, I don't think a fork is supposed to sit at 20% travel with no weight on the bike at all.
  • 111 2
 I work at a bike shop and I can't agree more!
  • 37 2
 @shinook: Yup - I had to sit there and argue about a warranty issue on the SID fork. It was a known issue but the dude still wanted to argue with me that bushing play was normal.
  • 92 0
 Please forward this concept to the majority of shops in the Denver area.
  • 98 40
 Great tips! I see the "all bike shop employees are idiots and jerks" crowd has arrived in the comments, lol.

As with any interaction, treat everyone with respect and you're setting yourself up for success. If you don't get respect back then take Christie's advice and walk out.
  • 7 17
flag bbachmei (Mar 8, 2023 at 10:23) (Below Threshold)
 THIS!
  • 44 0
 @Portland-maine: I know a lot of really awesome bike shop employees, including those at the shop pictured above, so I'm not making a blanket statement. I have had some extremely negative interactions at a lot of different shops, though.

People think this way and are frustrated about it for a reason. It doesn't mean they all act that way, but it's clearly not an isolated issue
  • 35 0
 Yeah we can be massive dicks tbh
  • 13 0
 There is a local pivot dealer near me and I was shopping a switchblade. The owner/sales guy couldn't spend enough time shit talking other brands vs talking up his brand. I walked because of his ego

My favorite LBS I shop for extras all the time because the mechanic is the best and his opinion is important to me. But those are the 2 extremes in my city.
  • 31 0
 One time I rolled in to buy brake pads and the guy yelled to everyone else not to sell me them. He said since my pads were contaminated I'd need to throw away the rotors and leave the bike for a couple weeks so he can take the calipers apart and rebuild them.
  • 6 81
flag Drewzellator (Mar 8, 2023 at 10:38) (Below Threshold)
 @shinook: Ive worked at a bike shop for 2 months now and I can agree that some shops have the ego issue. I wish people would know exactly what they want when they walk through the door than them coming in for our advice. yes we live in the bike industry but then I would sell someone the same bike no matter price or discipline.
  • 69 11
 The lower the salary the higher the ego
  • 9 0
 Couldn’t agree more , I feel like I’m targeted with ego fueled devil eyes of a guy that doesn’t know everything, or get a slight giggle when you ask a actual question about something, they give you the pffft as if you don’t know that already..
  • 8 0
 @nsmithbmx: I've rarely had good/friendly/fair interactions with any of the service departments around Denver - aside from C3, WRC and Base Camp. For the most part, the sales folks in most shops are solid. But man, some of the service dept guys are just awful. I've definitely taken a lot of business with me to other shops because of it.
  • 66 0
 This is on shop owners. They have the power to hire the right people, fire the wrong people, and set the expectation shop-wide that kindness and approachability is priority #1 for their shop.
  • 24 1
 Yeah. The need to establish your cred to people supposed to sell you goods and services is lame. Was fun though to go tell the most elitist shop bros in town to reinstall my dad's tire facing the right direction.
  • 6 17
flag mtbandy FL (Mar 8, 2023 at 11:11) (Below Threshold)
 @shinook: I walked into a shop to demo the owners bike. He was out so one of the shop employees was getting it for me. When I asked about setting sag he went to a Rock Shox fork to see the recommended pressure. This bike had Cane Creek suspension.
  • 2 0
 Came to say something but you said it for me.
  • 56 2
 I got laughed out of a Very Highly Respected bike shop in the South of England in 2013 when I told them I wanted to fit a dropper post to a hardtail. I was told that that idea seemed 'a bit niche' and that I should probably consider an Enduro bike
  • 26 0
 @Drewzellator: Are you being scarcastic about your wish for every customer to know exactly what they want without your help?
  • 19 1
 @Drewzellator: I will come to your store and ask many questions just so i can piss you off now.LOL
  • 44 1
 @Drewzellator: People who know exactly what they want buy online. The advice is the only reason the shop can exist
  • 27 0
 @Portland-maine: My dude, you were on here last week complaining about how annoying customers are.
  • 45 3
 @Drewzellator: It seems like whenever I walk into a shop knowing exactly what I want, they don't have it, but "we can special order that for you." Yeah homie, so can I.

You wish people would know exactly what they want when they walk into the store? That's the stupidest thing I've ever read. Helping people who come in is why a lbs f*cking exists in the first place. It's why you have a job dude.
  • 11 3
 @rickybobby18: ...and most importantly pay the right people a decent wage.
  • 3 6
 While making minimum wage, smth
  • 16 0
 @Portland-maine: "Don't be a dick" is a remarkably effective way to have decent interactions. "Be kind" further improves on that. I don't like the broad brush either. In fairness, though, a disproportionate portion of bike shop employees are young and male, and generally (again, the broad brush), that population is usually (how's that for generalizing?) more apt to big egos and know-it-all-ism.

That doesn't mean you can't get good service from a bike shop - it does mean, though, that running a bike shop presents some challenges in managing employees and leading them in a way that's going to result in good, customer oriented service rather than a bunch of stupid posturing bro-ism.
  • 7 0
 @Drewzellator: If people knew exactly what they want or need, they wouldn't need you, though - online ordering or a super-market style big box store with massive inventory would meet their needs. The only way the LBS model makes sense is if there's something extra on the service side. Helping people figure out what'll work for them is valuable - and people are generally willing to pay for that. Doesn't mean you won't get the occasional obnoxious customer who'll ego spray all over you (it goes that direction, too - egos are egos), and it doesn't mean you won't get the occasional person coming in to pick your brain and then go home to order cheaper online (which is also a bit of a dick move).
  • 10 0
 I worked at a shop and the manager told me that we are supposed to be the experts, and I’d watch him talk down to people and they would eat it up and spend more money than they intended….I hated that shop and have seen similar BS at most “core” shops since then. I rarely bother going into a shop now. One exception was the OTE shop in Fruita, they were cool as could be.
  • 10 0
 @wobblegoblin: OTE in fruita is a rad shop
  • 32 2
 @wobblegoblin: Similar experience. I used to think bike shops were pointless because I was smarter than the mechanics and I could buy parts cheaper online. My first experience working in a shop only solidified my opinion, the manager was condescending to all the customers and yelled at all the employees, after I quit I thought I’d never work in the bike industry again. Fast forward a couple years and I’m working at district bike co in kamloops as a mechanic. Best job I’ve ever had. The owners rode bikes everyday and made it their mission to see all their customers get the bikes and parts they needed, sometimes sacrificing profits to guarantee the parts/labour could be arranged as fast as possible. Everyone in the shop got along, we all rode together and our customers were equally amazing. You could feel the community in and around that shop. However, humans are humans, I’m sure there were days we pissed someone off or left a customer hanging so I won’t argue with anyone who had a different experience with district. But overall, it taught me the value of bike shops that build up a community, and that we are all just friends playing with toys in the forest.

Sadly, I now live near aspen Colorado and the bike shops in this valley have reminded me how toxic and belittling it can feel to be a customer surrounded by egotistical and profit driven managers.
  • 22 1
 Years ago I was traveling with my mtn bike and stopped at shop in the Buffalo, NY area. I had a set of then-new XTR cranks and a BB that I wanted installed. "Nope" said the shop manager. I asked "Are you booked for the day?" and he answered, "No because I know you didn't buy them here." WAT. I tried to ask if any of his employees wanted to do it on their lunch break for cash and he told me to scram. It was BIZARRE.

I drove up the street, found another shop, and I was riding on my new parts an hour later. Still friends with that shop owner, now 20+ years later!
  • 9 0
 @ivemadeahugemistake: Tell me the service at Basalt Ski & Bike isn't the most condescending, shit service you've ever gotten
  • 14 0
 @rickybobby18: I agree. Unfortunately, sometimes the shop owners are the ones with the garbage attitude/ego. I can think of a few here in BC where if you're not a one of their super cool brobrah local buddies, you get treated like crap.
  • 8 0
 @Muggsly: This. Nothing more annoying than a shop selling only the "best of..." because it is what they carry.
At any given level of bike cost there is very little difference between brands. A $3300 xc bike will be comparable across brands. A $999 hardtail will be comparable across brands etc etc. It is actually very difficult to find a terrible bike from any brand these days.
One year your shop carries Specialized, and they are all great, a few years later the same shop now carries Trek instead and Specialized is terrible and Trek is amazing. BS.
It's that old Ford vs Chev vs Ram crap in the truck world.
  • 19 21
 @shagolagal: My dude, annoying customers are the ones who aren't respectful. This article is all about how to build a good relationship with your shop.

You can tell a lot of people on here have never worked retail and had to deal with rude and entitled customers.
  • 8 0
 @shinook: Yeah, I tried to point out a backwards brake rotor (a centerline) on a rental bike at a well known shop in South Lake Tahoe, and the employee told me that was just a new kind of rotor. Sure bud...tell that to the Clyde who crushes that thing on Toad's.
  • 11 0
 @shinook: Agree, I went into a local bike shop asking for a specific set of pads by the part number, was told "I've never hear of those you have the wrong part number, this is what you need" Looked nothing like what I had. He seemed pissed when I walked out without buying them. Have never been back. Stopped in an REI 30 minutes later and asked for the same part number. Employee says, let me check to be sure BRB, headed back into the shop area, walked back out with a blister card with the exact numbers I asked for, correct match for my pads. That's how you do it.
  • 2 2
 @nsmithbmx: exactly this! I’d go so far to say most of CO.

Oh hey, on to more important topics - do you have a BMX background?
  • 1 0
 @stinky-d-lux: yeah, so what shop does he work for?
  • 2 2
 @HankHank: it's abit of a joke that I've probably got the oldest reverb running without a service. On a hardtail. Little wheels too, I'll find a photo of it
  • 3 6
 Its like someone whose shot or held a gun before and thinks they're ready to go to war
  • 3 0
 @HB208: I feel like I am screwed, I bought a SID as a new take off from someones spur and it has the play. I am assuming any shop and sram will tell me to take a hike.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: @rickybobby18: something tells me they will just end up with no employees then
  • 13 6
 They need to remember they sell and work on bikes not Porsches. If you have any mechanical skills at all working on a bike isn't that complicated. I quit using bike shops 20 years ago because of bike shop employees thinking their crap doesn't stink. Been buying tools , parts, and bikes using mail order then internet. In fact the online companies seem to be more helpful.
  • 3 0
 @dmclemens: was it south shore bikes? I have horror stories from that place
  • 4 0
 @stormracing: It wasn't. It was a shop I have a lot of respect for and I'm sure it was just a rogue junior employee, but I'd rather not blow them up.
  • 5 0
 @HB208: SAME with a SID, but in 2009 Rockshox was shipping many forks with zero oil. My fork felt like crap from day 1. "It's the break in period" then it was "you need to service race forks more often" and then it was "the coating on your sanctions is gone because there is no oil in your brand new fork and you need a new fork"
  • 5 0
 @Portland-maine: I worked in retail. Not bikes but pretty related industry. In no way does that make me accept rude or ignorant shop employees. On the contrary.
Rude customers? Not the most pleasant experience, for sure. If you are already making more money than you need, just show them the door. If not, suck it up and take their money.
  • 2 1
 BINGO
  • 8 3
 @mtbandy: So the owner was kind enough to allow you to demo a personal bike and you have the audacity to shit-talk the shop rat? Classy.
  • 4 0
 @Drewzellator: you're fed up after 2 months? It might be time to seek out a different career my friend
  • 1 0
 @robbiekane: Thats the name of a board game right...
  • 10 0
 If you're in the Boise area come by my shop Rolling H Cycles, zero egos and everyone is cool AF.. If we had some weird ego stuff going on I would of fired them. My bike shop is ran based on how people have treated me at other shops.
  • 1 0
 @therealnobody: na this is my dream job. I love bikes too much
  • 4 1
 @jacobxpaul: thats the right way to run a bike shop. I once walked into a bike shop (not my local one, I was out traveling) and gave the brakes on a bike a squeeze. Some employee told me to "not squeeze the brakes because it was bad for the bike." Last I checked testing the brakes on a bike isn't bad for them. Maybe because I was a teenager then and I looked dumb but still. I was kinda shocked they said that. Either I have been wrong for years and have been abusing my bikes or they had some big ego.
  • 4 0
 @nsmithbmx: riiiiight?!

C3 out in Golden doesn’t have any pretentious staff. They all
Seem pretty calm and nice.
  • 3 1
 @nsmithbmx: cough... Wheat Ridge Cyclery.... cough, cough
  • 2 0
 @dresendsit: definitely agree with you there
Called one day asking for some help on something when I was in town and the owner was such a condescending douche to me over the phone. I know there is always two sides to a story but I was just asking about help with a spring press so I could get a coil barely too long to get on without help onto my fresh TTX22 … dude told me Ohlins was wrong and also stupid for sending that size even though they(Ohlins) had gotten it on no issue , I should return it all, and he couldn’t understand why I would even call about that. Let’s just say I quickly hung up and found a shop that was extremely helpful. Tiny little shop in golden.. I’m trying to remember the name
  • 9 3
 This comment section proves that bike shops are just like any other shops (what a surprise), they mostly have nothing to do with community, they are just plain businesses, like selling used cars or hardware stores. They make most money on novice people so they don't have to be overly smart or kind to survive. Sure, there are nice guys out there but that's rather an exception. I have no idea why would I support other people's businesses, they certainly would not support me.
  • 7 0
 @nowthatsdoomage: Theres enough material in this comments section for a Monty Python movie.
  • 18 0
 When I worked at a Trek store I did this weird thing where I shared my knowledge with everybody, tried to be helpful and treated customers with dignity and respect and somehow I ended up selling >£500,000 of bikes & gear in one year by myself. It was weird.
  • 4 0
 @tom666: so two new Lambos for shop owner?
  • 5 0
 @bok-CZ: The shop will have made a reasonable profit in 2021 (it's first year) which will have gone towards paying back it's shopfitting costs and the store will have made a fat loss the second half of 2022 and so far in 2023, so no lambos for anybody.
  • 4 1
 @Drewzellator: You don't say in what capacity you work for the shop, but I hope you're nowhere near the service department. Or sales. Or parts. Maybe there's a floor looking to be swept.
  • 1 0
 @Drewzellator: right on, I believe you
  • 1 0
 @Drewzellator: new bike or customer bike?
  • 1 0
 @Drewzellator: It doesn't sound like anyone in this scenario knew exactly what they wanted...
  • 5 0
 @shinook: This is not industry exclusive. I am pretty mechanically inclined and have worked in a few diff industries and have had folks in car shops be the same, hvac, construction, as well as bike shops. Many assume we don't know squat when we walk thru the door, at least technically. Learned a long time ago in sales that people are more educated now than ever with the internet.
  • 2 0
 @inside-plus: a little more material for the movie. Just browsing in the lbs, I thought I was friends with the employees and owner. Saw some really good looking socks with the shop name on them. "How much for the socks?". Guy yelled at the manager across the shop, "Should we sell him some socks?" Manager yells back, "gonna have to check with the owner". Holy shit! I'm so slow that they don't me representing the shop with a pair of fcking socks?!?! If it wasn't so funny I'd be offended
  • 2 0
 Literally the exact reason I don't ever visit most of the "high-end" bike shops in my area. Lots of attitude from the employees.
  • 4 1
 Leave the ego at home. That way you’re not a total douche on your way to the shop too.
  • 2 0
 @inside-plus: Damn, now I have to go back to the top and read every comment again (picturing them as monty python sketches.
  • 2 0
 @Esmond: This. I owned a Porsche and the service guys had less of an ego than some bike shops!
  • 3 0
 @Call-me-Dill: C3 shops are all pretty cool. Definitely helps that the owner is a pretty cool dude and hires other cool dudes without attitudes. When I was in Denver, I always liked supporting their shops. If Evil came out with steeper seat angles a few years earlier, I probably would have bought one from them.
  • 3 0
 seems like this article was written in response to everyone complaining at last week's article about buying online vs. in a shop.
  • 3 5
 @lkubica: That last sentence is so stupid. You obviously buy stuff from people like everyone else, you’d just rather support jeff besos so you can save a few bucks.
Not everyone needs bike shops but some people do, and those checking it out/new to mtb really do. The sport/industry needs shops. If you don’t understand the role shops play in the future of people riding bikes, your cornbread might not be quite done in the middle.
  • 3 0
 @Call-me-Dill: great people at C3
  • 1 0
 This is a result of improper training and the trickle down effect
  • 1 1
 This article was written by a lifestyle bro.
  • 1 1
 @emptybe-er: This is a sentence in context of supporting so-called LBS (aka Local Bike Shops) as opposed to buying online, because LBS maybe have higher prices, maybe you wait weeks for stuff, but you know, by supporting LBS you are supporting bike community, you know. So I say BS to this. People doing business which I could support I can count on a half of my hand and I am 40, so have quite a lot of life experience already.
  • 2 0
 @funboi-parisi: @funboi-parisi: if you want spot on service in the Denver area, go check out BROS bike shop on colfax, logan owns and operates it, best service hands down. Best part, doesnt sell bikes, so hes not pushy at all. His work is spot on every time, and he gets great reviews from all the local pros
  • 1 0
 @nsmithbmx: do you have a recommendation for a good shop in Denver? I’m moving to the area and was hoping to find a good one. Was also hoping to find a shop or community that hosted social events for riders and stuff.
  • 1 0
 @tom666: Oh, I see. But thats probably the same with any business starting, isn´t is? Not for Only fans maybe.
  • 3 0
 @nsmithbmx: I live here too. Pedal Pushers is the Worst that I have experienced. I go to MIke's Bikes Highlands Ranch (used to be Elevation) and Base Camp Cyclery. I also had great service at Golden Bike Shop when I lived in that area,
  • 1 0
 @user178323: I have a massive ego and think I know everything and couldn’t agree more!
  • 1 0
 @Riddler7: foothills Cyclery is who I had a great experience with
  • 1 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Campus Wheel Works perhaps?
  • 1 0
 @jhess8: couldnt agree more, pedal pushers really went downhill, worked there for a short while, and management was HORRIBLE.
  • 2 0
 @Riddler7: Rhythm Cycles in wheat ridge has a great community, and they got a pump track on site, where they hold community jams events
  • 3 0
 @nowthatsdoomage: could be the best route to take. Obviously I wasn't there so I don't know for sure, but (I'm a mechanic) a lot of times, especially on old or cheaper brakes the piston seals in the caliper go rotten, which generally leads to the brake fluid leaking which will get on the pads and if you use the brakes at all will contaminate the rotor as well. Now sometimes you can clean and sand the rotor and pads and you will be good to go but likely he didn't have time to fart around with that on the off chance that it might work. And even if that did work the amount of time that takes you would probably be looking at a similarly priced bill. Personally I would have handled that situation a little differently but I do know that 9/10 there is a lot more going on than meets the customers eye.
  • 1 0
 @wobblegoblin: OTE Fruita is my LBS. Ima lucky fellow--absolutely hilarious to see it mentioned here.
  • 5 0
 This is what happens when you employ people because they are into bikes rather than because they are in to customer service.
As a retail sales manager in a completely non biking related company, the complete lack of even basic customer service skills in most bike shops astounds me. Yeah so you know a lot about bikes do you, I know some sales people who could sell more bikes in a day than you could in a month, all while knowing close to nothing about them.
Most bike shop employees in my experience come across as arrogant and snooty. They look down on anyone who isn't buying a £10k bike and it's obvious to the customer. Maybe I've just got a really shitty lbs, but this has been my experience in most other bike shops too.
  • 1 1
 @dresendsit: I actually wrote up what I did and I meant it to Rhythm Cycles. Not Wheat Ridge
But Rhythm

Called one day asking for some help on something when I was in town and the owner was such a condescending douche to me over the phone. I know there is always two sides to a story but I was just asking about help with a spring press so I could get a coil barely too long to get on without help onto my fresh TTX22 … dude told me Ohlins was wrong and also stupid for sending that size even though they(Ohlins) had gotten it on no issue , I should return it all, and he couldn’t understand why I would even call about that. Let’s just say I quickly hung up and found a shop that was extremely helpful. Tiny little shop in golden.. I’m trying to remember the name
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Oh damn, im so sorry man. I work there in the summers, and Im really sorry if that was you're experience. Definitely could've been a bad day, or something else at the shop, Shawnee(The Owner) can come off harsh sometimes for sure.
  • 1 0
 @nsmithbmx: pedal pushers douchey af.
  • 1 0
 @BrambleLee: but you can special order it for yourself 10% cheaper if not more…hell I’ve even seen shops selling oneup pedals for $10 more than on the oneup website. That’s bs.
  • 1 0
 @jhess8: I 2nd pedal pushers being incredibly douchey. Especially one of the managers.
  • 1 0
 @NoahMac05: yup pretty sure Eric is his name what a douche.
  • 1 0
 @Mgabriel757: Eric’s the owner believe it or not
  • 2 0
 @ivemadeahugemistake: District is the best shop in town, I wont name any names but theres another shop i refuse to spend any money at.... as i feel like every dollar ive ever spent in there is meaningless to them unless its going towards a brand new bicycle.
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: You’re completely ignoring the role lbs has played and needs to continue to play in the sport. They’re crucial for many families, commuters, and people not yet turned on to cycling. I find it hard to believe a 40 yr old would fail to understand this but there are always outliers I guess.
  • 2 0
 @HankHank: @HankHank: Dont' we all, but when the money's tight, needs must. Obviously they were trying to shame you into the upsell. Pfft! That was the first upgrade on my hardtail. Even my kids wanted droppers. It gets old fast, having to stop and drop your seat, stop and lift your seat, stop and drop your seat, stop and lift your seat Obviously a respected XC bike shop! Stay well clear! come to Western Australia, there's one place called the Hairy Marron where the owner and crew ride even hardtails with coil front ends! I'm assuming times have changed.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: I think I do that with thinking or malice!..I just love bikes
  • 1 0
 @Drewzellator: wow, 2 months eh? Veteran advice right there
  • 1 0
 I’m a shop employee and I quit cuz of this
  • 237 1
 I walk in with my dick out and flip everyone to match the energy of my LBS Oh and do not forget to pee on a counter of a service desk to establish dominance
  • 136 1
 Having wrenched for multiple shops I can say this is very important advice. Us mechanics are bound to herd mentality and will submit to the alpha. You may have to headbutt the more stubborn ones though.
  • 30 0
 Must assert dominance. Id crap on the showroom floor too. Really mark your turf by getting the keyboard sticky too. Bonus points if your in full enduro gear.
  • 15 1
 I thought this was @iamthedogezra before I saw otherwise. I haven't seen him around for a while...
  • 5 0
 If anyone ever did this I would give them trade and free labour.
  • 5 0
 I like your style...
  • 3 0
 It's like you see us! Weird...
  • 9 5
 Dick Pound
  • 193 1
 Simple. If you feel stupid once you're in there, walk right back out. They don't deserve your business. Any shop worth a damn can at least be welcoming. That's not even to do with bikes, that's just good retail etiquette.
  • 26 1
 The inverse is also true: if they don't know what they are talking about, the shop doesn't deserve your business. And I'd argue part of knowing their stuff is being able to explain it to anyone.
  • 3 0
 Yep. Only time I go to a shop is to have pivot bearings replaced or wheels trued and I pull the parts myself and bring them in. I don't really have to do either of those tasks enough to warrant buying the tools for them.
  • 10 0
 Could not agree more.

I usually try to give shops three strikes, then they are out. Unwelcoming/unfriendly vibes on entry, or at anytime, really - strike. Mega bro ego - strike. Mechanic f-ups - strike. Unreasonably poor communication about service orders - strike.

It's astonishing and unfortunate how many shops I've moved through, mainly from striking out on the unwelcoming/unfriendly vibes and poor communication skills. But maybe it's not? Most of these shops have been run by 23 y.o. bros that have their brains on the trail and not on customer service.
  • 9 0
 @zwa2: I'm more of a 4 balls and I walk customer.
  • 178 8
 Step 1:
Learn how to do everything on your bike by yourself and stay out of the bikeshop.
You'll save a lot of money and frustration
  • 37 6
 Buy online, watch YouTube videos, invest time in learning new skills
  • 23 2
 Yes. I have to be very desperate to go into a bike shop, and even then, I only talk to the mechanics I know and trust.
  • 38 2
 this leads to a road of a lot of cash spent on tools unfortunately haha
  • 19 0
 @mariomtblt: Ehh the way I see it, if it's something that will likely happen again within a year or two, I buy the tools. The tools are usually equal to or less than the price of the labor on the repair. If it's something that I don't foresee happening any time soon, and the tools are expensive, I have the shop do it
  • 7 0
 Gotta say my first two LBSs made me to learn a lot about servicing bikes home. Besides shock re-build which I don't have tools for maybe everything. God bless them
  • 5 0
 @mariomtblt: HA! yeah when I buy tools these days I have to have the expectation that they might just end up unused in the toolbox... maybe someday they will get used. The more tools the better I say.
  • 7 1
 @MT36: haha yeah, I have for example the park tool derailleur hanger aligner that I have used once, should have just bought a new hanger
  • 25 0
 @bok-CZ: I actually buy parts now almost entirely based off of how easy they are to service. When you start doing all your own work (including full fork/shock rebuilds) you tend to look at bikes and bike parts a little differently than other people might.
  • 6 0
 @mariomtblt: Have you checked in on your hanger and your mates bikes hangers? I've wondered if they get a little bent over time like rims do and we just get used to slightly worse shifting.
  • 4 0
 @mariomtblt: Same money could have been spent on labour time but at least you have a blue wall of tools at the end
  • 4 0
 @nowthatsdoomage: honestly the tool is not very exact anyways so unless its bad then you probably could never tell
  • 8 0
 @vitaflo: Same here. I maintain six bikes in my family.... everything from frames to suspension products has to pass the "how straightforward is this to fix/maintain from home?" test.
  • 1 0
 @MT36: Sounds like you are desperate pretty often. How else would you get to know and trust those mechanics? :-))
  • 2 1
 Yep. Only time I go to a shop is to have pivot bearings replaced or wheels trued and I pull the parts myself and bring them in. I don't really have to do either of those tasks enough to warrant buying the tools for them.
  • 11 0
 N+1 applies to tools as well, at least in my experience...
  • 21 0
 Yup. Learn to DIY. I had a weird "clunk" from the back of my 5010 when I'd land some jumps. Took it to the LBS, who's a Santa Cruz dealer, the mechanic said "oh, yeah the lower pivot bolt was a little loose, I just snugged it up, should be good now." Next ride, it literally started happening again after my first jump.

Got home, looked at the SC site for frame specs, clearly shows the pivot bolts need to be torqued to a certain value. Brought it back, since they charged me like $30, said it's happening again and asked him to torque it. Dude tells me he "never torques them down, only makes them snug, blah blah blah..." Went home, ordered a torque wrench and tightened it back to the spec per the site with some blue loctite as well, never had the issue again.
  • 5 0
 @Mr-Gilsch: N+2, at least. And you have to have at least 2 of everything, possibly a slightly different variation (ball end and non-ball end T-bars, for example). So 2N+2, possibly more.
  • 7 2
 I quit using sram because I have to go to a shop for issues. Shimano and Fox deal with the public.
  • 9 0
 @MT36: As i get older i seem to be buying more toolbox upgrades than bike upgrades..go figure Smile
  • 6 0
 @mariomtblt:
You still need to use that hanger tool even on a new hanger. Sounds strange but it’s true.
  • 1 0
 @mariomtblt: sorry, unfortunately? I don't understand?
  • 5 0
 @mariomtblt: I have rarely seen a straight one out of the box. Usually even new hangers need to be fitted to the bike if you want it to shift perfectly
  • 5 0
 @bikedrd: Fox are good about serviceability, but Rockshox are honestly even easier and have much better instructions. For example, Rockshox sell bulk packs of foam rings, but fox only sell them with the full seal kit.

Shimano and sram both have pretty good service manuals, but I've had even more trouble finding Shimano than sram parts the last few years
  • 5 0
 @mtb-thetown: you can buy the foam rings for Fox separated just not the original ones but who cares
www.enduroforkseals.com/products/front-suspension/small-parts/2XFR-38.html?ucacid=1204217983.439242
  • 3 0
 @mariomtblt: That is true. I have a a huge parts bin and random tools that are not un-cheap that are only used once or twice. But, I think of my box of parts and tools as a fuse. You need a fuse to make the dynamite work
  • 3 0
 Fixing a bike without frustration? Is this possible?!
  • 1 0
 @KingPooPing: dynamite works just fine without a fuse; just use a really long match
  • 3 0
 Im all for it. That said I try to make sure and throw a few bucks to my LBS when I can. There are definitely plenty of times that I still need help with tasks that require niche or expensive tools or I just need a spare something or other that I forgot to order online but need asap. Its definitely nice to have them around in times of desperation but also just nice to see in my community, so I try to do what I can to keep them afloat.
  • 5 0
 @chadbrochills: That is exactly why I avoid bike shops. The chances the mechanic cares about your bike as much as you do are slim.

Bike shops all the time hire people like this; something so incredibly obvious: HOW COULD YOU NOT USE A TORQUE WRENCH ON A PIVOT BOLT? But this is what I come to expect at bike shops. Even had a bike shop once change the angle on my brake levers, when I brought the bike in for a fix that had nothing to do with the cockpit.... I mean what kind of "mechanic" would do this?
  • 2 0
 @mariomtblt: That’s probably one of the most used specialty tools in a bike shop. Some brand new hangers aren’t straight. Worth their weight in gold, or about $70.
  • 143 1
 the fact this has to be an article is embarrassing. "Support your local bike shop" but also they do business a certain way, you better be ready when you walk in the door with these tips.... As a shop, I really hope my staff aren't treating anyone poorly, regardless of income, expectations, or knowledge level. We charge more than an ecommerce website, we better provide better service and we better treat people right or we're in real trouble. We're suppose to support people getting into the sport, this article is proof that we're failing.
  • 11 1
 I’ve had nothing but positive experiences in your shop. Can’t say the same for other Kelowna area shops though.
  • 14 0
 "the fact this has to be an article is embarrassing." This right here. PB next time you make a "what's wrong with MTB" article/video, this should be at/near the top.
  • 15 0
 Haha, I was just about to comment about how great I get treated at smithcreekcycle and then I saw you commented. Can’t say enough good things about this shop. The customer service is fantastic but more importantly everyone there is super friendly. Highly recommend going there even if it is just to shoot the shit about bikes. Brian and his staff are super easy to talk to. Can’t wait for my new bike when I get back. Thanks boys
  • 21 0
 Well said. Local bike shops don't sell bikes, parts and gear. They sell service, advice, and relationships. If you just want bikes, parts, and gear, you can get those delivered to your front door for less money, and often faster than the LBS can order them for you.
  • 5 1
 @dancingwithmyself: Just logged in to upvote you. 100% this.
  • 1 0
 Yeah your shop is good.
  • 1 7
flag emptybe-er (Mar 9, 2023 at 7:15) (Below Threshold)
 @dancingwithmyself: What about small shops in smaller towns that can’t survive on labor alone? F em? What repercussions will this have? Would you be cool driving an hour and a half to REI because all the small shops are gone? Or would you just get a dirtbike and start drinking monster? MTB is headed down the tubes. I mean seriously, $10k 38lb 29’ers? So much for those short-lived direct-to-customer savings, huh? Seems like once everything went D2C (2017-ish) 29’ers became the only option and then prices soared. But yeah, we don’t need shops anymore. lol
  • 1 1
 @emptybe-er: whoosh

Of course the economic transaction is very often a bike, part, etc., But that's not the real transaction. A local shop can't compete on that front alone. The way they differentiate themselves is the advice, relationships, and - often attendant to the sale of something tangible - service.

And having a good relationship with your shop is very much a two-way street. If they provide the service, advice, and relationship to you generally, then you should support them even in instances where all you need is a part, pair of shoes, etc.
  • 1 1
 @dancingwithmyself: Nice job, a word salad with ranch. I know plenty of morons on here love the idea of being able to just count on shops for service and group rides and advice but that isn’t realistic. And it’s annoying as hell.
  • 1 0
 @dancingwithmyself: And you didn’t answer my question in your word salad.. What impact do you think small shops closing will have? Will cycling continue to get gentrified or will you be taking your bike to walmart service center? Maybe both?
  • 73 1
 Next up - How not to be an a-hole to customers when working in a bike shop.
  • 2 1
 Oh I think that’s day one training at the shop. At least in my neck of the woods.
  • 62 1
 How to not feel stupid: Go to a shop that treats you with respect and curiosity.
  • 6 0
 If only one existed... I've got two near me and they're both okay, but the vibe is almost always, "I hope you brought your wallet" and/or "I'm busy leave me alone"

It's shocking. And sad. It's not just me either. I'm constantly talking to guys at the trails and around town and most people have some reason they love one of our two LBS' and hate the other.
  • 3 0
 @nickgarofalo: I'm lucky to live in a town with a lot (actually, an unreasonably large number, given our total population...) shops. Seems like for every one of them, there are folks who've had great experiences, folks who've had horrible experiences, and a lot of in between. But all that competition and the large community supporting them seem to have created a pretty decent baseline - and none of the shops in town seem to engender the sort of universal dislike that you sometimes hear about the only shop in town in some places.
  • 55 0
 "How to Not Feel Stupid Walking Into a Bike Shop"...this article could also apply to the LBS employee/owners, kind of a two way street
  • 20 0
 For real, Playing the dumb because employees doesn't know crap gets boring quick
  • 13 0
 @Noeserd: that’s my cue to leave. If shop employees don’t know the products they sell, I’m out.
  • 46 2
 How to not feel stupid:

-Don't give a shit if you do or do not know any certain thing.

-Realize that knowing about bikes doesn't implicitly make you cool. Bikes are toys.

-Understand that the people at the bike shop are there asking for your money. You are the one with the leverage. Don't let the cool guys that can wheelie and crank flip make you feel dumb.
  • 31 4
 lol bike shop employees dont ride bruh
  • 16 0
 @drakefan705: We used too... just not anymore...
  • 7 2
 @drakefan705: username checks out
  • 44 9
 Tip 6: Expect to be back in a few weeks because they somehow messed up another part of your bike that should've remained untouched
  • 4 1
 i feel seen
  • 14 6
 If the issue arose a few weeks after being in the shop, and it's a part they weren't likely to touch, do you think maybe it wasn't them that caused the issue? Bikes go wrong on their own, especially if they're being ridden, and not all issues are due to they guy that worked on your bike weeks ago?
  • 7 2
 @Darwin66: Are you like 1.5m tall? Because the point when straight over your head.
  • 11 4
 @nickfranko: he’s absolutely right though. Just this week I had a customer destroy his own thru axle a month after he brought it in and complained that we over tightened it, but I watched the whole service take place and the wheel was never removed. I’ve also had customers call back and complain things weren’t fixed or replaced when I explicitly called them before they picked it up to tell them why it wasn’t possible, and I have notes to prove it. Just because you’re on the customer facing end doesn’t mean you can’t sympathize with both sides.
  • 2 0
 @Zimbaboi: definitely always two sides to a story
Ultimately it’s just a bummer everyone can’t be better overall
On both sides
  • 8 0
 @Zimbaboi: Last week a customer complained that his drivetrain wore out because we replaced his BB two years ago.
  • 32 0
 Item 1 should be that NO BIKE SHOP should be intimidating. It's just bikes. Why the attitude? When we opened our shop this was job 1. Be approachable. Don't ice anyone out. I've walked into shops and been vibed and I think I'm fairly qualified. Can you imagine someone new to the sport walking into a shop like that? If a shop doesn't want you there fina another shop. I'm constantly shocked to learn that people will spend money at a shop because the sell (insert brand here) then proceed to trash talk that shop to us. If you don't like a shop please don't reward them by spending money there.
  • 4 0
 You're absolutely right - there's a level of BS entitled superiority complex in some shops that simply doesn't jibe with the idea that bikes are supposed to be fun. Bit of dysfunctional culture BS that was inherited from the surf industry, I think.
  • 34 2
 Don't ask if the shop has the part you need in stock. They won't. They they will say they can order it have it a week after next Tuesday. Then you have to come up with some reason not to. You feel guilty and buy a couple energy gels at the counter. Back at home you order online and have it in 2 days. Wasted time going to the shop but at least you got to look at the $15k emtb on display.
  • 5 1
 Are we related?
  • 2 0
 damn i just did exactly this
  • 1 0
 Most here from covid have online stores. So you can look up what you need. No one has it ill order it from an online shop or them depending. Majority of the time we get so screwed here in canada unless you want to order a shit ton of stuff with shipping its easier for the lbs to order it.
  • 27 0
 While some of these tips are good, it makes me cry that so many bike retails sales people are so damn clueless this even needs to be written.

A bike shop should be a customer/rider/community centered resource of information, skills and inventory. If you look down on customers you should fail.

PS - makes my job easier, the amount of times a customer shares they appreciates good listening and service and also how bad other local shops treated them is... awfully high.
  • 8 8
 Customers are clueless dude. Feedback about other shops is utterly worthless. I guarantee you there are customers going to them telling similar stories about you. There are 9 bike shops in my town of 60,000 people and I’ll tell you right now I’ve had people come in telling me a shop who the only employees are a father and his sons did all sorts of horrendous stuff while they were there. I know for sure that customer either didn’t communicate well or was blowing it out of proportion because they’re some of the best people and mechanics I’ve ever known. This is just the way the service industry is. Some people cannot be pleased.
  • 2 0
 @Zimbaboi: very true. See: Yelp
  • 3 0
 @Zimbaboi: nah, I know the kind of people you're referring to. The straight up shit-talkers. I can smell them and prefer to avoid them.

I'm talking about (for example) a woman in her 50's saying "thank you for taking the time and making the process of getting the bike fun, easy and low pressure. I felt like shop X was pushy, rushing me and not listening, while shop Y didn't acknowledge my existence" and I happen to know both shops and their culture and it totally makes sense (and by the way neither shop is awful, they just have their niche and hire a lot of young staff, and don't take the time to train some critical basics)
  • 1 0
 @dontcoast: absolutely. Totally agree.
  • 28 0
 Title alone proves there’s a long way to go with bike shop attitudes.
  • 26 2
 Armchair psychologist here but bike shop dudes are a strange breed. They have given up money, their time, status outside of the bike community (most women most likely don't seek a bike shop bro) just so they can have a handful of status within their circle and access to cheap bikes/parts. With those circumstances it festers a weird resentment thats passed down to the customer. I worked in a couple different bike shops in northern arizona and while I had a blast it would also break my heart when a customer would drop 90 bucks on a camelbak backpack just so they can go on their little hike while I netted about 60 bucks a day after taxes and gas.
  • 6 0
 I think you're onto something. I don't experience the same arrogance in other sports
  • 9 0
 @t-rick: You get the same in ski shops.
  • 4 0
 Big Fish in a Small Pond syndrome....
  • 1 0
 Mmmm fuxkin eh
  • 22 0
 I got so triggered reading the title of this article... All those memories of terrible bike shop experiences, from trying to get a job at a bike shop to dealing with the most socially inept employees, came rushing back to the surface. If customers need to be mentally prepared to walk into a bike shop... there's something messed up with the industry.
  • 3 12
flag mm732 (Mar 9, 2023 at 7:24) (Below Threshold)
 Ppl in general today are mentally fragile and socially weird. Just the times.
  • 27 2
 LBS wonder why DTC brands are popular. So many bad bikes shops.
  • 26 2
 As Ron Swanson said walking into Home Depot when asked if he needed help:

"I know more than you"
  • 3 12
flag Motdoc (Mar 9, 2023 at 7:53) (Below Threshold)
 What aisle are the workshop towels in then?

Prick
  • 5 2
 @Motdoc: Woah easy there, might want to up your meds a little bit.
  • 2 4
 @powderhoundbrr: Not you buddy. Ron. He sounds like a douche.
  • 25 1
 The fact this article exists is pretty sad
  • 1 0
 Bicycling Magazine
  • 20 0
 Stepping further outside the box, I've always laughed at other riders in this sport (having been a cyclist for 30ish years) think they are literally better human beings overall simply due to their ability on a bike.
I raced for a team that pretty much treated you like crap if you weren't in the top 5 of their riders and then when you were, it's like you were a God. It truly was not a "team".'
In our local bike shop scene, I would refer others to multiple shops in our region based on their needs and closest location. One in particular, I kept getting bad feedback and friends disappointed that I recommended they go there. I finally approached the owner and mechanic about this feedback with a very "don't shoot the messenger" attitude, only to get a very hostile response. Oh well. I don't even mention they exist anymore.
I won't even get started on Trek stores. It's like walking onto a new car lot. What really pisses me off is when they send their employees to infiltrate our local NICA chapter......and the kids start telling me how they are treated different based on what brand they ride.
Egos in this sport are often the downfall of the sport in areas. As time goes on, I ride with a smaller and smaller circle of friends, and ride deeper into the backcountry where the egos are too lazy too go.
  • 2 4
 Thats pretty heavy. Seems like you experience life in a very intense, personal way.
  • 20 0
 Customers should not have to do anything to "not feel stupid" when walking into a bike shop... This article should be targeting LBS owners and staff NOT the customer... This has been an ongoing problem in the industry and anyone who has stepped into a bike shop knows this
  • 2 2
 Customers arent always tgat humble. Ppl with egos have trouble admitting theyre ignorant
  • 20 0
 Man, articles like this just bum me out. My wife and I own and operate a mountain bike shop and aside from the occasional weirdo wanting to discuss 2 stroke motor adaptations on a 12 inch kids Lightning Mc Queen Huffy we love everyone. Come in with all the knowledge, come in with no knowledge. We will help. Have an idea of what you want or no idea at all. It's how we pay our bills, buy bikes ourselves and provide for our family. Come in with a bad attitude and leave with a great one. We love bikes and our customers. Always. If I'm having a bad day I'll just stay home and announce it on facebook or something. Having said all that, it's just us with no employees. Easier for us to be nice that way.
  • 1 0
 I appreciate this. I live in VT but my family lives near Fred and Watershed is awesome. Might have to swing by sometime Smile
  • 20 0
 It took me a long time to find the right shop for me! Now I've bought 11 bikes from them. It's all about the relationship!
  • 12 0
 Your user name seems pretty on target Wink
  • 5 0
 @g-42: Three boys who won't stop growing don't help, I'm gonna need some sort of punch card or something
  • 2 0
 @bikehoarder23: I feel your pain!
  • 22 0
 Open the door first.
  • 15 0
 Please be aware that doors in the wild west (or Spain) have a top part and a bottom part. Only opening the top part will make you feel stupid tumbling into the shop. Similarly, only opening the bottom part won't work. Again, be sure to open both parts. You made it, congrats. Now, don't blow it by pulling your gun and recommend everyone to get flat on the floor. They may have coffee but that doesn't make it a saloon.
  • 1 1
 Haha!
  • 2 1
 @vinay: Comment of the year lol
  • 2 2
 Man spitting fax right here.
  • 18 1
 Starting off strong there with the condescending article title Pinkbike :roll Making the assumption most people feel stupid going into a bike shop isn’t helping the dynamic or situation. I mean ANY kind of retail store I walk into I have to assume the people who work there know more about the products then I do. Too often the bike shops either have cocky 17-19 yr old kids working there or salesmen who’s agenda is obvious to sell you big ticket items.
  • 16 0
 The title of this article definitely caught my attention. As someone who has worked in bike shops and the outdoor industry for most of his career, I've found the underlying bro culture to be infuriating. Someone who walks into a bike shop looking to buy their first mountain bike has completely valid needs and shouldn't have to tailor their questions to sound like they're more experienced than they are. To the article's credit, as a consumer you should absolutely do your research. In terms of being honest about your goals and being realistic with your budget, someone who has a good problems solving framework for sales should be able to help you navigate that. As an industry I don't think we need better customers so much as we need better service.
  • 7 0
 In fact, the first-time buyer is not only "valid", but should be ACTIVELY PRIORITIZED.

Bike bro probably knows enough to showroom you online and is coming to you for convenience.
First time buyer is coming to you for your expertise and can form a long term client relationship.
(In no way saying treat bike bro bad, just effective use of time will prioritize the newcomer.)
  • 8 1
 @dontcoast: Then again, bike bro can be that well-liked, well-respected member of the local riding community who helps friends and family get into the sport - and whose recommendation on which store to go to can bring a lot of business.
  • 1 0
 @g-42: of course! having great relationships with passionate riders is important for shops, too.

My statement wasn't about not helping the bike bro, just that shops can and should take extra time for first-time buyers.
  • 22 7
 A bit odd, an article like this, on a day like today (International Womens Day) doesn't have a female perspective on this. I am a male, but, worked at shops (100 yrs ago) and married to someone that was an athlete back in the day and works today in the industry, i've worked along side many females and I know from them (or seen it myself) the experience of being a woman and going into a shop is often, not always, a f-ing bad experience.

I've been with my wife and watched them talk down to her, like she doesn't know about bikes, parts, racing, etc...she does know a lot. I've been with females that don't have a lot of experience with bikes and they are spoken too differently. It has positively evolved over the years, but surprised this wasn't brought up on how to continue to evolve, etc etc..
  • 15 1
 +100. My tip #1 would have been "don't be a woman"
  • 5 0
 Yup, just searched the article for "woman" for this exact same reason.
  • 3 7
flag Seldomseen83 (Mar 8, 2023 at 21:37) (Below Threshold)
 @ravenra: For those who are considering it I always recommend to not be a woman-
  • 1 0
 Gasp
  • 2 0
 *article written by a woman.
  • 7 0
 I am a woman and a huge bike nerd. I love bikes more than most people and it is disappointing the way I get treated at bike shops. Absolute Bikes in Salida CO was by far my worst experience. They told me to avoid certain trails because they would be too difficult for me. I have been treated poorly at most bike shops that I have ever walkeed into. Last fall, I got a job at a bike shop, and I was not even trained on how to use the inventory software properly. My manager would swoop in every. single. time that I was speaking to a customer and steal them from me. I gladly quit working there and I am now about to give working at a bike shop a second go.
  • 3 0
 On the flip side, I make sure to ask opinions and advice from the women working at the bike shops. I don’t think most of them are used to being respected in that manner from men.
  • 19 1
 Or the shops could just be... you know.... friendly and not arrogant
  • 8 9
 Overworked, underpaid, and underappreciated are the three main contributing factors for bike shop employee arrogance and rudeness.
  • 8 1
 @seraph: At first I disagreed but ultimately you are correct, because all the good staff leave those shops and either find new good shops that treat them right or move into a different line of work. This leaves the bitter and resentful staff who feel as trapped by their customers as they are their employers.
  • 1 0
 @L0rdTom: It's true. Another issue that exacerbates things is that as the fed-up employees move on to better-paying jobs, the ones who are left behind are further burdened by the increase in work responsibility without an increase in pay (usually). So they're even more bitter than before. And most shops don't pay on commission to my knowledge, so there's no real incentive to selling bikes with any grace or form.
  • 16 1
 Bike industry egos are so annoying!! The fact that this is an article on PB shows the problem lays with the industry know it alls!
  • 26 10
 Been riding my whole life, I despise bike shops. Just ruins your day, will avoid at all costs.
  • 11 0
 I work at a specialized owned shop, and as much as people hate on specialized as a corporation, the training and guidelines they provide to employees for customer interactions are extremely valuable. Putting the customer first and keeping an open mind really helps us interact with even the most difficult customers in a civilized manner. I've had a decent amount of bad experiences at other shops and now that I work at one that provided training, it just blows my mind how the rude shops even get business. The difference in experience is definitely tangible. So, essentially, if the attitude in the shop sucks, go somewhere else and support a better group of people. If you feel like you could be the most difficult customer and still be treated with respect and a good attitude by the employees, stick with the shop.
  • 15 0
 6. Use the word "bro" excessively
  • 9 0
 Or stoked.
  • 11 0
 A lot of bike shops aren’t terribly welcoming. I understand how employees can get ‘jaded’ from working in a shop for years, but at the end of the day, their job is to provide a friendly service to people who don’t know as much about biking.

If you find yourself getting jaded in any profession, it’s time to look for a new one.
  • 10 0
 Tip 6:. Spend all winter in the PB comment section not watching a single AutoPlay video or reading a single article ( you can look at the picture as you scroll down). Then start all your phrases with "Well I was reading in the PB comment section that...."
  • 13 0
 I am stupid, so what’s your point
  • 18 10
 #6- Don't be in a hurry, treat the employees like people you're going to be in a long term relationship with. (this goes for any store honestly). Find out their names, be kind. If you're going by the shopping center or are in the area where the store is, stop by just to say "Hello". You can be the one that helps create an atmosphere of community within the commerce.
  • 18 0
 User name checks out
  • 6 1
 Also, don't think you need to make it clear that you're there to buy a bike. Mountainbiking is a hobby. It is very normal for a person to walk in, be curious and amazed by what's out there, suck in the vibe and don't buy anything for weeks. It is ok. A good shop understands that. A customer wants to know what they're saving up for. If you end up buying a cheap Rockhopper, ride the hell out of it for years and they help you with advice when you need it, you might buy that fancy Stumpjumper over there a few years later. If they treat you like crap because your bike is not worthy, you'll buy the Stumpjumper elsewhere. Again, a good shop understands that. So if you're passionate, show it. It gets you more help and goodwill than if you're just there to show your money.
  • 7 0
 It's up to the shop employees to not make you feel stupid. When somebody walks into your shop and ask for your help, they're counting on your expertise that you've gathered over the years. We all started somewhere, sometimes people forget that.
  • 8 0
 If a shop makes you feel stupid at any point they don't deserve your business. Bikes are complicated and huge investments for most people. Take your time and ask as many questions as necessary.
  • 11 0
 You guys have obviously never walked into a surf shop...
  • 3 0
 Ha, only reason to do that is for wax... and I'm ok with that cute girl behind the counter.
  • 1 0
 @Eatsdirt: mmm more cute Cashiers at bike shops, tip your LBS
  • 7 0
 I use shops here in Philadelphia mostly for repairs I get stuck with. Whenever I have to do this I think I would get weird looks because clearly I tried first to do it myself first avoiding the shop. However this is not the case. Recently I had a frame I found in the trash to build a kids bike. I could not get the bottom bracket out. First shop- the mechanic looks at it, stops whatever he was doing and takes it to the back. I hear some grunting and cursing, after 5 minutes he comes back saying - no way. He nearly apologized and did not want to charge anything. I took it to another shop, the mechanic asks me if I can wait for 5 minutes than gives it a try. After 5 minutes he comes back and got it out. I tell him how amazing this is and how much muscle I already put into it. I ask how much the service is, he refused to take money, even when I suggest to give him a tip. He wishes me good luck with the bike build.
  • 9 2
 The SINGLE biggest problem at bike shops- I give you: The “It Depends” treatment—
Customer: “I’m new to biking, can you help me find a bike?”
Shop: “sure it just DEPENDS what you’re looking for. Enduro? Trail? Long travel enduro? downcountry?”
Customer: “uhh, i’m not sure, whats the difference?”
Shop: “it just DEPENDS on the frame geometry you want, and how much travel you want”
Customer: “Like I said, I’m new, so I don’t really know”
Shop: “well it DEPENDS on the trails you usually ride, Dirt Merchant? Credit Line?”
Customer: “I don’t know… I’m new…”
Shop: “sorry cant really help you then. Once you figure out exactly what you need, let us know”

Shop: “support your LBS, we add value!!” /s
  • 8 1
 If they don't ask those questions,you're going to get out with the wrong bike,aren't you...
  • 1 0
 I use this approach but obviously if someone is brand new they get a stumpjumper and happy new bike day hahaha roflcopter jk I’ll sell em a downcountry bike and recommend they overfork it. Haha jk obviously you get a hardtail as a beginner but good luck on dirt merchant
  • 9 3
 As a cool local shredlord who knows the mechanics at all my local shops to the point they ignore every other customer when I walk in and don't spend money, I don't know what you all are complaining about. Ride faster and drink harder and maybe you won't need an article to tell you how to shop. It's easy folks. Also the public is dumb. #keepshopstoxic hahaha
  • 1 0
 Also give the shop guys weed
  • 2 0
 @wwoooaaahh: a pair of 1g Sativa Moonrockets rolled in Oil and dusted with Kief is, as Im told by my mechanic at my LBS, the best tip he has ever gotten for building up a frameset.

Build those Brolationships.
  • 2 0
 @KDix85: see I told you so
  • 6 0
 I think it's important that a bike shop hires people who ride. BUT next step is to hire a diversity of riders (Enduro, XC, Road, Trail, Gravel, Commuter, etc). I've been to more than 1 shop where all the employees are enduro bros or roadie mafia. You can quickly feel out of place if you're not part of their scene.
  • 6 0
 Possibly the industry needs to look itself in the mirror if the article is "how to not feel stupid trying to spend money with this business" rather than "how to treat your customers with respect and make them feel welcome"

Some serious small dick syndrome at a lot of bike shops. Condescending attitudes helps them with their chronic symptoms. But there is some absolutely money customer service at others where you know the dude across the counter knows more about parts/suspension tuning/anything bike related but still treats you with absolute respect and you learn new things.
  • 8 3
 It is NOT ridiculous to ask for beer/ cabbage. A Starbucks batista gets tipped for pushing a button. Can't even make latte art. Yet, I still to a dollar. Why not tip your bike mechanic that has YEARS of knowledge and experience? Someone who is a SKILLED laborer. It ain't fair to say that's "ridiculous."
  • 9 3
 I'll never understand why most people working in a bike shop are so full of themselves. Seriously get over it you work in a bike shop. You can literally feel the tension walking into some shops because of this.
  • 5 0
 This entire article is Backwards! It isn't the customer job to adapt to the Shop's issues. The SHOP needs to learn how to serve customers. Invest in training your employees! Both Product Knowledge AND customer service skills. Schedule your best employees to spend time on the floor during busy hours. In too many shops the experienced employees are in the back doing service...and only come out to the floor when a bro comes in...leaving most customer contact to the newest employees with the least knowledge.
  • 7 1
 Extra tip: Be prepared to spend way more than you originally planned because apparently your cranks have play and the only have XXI in stock...
  • 11 4
 That’s a red flag. Your fault if you get sucked in.
  • 4 0
 I hope people can mention some shops that don’t do some of the negatives things discussed. Gotta say Crazy Bear Bikes in La Verne, CA is amazing and gets your bike back to you within 48hrs when they fully service suspension. They’re stoked on all disciplines of mtb. Don’t live there anymore but they used to run really fun shuttles as well. Never regretted the hour drive to support them.
  • 5 0
 Black Rock Bikes out of Reno, NV
Curtis the owner is phenomenal. I’ve since moved far far away and always use him for building new bikes. He treats a kid with a 15 year old $75 bike needing service the same way as someone who just spent $15K in his shop. All equal. Got to say him and his crew truly are awesome!
  • 2 0
 @stormracing: Glad to hear this. I just bought a bike from him online, not knowing anything about him. Friendly and helpful on the phone though.
  • 2 0
 @abhooligan: oh right on. yeah, he’s an awesome guy! I’m sure you’ll be pumped on it and if ya ever have a question, never hesitate to call him. He will bend over backwards to help out. Always easy to get a hold of too
  • 6 0
 If your intimidated by a bike shop you should find another bike shop. I've never been anything but warm and welcoming to my customers, find a shop that gives a shit.
  • 8 4
 Do people ever actually feel stupid walking into bike shops? Typically, I feel the exact opposite. It's not like the mechanics/employees you encounter are engineers or real professionals, despite how hard they may pretend to be. And when that does happen, I find to be more cute than anything. We're all entitled to think highly of ourselves, even in the absence of any reason to.

All said, my LBS is exceptional and I'm good friends with the mechanics there.
  • 3 0
 I shouldn’t feel intimidated walking into a shop but I do and honestly rarely look forward to it. I’m blown away whenever I receive service from someone who actually wants to help and is patient.
  • 1 3
 @generictrailrider: I get it. I'd be lying if I said I've not experienced the same. However, years ago, I made it a point to learn how to service my own bike, which led me to realize just how often mechanics have absolutely no idea what they're doing, and often create additional issues in carrying out what should be routine repairs/maintenance.

I'm comforted by the fact that I can out-ride most of the LBS bros I've come across which, at the end of the day, is really what matters.
  • 4 0
 my experience in shops is: they just argue to sell you what they have. they never say, sounds like we dont have what you want.
if i try to buy an enduro bike and the dont have one, the try to tell you 140mm and 66 degree ha is enduro.
i envy those areas that really have good shops
  • 4 0
 You have customers and customers. And yes this fear is real, it's kinda odd to witness sometimes.

As a mechanic I know my regulars and there are certain behaviour patterns of customers that will make you understand how to deal with them and their needs.

I'll be friendly, patient, direct, try to explain when necessary also with 1st grade school examples to make things a little bit more understandable, be on the side of the customer, chuck in a coffee when needed and just do my job the best of my abilities and be transparent about other damages / repairs that need to be looked after eventually. Try to trace back the origin of the problem and try to tell how this can be avoided (if they are interested) etc etc. I'm not interested in making sales, but if I know of some upgrade that will rule out irregular maintenance I will try to at least make you understand the thing exist.

It can't be that hard to just help the people that come spend money at your shop.
  • 3 0
 Several years ago, I vowed to teach myself how to maintain and repair or replace everything on my bikes. And, over a twenty-five year riding history, I’ve spent quite a bit of money on special tools and have made several frustrating and expensive mistakes. It’s a fraction, however, of what I would have paid had a shop done the work for me. A large part of my motivation was no longer having to engage in a needless back and forth, a pissing contest with some know-it-all shop wrench before my bike was deemed worthy to service. Today, I don’t feel stupid visiting bike shops, because I don’t go to them, and because I have shop-quality tools for nearly all jobs, friends, friends of friends, neighbors, and even random kids with backwards-installed forks all get free service. Nothing motivates me to help people more than hearing how much the average shop charges for a “tune up.”
  • 5 0
 ah... I think you ARE a bike shop at this point. Cheers, beers and happy trails.
  • 3 0
 Worked in the back of the shop and used to love the sales people getting deflated faster than the tubeless tire they just pumped up loosing bead. We would peep every once in a while and see the impending doom of the tire with a hole in the sidewall and signal when we heard the air start flowing to cover our ears. Nothing like giving a customer tinnitus to make a good initial impression.
  • 4 1
 The only two types of bike shop that don't make me feel stupid for walking in there are: 1 the one where the employees know more about bikes than I do, 2 the one where parts aren't at least 50 percent more expensive than online.
Either type is rare.
  • 3 0
 Damn, I feel like that walking into ALL shops. However, I feel more at home walking into a bike store and I go up to the counter knowing the part numbers and how much those parts should really cost! This is why I shop mostly online!
  • 6 0
 If you have to give yourself a pep talk before going to a bike shop… don’t go to that shop
  • 3 0
 Learn how to work on your own stuff and do your own research.

Sadly, bike shops with attitudes are a big turn off BUT that's not your problem, if the owner/manager wants to run their business that way, then they are ultimately responsible for loss income.

There are a few bike shops I avid due to bad service and/or bad attitude.

As a bike mechanic, I cannot remember ever working in a shop where we gave attitude to customers .. cuz that would lead to being fired.

Bike shops are no different than any other business, customer service and making customers feel welcome is the single biggest selling pint.
  • 1 1
 CHUCH!
  • 3 0
 I feel very fortunate to have been a long time customer of my LBS and I appreciate all the help they've given over the years. The staff tends to be around for a while which is great and they tend to be knowledgeable. Always a great selection. Like so many businesses, they aren't for everyone but if you need help, they will help if they can even if it means directing you to a shop better suited to your needs.
  • 3 0
 I can’t ever remember having anything other than good shop interactions in 30 years of hitting local bike shops. Maybe Squamish shops hire well? Corsa is great. So is Tantalus. The little service shops around town are all super friendly and helpful too.
  • 1 0
 Given the location though, if you were a Dickhead shop in Squamish, Pemby, or near the Shore, I think you'd go under fairly quickly. Thats the kinda neighborhood you gotta be Good in all aspects as a shop to survive or excel in.
  • 3 0
 I didn't think it was a thing until I saw this article. Some local bike shops really do make me feel unwelcome, while others make me never want to leave. I'm the type of guy that loves just browsing in bike shops and chatting with the employees about everything bike related. I don't always buy stuff. BUT the attitude and experience of the visit determines if I go back to buy stuff when I do need it.
  • 3 0
 We need to tape off a service area, throw in a folding chair, and let @Drewzellator , @Seldomseen83 , and @danielfloyd have at it to see who comes out on top. We'll have to watch via RedBull TV though since none of us will be visiting that shop...
  • 2 0
 Take every bit of their advice with a grain of salt. If it goes against what you think, go home, research it, decide if it's what you want and get it there or maybe elsewhere if that is what you want. I've walked into bike shops, usually in a strange town because of a part failure and had them literally say, "You don't want that, it's junk or too expensive. Buy this instead! I use it on my bike". Then points to his bike, that has been offroad once, 6 weeks ago. "Well, that's what I just broke, I want to spend more on something better. Do you have one?". I worked in shops for about 12 years, broke so many fancy things, I know what works for me. Wish shops would recognize. You don't need the "best", you need what works for you.
  • 2 0
 I always try to be as honest as I can. About my needs, budget, knowledge and everything else.

It usually works, and definitely shuts down their ego as well (in case they come up with this attitude).

For example, once they used scratched parts from inventory and gave me a nice discount, and I'm pretty sure they did this as they know I run on a tight budget.

Idk, the general rule of not being a dic*, a smile on the face and being humble works a lot.
  • 2 0
 wrong post
  • 5 0
 Sometimes I go to an LBS for old time sake. Then I feel stupid for buying a simple tool for $40 or a $20 bottle of lube.
  • 4 2
 My local shop is horrible, cant ever get a good tun-up/repair from them. Last time I went in for a basic fork service for $50 and came back the next few days and they tried to charge me $160 because they serviced the rear shock when I didnt ask them to. This shock was just serviced by FOX and didnt need to be messed with. They also didnt put the sag ring back on, both wheels were loose and not tightened. The rubber gromet for my headset was gone too. When I first rode the bike the rear shock was all messed up and rode like it was locked out and had to cycle it up and down a 100 times and ride it around before it felt normal again. Do not go to Tour of Nevada City in Nevada City!
  • 2 0
 Also when I went back they were extremely rude and didn't take any responsibility, ridiculous...
  • 3 5
 Whoa this isn't Yelp or some Google rating platform. Give this of bad service reeking shop some space to defend themselves in the digital world.

So basically you got a free rear shock service and had to tighten the wheels. I guess they inflated the shock in one go and then needed cycling to even out the chambers. Did they do a proper job on the fork? It's odd to me that they wouldn't take it for a test-ride when done servicing.
  • 2 0
 my agenda is very simple. If I have no idea about something I shut my mouth and don't pretend to be the great I know everything guy. ok... in some shops the employees aren't brilliant either, but luckily I have a shop where there is a lot of competence and nobody comes across as rudely arrogant.
  • 4 0
 Don't go to the shop at peak time- after work or at the weekend. Take half a day off if you can. The shop will be empty and only the main employees are there.
  • 3 0
 Bike shops are customer service organizations, shouldn't they be going out of their way to make new customers feel welcome and appreciated? There should be 1 rule: if the bike shop makes you feel stupid walk out.
  • 1 0
 Agreed, this is some kind of weird gaslighting customers into somehow being part of the problems when bike shops make them feel stupid.
  • 2 0
 Jeez. My local shop is full of chillers who will gladly refer you to their extremely knowledgeable, no BS mechanic if they don’t know the answer to your question. If you’re getting bad vibes from a shop, see what other options are in your area. Once you’ve found the right one, build relationships with them, and it will pay dividends for years to come.
  • 1 0
 nobody has time for that
  • 1 0
 Maybe it's just me and my experience with local shops, but it seems almost an requirement to be an arse hole and own a bike shop. HURRY UP AND BUY!!!! That said Cyclesmith in Halifax, Nova Scotia is the exception, great shop!
  • 2 0
 You must be kidding...
  • 3 2
 tip 8 - find out how long the backlog is on bike service.

Unbelievable that it is still 3+ weeks at some major LBS on the north shore. Shop around for the LBS with great review on personnel (especially bike mechanics) and speed of service. With bikes pretty much able to do nearly everything, I'd put more focus on service as it is the longer term relationship that is key.
  • 1 0
 I am with you. That is what has driven me to do most work on my bike. I can't (don't want to) wait two or three weeks for something.
  • 3 0
 Come to Scotland bud. We (my business partner and I) hate the way most bike shops are, so we started our own. Same day turn around on repairs (or within a day or two if parts are needed to be ordered) and no waiting for weeks without your bike as we work on a proper booking system.
The industry standard is lazy and bad service, hopefully we are exactly the opposite of that!
  • 1 0
 Got a shop local to me that treats you differently depending on what bike you bring in... I have been in with my old hardtail and got ignored, while people getting their 10k road bikes serviced are getting treated completely different. Sucks so bad to see, especially for the new people who don't know what an LBS should be like.
  • 1 0
 It’s definitely the person behind the counter that can make or break a bike shop visit. I’ve had good and bad experiences at shops I’ve gone to more than once around the Midwest, even at my own LBS. you can’t win em all. For some reason I feel like if you go in just to browse you get treated differently.
  • 3 2
 when are you going to publish the guides to walk in a groceries store, car mechanic shops and pharmacies? I tend to be in one of those way more often than in a bike shop...is a guide on how to walk without tripping on your own toes in order soon?
  • 3 0
 I'm not laughing at your wheel reflects because I'm a dick, I just inhaled a whole can of WD40 and necked a pint of Rozone fluid.
  • 2 1
 The mere fact that this post exists on pinkbikes main page speaks so much to the toxic culture in bike shops towards new customers who know nothing about bikes or people who know a little bit. A bike shop should be a welcoming understanding place to bring people into the wonderful world of cycling. This thread shouldn't exist it should be a post to bike shop employees and owners to stop being so Effin snobby and condescending.
  • 4 0
 If y’all are crying about being vibed in bike shops, be extremely careful with ski shops in the SLC area.
  • 1 0
 Researching your needs for where you're at now and 90 days from now is all u need before walking into a bike store. So, if you're green as a fern, keep the cost down and get what will allow you to pedal beginner trail and possibly through small roots and rocks. Once 90 days of 2-3 times a week of riding is complete and you feel confident on the bike going through all the flat terrain obstacles, research what your bike will need to make going up/down hills through the roots and rocks. Only buy what is necessary until you have complete control on the blue/green trails wherever you go. Once you're craving gnarly terrain and climbing, research what an advanced riders bike should have on it for the terrain you like to ride.
  • 6 2
 Bring them a six pack every so often. It gets you to the front of the work queue. Ask me how I know.
  • 2 1
 "you may even have met an employee that is under the illusion that you are the dumbest person on the planet" First, shop employees ( I'm in for 25 to life now) are human, or a lower level version. It's hard to balance the desire to help by providing ALL information required to have the optimal experience, while unsure of a customer's knowledge. Talking over someone's head and talking "down" to a customer are both equal sins, in the end, we are only trying to help. There's room for compassion, mutual understanding and love in this life. Bike shops are just a microcosm. Like any relationship, there be ups and downs, just go with your gut. The important thing is ; when they offer you an upgrade, you ARE worth it. The ride is short, so best to charge into it with fresh pads and properly adjusted suspension.
  • 1 0
 I once had a guy in a bike shop tell me that the Boardman Team HT he was trying to sell me would be better at downhill riding than my Nukeproof Pulse. My advise would be, do your own research, trust your own knowledge and remain polite.
  • 1 0
 Hum...who is the customer ? Who gives money to another?
This tuto is complete non sense for me.
As a customer I am supposed to be treated respectfully in a shop whatever it sells (mtbikes clothes high tech....).
If I have to bear the ego of bikeshop employee, I will not return to this bikeshop.
It has already happened to me in a bikeshop: a long time to wait until employee answered me, bad attitude, words from them in order to make me understand I am stupid.
OK no problem, I founded another bikeshop with friendly mechanics to service my mtbike.
And I buy now my bikes or part on the web or in second hands.
Congratulations to these employee who make happen the end of their own job ;o)
  • 1 0
 It is somehow connected to the topic. Everytime I give a bikeshop something to do, there is a pattern. For example:
I need my shock serviced, and seals changed. They say it's done so I pick it up. At home I notice that the main Oring is still inside the bag. I call them back and drop off the shock. They change everything missing. I pick it up. At home I notice that the shock is not bled properly. And I feel bad for calling them back again!
This is exhausting.
  • 1 0
 The worst is when you need brake pads and the mechanic is so arrogant to claim they never use the rear brake for downhill or a bike park. Any brakes for that matter. They should just say they are so good they don’t have brakes on their personal bike.
  • 1 0
 The number of times I have heard a bike shop employee give extremely bad advice to a customer (whether out of ignorance or because they want to sell what they have in stock) ... On several occasions, when the information given is so egregious, I've stepped over to the customer (after the employee has walked away)...to correct the (mis)information they were given.

However...the other day, I was walking through my local Walmart and they had someone in the back assembling their bikes with an impact driver! So I guess the LBS isn't as bad as that...but both bad experiences....which is why 98% of my cycling dollars are spent online these days.
  • 1 0
 My LBS hook me on the MTB like 20 years ago, I just walked in in a small basement, and went home after 4 hours of NWD talks and understanding how much I need to earn next month to hit the ramp they had on the back yard. Month later was happy customer with GaryFisher dirt jumper. Nowadays I prefer similar style LBS.
  • 2 0
 The fact that this article has to be written, shows how many shops don't understand customer service. If you walk into a shop and feel "Stupid", leave and find a shop that is more positive and welcoming.
  • 1 0
 @Drewzellator: This is EXACTLY why some people shop online now!! Your job as a bike shop employee is to help your customer. If they knew everything then YOU are no longer needed, which means the shop is no longer needed!! YOUR job is to listen to your customers needs, actually LISTEN to what they want. You might love long travel Yetis, but your customer my want a mid travel Pivot (or whatever brand). You may want to sell what you like, but listening to your customer and making suggestions for them is YOUR JOB. By doing your job, you will gain a happy customer, and that means a repeat customer! That means you keep your job and the shop owners keep the shop. Remember that, because without it, everyone shops online!!!
  • 2 0
 In my area we now have the “Trek bought half the bike shops and I think Treks are a little overpriced these days” problem
  • 3 1
 Is that Zac in the top pic?

Also I like to set a great first impression at shops, I walk in the door hunched over rubbing my ass, and I start begging for a Rim job
  • 2 0
 Squamish has some of the nicest, most welcoming and most knowledgeable bike shop employees I have ever met. A vast contrast to some in Whistler...
  • 3 0
 It does'nt seem to matter how stupid I make myself appear in the bike shop, amazingly, I feel even stupider when I leave.
  • 4 1
 Just the fact that this article exists is a testament to how retarded a bunch of bike shops are... my trick? Not go there
  • 1 5
flag scottty (Mar 9, 2023 at 4:15) (Below Threshold)
 Wow, so much intelligence from your intellect.. do you even know what the word retarded means ?? I suggest you open a dictionary and read it instead of using a word you clearly don't understand.
  • 8 8
 Im sorry, or maybe not, but this article was written by an a-hole. step 3 describes a new customer as being "comically unrealistic" believing $500 dollars will get them in to the sport. Umm... hate to say it, but for the vast majority of the world paying over $500 dollars for a bicycle, which is often considered a children toy, is a shit load of money. Yes, people like us who ride all the time know better, but as a shop employee you better be able to explain why its not okay to bring anything less than a $3K bike out to the trails. And since you cant, you better accept that most costumers are going to leave due to sticker shock. Your job is to get them over that barrier and make a sale, not be a dick.

If someone spends a bunch of time educating themselves before they come in they will quickly realize DTC is a much better deal, and most of those companies ship bikes in a state that requires almost no technical knowledge to complete. if you want peoples money you need to do better.
  • 1 0
 @dpars63 : Say what else you want about the quality or relevance of the article, but I think you took the $500 out of context. Ms. Fitzpatrick didn't say $500 was insufficient, she only outlined that it was likely insufficient if you want a race bike you can also tour on and weighs as much as a road bike. This also ties into Point 4, being realistic with your goals.

The point was to research the type of bike you want and see what's common for price range, which is what you should be doing anyway whether you buy DTC or in a shop.
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart: I get what the author was trying to say, and it’s still an issue. We are talking about retail, expecting the customer to pre research anything is a great way to go out of business. The sales person at William Sanoma better be able to explain why their frying pans are 10x the price as Walmart or Target. It’s no different. It is fundamentally why people are shopping online over in store. The only thing that will bring people back to in person retail is providing a better experience, and if the author thinks it’s on the customer to provide a better experience then they are going to be waiting a long time.
  • 2 1
 @dpars63: the more prepared the buyer the more theyll get out of the conversation. Coming in comoletrly ignorant is irreslonsible. There are levels. Gotta do the prework. Its not the 80s where the only differentiator is SIS.
  • 2 0
 @dpars63: As @mm732 alluded to, this isn't the 80 anymore. There's so much info available out there that to not do a cursory look at something you're interested in is only doing yourself a disservice. You certainly wouldn't go into a car dealership and depend solely on the salesperson to get you sorted. People are doing this research in general now anyway, which is one reason why DTC is successful. The more you know...whether you're in an LBS or on a website. And I don't think Ms. Fitzpatrick was expecting you to research; she indicated these are tips and strategies that could better your experience in an LBS.

And if someone is explaining a 10x better frying pan I'm walking out.
  • 3 0
 @iammarkstewart: I totally agree its not the 80s anymore, and I have no argument that it is in the consumers best interest to be educated. But... lets talk about that frying pan. that wasn't a joke. I can get a frying pan at walmart for $10 , there are frying pans that look the same at high end shops for well over $150. It's retail, so how much education does the fancy shop expect people to be doing before they come in? Most people interested in that line of cookware become so because either A: they like to cook and its their thing, or B: they want something better than walmart at some-point.

Cycling is 100% the same. Most people are not born hardcore mountainbikers who troll pinkbike. Most people who are hardcore riders dont go to shops because they dont need to, they can do the work themselves and know what they want and where to get it cheaper. A shops only real value proposition to a customer is the level of service they can provide, and its a cop out to put that back on the customer. Ive worked in shops, granted that was the early 2000's but to no surprise most people A: didn't understand why bikes were expensive, and B didnt buy anything that day. BUT, educating them and giving them a sense that they were not stupid, but simply like everyone else who doesn't understand the industry, which is most people in the world, allowed them to leave in a good mood. That sometimes meant a sale later on, but at a minimum it meant they wouldn't talk shit on the store.
  • 1 0
 @dpars63: So we have different angles on this and that's fine. But regarding your frying pan...it's not the same as a bike. And if you need a $150 frying pan, you did some research or knew what you're looking for already or else you're not paying 15 times over what you can get a perfectly fine pan for. Vast majority of people are not walking out with a Ferrari when they came for a Yaris.

If you're a beginner rider and/or have a budget, I find it hard to fathom these days that the vast majority of people aren't at least doing a cursory look around and/or asking friends about where to start on a $500 or $1000 dollar bike. And that person will know they're not going in to buy the $15000 dollar bike...the proverbial William Sonoma bike...without having checked to see what they're getting for that money. No doubt the shop should have a huge role in helping the customer, but again, the article is talking about being pragmatic and looking out for yourself, not an actual how-to guide. You can take or leave the advice.
  • 2 2
 I have found bike shops to be completely incompetent from both a mechanical and knowledge standpoint. They have messed up my bike so many times I no longer see it as a viable option for repairs and thus rebuild/maintain everything on my bike. The only exception to that is fork/shock damper service or warranties (SRAM guide R, etc) but last time I took it in they sent out my fork damper instead of the rear shock, and left plenty of air in the brake lines. Why would I pay someone to mess up my bike?
  • 3 0
 Interesting that they post this article on international women’s day… lil suss
  • 3 0
 I don’t go to bike shops to browse anymore because of pressure to buy or get out.
  • 1 1
 All I care about is the quality of the work a shop does. I do most of my own work but occasionally have one of my local shops do work that requires special tools or if I just dont have time. In the last five or so years I have had nothing but crappy service. Like a fork rebuild that was reassembled incorrectly, etc. I'm pretty much done with all of them.
  • 4 0
 Its true, we are total shitheads.
  • 3 0
 Wheel builds, full on suspension rebuilds or warranty. Only reason I go in to a shop if I’m not there to buy a bike.
  • 2 2
 This weird idea of loyalty ruins most bike shops. It is like if you didn't buy your bike there, they are disgusted. I make sure I get my basic things like lube, stans, co2, new chains, socks, cables, wires, etc. from my LBS (which is still hundreds of dollars a year). However, I am not going to buy a $13,000 Epic from the shop when I can build my own frame up for $3-4k. I am happy to pay labor on intensive projects like fork rebuilds, but could do without the attitude. I am probably just going to buy the small things online from here on out too.
  • 1 0
 My LBS:
Can I help you?
Yes, interested in a new Enduro bike.
Ok, whats your budget.
About £45k
Ah you wont get much for that, can you stretch to fifty.
have a word with yourself mate.
  • 2 0
 It’s just a math problem really. If you get treated like shit it’s because they don’t need your money. That mentality will change when the money slows down.
  • 1 1
 Around my area most of the bike shops are stupider than I am. There was this one bike shop in Colorado that was kind of intimidating. That was the first time I've been into like a big time bike shop. Nobody asked if l wanted help so I guess I didn't have to be worried.
  • 2 2
 I simply don't go anymore. I don't care to hear the gossip, be offered "a better deal than last time" on something I've already bought nor to listen to judgemental mechanics who clearly haven't been riders for years. It's a pageant show where I live and frankly, I have 90% of the tools the shop does and that's adequate 99% of the time.
  • 5 2
 So much hate on here .. just go ride your fuc***g bike and try to be nice to people before forming opinions.
  • 2 0
 There are Bike shops you buy parts at and there are shops you buy water bottles snacks and socks, you usually know in 2min. Sage advice from an old frat.
  • 3 0
 Does anyone else read Karen's bikeshop yelp evoews for fun or is it just me
  • 3 0
 I still feel stupid walking into a bike shop, and I've worked in them for 10 years.
  • 1 0
 Go to the bike shop after hours when no ones in to have to deal with either ones nonsense,
reverse the transit through the door and take your pick.
Just watched Shopping with Jude Law : )
  • 3 0
 Man the hate for bike shop employees/mechanics is high. Might just have to quit my job!
  • 2 0
 I like seeing who is more high on Sunday mornings at my favorite LBS in Bellingham. Myself or them?! Tough call, but it evens us all out haha.
  • 1 0
 I never thought we'd need an article on how not to feel stupid walking into a bike shop. This is 100% on the owners IMO. Treat customers with grace, humility and curiosity - at least have that as an aim.
  • 1 0
 Why bother with shops who employ those type of people? Buy online let the high street shops go under. Personally never bought anything from a shop that wasn't food in the last 20 years.
  • 2 1
 Tip 5 should pretty much be the only tip necessary. The rest is just gaslighting us to make it the customer's fault that they're treated like shit.
  • 1 0
 Do some research but don't be stubborn with your findings. If we tell you that you're wrong and give you a legit reason, just let it go.
  • 1 2
 It could help for shure if all the bikes don't look like a session!!!! Nowadays nearly all are clones...of a bad iteration bike !!! Good and improved ideas as Brian Berthold Tantrum Missing Link bikes are lost in me too stupid design bikes. Where have been put my new Turner 29er ALUMINUM DHR ? Usually I know more about bikes and tech components that most of bike employees...but their ego lost them...and me !!!
  • 4 2
 Wtf? Why is this like tips for a job interview, but it’s just to buy something.

Extra cringe
  • 2 0
 This is so incredibly stupid. Sorry not sorry. No
I haven’t read it but the whole idea just pisses me off.
  • 1 0
 as a customer, I assume the bike shop person knows more than I do (about bikes), so I am allowed being stupid and don't have to feel stupid about that at all
  • 2 0
 walks into bike shop tries to push a pull door smash face into glass feels pretty stoopid then!
  • 3 0
 Why is it a bike shop "Bro"? Women can be condescending too.
  • 2 0
 What if you're the one intimidating the bike staff with your size and knowledge?
  • 3 0
 If you feel this way in a shop, you're in the wrong shop.
  • 1 0
 Next PB Poll, how many Customers V/S Shop Owners , are active here. ShamBum ! Looks like a lot of customers got into a Rant with the Headtitle.
  • 3 0
 Notice that the door says 'Pull', not 'Push'
  • 2 0
 How to Not Feel Stupid Walking Into a Bike Shop .....dont wear your pinkbike shirt .
  • 1 0
 Hi, I work at a shop with a bunch of friendly people. We help all sorts of people get onto sweet bikes! Don’t be scared, just be yourself and come say hi Smile
  • 4 1
 Yikes
  • 2 0
 Go ride your bike 1st prior to "need" something new...
  • 2 0
 My two favorite shops are in California. I live in Arizona.
  • 2 0
 don"t lock your keys in your car in front of everyone...
  • 2 3
 haha one should never go into a bike shop unless its for free warranty work. have long since given up on those places. its like the equivalent of going to the car dealer for out of warranty service
  • 2 1
 That photo says it all. Back turned, gossiping about some bullshit, help you later.
  • 1 0
 Eyyyyy it's Squatch! Great place to stop when you're wandering around downtown Brevard. Also don't ever come here. Ever.
  • 2 0
 If you walk into a bike shop you're already stupid.
  • 2 0
 Did you mean: how to not feel stupid working in a bike shop
  • 1 0
 Great, next article should be ‘how to make customers feel confident in your shop’.
  • 2 0
 I feel pretty stupid reading this article.
  • 1 0
 …or don’t and buy a Canyon, YT, Commencal, Vitus etc. bang for buck is superior anyhow!
  • 1 0
 I really don't think this is unique to bike shops. But yeah I won't go back to a bike shop that act like dicks.
  • 1 0
 How to Not Feel Stupid Walking Into a Bike Shop?
I encourage to simply say a nice good morning upon entering...
  • 11 10
 Don’t walk into a bike shop problem solved
  • 2 3
 I don't like bike shops, when i go with casual cloths, their attitude is like i am newbie. When i go with full ON gear after ride, it's a different story.
  • 7 5
 Shop online?
  • 4 3
 Step one: shop online. Bike retail is near worthless at this point.
  • 1 0
 For me they are worthless, so many I have tried don't know what I am talking about and when they finally understand they can't help me even with exact part numbers.
  • 2 1
 Maybe look where you’re going and you can stop waking into things.
  • 2 0
 Tips for life.
  • 1 0
 I considered tip 2 and tip 3. Ended up buying online.
  • 2 0
 Lol OUTSIDE+
  • 2 0
 is it STILL slow season?
  • 1 0
 The Hub PF is where it’s at!!
  • 1 0
 Never have I felt more welcome right off the bat in a shop. Its my 2nd fave part of driving down from Canada to ride the Pisgah area.

Didnt have a tool I needed? "Try Sycamore across the street"
New Dominion A4 felt squishy? "Yea dude we can handle that in 20 mins, grab a pint while ya wait"
Broke my leg on Rocky Ridge? "Oh dude, you need a hand packing up your campsite and bike today?"

Love The Hub.
  • 1 0
 "bro im new at this, is 150mm travel enough for me?"
  • 1 0
 Yes, go bike it’s fun and you’ll learn quickly if you enjoy yourself
  • 2 1
 I just send the butler with a suitcase of money.
  • 3 2
 Pinkbike is becoming the DailyMail of the bike press. What a sad article.
  • 3 0
 How is this gonna affect my house price though?
  • 1 0
 Power of the purse! They need u more
  • 1 0
 Step 1: Don’t be female or female identified.
  • 1 0
 Wow this article has changed my life........
  • 1 0
 bike shops = computer shops back in the day
  • 2 3
 NOT TO COME IN THE SHOP TO TRY AND THEN BUY THE PRODUCTS ONLINE. we're not stupid . we're aware of you doing this. There's a special place for you in hell.
  • 1 0
 In Australia, most bike shop employees know less than the customers.
  • 19 19
 Tip 6 - thank them with a 6-pack.
  • 22 6
 Some of the best shops would rather cash tips and don't have drinking in the shop. If they earned a tip, tip cash or ask the staff what they like.
  • 7 0
 I once got tipped a 6-pack, I was 17. Service Manager confiscated it rather quickly.
  • 15 4
 You KNOW it’s a good bike shop when you walk in and it smells like a bar and/or suspiciously herbal
  • 12 0
 Thank them with your repeat business. If they deserve it.
  • 14 0
 @dontcoast: I see this "bring them a six pack" stuff all the time but unless I personally know the people working on my bike I'd feel stupid buying people beer. Do these people even drink? And even if they do how much f*cking beer do they need if everyone tipped them with a six pack?
  • 20 2
 Thank them with M-O-N-E-Y. People like money. Underpaid shop mechanics can't pay their rent with beer. This tip with a 6 pack bullshit is some cliche caveman shit. MONEY, ffs.
  • 6 1
 @SirWonky: I like beer and party lettuce and I disagree.

A good shop is professional.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: exactly.
  • 8 0
 @dontcoast: maybe in the states… but please don’t ruin the rest of the world with tipping!

The giving beer thing is just such a strange practice though. It seems so natural and yet I can’t really figure out why it’s less gross than cash :/

You wouldn’t give bottled water… maybe it’s because the alcohol is harmful. “Let’s hurt ourselves together” kinda thing, maybe?
  • 5 2
 @dirtyburger: I can't stand USA's "tipping always" culture, however when someone goes above and beyond to do a great job; I think tipping (wether cash or "can I bring you beer/snacks/lunch) is a lovely gesture in any culture.
  • 4 1
 @dirtyburger: Donuts/muffins, as well as coffee supplies for the obligatory bike shop espresso machine seem to be welcomed...
  • 3 2
 @g-42: but why do we just assume everyone who works in a bike shop is some degenerate who lives on beer, junk food, and caffeine? I get that’s the general stereotype but I’m sure there are plenty of shop workers who wouldn’t have any interest in it.
  • 1 1
 @RonanM825: one of the most, if not the most important aspects of proper mountain bike maintenance is proper lubrication.it can also be the key to developing a great relationship with your bike store. Don't be a jerk to the workers and show gratitude
  • 2 4
 @dirtyburger: A lot of Puritans in here. A six pack after every major repair from me. It's a f*ckin tradition. There is at least 1 boozehound in every shop, if not a majority from what I've seen. Cheers.
  • 6 0
 Tried it..showed em my six pack...werent that interested. Left dejected.
  • 6 0
 @sino428: As a former mechanic it also feels weird taking "tips" from people you haven't established rapport or a relationship with. The exceptions are things we can safely "use" during business hours, or even offer to other customers (snacks, donuts, coffee, other "safe" stuff). Me personally, I tried hard to treat everyone's bike as important because my assumption is it has a level of importance to the owner. That's usually enough for me. I'm also picky about my beer these days.

I like beer, whisky, coffee, and I'm not a party vegetarian (hippy lettuce isn't for me), but I also liked my shop and my owner and these days you have to watch who's watching. For one, we have more than 6 people who contribute to the shop success in a day so someone's not getting a beer. Our underagers, also valuable contributors, cannot share in said "success" (and also have parents who hear stories). Then you have owner and liability concerns. If your retail space is in a communal property (mall, etc), it may only take one complaint or the wrong person seeing things at the back door to jeopardize tenancy or insurance coverage.

TL,DR: If someone really wants to reward us, I think it's ok that we request the reward is something we can all use and distribute equitably. Cash universally fits that bill (literally). Whether we save it for the staff holiday party or bail someone out of a broken part or whatever.
  • 4 6
 Beer tips are a part of shop culture. If you don't drink then just appreciate the gesture. This person has gone out of their way to go bring this thing to you to show how much they appreciate your work. Or you can shame them and tell them it is inappropriate and they will walk out of your shop feeling stupid... exactly how most people walk out of bike shops these days and why this article exists.
  • 2 1
 @sino428: Project much? Lots of people like coffee - very few indulge in it to a level that would qualify as degeneracy. Pastries - same story.
  • 4 2
 @venturavin: You’re setting up a weird straw man here. No one’s talking about shop employees rejecting gifts, and shaming customers for a thoughtful gesture. What we’re saying is that your thoughtful gesture isn’t as thoughtful as you think it is. What we’re talking about is changing the culture by changing the behavior of folks before they even go into the shop.

We’re saying:
Hey you—upper middle class white dad having the shop install a new fork on your SB160 just because you had upgrade-itis—instead of stopping at the store for a 12 pack of IPA to bribe your way into friendship with the cool kids, stop at the ATM, grab a twenty dollar bill or two, and throw that shit in the tip jar instead.
  • 2 0
 @g-42: ‘lots of people’ does not equal everyone, which was my point. And the degenerate comment was just a joke.
  • 4 3
 @BrambleLee: classic shop guy attitude... how about you be grateful for this customer who has worked hard for decades so that he can afford to splurge on a new fork for his SB160. He is the ONLY reason that your job exists at all, fact. If he can't read the room and brings an inappropriate "tip" of some kind, just appreciate the gesture. He's not prying your jaw open and pouring beer down your throat, he just genuinely pictured you and your colleagues cracking a few open after your shift and having a good time together. That was the entire point of my comment, just appreciate the attempt. I'm not arguing whether or not beer is appropriate to bring in, that fully depends on the situation and people involved.

Straw man? Shop employees rejecting/not wanting gifts is exactly what we are talking about here. What we're talking about here is how the customer experience in bike shops these days is so terrible that it makes the average customer uncomfortable. And yet in classic bike shop fashion, y'all try to point that blame back around at the customers.
  • 2 0
 @venturavin: Speaking to my comment...this is all a hypothetical "If there was something we could mention to customers about tipping" take. I never said I wasn't grateful about anything a customer "tipped" us, and far from throwing anything but cash back in a customer's face.

You're the one who has focused on this tip concept and made a lot of assumptions about your fictional SB160 owner and mistaking our preference for cash (in a bike shop hypothetical vacuum) as being ungrateful for the service work. On top of that, in real life, tipping happens so rarely that we really do appreciate it and sincerely thank the customer. On the back end we try to make sure we sort the team out as best we can. There is no blaming customers for being extra nice. I don't know what shop hurt you but you're using a lot of lead-based paint in your broad brushstrokes here.
  • 2 0
 @BrambleLee:

This:

“Hey you—upper middle class white dad having the shop install a new fork on your SB160 just because you had upgrade-itis—instead of stopping at the store for a 12 pack of IPA to bribe your way into friendship with the cool kids, stop at the ATM, grab a twenty dollar bill or two, and throw that shit in the tip jar instead.”

See the top comment.

As someone that’s turned bike spanners at one point, I hope I never have to go to a physical bike shop ever again. It’s not just bike shops through, pretty much any ‘lifestyle’ retail is similar.
  • 3 0
 @venturavin: I'm not a shop guy. If anything, I'm a lot closer to the dad character I made up, but with the common sense to know that cash is going to be a better gesture than beer. If they want to spend the cash tip on beers for the shop, cool. You making that decision for them because it's "part of the culture?" Gross.

Yeah, straw man. We are 100% not talking about employees rejecting these gestures, but for some reason you're reading it that way. In fact you're doubling down on the straw manning with your "no one is forcing their jaws open" nonsense. You're arguing things that literally no one is thinking, saying, or even suggesting.

In 2023, with the cost of everything going up, sobriety having a moment, and shop folks working for retail wages, we're simply saying your "beer is part of the culture" argument is outdated. It's not unkind, it's not rude, it's not meant in bad faith. But it's quite possibly an empty gesture, and not as helpful as just tipping cash instead of deciding for them that that that $20 should be spent on beer.
  • 4 0
 @dirtyburger: Maybe I'm being dense, but I'm not quite sure what you're trying to say here. Do you mean to agree with me, or do you think I'm a shop guy failing to leave my ego at the door? I think the latter. As it turns out, I'm not a shop guy. I'm a 40-something dad. I briefly had a shop gig in the build room of a bike shop in Rochester NY back in the 90s, but that's it. But, you know, I have eyes and stuff—we all know that upper middle class glad handing dad with the SB160 and a 12 pack is real.

Today, I live in Portland OR. There are lots of bike shops here, and I go into them very very little, because I largely hate the experience for all the reasons listed in this article and comment section. But I also know it cuts both ways and that customers are often entitled, bloviating douchebags. It's a complicated recipe as to why things are the way they are. Regardless, I think shop staff deserve to be treated with respect. And while no one is being expressly disrespectful by tipping with beer, it's kind of a clueless misplaced way to show appreciation (in my, and many others', opinion).

Shop work is service work. I don't know where you're actually from, but I'm going to guess it's not actually Antarctica (or, are you posted there doing research or something? Cool.) I know the tipping situation is different in other countries, and maybe it should be here too, but it's not. We don't go to a restaurant and tip our servers with homemade banana bread. We don't tip our barbers with donuts or weed. We don't tip our baristas with beer.

It's just not that complicated—if you want to tip someone for a service they have provided you, in 2023, do it with cash.
  • 3 0
 @venturavin: listen, dear bike shop customer. We ALL appreciate ANY tips.

There are also multiple bike shop employees explaining WHY cash tips are preferred.

So...maybe listen to the service providers. If you actually care about what they think.

@BrambleLee couldn't have said it better.
  • 4 1
 @BrambleLee: Cheers for the reply.

Makes sense. No I’m not from the USA, I get that tipping is standard practice there, I just would rather it didn’t spread to the rest of the world where it doesn’t even make sense to do so.
  • 4 1
 I think there's some confusion on how this whole thing works. I have never once carried beers into a shop that I had not previously discussed with the specific person I was bringing them to, I am not a psychopath. I get that there are probably people who do this, but that shouldn't ruin free beers for the many boys and girls who love and appreciate them. It's quite a simple process. You drop your bike off and at that time you ask them something like "you guys got a favorite beer or drink for the shop?" (at this point they can of course, for any reason, state that they would not like beer without creating any discomfort for anyone) You go buy that exact drink they requested, not something you think they'll like more or something you happen to have, but the one they actually wanted, and you bring it to them when you pick up your bike. TOTALLY AGREE that cash is awesome as well, so 100% go ahead and tuck a $20 in the handle of that 12 pack.
  • 1 0
 Call Velofix
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