Push Industries Releases Nine.One Inverted Fork

Feb 29, 2024
by Dario DiGiulio  
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We first caught a glimpse of a new fork from Push Industries at Sea Otter last year, where they had some early prototype versions on display at their booth. Information was tight then, but the day has finally come and we're getting filled in on the details.

The Nine.One fork is Push's first foray into an entire fork chassis, but based on their existing dampers and aftermarket upgrades it's a promising proposition. The fork features an inverted design, adjustable travel, and is coil-sprung, of course.
Nine.One Details

• 140-170mm travel, user adjustable in 10mm increments
• Coil spring with pneumatic bottom-out control
• Inverted chassis, 36mm stanchions
• All new Nine.One damper
• Made in Colorado
• Weight: 2,790 grams
• Price: $2,600 USD
pushindustries.com

We'll have one of these in hand soon, but for now we'll leave the words up to Darren Murphy, the founder of Push.



PRESS RELEASE: Push Industries

Upper Structure

With the inverted design comes flexibility and the ability to decouple the various components. These freedoms allow for the use of various crown, outer tube, and bushing configurations that would otherwise be relatively fixed. Using a host of FEA simulation tools, test equipment, and many hours of ride evaluations, PUSH engineers tirelessly analyzed and tweaked each aspect of the fork’s upper structure. This included exploring both large and small adjustments to crown shape and overlap, outer tube diameter and taper, as well as floating and fixed fork bushings.

The result? The NINE.ONE features a uniquely tuned 44mm upper chassis where increases in frontal stiffness were achieved to manage large square impacts without compromising the torsional stiffness needed to improve cornering traction by reducing front end push from chatter.

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Fork Bushings

Fork bushings were a primary focus in chassis development with extensive development going into design layouts and material structures. Proprietary fork bushings are precision fit and individually hand burnished to mating stanchion tubes. The NINE.ONE also features a bushing design which keeps the bushings submerged in fork oil which provides constant and consistent lubrication resulting in a fork that is plush, active, and free of binding friction even under the heaviest braking loads.

Fork Seals

Each fork features our exclusive and proprietary ULF fork seals. Longer lasting, better performing and engineered to reduce hand fatigue by reducing sliding friction. As with our fork bushings, NINE.ONE fork seals are constantly and consistently lubricated improving performance and increasing durability.

Stanchion Tubes

NINE.ONE forks feature 36mm centerless ground and polished stanchion tubes utilizing our proven MicroXD micro-finishing hardcoat process to reduce friction and increase durability.

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Axle Lugs

The axle lugs of the NINE.ONE take an innovative approach to design. With their bolt-on design, riders can easily switch between axle offsets as well as wheel sizes without purchasing a new fork. The extremely stiff 38mm clamping area of the lugs aids in both the forks overall feel as well as harmonic free braking stiffness. The brake side axle lug also features our exclusive Dual Standoff Direct Mount brake mount system eliminating mounting brackets for 180/185mm as well as 200/203mm rotor sizes. This feature reduces setup time and improves braking stability.

Fork Guards

Lightweight integrated fork guards provide excellent lower leg protection and feature integration of both the front brake house guide and traditional low mount fender. The guards are manufactured from a high impact polymer material that provides high stiffness with excellent impact and shatter resistance.

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Quiet Coil Spring

Have you ever noticed how frequently air sprung forks are described as providing “the most coil-like feel”? This is because coil sprung forks provide a more plush and active initial travel, better mid-stroke support, and the most consistent end stroke. We made it simple….the NINE.ONE is coil sprung. Better yet, the fork spring assembly sits inside our lubricated “Silent Surround” chamber allowing for quiet, smooth, and maintenance free action without the use of secondary devices such as heat shrink.

Independent External Bottoming Control

The NINE.ONE also features our exclusive position sensitive ABS pneumatic bottoming system. Independent from the main coil spring, the ABS unit provides additional spring support for the final 10-45mm of wheel travel. The engagement position is automatically adjusted based on base pressure. Base pressure is adjusted externally with a standard shock pump with recommended pressures between 5-50psi. Additionally, more aggressive riders can remove the ABS unit and reposition the ABS main piston as an additional tuning tool.

Nine.One Damper

With its pressurized reservoir, Internal Floating Piston (IFP), and large volume compression base valve, the components of the NINE.ONE damper resemble an advanced rear shock damper. Designed and engineered specifically for the unique characteristics of the chassis, the damper features a uniquely developed damping characteristic that offers new levels of speed sensitivity and control. With 28 clicks of both Low and High-Speed compression damping, and 18 clicks of Low-Speed rebound damping adjustment, riders are truly able to fine tune just the right amount of performance, comfort, and control. In addition to the external adjustments, internal tuning of the compression base valve, rebound piston, and mid valve are available for riders riding at an elite level.

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User Adjustable Travel

To give riders more options, the NINE.ONE features a proprietary travel adjustment system that allows riders to internally adjust the forks travel between 140mm and up to 170mm in 10mm increments without the need to purchase additional parts.

Durable Construction

Throw a punch….it can take it. Not being exceedingly happy with modern fork durability, PUSH engineers took a fresh approach to performance while being consistently focused on durability. Both component design and material selections were chosen based on the results they produced after a full season, not just how they performed after a fresh rebuild.

Floating Axle

Decreasing friction results in better traction. The NINE.ONE’s floating axle design eliminates binding friction caused by hub width tolerance and variance. With this design, hub preload and fork leg alignment are completely independent of each other.

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Speed Service Feature

While regular maintenance is necessary to keep the NINE.ONE fork operating at its maximum, riders are able to remove the forks lubrication fluid and replace it through our outer tube speed service feature. This is a basic service that can be completed without removing the fork from the bike.

Pressure Relief Valves

Featuring a Patent-Pending design, and conveniently located on the backside of the fork crown, our pressure relief valves make pressure balancing the NINE.ONE a breeze. The valves completely sealed pull-to-release design eliminates the common problem of entering debris and leaking lubricating oil.

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Homegrown

Manufactured here matters. Creating high quality products manufactured right here under the roof of our Colorado facility by skilled individuals adds a level of detail that simply cannot be matched. The result: Quality, Durability, and Performance.

Warranty Reset

A revolutionary suspension warranty first introduced with our ELEVENSIX rear shock, our Warranty Reset ensures that after every annual service performed by one of our Factory Authorized Service Centers, you get a full factory warranty reset for another year of use. In addition, all PUSH forks and shocks feature a fully transferable warranty.



Stay tuned for a full review of the Nine.One in the coming months, as well as some comparisons to all the top forks on the market.

Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
168 articles

426 Comments
  • 418 13
 This fork is 100% for dudes who drive shareholder value.
  • 40 2
 Will i have to sell my ferrari to afford it?
  • 48 0
 No i really really want one. Just cant afford it. For this money you could buy a carbon dorado, throw in the coil kit while you decrease travel to 180mm throw it on your long travel trail bike and have lost of extra gas and beer money.
  • 69 0
 I am looking forward to seeing this tested against other forks.
  • 20 8
 @PHX77: I bet it is really better then the other single crown stuff. Coil mixed with USD and hydraulic bottom out is just hard to out do. It'll just be frictionless compared to other common offerings and honestly that's half the battle.
  • 7 0
 @Compositepro: you mean can I trade in for a gt3 with a roof rack!
  • 8 5
 @Compositepro: Would recommend just trading in for a Lamborghini Huracan Sterrato as they come from factory with a roof rack.
  • 26 0
 @cougar797: People buying this aren't worried about gas or beer money. It's just money.
  • 60 0
 If money was no object, I would consider buying. It’s a cool piece of mountain bike tech. But alas, I have a “like new Fox Rhythm take off” budget.
  • 41 2
 @PtDiddy: Does it even work without the Kashima coating?
  • 13 10
 @cougar797: re coil: hated my vorsprung coill set up on my lyrik. the feeling was way too linear and couldn't get any front end ttraction on confidence. Knowing push tho, i'm sure it's stellar. $2600 is a hard pill to swallow tho! dang.
  • 25 7
 @rean1mator: you're not alone. I've sold a ton of coil forks to riders who then lamented the lack of mid-stroke support. They'd spring for sag or comfort but then not have the necessary progression or bottom-out support. Or they'd spring for bottom-out and then have a harsh top stroke.

PUSH has it right with needing an air bottom-out bumper so you can spring for mid-stroke support and lean on the air pressure deep into travel. Frames have progression from the linkage, forks need progression to balance the fork dynamics to those of the rear suspension.
  • 3 1
 @Compositepro: Depends on the Ferrari.
  • 14 1
 @GTscoob: A well set up dual positive air fork is incredibly effective at doing this while being a lot lighter and less complicated. EXT really did the best of both worlds by adding a small spring to the end of the air shaft that is utilized for small bump and initial stroke sensitivity any time the fork travel changes directions and then seamlessly transfers into the air spring once stiction force is met. Another solution that I know some manufacturers have tested and tried in the past is multiple rate coil systems. Downside to those is obviously weight and complication of having to spec multiple spring rates for at least 2-3 phases.
  • 7 0
 @rean1mator: I liked the one I had in a lyrik. I moved it to a zeb and never got along well but I think that was more of a tight bushing tolerance thing causing too much friction. Now that said the air spring in my dorado is my fav spring going right now. My mezzer pro is close behind but non usd and shorter air spring will never be as good. Also have to remember that a damper built around a linear coil has been designed to damp around a linear spring force.
  • 19 0
 Kid didn’t need his kidney anyway
  • 4 0
 @notsosikmik: Bet. I've run a DSD Runt in every air fork I've ridden for years. Even got really silly on a 2017 Fox 36 with the MRP negative chamber valve for three fully adjustable air chambers on that fork, shouldn't have sold it.
  • 13 0
 @Compositepro: I am sure this fork will be great. However, I have a hard time believing that my experience riding one will be that superior over any other top quality fork that is half or less of the cost. This falls kind of under the old saying that it's more fun to drive slow car fast than a fast car slow. This thing is a Ferrari no doubt. Great if you want that and have the money to spend on it, but I can't seeing it being any more fun than rowing your own in a Civic SI for a fraction of the cost and way less hassle.
  • 10 0
 @cougar797: The Dorado might even be lighter
  • 7 1
 Share buy backs and $2600 forks go so well together
  • 19 4
 @GTscoob: are you for real? when a coil with the same sag as an air spring has less mid-stroke? The progression must come from something like the Air Bump Stop in the ACS3, not from the spring itself. Also, too linear and couldn't get any front traction? omg... okay
  • 11 13
 @gemas09: I didn't make the comment about front traction, but the riders I helped set up complained about diving too much in corners and making the bike unsettled and unbalanced accordingly.

These are aggressive riders trying to drink the coil spring koolaid but moved back to air for better balance and progression. Spring for the fluttery active coil feel and lose the mid and endstroke they needed; spring for the support they need and end up with a chattery fork off the top. Air springs can fine tune that balance better.
  • 1 1
 @Compositepro: yeah, i will have to buy a Porsche, sell it for way more, buy this setup, buy a tent, move out, live in the tent, and befriend Jeffy the hobo. But i will have a sick bike!
  • 4 0
 @skiwenric: depending on the rest of the build the whole kid might have to go! Haha.
  • 1 0
 @edventure: it does, but it’s more painful.
  • 11 0
 @GTscoob: Its pretty funny,
I built an air over coil Marzo fork back in the 00's,
It was pure silk
essentially just a Z-1 air, with a coil spring.
size the coil light, pressure air for some additional support and ramp up.
It eventually split the lowers right down the middle on a fairly large stair gap. Sprayed high pressure oil all over the place.

Ahhhh, the days of Urban Freeride.....
  • 2 0
 @nateb: sometimes….!
  • 4 6
 @onawalk: those forks were great.

It's widely accepted that rear suspension can be linear paired with a progressive shock or progressive paired with a linear shock, but the moment you make the claim that coil forks need help for progression, the zealots come out.

Ideally your progression would be balanced front to back which doesn't happen with a full coil fork.
  • 2 1
 @cougar797: that only works if your frame is compatible with a dual-crown. But a good point none the less.
  • 3 4
 @EdSawyer: I’ve never understood the non dual crown compatible fork argument. Axle to crown is axle to crown. Both are squeezed on top and bottom of headset.
  • 8 2
 @hellbelly: I don’t care how well a fork works, if it won’t accept a mud hugger / fender it’s basically next to useless if you can’t see whilst riding it.
  • 2 4
 @GTscoob: more likely they went back to air as it’s easier for someone who doesn’t know what they’re doing just pump it up and get it to work reasonably well. With coils you do need to understand what you’re doing or you’ll never get a decent set up. You can’t wing a coil like you can with air.
  • 2 2
 @briain: The Dorado Pro is not and that's before any sort of coil conversion. The Dorado Pro also has a MSRP of almost $2000, and I've not been able to find anyone who has a 29" wheel version in stock. I have a previous generation 27.5 Dorado Pro and like it, although it's actually heavier - I just weighed it: 3000g.
  • 3 0
 @IanJF: Dorado Pro 29 can currently be found for under $1400. www.treefortbikes.com/Manitou-Dorado-Pro-Suspension-Fork-29-203-mm-20-x
  • 3 0
 @Compositepro: nah just some crypto
  • 1 0
 @rean1mator: Thats odd, right spring? Mine has been stellar
  • 2 0
 @cougar797: More rigid fork due to increased stanchion and top crown (you dont hear about creaky triples) those forces are subjected to the frame directly, rather than through the deflection of the fork fore aft.

stanchion can come into contact with the frame quite violently in a crash, that wouldnt otherwise happen in a single crown.

Hope the explanation helps
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: It's the latter. Requires a considerable increase in impact strength in an area that's otherwise a good place to reduce material.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: It's the latter. Requires a considerable increase in impact strength in an area that's otherwise a good place to reduce material.
  • 15 1
 @GTscoob: on a technical note, generally speaking a coil spring will always generate greater “mid-stroke” support than an air spring for a given sag value. In fact in a situation like a telescopic fork or non-linkage driven single pivots where leverage rates remain [almost] the same across the entire stroke, a coil should be more supportive in the 35-65% of travel zone. It seems that people’s experience on coil forks in relation to diving has more to do with the fork being more able to move freely in its first 30% of travel and that unless you’re accustomed to that ride feel, it can feel like the fork is moving more especially in supported corners or under light braking. This in turn seems to be reported as lack of “mid-stroke” when in practice the fork isn’t yet to the middle of its stroke where it would indeed offer improved support vs an air spring. DSD Suspension, Vorsprung, Manitou, and Ohlins have all developed air springs/add-ons that attempt to improve support across the full stroke including the mid-stroke to emulate a coil. I’d certainly concede that coils can struggle with big impacts when ridden incorrectly, and in my experience a coil spring demands more controlled and sophisticated damping to truly offer well rounded performance vs similar air forks.
  • 6 0
 @rean1mator: I’ve never heard about a bad experience with a Smashpot, did you try different preload and spring rates? I have ridden mine around the world in every condition and it’s been the single best enhancement to any bike I’ve owned. Steve and his team are the best in the industry IMO.
  • 1 1
 @Compositepro: "Cheaper version of DVO Emerald.
  • 1 0
 @cougar797: USD for just sweet and smooth.
  • 8 0
 Expensive for sure, but there is a lot of performance to be gained from running a good fork. People are willing to pay a lot on a frame, but the fork enables you to do all the steering and provides you with comfort, support and confidence so if this performs well it would be money well spent. Cheap frame + expensive fork vs expensive frame cheap fork would be a good experiment. My money is on the fork...
  • 4 0
 @rojo-1: The most important factors in making a frame good don't have to cost extra. Good geometry, good kinematics, and adequate stiffness: all free. Exotic rear kinematics and light weight can also offer benefits, but they cost a great deal and usually offer diminished returns for the money.

Forks and shocks maintain a high return on investment to the upper end of the typical price range. Fancy dampers and springs with multiple rates and/or bottom-out devices usually deliver on comfort and control.

I haven't ridden the Push fork and can't say whether it's better or delivers acceptable return on investment, but, in general, you're absolutely right about where to spend the money.


(For those who want to nit-pick: Yes, products like first generation Fox Rhythm fork have been less expensive and better than their more expensive peers. They don't disprove the thesis, they simply reset the standard and make obsolete the existing expensive products. New high-end products quickly follow and restore the "cheap frame, expensive fork & shock" balance.)
  • 3 0
 @nation: Totally agree in principle, but I have a slightly different perspective on a few points.


people’s experience on coil forks in relation to diving has more to do with the fork being more able to move freely in its first 30% of travel

Possibly, but I think the perception of dive on coil forks is because people usually set them up to feel similar to an air spring over the travel that's accessible while bouncing around in the garage, i.e. the first two-thirds or so. As you know, a coil spring rate that allows equal access to the first two-thirds of the travel, compared to an air spring (often with a few reducers), will bottom out far more easily than the air spring. I think this is the reason why many perceive a coil to dive or have less support. Few people understand how much more support the coil should have in the mid-stroke to ensure adequate bottom-out resistance.


a coil spring demands more controlled and sophisticated damping to truly offer well rounded performance vs similar air forks

If the coil isn't stiff enough to manage bottom-out impacts, the damping has to pick up the slack. Firm compression damping usually feels "harsh" to most people and it takes a sophisticated system to add considerable support while still feeling "plush". For most people and most budgets, the solution is simply to run a coil rate that's firmer than expected.
  • 3 0
 @GTscoob: I don't mean to be mean, but your comment does not make a lot of sense.

They complained about diving too much and too little progression? while at the same time the bike felt unbalanced (I'm guessing too low a front end?). Higher spring rate addresses all of the issues at once: riding higher in the travel, more forced required to bottom out and probably better balance between the two wheels.

If you matched the force in the mid-stroke/valley part of the air spring, you get the same force there for both spring systems and the coil spring will still have more sensitivity in the initial part since the air spring rate increases at the start of the stroke. Ramp up is tuned separately, but it can still be tuned.

Is the air spring easier to modify trail side? Yeah, I'll give you that. But your claims for what the coil spring does or lacks seem backwards.
  • 3 2
 @R-M-R: Wouldnt that depend on where you started from?
If I'm welding up a frame in my garage, "adequate stiffness" is going to cost extra in material upgrades or additional bracing.
If I'm working with a catalogue frame from overseas, custom geo, Kinematics, and adequate stiffness could all cost additional money.
Along with the additional engineering for how all those things interact with one another.
As my fathers mother always said, theres no such thing as a free lunch.

I beg to differ on the ROI of any sort of mtb component, its really all just about whats "in" at the moment. Currently Fox suspension can be had far cheaper than RS stuff, mostly due to the fact that the current RS stuff is newer, and theres a belief that newer new Fox suff is coming.
You can literally walk in most shops in my town and grab a Fox Factory 38 for half of what they were before. Thats a terrible ROI, when comparitivly an Elite, or even Rythm (based on it being a take-off fork) even though its "less" money, is still prolly %wise, a better return.

Add to that, for prolly 55% of the riders and athletes that I work and ride with, getting suspension setup at even a basic level is a mystery to them. They have very little idea how any of it works, and have never twiddleded any of the knobs. They are in essence riding the suspension as someone else has set it up for them, and have never changed it. They would be better suited with a Rythym fork, or most basic RS damper.

Rear suspension leverage almost negates any "feeling" for most in rear shocks, and we could likely all be better suited with much more basic, high quality dampers and air springs.

Given the choice, i can ride around the suspension bits with a good quality frame, wheels, and contact points. Just go faster and hold TF on
  • 4 2
 @R-M-R: Quality damping, and much more of it, is essentially the whole theory behind Ohlins suspension design. They rely of the damping circuits to do the heavy lifting in their suspension designs, and its prolly why most have a difficult time making the transition to their products.
Go fast af, hit things hard af, and their bits really shine. Ride like the GP and not nearly as comfortable. In nearly all performance suspension design we rely on dampers to do what they are intended to do.

If you got on my dirt bike, and did a lap, youd prolly come back in pieces, and tell me how terrible it is, but for me, at my speeds, and my style, its damn near perfect. but toodling around with the kids, hot garbage
  • 5 0
 @onawalk:

Re: Frames, forks, ROI

There's always a janky, straw man argument to be found, such as old-school catalog frames. Let's limit the conversation to bike companies that have proprietary designs. They have to place the pivots somewhere, and it doesn't cost more to put them where they produce kinematics that are known to be well-liked. Same for the geometry. Mind you, that's also true for catalog frames.

Broadly speaking, metal frames tend to be much cheaper than carbon frames. You can typically get an aluminum frame with good geometry and kinematics for much less than a carbon frame with the same. The difference is usually a bit of weight, but the ride experiences are pretty similar, despite the price difference. Therefore, I believe the more expensive - usually carbon - frame has a poor ROI on the cost difference.

There's little sense comparing the sale price of a high-end fork to the regular price of a mid-range fork. If we're going to do that, we might as well compare the best-ever price for each - maybe even look at the used market. So let's set a reasonable, consistent standard; I propose OE pricing to allow us to consider the decision from the perspective of a product manager. As such, higher-spec forks keep adding significant performance right up to the point of choosing Fox Performance Elite vs. Factory, at which point the Kashima Coat ROI gets rather questionable.

You mention being able to deal with poor suspension as long as the frame, wheels, and contact points are "good quality". Obviously, no one would propose evaluating this ROI question using structurally inadequate parts, so we're mostly talking about weight. And that's what it call comes down to: the difference between items of good quality, but different cost in the frame, wheelset, crankset, handlebar, etc. is typically weight, while the difference in forks and shocks is usually sophistication of the spring and damper. So we can distill the whole argument to this: spring and damper upgrades have a greater ROI than weight upgrades. And yes, contact points are vitally important to the ride experience, but 1) the discussion is about frame ROI vs. fork & shock ROI; 2) I'm pretty keen on Oury push-on grips, which are among the cheapest respectable grips, so the ROI argument doesn't make much sense here.

Re: Damping

Every motorsports company that enters the bike market always starts with vastly more damping than the industry standard and always decreases it until it's roughly in line with the norms. Öhlins was no exception - they were actually one of the most dramatic examples. I recall a podcast with the Öhlins bike project leads where they started testing with what they thought ought to be a suitable damper. Their test riders eventually settled on about half the compression force for racing, which Öhlins halved again for the consumer model. Most people felt the early Öhlins bike forks had too much damping and were uncomfortable, so Öhlins halved it again, then reduced it a smidge more for the latest generation. Bikes are not motorized vehicles and what works for the latter doesn't work for us.

That said, I believe most suspension would benefit from more compression damping, and I suspect the reason the bikes of Bruni and Iles are visibly more composed than those of most other racers is due to a higher ratio of support from their compression damping to support from their springs. A DH racer needs only to be able to endure the experience for a few minutes, so they can get away with a bike that isn't comfortable if it offers more control. I believe more sophisticated dampers that combine speed- and position-sensitive properties (ex. bypass designs) can benefit all riders, at which point we can talk about the ROI of bypass dampers vs. carbon fork legs for designs like this Nine.One.
  • 3 3
 @R-M-R: Limiting the conversation, as you say essentially just removes variables that dont support your argument that good geo doesnt have an inherent cost. I merely presented examples where it does have a cost. As it does with placing pivots on a propriety bike. Engineering, research, testing, designing, manufacturing for changes has a cost, and its a cost we are all ready to bear as we typically want new bike designs every couple years or so. Things change, suspension changes, manufacturing techniques and materials change, and theres costs associated with those changes. Moving the pivots as you state then requires all those things to happen again, to optimize for the new pivot locations. If there was a "perfect geo" well we certainly woulddnt see much change over the last couple years.....

All those different forks exist together, whether new, used, on sale, fresh out of the manufacturer, so you cant compare them in isolation and state the highest end fork represents the best ROI. A kashima fork surely doesnt represent the best ROI either in terms of performance, or cost when compared to the elite version, or a Lyrik. The ROI is an individual assessment, of the riders needs and wants, not yours or mine.

Better quality doesnt necessarily mean lighter weight at all, in fact, for me its a more stout wheel that I can lean into. I'd happily give up a Kashima fork, for a set of WAO hand built wheels.
Its not the weight, its the ability of the wheel to hold the line when my fat ass has misjudged the corner. The difference in wheels, for me, is far more important than the amount of knob to twiddle on my fork. Add to that, that I, and everyone else is fully capable of setting up a Rythym fork for the 90% of riding that is being done.

That, along with good brakes (for me) are also not the lighter weight option, neither is the handle bar. maybe I mis-communicated, but good quality (for my purposes) does not necessarily represent weight as you felt was the case, but is the right part for my use case. A "good quality" frame isnt likely to be the lightest affair for me either, again I'll happily trade away an Ultimate level rear shock for its select counterpart if I've got a Knolly or Transition frame under me, rather than a Stumprjumper. Again, neither of those could be considered the lighter option, just the right tool for me.

Whether in motorsport on not, those that go faster, typically run more damping for the added control and support. All the athletes I work with that race at a high level, run considerably more damping than most of us, as their needs are far different than ours. When I ride their bikes I'm blown away by where they are, and it feels altogther hectic and uncomfortable to me. Swap to dirt bikes, and its a different story, not because its motor sport, simply because I have more experience on that platform, and what works for me, doesnt work for someone else.
  • 7 0
 @onawalk: Every comparison needs to have other variables held constant. It is not an attempt to limit the disucssion to favour my view, it is simply how science is done.
  • 3 5
 @R-M-R: Its not science,
your comparing the opinions of ROI, theres simply no qualitative or quantitative science discussion to be had here. Its opinion based, and varies between what people want or need.

While you might believe there is a better ROI on high end suspension (assuming by ROI you mean you prefer to spend more on a high end fork than a high end frame) Thats not necessarily how I feel, therefore, its not the best ROI for me (again, subjective)

Youve made some presumptions, that would wildly skew any social science experiment that could be dreamed up (assuming good quality meant lighter weight, vs. being more stout)

Some of the most recognized "science" in the world is full of personal bias, poor experiments, and undermined motivations, especially in the social sciences. That seems like a "strawman" argument to me.
  • 1 0
 @nation: this is why it feels different in jumps compared to air shocks?
  • 131 3
 Machinists will see this and think “hell yeah”
  • 45 3
 Correct
  • 21 97
flag 5poundplumbbob (Feb 29, 2024 at 9:13) (Below Threshold)
 Machinist see this and think it's stupid.
  • 6 16
flag terashred (Feb 29, 2024 at 9:20) (Below Threshold)
 No yur rong
  • 14 5
 Non-machinsts here - this thing thing looks the dog's bollox. Eager to check it out at the Sea Otter.
  • 18 1
 ^^ translation for US: "looks rad"
  • 6 14
flag Henchman21 (Feb 29, 2024 at 11:08) (Below Threshold)
 Meh, forged is better
  • 1 1
 hell yeah
  • 100 3
 If you have both the Nine.One and the ElevenSix... is that a NineEleven build?
  • 24 3
 No it's a TwentySeven. 27.5 ain't dead
  • 123 2
 So you're sayin Push did NineEleven?
  • 31 1
 @Gregmurray50: can damper heat melt steel beams?
  • 8 1
 With a Transmission drivetrain and Enve wheels it will cost almost as much as a used 911.
  • 1 4
 omg hahahahaha wait wait wait!!!?!!
  • 3 5
 @Gregmurray50: freaking gold bahaha
  • 7 0
 @Gregmurray50: you'd need two tall neatly stacked and identical stacks of cash to afford the fork and shock.
  • 2 0
 Run it with Box9
  • 1 0
 @Gregmurray50: I know already eightNine for lunch
  • 1 0
 its the six.nine build
  • 105 9
 Dentists will be going door to door like Mormons to get enough money for this
  • 67 0
 Dentists at the trail head lamenting on how teeth aren't the only things getting drilled.
  • 3 3
 @PhoS: This was gold
  • 71 0
 We make this kind of money before the anesthesia sets in.
  • 23 0
 "Excuse me, my name is Dr. Sorensen and this is Dr. Anderson, and we're in your neighborhood delivering a message about how we can all be saved from gumline recession..."
  • 3 1
 As someone who plays a dentist on TV I just want it to be known that I will not need to go door to door and I already ordered one.
  • 1 9
flag jrocksdh (Mar 1, 2024 at 7:44) (Below Threshold)
 Ya those idiots probably thought crypto was a scam so there they are workn on bad breath instead of riding
  • 5 1
 Just perform a couple non necessary root canals and you got this.
  • 1 0
 You'll need to have a nobel prize in dentistry now
  • 64 4
 For some people spending an extra $1700 for a masterpiece of a fork is no big deal. Your $1700 is like $100 to them, not a big deal for the sport that they are passionate about.

I really look forward to the reviews although I'm unlikely to be a customer.

It's certainly the best-looking fork I've ever seen!

Good luck to Push!
  • 16 6
 Like the guy that buys a Ferrari just to drive it under 50mph to the ritz Carlton on Sundays
  • 40 3
 @nvranka: sounds like a nice way to spend a Sunday, what’s ya point?
  • 7 26
flag adrennan FL (Feb 29, 2024 at 10:46) (Below Threshold)
 @nvranka: few things piss me off more than people who buy fast cars then drive like a grandma in them haha
  • 16 0
 @nvranka: Be real, many supercar buyers are collectors, not drivers. A similar thing might be true for this fork. The typical customer will be a well-off white collar worker in his 40s or 50s who treats himself to an expensive "dream build".
  • 4 0
 @adrennan: haha I wouldn’t go as far as to say it really pisses me off, but it’s definitely disappointing.
  • 3 0
 @Rabbuit: I think I'd rather ride my bike on sunday.
  • 4 0
 I am absolutely passionate about cars, and if I could afford a Ferrari, or any other premium supercar... I would NOT be ashamed at cruising down the road on a Sunday for a meal. Some things are to be enjoyed, without going mad, right?
  • 4 2
 @adrennan: You should worry less about how other people. You'll live longer.
  • 2 0
 I've been known not to shy away from expensive mtb parts, but in Australia this is $4000! That's wild. An Elevensix is $2300.
  • 2 2
 @Ttimer: lol I didn’t say they needed to be Misha, but not being a driving enthusiast and using a proper race car as a glorified grocery getter is super lame.
  • 7 0
 Most people spend a few grand extra on a car - tick a couple options boxes, buy the more expensive engine, can't bother to learn how to shift a manual, buy new instead of used, etc. Someone spends half that cost difference on a posh fork and we lose our minds. People are weird.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: it’s ok, you can say it will be the Yeti riders Wink
  • 53 1
 I was pretty stoked on hearing the details of this fork for a long time. But 2790 grams for a TRAIL fork?! A Dorado is only like 180 grams heavier. It’s a shame it only goes up to 180mm too.

I’m sure it rides great and feels amazing, but $2600 more amazing than a much lighter 36/Lyric with a coil?
  • 24 1
 Yea, around 100g to a boxxer. That's a lot of mass. It's also kinda weird how this goes down to 140mm. I can probably stomach the weight on an enduro bike, but 2.8kg fork for 140mm application is definitely nuts.
  • 9 0
 @chaoscacca: Agreed. Realistically, this is an e-bike fork. I’d put it on a long travel enduro bike, but it’s 170mm max travel.
  • 18 7
 Thats USD for you. It has to be heavy as shit to be only a bit more flexy than a correct way up fork
  • 35 0
 Bomber Z1 coil on sale for $300-380, right now. Hard to argue with that!
  • 3 1
 @gabiusmaximus: stanchion diameter doesn’t have as big of an impact on torsional stiffness- especially a millimeter or two. This fork will be incredibly stiff fore an aft though. Much better than a RSU fork.

Look at the reviews on the Intend forks (much lighter), people who have them love them and see the slight torsional flex as an advantage in tech.
  • 8 0
 @TurboDonuts: Plenty left over to buy a Grip2 damper from a 36 to make the uber sleeper fork
  • 14 10
 @v57z3F0q: of course they do, they spent a ton of money on the things... However when viewed objectively, mtb is just too weight critical for usd to be competitive. On 200kg motorbikes with another 70+kg of rider on top, and a 100bhp engine to push it all, 10kg+ usd forks make sense. They deal with the massive braking loads inflicted when hauling on the anchors at 70mph far better, and are massive enough to be torsionally stiff enough. However on a bicycle with a total system weight of +/-110kg being driven by 2 or 3 bhp, 2kg right way up forks are simply the better solution. Horses for courses as they say.
  • 11 0
 For another point of comparison, my Cane Creek Helm MK1 fork is adjustable from 120-160mm, coil-sprung, and has 36mm-dia. stanchions. It is kindof a boat anchor at 2370g on my scale. But it's still a full 420g lighter than this thing.
  • 8 1
 @big-red: yep. Seems to be nearly a pound heavier than any coil RSU fork. I totally get the sprung/unsprung weight advantages and increased fore and aft stiffness of of a USD fork, but nearly a pound heavier isn’t worth it to me
  • 5 12
flag Grizzly134 (Feb 29, 2024 at 13:30) (Below Threshold)
 @gabiusmaximus: Regardless of how this works out, this fork is the correct way up. The forks on the front of our bikes are all silly toys to anyone with any non-mtb performance suspension experience.
  • 3 0
 maybe $1800+/- more amazing, depending on wheel size. Still puts a dent in Green's fees and Tennis lessons.
  • 25 3
 @Grizzly134: Apples to oranges comparison, bicycles are not small motorcycles. Trust me, SRAM and Fox have done more R&D on inverted forks than Push or Intend combined. Its a weight/performance equation that gets lost when so much weight is added to keep the forks legs from moving independently. That weight is nothing on a Moto, but as shown here is a tough sell on a pedal bicycle. Bicycles don't have a throttle to get that heavy front end up and over stuff.
  • 3 0
 @TurboDonuts: I blew up the damper in my long-suffering Revelation 150 for the second time, was resigned to scrounging the Buy/Sell for takeoff Lyric selects.

Jumped on a 51% off Z1 coil from Jenson for less than I was going to pay for used. They’re only being blown out because it’s the old decal package.
  • 2 0
 @sfarnum: Good stuff! Is that really the reason why? I’m suspicious of the Bomber forks. The white “limited” colorway made me thing that a new generation was about to come out, but I’ve seen nothing. For an enduro fork, they’re really solid (especially at half price…)
  • 3 0
 @TurboDonuts: For new internals to come out, Fox would need a new (grip 3?) damper tech in their own forks to hand Grip 2 down to marzocchi, and that hasn’t happened.

The new Z1 graphics follow the design on the white forks, not much different. If someone liked those decals more, they can buy them from silk graphics for $30. Or ride fast enough that people can’t read the sticker on your lowers…
  • 1 0
 @TurboDonuts: Got that right!
  • 2 2
 @Henchman21: I suspect it’s also a price to manufacture issue. USD forks require more precision, better QC and will always be slightly heavier, it’s a hard sell…
  • 3 2
 @SonofBovril: Why would they require better precision and QC? The two legs are essentially independent units and the axle floats meaning the upper crown doesn't have to be any specific width. USD's are if anything easier to manufacture. No lower casting, just a few machined tubes and a crown.
  • 2 0
 @TurboDonuts: If you look at the parts page for Z1 forks on the Fox site (under Tech Help), they do list an update to 2024. Grip2 and Grip dampers will be getting some internal changes. Mainly just valving and a slightly firmer spring rate for the IFP to reduce cavitation. This parts will be retrofittable, so getting the fork on sale still makes sense.
  • 2 2
 @Grizzly134: motocross guys think they’re a joke. But they also think they have good fitness so…
  • 5 1
 @brycebee: MX athletes are some of the fittest competitors compared to any other sport. Just look it up.
  • 1 0
 @hypermoto: Didn’t catch this, thanks.
  • 2 0
 @gabiusmaximus: MX bikes are only around 100 kg, but! One of the big differences between motorcycle RSU forks and mtb RSU forks, is that motorcycle forks usually lack the lower crown / bridge between the legs like an mtb has.
This means that on a motorcycle, the lower legs of a concentric fork can also twist and bend independently, which means they have no advantage at all in that regard to a USD setup.
Casting both lower legs in one single piece is what gives them all the advantages over USD for mtb.
  • 1 0
 Concentric should have been conventional of course.
  • 1 0
 @hubertje-ryu: Yeah, MX bikes are far lighter than almost all road going bikes. which tend to average out at a little over 200kg. But yeah, the point being that either way, they are a whole different proposition to suspend than a 14-18kg mtb.
  • 36 0
 "riders are able to remove the forks lubrication fluid and replace it through our outer tube speed service feature. This is a basic service that can be completed without removing the fork from the bike."

nice.
  • 5 8
 What gets me, though, is it's a coil fork. You don't need to service nearly as often. I change the oil in my coil fork once a year and it takes 5 minutes.
  • 7 2
 @howejohn: idk I don’t change the oil in my air forks nearly as often as recommended and they ride fine too.
  • 4 0
 I mean, when I do my lowers service I never take the fork of the bike. Sure its a little cumbersome to flip the bike over a couple times, but much less cumbersome than trying to put a fork on and off I have found.
  • 4 0
 the bushings and stanchions really could care less if there's an air spring or coil and they're likely the first thing to wear out from lack of maintenance
  • 4 0
 The speed service is quite cool. I'd love to see this implemented in other forks.

Looking into it a bit more, it sounds like you don't even have to do remove the wheel from the bike to do the service. Just slurp out some oil, and squirt some more in with a syringe.

Would sure make it easy to do a quick oil refresh for sure (not that it replaces other more complete services, but making the 50hr service easier is never a bad thing).
  • 4 0
 @ocnlogan: the old 26" Rockshox Totem had this. It was great and I'm always surprised that nobody else has implemented bleed and fill ports onto forks. In 2024, you could make the fill valves removable and double as fill ports for oil with a smaller drain plug at the bottom.
  • 3 1
 @ocnlogan: Definitely a cool idea. However I would definitely remove the wheel and probably the brake pads (at least cover Caliper completely) for at least the first time I did it to not take any chances.
  • 2 0
 @GTscoob: agreed, but the problem was the oil would often come out the wrong port…didn’t call it the Explodem for no reason
  • 42 6
 Almost a buck a gram.

I'd like to see the Venn diagram of "People who want everything made in 'Merika!" and "People who buy this fork." Two completely separate circles...
  • 17 2
 Much less expensive than cannabis "Made in Colorado"! Frankly, a bargain.
  • 18 8
 I've become a lot more picky about buying domestic made shit when I can - my car's made in Ohio with a 1up Rack, I wear made in USA New Balances & Allen Edmonds shoes daily with Darn Tough socks, all that good stuff.

There's no way in hell I could justify $2,600 for a fork, of any kind. That price is taking the piss. Cane Creek and MRP make forks in America that are price-competitive with Rockshox/Fox/Manitou/DVO.

This fork is unjustifiable if money is a concern for you at all, full stop. There's nothing inherently wrong with it existing because trying new shit and making stuff here is expensive...but I drive a Honda, not an Escalade, and a 1 1/4" receiver can't pull an Airstream anyway.
  • 17 16
 @sjma: cane creek does NOT manufacture their products in the US. And MRP is just garbage. You can’t compare injection molded plastic internals to 5 axis machining. In terms of build quality, compare mrp forks to a Rockshox yari, which I think is generous. The price of an MRP fork is double the yari
  • 13 0
 @sjma: you gotta take a deeper dive into "Made in America" which can mean a number of things; assembled in with outsourced parts vs really "Made" in the US. Until you know that who knows if it's really a value proposition and this is not even remotely close to CC or MRP forks in construction, this is much closer to some of the Euro offerings, considering the price to manuf. in the US relative to those places, this seems expensive but 'reasonable'.

Your car is "assembled" in Ohio, like most these days - so you are supporting US assembly line workers but not a full US supply chain.
  • 15 3
 @sjma: Not everyone needs to be super-conservative with their discretionary money. Let them live. I can't afford it currently, but don't be telling me what is justifiable, OK? USA USA
  • 10 1
 @sjma: Darn Tough socks are mana sent from the gods!
  • 4 1
 @olafthemoose: @redbarttaylor: I was mistaken about Cane Creek - I didn't realize their NC factory is more of an assembly location. I'm also sorry for not knowing the exact, legalese definitions of "made" vs "manufactured," both of which Push uses in their press release above. I know "assembled" has its own minimum criteria for legal advertising.

I guess I should personally apologize for even daring to mention Push and MRP in the same breath. I've never had an MRP but I know they say they're made domestically and I know I had a great time on my hardtail when it had a Yari.
  • 2 1
 @RadBartTaylor: To carry a Made in USA label you have to make a lot in the US something like mid 90%.

Made in America is a bit different since America is quite a bit bigger than the US and I am not sure how that label is protected.
  • 1 0
 @olafthemoose: Yeah, CC assembles a lot in the states but I am not aware that they actual make something here.
  • 2 0
 @olafthemoose: I think CC is mixed manufacturing now with some parts here and other in Taiwan and then assembled here. At one point I believe they were 100% manufactured here on the original CCDB and even then we’re not much more expensive than competitors. As for cars made here the parts are also typically made here in a just in time manufacturing process.
  • 6 0
 This is honestly the venn diagram for most Americans. I've worked at a few companies that made products in America and most consumers still want you to match prices to overseas products. Hell, I drive a MUSA truck and you'd be surprised how many of the enthusiasts for my truck shop at WalMart but bag on anything made in China.
  • 5 0
 @thomasjkenney1024: Couldn't give a monkeys where they're made, I just know that Darn Tough socks changed my life and how I view anything that I buy. I now have a sock draw worth $300 but will never need to purchase another pair of socks in my life. For me, that's more than worth it.

If this fork offered a lifetime warranty on all components, including wear and tear parts, they could probably charge $3k for it and people would bite. If your quality and durability is there, back it up with action not just words. Reserve and RF wheels are doing so to great success, and I'd love to see more manufacturers be brave enough to do the same.
  • 9 0
 @MumblesBarn: they offer a renewable warranty by sending it in for service, that’s worlds better than any other suspension manufacturer. The warranty is transferable when you sell their stuff too. Compare that to a 1-2 year non transferable non renewable warranty that fox and Rockshox offer and I’d say that’s absolutely standing by their product
  • 1 0
 With "dreamer" in the intersection.
  • 2 0
 @sjma: I wasn't trying to pile on ya - they use those terms to confuse. Maybe some parts of this are not truly "Made" in the USA although Push is traditionally all US made....we'll probably neve rknow.
  • 2 0
 @EvolutionsVerlierer: 90% of what, # of parts? If so all the innerworkings could be US made and the main structural components could be outsourced.

It's a fair point, "America" is a loose term, I think most labels say "USA" and it's a good question of how that is protected and/or enforced.
  • 3 0
 @RadBartTaylor: it's confusing because in their own press release Push says it's both "made in Colorado" and "manufactured here" - so is it made there or manufactured there? Or is it assembled? It's all really hard to tell as a consumer without somehow getting access to a bill of materials, which I understand is subject to change at any time.

I want to buy domestically-made products whenever possible when the performance of those products is comparable to internationally-made products and when the price is reasonable. Wolf Tooth is a good example of this, in my mind at least. Paul roadie stuff seems to be this way too.
  • 3 0
 @sjma: agreed, Paul, White Industries, Phil Wood....I've always been a big fan. In some cases other countries do it just as good (for a fraction of the cost) or better in some cases....in which case paying more for less is hard to stomach.
  • 2 0
 @MumblesBarn: well that is good news for me.
I will check those socks out because I go through regular socks like other people through toilet paper.
  • 11 0
 @EvolutionsVerlierer: You're using them wrong. Don't they block the pipes?
  • 1 0
 @sjma: "Made in USA" can be an ambiguous term. It might say made in the US...but you don't know where the parts come from. Most companies won't disclose where their parts originate from.
  • 2 0
 @MumblesBarn: First, who actually sends in a pair of years-old, heavily-worn Darn Tough socks and claims the lifetime warranty? I know they offer it, but I have to imagine the only way it works economically is that most people conclude they got their $25 worth and buy another pair. At least that's what I do.

A lifetime warranty on something like a suspension fork is almost as ludicrous as the idea a product like a suspension fork will still be relevant 10 years from now. Rims are completely different in numerous ways. And if Push was dumb enough to do it, they'd have to eliminate the transferable option on the warranty, which is actually way more fair to them and more valuable to consumers.
  • 1 0
 @dancingwithmyself: Well we are unfortunately all to aware that what lifetime actually means is defined by the manufacturer and that is most likely not what we as customers think lifetime means.

Regarding socks I would not dare to put them having to look at the remains of their socks proudly made in the US shaking their head what I did to them for warranty.

Not even talking about the pungent smell of my feet that seems to never fully leave the socks once they housed my feet no matter how many times they get washed.
  • 1 0
 @EvolutionsVerlierer: A lot of what? 90% without the metric doesn't mean anything.
  • 5 0
 @dancingwithmyself:

I purchased my first pair of DT socks 6 years ago, and, I shit you not, I have no idea which pair was my first because none of them show any signs of wear whatsoever.

However, you really should take advantage of the warranty if needed. My cat ripped a hole in the side of one sock. I took a picture and sent it to their customer service department. Had a new pair of socks the following week.

Comfy, warm, breathable, basically indestructable, yet honored with a lifetime warranty. They changed my life.
  • 1 0
 @abtcup: If you buy a alu block from “CHINA” and turn it into something in “America” it is “Made in USA !
  • 1 0
 The T-shirt I'm wearing is 'American cotton - assembled in Mexico'. I can live with that. For plain 'ol heavy-duty t-shirts with a neck that doesn't get all sagged-out, Pro-Club. Thin, flimsy, 'soft' shirts suck - leave em to the techies. This 'thread' is taking a wrong turn.......
  • 36 4
 Flexy, heavy, and expensive? Sweeeeet! I need something to replace my Trust linkage fork with.
  • 6 1
 Heavy and expensive sure, but the trust fork in my experience was very stiff, possibly too stiff. And the Push fork should be stiffer fore and aft than a singlecrown. Although with the weight penalty it should probably compared to a dual crown.
  • 1 1
 You should listen to the vital podcast episode with them, one of the first things they talk about is how they addressed flex.
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: I agree the Trust fork was stiff.
  • 2 1
 The Trust fork, while admittedly expensive, was only a bit heavier than a regular fork of the same travel. It also offered things telescopic forks don't- namely much better handling, and less brake dive. Not saying the Trust fork was a great product by any means, but it did offer unique and useful features. This Push fork does none of that, and at a whopping 800 gram weigh penalty.
  • 3 0
 @Insectoid: Further to this point I would say the Trust fork was not known for being well rounded or best for all people but what it did well it was excellent at. It was a beast for flat corners, rough terrain and square edge hits when keeping the wheels on the ground. Where it fell flat was playfulness/ jumping.
  • 20 2
 I don't have a spare 2k, so just wondering, if I got an old pair of Marzocchi upside down forks, put on Push decals and painted some bits strategically gold, would they be as good for standing round the carpark looking cool?
  • 8 0
 I would say no, it's more bronze than gold....so paint it bronze and you're good to go as a parking lot hero.
  • 7 0
 i'd rather have a pair of forks saying shiver than push

u see the rulezman shiver tributes made with intends? that shiz is beautiful
  • 1 0
 just sell your marzocchi for 2k.. you have the better fork already ??
  • 1 0
 just sell your marzocchi for 2k.. you have the better fork already ??
  • 1 0
 Gawd no, keep those shivers.
  • 1 0
 @hubertje-ryu: just got my shiver and a fairly unused marzocchi 66 with a tapered steerer tube pressed in by marzocchi mark! life is good
  • 20 2
 Congrats on the launch! We know the hurdles of producing everything in house and stoked to see you guys push hard to make the Nine.One fork a reality. All of us here at We Are One are pumped for you.
  • 17 3
 Man there's only so much you can do with some tubes, clamps, pistons and shims, even if they are US made...2.5x the normal going rate for a 36 or Lyrik or Mezzer is just a bit bonkers.
  • 5 2
 Exactly.. I want to see some real effort into something different that functions better for longer. Kudos to Trust and the others that stick their necks out to go that route. Even that wacko looking full linkage bike that looks nuts but apparently works fantastic. This is just a really expensive Marzocchi Shiver. The improvements can't be that much over what's been tried many times over.
  • 12 1
 Its almost 800g heavier than a Mezzer, 2x the price with 10mm less travel. Cool
  • 12 2
 Listen idk if this fork is great or not, but most of the mountain bike forks and shocks that come on our bikes literally live in the dark ages of suspension design and technology. Now I'm not sure we need all the latest and greatest for our humble mountain bicycles, but $2700 is hardly scratching the surface of high end suspension when it comes to cars and motorcycles.

I think I just like seeing some companies out here really trying to move the needle, god knows Fox and RS could care less about real development. They just give us little servos that turn our lockouts on and off for us.
  • 6 1
 @Swangarten: but owning this doesn't require being an MTBR member and Manitou evangelist.
  • 4 1
 @Froday: the problem is that the one serious place they could be improving over the competition is their damper, but their dampers have been not measurably better than anything else out there. In fact the HC97 was not a particularly well received setup and is probably their baseline for this.
  • 2 0
 @ghill28: So what you're saying is, these need to be a lot more expensive to actually be high end.

This is important to know, I feel like damper tech is the major issue with MTB suspension. I feel like Fox and RS lean very heavily on springs, not so much on dampers, which honestly seems really backwards if you think about it.
  • 3 2
 @Froday: The Fox/RS chassis are pretty dang good these days. There are aftermarket coil options out there for them so that's mostly covered. The dampers on Fox/RS are both pretty weak though. Manitou significantly better. PUSH historically a let-down in that department so if this is similar, I wouldn't call that a compelling case for a 2.5X spend. Not seeing the value proposition with this. Especially because this should be a heck of a lot cheaper to make and sell without a ~$500k tooling cost for lowers.
  • 1 3
 @ghill28: the 11.6 is their baseline for this, essentially. The hc97 was good for what it was which was a mod to an existing damper to improve how it worked with their spring conversion (and in general)
  • 1 0
 @Froday: springs and dampers do different jobs. Trying to make one work in place of the other is a recipe for harshness and bad results. (Eg too much compression for example)
  • 3 3
 @EdSawyer: Problem is the HC97 didn't perform very well. At all. And frankly neither did the 11.6 if you actually rode the thing hard. Some real build quality issues on both on top of that.
  • 2 1
 @EdSawyer: And yet the GRIP2 is a fidget toy which doesn't do much of anything, while many love the Fox 38.
  • 1 0
 It seems that their high cost is because of the expensive manufacturing methods they chose to construct the fork. Note that every part is CNC or burnished, machined and they say made in Colorado. You are paying for the high cost for the precision which may or may not be necessary They also chose to use a proprietary bushing material, and a special hard anodizing process for the stancion tube. There's no way they can even be comparable on price to larger manufacturers. The only direct competition to this is the intend USD fork I would say that torsional stiffness is necessary for fighting wheel flop, but that's just me.
  • 15 0
 most expensive suspension on the planet, slaps promo picture with a GX on it
  • 19 0
 at $2600, who has money left over for things like shifting, braking, rolling in general?
  • 3 0
 Sorry, I love PUSH but too heavy, too costly, too much required to set up and maintain. Gotta ride sometime.
  • 5 0
 Had to use the heavier gx derailleur to balance the bike back out.
  • 4 1
 @dwidemanjr: Weight doesnt bother me since its a coil fork and set up n maintenance are actually super easy on something like this. Less service intervals than air too.... so I guess what I am saying is go buy a Vorpsrung Smashpot coil kit and save a few grand ha
  • 15 0
 9-1 is all you could dial before collapsing to the floor after seeing the price
  • 13 1
 Meanwhile, at SRAM headquarters a mad scramble is underway to figure out who at Push has refined the art of buzzword-filled hyperbole to these heights. As soon SRAM figures it out, lucrative new employment opportunity coming their way. Whoever handled the launch of Transmission better watch their back.
  • 11 0
 catering to the exotic end of the spectrum probably isn't a bad concept for a relatively small volume manufacturer like push. while midrange purchasers are feeling the pinch in the current economic climate, high end clientele are somewhat insulated, and continue to merrily snap up the shiny baubles (just take a look at the supercar market; stuff like this is pocket lint). i'm thinking they'll readily sell everything they make, and (assuming some aspects of this chassis are class leading) will keep the big players on their toes. all good, imo.
  • 10 0
 I would love to see a full build up of the most expensive enduro bike possible. Literally pick the most expensive frame, and ensure that every part on it is as expensive as possible.
  • 3 0
 I thought there was a video of this? Bike was almost $20k usd, maybe more. This fork would definitely give a big boost to the cost.
  • 1 0
 There was a thread on singletrackworld that did this.
  • 4 0
 If you just bought a P-Train frame from Actofive bikes and then the fork and shock from push.... youd already be spending $10,200...
  • 2 5
 That’s basically any S works lol
  • 24 0
 Frame : Actofive P-Train $7,549
Shock : PUSH ElevenSix $1,600
Fork : PUSH NineOne $2,600
Headset : Chris King Inset 2 $207
Crankset : 5DEV Titanium $1,500
BB : Chris King Threadfit 30mm $212
Chain : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $150
Shifter : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $200
Derailleur : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $650
Cassette : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $600
Brakes : Trickstuff Direttissima $1,018
F Disc : Hope V4 Vented Floating $140
R Disc : Hope V4 Vented Floating $140
Handlebar : Thomson MTB Ti $389
Stem : 5DEV 2-bolt Ti $400
Spacers : Carbon $40
Grips : Sensus Meaty Paws $33
Saddle : Specialized S-Works Power $450
Dropper Post : Rockshox Reverb AXS $861
Wheelset : Chris King MTN30 29” $2,700
F Tire : Maxxis Assegai DD 29x2.5 WT $117
R Tire : Maxxis DHRII DD 29x2.4 WT $112

Total $21,669.03

Just by poking around for 10 minutes it's easy to blow $22k on a fantasy Enduro build. Pretty sure I'm not aware of the blingiest parts out there either.
  • 2 0
 @guygantero: naw RevGrips are $89.99. Replace that with the Sensus Grips. I don’t see any pedals? I guess you’re making a balance bike.
  • 14 0
 @kroozctrl: with RevGrips and some 5DEV Trail pedals we're nearly cracking $22k!
Just need some super necessary Ti bolt kits to top off the build.

We should call this the Grim Wallet.
  • 3 0
 @guygantero: haha nice build, we can probably go over 22k by slapping on the Trickstuff Maxima brakes instead, getting a custom Posedla Joyseat, and top cap from Tomii

Trickstuff Maxima - $1300
Posedla Joyseat - $490
Tomii Top Cap - $400 (thats not a typo)
  • 4 0
 @Takaya94: holy topcaps I had to look that up, along with the custom 3D printed seat
(Presumably they scan your keester?)

$22,696 now
  • 3 0
 @guygantero: revgrips also sells hand guards. And then we should use the Reserve Filmore Valve stems ($49.99) custom stem caps ($9.99). And I got a quote from Tecgnar a while back. $1000 for custom paint. And we can custom paint for suspension for an additional $500.
  • 1 6
flag bushbush (Feb 29, 2024 at 16:41) (Below Threshold)
 @guygantero: A shop once tried to sell me a stem for $60. I've never gone back. What a rip.
  • 2 0
 @guygantero: what about matchy-matchy colored anodized custom TI bolts to tie it all together?
  • 5 0
 OK with Reserve Filmore stems, custom caps, custom paint (frame + suspension) we're north of $24k.
If we go nuts on betterbolts.com for everything, at $3-5 per average bolt, a $45 disc caliper adapter, and AXS post bolts racks up another $192.

Total: $24,514
  • 4 0
 @guygantero: No pedals? I would suggest the VP Blade Ti pedals at $529. shop.vannicholas.com/en/products/titanium-bike-accessories/VP-Blade-Ti-Pedals/14435?currency=USD
Although there are probably more expensive options that have powermeters, etc......
  • 1 0
 @guygantero: Weren't there über expensive 3d printed third party shifters triggers available as well?
  • 3 1
 @guygantero: Sturdy cycles have some components that migth push the price up a wee bit:
- Titanium t47 Bottom Bracket: £ 216.67 GBP (EX VAT)
- Titanium 3D printed crankset £ 1,200.00 GBP (EX VAT)
- Titanium 1x chainring £ 260.00 GBP (EX VAT)
- Titanium Jockey Wheel set £ 166.66 GBP (EX VAT)-
  • 10 0
 @Bitelio: @opignonlibre
giving dangerholm a run for his money with these prices

Found that 3d printed Vivo shifter for $315 which would force swapping out the XX1 AXS Trans derailleur for a standard $323 XX1 Eagle. Until we can find a cable-actuated 12spd derailleur above $525, we just can't afford that kind of savings with the Vivo.

VP Blade Ti pedals are double the price of the 5DEV Trail/Enduro's
Sturdy's BB, chainring, and Ti jockey wheel are in, but the 5DEV Ti cranks win by $25 on currency exchange rates. Sturdy makes a £ 60.00 GBP bottle cage though!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Grim Wallet Enduro Bike $ (MSRP)

Ridiculous essentials
Frame : Actofive P-Train $7,549
Shock : PUSH ElevenSix $1,600
Fork : PUSH NineOne $2,600
Headset : Chris King Inset 2 $207
Crankset : 5DEV Titanium $1,500
Chainring : Sturdy 1x chainring $320
BB : Sturdy T47 Ti BB $304
Chain : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $150
Shifter : Vivo 3d printed shifter $315
Derailleur : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $650
Cassette : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $600
Brakes : Trickstuff Maxima $1,300
F Disc : Hope V4 Vented Floating $140
R Disc : Hope V4 Vented Floating $140
Handlebar : Thomson MTB Ti $389
Stem : 5DEV 2-bolt Ti $400
Spacers : Carbon $40
Grips : RevGrips $89
Saddle : Posedla Joyseat $490
Dropper Post : Rockshox Reverb AXS $861
Pedals : VP Blade Ti $529
Wheelset : Chris King MTN30 29” $2,700
F Tire : Maxxis Assegai DD 29x2.5 WT $117
R Tire : Maxxis DHRII DD 29x2.4 WT $112
Valve Stems : Reserve Filmore $50
Disc brake caliper adapter : Better Bolts Ti $45
Bottle Cage : Sturdy Ti $74

Ridiculous extras
Top Cap : Tomii Custom $400
Custom frame paint : some guy on the internet said Tecnar would do it $1,000
Custom suspension paint : some guy on the internet said Tecnar would do it $500
Custom valve caps : too cheap to check $10
Better bolts full kit : Assorted $212
Jockey wheels : Sturdy Ti jockey wheel set $180

Euro to USD 1.08
GBP to USD 1.23

Essentials $23,271
Extras $2,302

Grand Total $25,393.47
  • 1 0
 oops left the Vivo shifter in
swap that back out for XX AXS

corrected Grand Total $25,278.47
  • 6 0
 @guygantero: dude, why are you cheaping out on the Chris King steel bearings, ceramic all the way!
While we're on the subject, the derailleur cage definitely needs a fancy ceramic speed or Kogel treatment which should easily add another $650 (it's €749 incl. tax here in Germany).
The chainring is also too cost-effective, Dward Design x Dangerholm collab titanium ones start at $400 (€457 incl tax).
  • 1 0
 @Mr-Gilsch: also, I feel like the Wheelset could be pricier if you used Rims, Hubs and Ti Spokes
  • 3 0
 @guygantero: you forgot the Aenomaly SwitchGrade, probably around $300
  • 2 0
 @guygantero: plus Gnog bell for $40
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: you can get 2 Zirbel WE05 shifters for $293 (plus VAT) and a SRAM Blipbox for $415.
  • 2 0
 @vhdh666: it's not compatible with the Reverb AXS seatpost.
  • 4 0
 You guys know how to spend a buck

- Updated headset with ceramic bearings: $296
- Updated wheelset for custom Chris King ceramic / Derby 35i Sol Rims / Berd polylite spokes $8 ea: $3250
- Added Aenomoly switchgrade: +$255
- Added a Dward Ti rear axle: $148
- Added a Dward Ti bash: $118
- Swapped in Ceramicspeed OSPW X (cage + pulleys): $669!
- Knog Bell: $40

Grand Total: $26,003.57
  • 6 0
 @guygantero: I absolutely love that this is happening. I feel as if we're running out of opportunity - but if we could somehow crest $30k.... *chef's kiss*.
  • 1 0
 @guygantero: sorry, you cannot use the Aenomoly Switchgrade with the reverb AXS seatpost. They are not compatible.
I think a pair of Zirbel WE05 shifters+1 SRAM Blipbox+SRAM XX0 Eagle AXS derailleur would push it up a wee bit? (Plus, I have this set up and works great!!!)
  • 3 0
 @guygantero: you may want to check the SYNCROS Wheelset 29" Silverton SL 30 Carbon, for only 3999 Euros.
  • 4 0
 @guygantero: oooops, my mistake: that frame uses a BSA bottom bracket. You can not use the Sturdy Cycles BB. You will have to swap that for the Dward Designs BSA Bottom bracket, at £137.50+VAT (I wonder if a Chris King Ceramic BB will be more expensive????)
Edit: yes it is!!! A Chris King Threadfit Ceramic BSA bottom bracket is $322!!!
Dward also has a Titanium seatpost clamp for £66.50+VAT.
Good news: you can add the Hopp Carbon SL clamps to the Trickstuff brakes for just £73.33.
  • 2 0
 @guygantero: the Intend Moto fork+shock is $4377.19, so a wee bit more expensive that the PUSH combo.
  • 4 0
 @Bitelio: you are comparing a fork + shock to 1 fork. Your math doesn’t add up. The moto intend fork is not in retail. It was an exclusive buy. And if you want to get technical, no push industries is still more expensive. The eleven six (s series) is $1600. That is without hardware or the coil. Then you go with SAR coil $149.99 + SAR adaptor $34.98. We are already over $4385 before taxes.
  • 1 0
 @Bitelio: Yoiu're right, Switchgrade and AXS don't match, my bad
  • 1 0
 @kroozctrl: fair enough. You cannot buy the Intend Moto anymore so I guess it doesn't count.
I got a wee bit confused with the currency exchange and the taxes. Push combo it is then!!!!
  • 8 0
 Updates, corrections, tips below!

- Swapped out the T47 Sturdy BB for a King Ceramic BSA +$18
- Syncros Silverton SL wheelset is *only* $4299 USD +$1k!
- Dward Ti seatpost clamp +$82
- Swapped on the Superalloy (SAR) spring + adapter for $185. We'll keep the stock spring for photoshoots.
- Hopp Carbon SL brake clamps (SL left + trans interface right) +$181
- Removed the Switchgrade -$255
- Corrected formula error in spreadsheet (had omitted some rows, when bookkeeping essentials vs extras)
- Swapped in the Zirbel WE05 shifters (pair) + Blipbox + XX0 Eagle AXS Der : $319.80 + $415 + $550 = $1284.80
(The Zirbel shifter combo narrowly beat the AXS stuff by $35 USD)
- Added a pair of tiny denim cutoff shorts, $2 at local thrift shop

We're a Rapha jersey away from $30k

Grand Total: $27,988.62
  • 1 0
 @guygantero: I am almost deceived we couldn't spend 30k.
  • 3 0
 @guygantero: Di2 may be a shout, I know we lose the AXS accessory stuff but the RRP of it is really high

Also lights could be an easy grand surely. Silca Hot Wax X for the chain, how bout a oneup headset tool and cushcore.
  • 1 0
 @guygantero: what the shop labor cost to build the bike?
I’ll provide labor at $220/hr which is roughly what we’d see at higher end dealership. The custom nature of it all is quote minimum 10 hrs
  • 5 0
 Updated the build, if we include high-end dealer labor (don't want to get our delicate hands dirty...), tire inserts, and tool+pump we're over $30k!

Di2 didn't quite buy itself in - we'd need a $775 cassette to beat our Zirbel + AXS combo

Grim Wallet Enduro Bike $ (MSRP)

Ridiculous essentials ----
Frame : Actofive P-Train $7,549
Shock : PUSH ElevenSix $1,600
Fork : PUSH NineOne $2,600
Headset : Chris King Dropset 5 Ceramic $296
Crankset : 5DEV Titanium $1,500
Chainring : Dward Design Ti SRAM 8-bolt (Dh collab) $406
BB : Chris King Threadfit Ceramic BB $322
Chain : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $150
Shifter : Zirbel WE05 shifters (Pair) + Blipbox $735
Derailleur : SRAM XX0 Eagle AXS der $550
Cassette : SRAM XX SL Eagle Trans $600
Brakes : Trickstuff Maxima $1,300
F Disc : Hope V4 Vented Floating $140
R Disc : Hope V4 Vented Floating $140
Handlebar : Thomson MTB Ti $389
Stem : 5DEV 2-bolt Ti $400
Spacers : Carbon $40
Grips : RevGrips $89
Saddle : Posedla Joyseat $490
Dropper Post : Rockshox Reverb AXS $861
Pedals : VP Blade Ti $529
Wheelset : Chris King ceramic / Derby i35 / BERD Custom $3,250
F Tire : Maxxis Assegai DD 29x2.5 WT $117
R Tire : Maxxis DHRII DD 29x2.4 WT $112
Valve Stems : Reserve Filmore $50
Disc brake caliper adapter : Better Bolts Ti $45
Bottle Cage : Sturdy Ti $74

Ridiculous extras --------
Top Cap : Tomii Custom $400
Custom frame paint : some guy on the internet said Tecnar would do it $1,000
Custom suspension paint : some guy on the internet said Tecnar would do it $500
Custom valve caps : too cheap to check $10
Better bolts full kit : Assorted $210
Ceramic pulleys/cage : CeramicSpeed OSPW X for Eagle Trans $669
Thru-axle (rear) : Dward Ti $148
Bashguard : Dward Ti $118
Seatpost clamp : Dward Ti $82
Bell : Knog $40
Hand Guards : Revgrips hand guards (Ltd Oil Slick) $110
SAR spring+adapter : SAR Enduro Spring + Adapter $185
Shorts : Denim, cutoff $2
Brake clamps : Hopp Carbon SL brake clamps $181
Chain lube : Silca Hot Wax X $165
Tools : OneUp EDC V2 tool + pump $135
Tire Inserts : Cushcore Pro set $150
Labor : High-end shop assembly (10 hrs @ $220/hr) $2,200

Euro to USD 1.08
GBP to USD 1.23

Essentials $24,334
Extras $6,305

Grand Total $30,638.60

oh and if we include 7.25% CA sales tax that's +$2,221
  • 4 0
 @guygantero: We've solved bikes! Now to get Pinkbike to build this monstosity. We could have even added Chrome Hearts valve caps for $500 lol
  • 3 0
 @tempnoo1: what's even funnier is the resale on this bike would probably be $5k in one year
  • 8 0
 swapped out our VP Blade Ti pedals for today's hotness:

Look X-Track Power Meter Pedals, $1099
www.pinkbike.com/news/looks-x-track-power-meter-pedals-cost-a-cool-1099-usd.html


Grand Total $31,208.60
  • 1 0
 Seem people don't like sarcasm
  • 7 0
 Damn that thing is so sweet looking and quite the looker! That said, I'd have to be a multi-millionaire to even start thinking this is worth it. I got a brand new Fox 38 Factory for $600. Add a Smashpot for $365 to coilize it. $2K more for this? Yikes. Be more worried about scratching that damn thing than riding it.
  • 3 1
 exactly my thoughts, I would be embarrassed owning this when I could get a 38/zeb + smashpot,.. go extreme and get closeout dvo diamond 36 with smashpot... jeeezus...
  • 6 0
 over 3500 cad for a fork! push makes a decent product but nothing blowing the competitors out of the water especially for a price of nearly 3 times what other manufacturers offer. this brand is not the end all be all. dont drink the kool aid people, any half decent rider will be able to kill this fork at a similar interval to any other fork out there.
  • 17 5
 lol no one decent at riding will buy this
  • 8 3
 Price actually isn't as bad as I expected, seems reasonable for such a boutique fork from a super reputable brand. That said, I don't envy them trying to sell that thing in this market when you can buy a 38 for $600.

Having lusted after an inverted SC fork for decades I am glad people are still taking stabs at it. But the reality today seems the same as 20 years ago... will never be able to compete on price, performance, or weight. Let alone competing at two or more of those at the same time.
  • 10 6
 Our initial impression for anyone who values our opinion  
Push Industries have taken on a very ambitious project in an inverted single crown fork - Push believes they can be successful in space where larger companies have passed - We would like to see this project succeed because that would warrant further development that could bring down the cost

The key success formula to single crown inverted forks: 
relatively low unsprung mass = more sensitive suspension = more traction

The problem: torsionally inverted single crowns have felt like "wet noodles" because the two legs are only connected at two points 1) the crown and 2) the axle -(no tire arch, no dual crown) This is why previous attempts from larger companies haven't been very successful - Other brands have tried various solution to fix this issue - 
1) Dorado single and dual crowns used Hex shaped axle end to resist twisting
2) The Shiver single crown had a full 20mm DH axle 
3) The RS-1 carbon fork used a proprietary oversized axle - marketed with "predictive steering" 

Our initial impressions of the Push Industries fork:
1) The crown looks impressive with a very large amount of crown / leg overlap 
2) The axle/dropout design is a head scratcher to us- in a place that in the past has had a shortage of torsional rigidity Push choose to go with a clamping design that could potentially twist and/or twist back under heavy hits 
3) We would have preferred an air spring  

The big question here is "How will the fork track in the real world?" so we look forward to reading the reviews and trying the fork on the trails 
\m/ 
  • 3 0
 The axle lug/dropout design really is a head scratcher. Those little bolts do not look up to the task of holding the lugs and definitely seem like compromise in torsional rigidity. I hope there is a system for alignment, but I can't tell from the photos.
  • 1 0
 @zuker81: Baffled by this as well. First thought when I saw it was that surely it must be keyed in some way but looking at the images it doesn't appear to be and I really think they would have indicated or pointed it out as a feature it it was. Maybe it will be totally fine but definitely going to be interesting to see how it holds up.
  • 4 0
 i'd question the lower unsprung mass claim. conventional magnesium lowers are quite light. i wouldn't be surprised if the moving assembly of this fork (thicker wall aluminum stantions, bolt on alu dropouts w/ bolt hardware, added guards & hose guide) is actually heavier.
  • 1 0
 @xy9ine: don't forget the oil, inverted forks have the oil to lubricate the wipers/bushings/seals in the upper part (which increases the sprung mass as opposed to right-side-up forks)
  • 7 0
 Looking forward to the extensive Pinkbike review that will ultimately conclude that it's not as a good as a Fox 38.
  • 4 0
 Darren came to my local shop with a shock & fork and talked about the products and rational behind them. Stuck around and answered questions for a while. Design decisions seem solid. Service is thought out as well. Obviously, hard to test it out so it'll be interesting to hear what people think. I believe dealers already have some forks in stock.
  • 8 2
 cost aside....it looks badass on that Arrival in the opening photo
  • 3 1
 That's quite a fork! Heavy, expensive, yup, that's quite a fork! I get the expensive part, and to a degrees I get that it's heavier because it's a coil fork, but that's nearly as heavy as a Dorado dual crown. I'm sure they'll sell a few to teh DC crowd who want a fork on par with a Dorado, but with less travel.
  • 2 0
 Great looking design and very cool tech on this fork, but my 200mm Formula Italy Nero Coil weighs just a few grams more than this and is a Dual crown. The Nero C is by far the nicest coil I have ridden to date and it has an very attractive price. They can be found for under $1,000.00 USD from some of the European online retailers. I love my fancy stuff for my bikes, but at this price, you could have an Intend BC for and a new set of decent brakes for the same price. You could even buy the BOS Obys for less than this fork.
  • 5 1
 When your only problem is you have too much money to spend on new bike parts for your EMTB that you transport to the trails with your $150k Sprinter
  • 3 0
 I was just wondering what I was going to replace my Trust fork with. The chicks don't even care about that thing anymore, this will get me back in the game! Is it ebike compatible?
  • 2 0
 "where increases in frontal stiffness were achieved to manage large square impacts without compromising the torsional stiffness"

Push makes great stuff, but this stinks of so much marketing wankery. Didn't realize that increasing frontal stiffness so often came with the compromise of reducing torsional stiffness. Usually it's a trade-off of weight of decreasing frontal stiffness for traction that compromises torsional stiffness. The claim of some magical increasing of overall stiffness as something new and special is iffy at best, bullshit at worst.
  • 2 0
 "With the inverted design comes flexibility and the ability to decouple the various components. These freedoms allow for the use of various crown, outer tube, and bushing configurations that would otherwise be relatively fixed."

What? No. There is nothing stopping a right side up fork from experimenting with crown shapes, leg tapers, or bushing locations. It's just that no one does it because it's drastically diminished returns beyond what's "normal" nowadays. That's not to say this new way is bad, at all, it's just that it has very little to do with the inverted nature, and almost completely thanks to the brand new from the ground up design.
  • 2 0
 "components of the NINE.ONE damper resemble an advanced rear shock damper"

Interesting, considering how other fork dampers have utilized the fork form to diverge from rear shock damper designs: bladder compensators, spring backed IFPs, semi-open baths, and obviously large pistons are always a goal.
  • 5 1
 No mention of CSU improvements? I definitely don't want a csu creak ever on a $2600 fork.
  • 11 2
 improvements over what?
  • 2 3
 @vemegen: Typical creaking/cracking issues in csus. I see they pretty much eliminated that on the upper chassis part of the crown which looks nice. I'm interested what they do with the steerer. Intend and EXT both state what they do to eliminate/reduce this issue.
  • 3 0
 The CSU looks pretty stout but yeah, I was looking for some info on that as well. Thats definitely one of Intends selling points for their forks
  • 2 0
 In the video n Vital they mention a bonding process between crown and steerer.
  • 1 0
 @EdSawyer: Excellent! That's what I'm looking for. Any tips on where in that video it is? It's quite a long one.
  • 3 0
 @slovenian6474: I think in first third or so. I watched it at 2x with auto closed captioning on, so no need to listen, just read the transcript essentially.
  • 3 0
 @EdSawyer: Thanks! 28:00 mark for anyone else interested. Very intrigued that's it's NOT pressfit.
  • 3 0
 @vemegen: At 1:16:00 in the Vital interview with Darren he's asked "What one industry standard would you change that exists right now?"

Darren's answer "Knowing what we know today, steering tube. So um, all the fork manufacturers know that the current steering tube is not adequate for a single crown fork and is kinda the thing that's dragging down enduro category forks." He goes into the crown/tube interface, steerer diameter, etc

So yeah. That's what I'm curious about and it seem like Push is as well.
  • 3 1
 Does it come with electronic manual assist? As one of the "light riding" holdouts on 35/36mm stanchions for 160mm, I can't imagine adding nearly 2 lbs to the front end of my bike.
  • 5 2
 Currently you can get a marzocchi z1 coil for under $400 and it weighs less. In case you’re looking for value.

Sweet fork though and made in USA is great.
  • 3 0
 It's beautiful. Shame about the price, but I suppose for smallish quantity runs, made in the USA, there's a cost for that. Out of my range but I can drool over it.
  • 3 0
 As someone that's been into motorcycles for a very long time, USD forks look so much cooler to me that conventional forks. I would love to see the same thing happen to MTB.
  • 2 1
 Would of made sense to put maybe an additional lock nut or set screw on those clamping screws on the lower lugs. If one of those come loose it will shove your wheel up the fork stanchions probably hurt like hell and will ruin your stanchions.
  • 5 0
 this thing weighs almost 2lbs more than a fox 36
  • 3 0
 With the state of the bike industry right now, and literally no one buying any thing, will see how this price point works out for Push.
  • 3 1
 The tech bros that will be buying this are still making a killing I’m sure.
  • 7 3
 Lots of people seem to want made in USA quality with made oversees pricing.
  • 5 1
 Nah. A $800 increase would be understandable over a factory fox 36 but not $1800 more. I’m all for buying made in America I ride a Reeb but push lost their damn marbles on this pricing.
  • 4 1
 @MillerReid: I’d be willing to bet Fox has more profit margin on their forks then Push does on this. I’m not their target customer, and it’s way out of my price range so it’s moot anyhow.
  • 5 2
 Colorado has dope weed, which Push seems to be utilizing in regards to the pricing and weight decision making processes of that fork.
  • 5 0
 Breaking or braking, get it right people.
  • 6 1
 A single crown USD fork and we are still stuck with 15mm axle ‍♂️
  • 3 0
 so, it weighs as much as a fox 40, and is considerably weaker.. the bold on dropouts don't scream enduro to me. they just cream in fear.
  • 1 0
 It'll be interesting to see if they were able to pull this off. I have fair amount of confidence in Darren Murphy. It is very difficult to make a single crown upside down fork that doesn't flex like a mofo. Manufacturers almost always underestimate this.
  • 1 0
 I think this is an amazing fork but at this time I cannot justify spending $2600.00 when I could buy a FOX 38 Factory Suspension Fork - 29", 180 mm, 15QR x 110 mm, 44 mm Offset, Shiny Black, Grip 2 for $619.00. This Push Nineone fork is in another class but at 4xs the cost, it is just too hard to justify the purchase.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure some here do know... but if you don't know Darren Murphy of Push's (pretty extensive) background in the industry - he was on the marginal gains podcast with Josh Poertner. It included the story behind this fork and it's development.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=en2M5SoaV1U
  • 4 0
 I have one very important question.
Who the f*ck is using 185mm rotors anymore??
  • 1 0
 Obviously people who think 180mm rotors need an extra 2.7777777778% stopping power.
  • 1 0
 I'm using one as garage decor
  • 3 1
 These photos are incredible! I thought they were renders at first, but I doubt anyone would put molding flash on a plastic part. Incredible light and image quality. Bravo to whoever did their product photos.
  • 1 1
 I also thought they were renders...if they aren't renders they are really really good real photos. I'm also impressed
  • 2 1
 @dgwww: The images are tagged with a camera name when you go into the gallery for them. There are a number of products shot with the same medium format digital camera in the PB gallery. Most of them are also very impressive images.
  • 1 0
 @WheelNut: The digital back alone was 52k usd when new ! One wonders how you can every pay it off shooting photos of mountain bikes. But I guess these things end up being writeoffs anyhow.
  • 1 0
 Five hex/allen heads needing specified torque to install and remove the front wheel. a very specific torquing sequence to keep the individual stanchions from binding.

---Insert align three things: right fork leg, hub, left fork leg.
---Insert axle, and torque axle nut to spec (who carries a hex wrench or torque wrench on the trail?)
---Torque left pinch bolts to spec
---Cycle front suspension
---Torque right pinch bolts to spec.

start at 2:43

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LtDZrSsu2U&t=216s&ab_channel=RockyMountainATVMC
  • 1 0
 Why not just make it dual crown. I think the excessive weight is mostly because they wanted it single crown. I have used inverted forks and they are good. The flexibility side to side increases traction. Right now I have a 36 with acs3 coil on it. Lovely fork. Before that I had a 36 obviously and an xfusion vengeance. The xfusion was way better than a generic 36 IMHO. I've tried the sc32 and had a duc32 for a long time. They really were nicer than many forks of the time. I was tempted by intend. This has great features like being able to swap between 27.5 and 29 but that covers with a weight penalty. The oil swap thing is lovely. Price and weight are both a bit high for me in the end. I hope people love them though.
  • 2 0
 They should get together with Yeti or Santa Cruz and offer a special Wall St kit complete with Trick Stuff Brakes and Ride 5 Dev Cranks. Maybe call it the "Let them eat cake." special edition.
  • 1 0
 Added fore-aft stiffness would give my short reach playful frame better composure charging the rough. Added weigh is damped and closer to my center with the shorter reach I have. I don't know, maybe this is the way to go! How do you think my reasoning holds up?
  • 1 0
 A USD generally:

Added fore-aft stiffness means there is less play.
The fork doesn't get unnecessarily steeper where it's not desired, for example while braking and hitting things in the rough.
It neither gets unnecessarily slacker where it's not desired, for example in tight slow corners.

Added weigh is damped and closer to the center of gravity for easier handling.

USD = UpSide Down mountain bike fork, i.e. the stanchions are in the bottom of the fork closest to the hub instead of at the top as a mountainbike fork has been from the beginning continuing today.

I wonder how this fork here holds up its good and bad in the world. It's obviously expensive for someone who doesn't have the money laying around, but what's it good and bad at being used for?...
  • 4 1
 So for $2600 you get a one-size-fits-all damper tune? Not one tuned to your riding style and weight?
  • 3 1
 The days of Push doing custom damper tunes are behind us. Push tunes are great but even the 11.6 is tuned to the bike frame, not the rider (they set the dials for the rider).
Most modern dampers have a pretty large sweet spot though.
  • 5 0
 Same weight as a 40.
  • 2 0
 Damn, weighs just about as much as a dual crown DH fork. Also for that price you would think dynamic bushings would be a given.
  • 6 1
 Hahahaha GLWS
  • 2 2
 Seems like an amazing product. I’m surprised it’s taken so long for the MTB industry to embrace these. There hasn’t been a single high performance motorcycle made in the last 25 years that doesn’t have an inverted fork.
  • 2 2
 There have been quite a few over the years. Off the top of my head: Manitou Dorado of various generations with double and single crowns, Marzocchi Shiver in double and single crowns, Marzocchi RAC (absolute rocking horse shit, mega looks though), various Intend forks, Rock Shox RS1.

I can't speak to the Intend, the current Dorado, or the Push, but all the rest did not like to go where they were pointed in corners.
  • 2 0
 @dougfs: And Wren forks.
  • 4 0
 @dougfs: The Intend and Dorado seem to have found their niche. Several DH teams on Dorado, and Intend can barely keep up with demand for their products.
  • 4 0
 I can buy 4 marzocchi shivers for that price
  • 1 0
 lol. Facts
  • 4 4
 Without mentioning the eye watering price (lets assume that is not a prohibitive factor), as soon as I read "proprietary bushings", I immediately lost interest and skipped to the comments.

Nice fork and should be a really good product but "proprietary bushings" are synonym of a "thanks I´ll pass".
  • 4 0
 No shims in the base valve no ride.
  • 2 0
 If I can be nit-picky, the push branding looks out of place. Should be their "P" logo, perhaps in bronze. Maybe on that lower guard.
  • 1 0
 You have to respect Push for trying this…looks gorgeous with great features (that easy oil change is great) but way too expensive in comparison with a 38…the 11/6 is as well but not as much in comparison!
  • 2 0
 Is it too much to expect an 'editor' at a mountain bike website to know the difference between breaking and braking? @dariodigiulio
  • 1 1
 Good thing they released this at the end of February instead of the end of March because a lot of people would be confused that this was an April fools joke but its actually not intended to be. Don't get me wrong I am a big fan of Push, the coil conversion rocks on the Lyrik and the eleven six was rad when it first come out, it improved many of my bikes over the years, but this fork release is bonkers.
  • 3 0
 The fully transferable warranty is well worthy of applause. Hope other high end components follow suit.
  • 4 0
 At least I can now convince myself that an Intend fork is a real bargain.
  • 1 0
 This is cool. Yes expensive but it's also made in the USA. We live in a time of 5k frames, $1200 cranks and 3k wheels. Looks like something very much made in the USA. Lots of machining, nothing cast. I'd ride it.
  • 3 1
 What really makes them think they can make this successful, with the history of inverted forks already ?
  • 2 1
 Dentists Rejoice!

I heard it also comes with your choice of free root canal or dental crown

and the word "proprietary" is used 3x.
  • 2 0
 Okay build the most expensive non e-bike ever with this fork…what are your component choices?
  • 3 0
 Is there a cheaper Deore option?
  • 1 0
 
  • 4 0
 Search "Bolany" on AliExpress.
$200 gets you a 140mm travel upside down fork,roughly the same weight.
  • 3 0
 Or pickup a used fork with a smashpot.
  • 3 0
 I could but a pretty damn descent bike on chainreactioncycles for $2600
  • 2 0
 Yeah but then they went out of business...
  • 2 0
 I mean it might be a good working fork, but you have to outperform the weight penalty first.
  • 3 0
 This fork will Push consumer Trust to a new level!
  • 2 1
 When can we get tires without patches.

I’m sick of advertising messing up my athletics.

Started heat gunning the fork and rims on all my bikes.
  • 3 0
 10/10 want to see this vs the Intend.
  • 2 0
 The new Boxxer is the most expensive fork on the market...

Push- "Hold my beer"
  • 2 0
 How’s the lower/ smaller brake mount work? Isn’t the upper lug in the way?
  • 3 0
 Would be a perfect fit in 140mm on the new Norco Optic with that weight
  • 3 0
 I also like 38lb 125mm trail bikes.
  • 2 3
 I think the idea of this fork with a bike like the Arrival is a super neat proposition. I have a 170, but most of the trails I ride would be better suited to a 140/130 trail bike. We Are One sells the linkage kits, but if I do that I also need a totally new shock and fork to match it. If I had this and it's adjustable range from 140-170 I could use the same fork for both builds.

I could buy this fork, the linkages, and a rear shock and spend $3500 and, essentially, I'd have two dream bikes and I'd only have to store some linkages and shock. Yeah, it's $1500 more than any of the ultimate spec RockShox forks, but for the uniqueness and the fact that I could make it fit multiple "bikes" is pretty rad.

Guess I need to start saving up for one.
  • 3 0
 you can just swap a $70 hairspring into any existing fork these days
  • 2 0
 The details on this fork are next level! Bravo PUSH! If I had spare cash I'd buy one!
  • 2 0
 be interesting to see how much better it is than a newer 38mm fork with a smashpot installed in them
  • 2 0
 Agreed. I've got a Zeb smashpot and it is amazing and so much better than air. Would be great to see the comparison.
  • 1 2
 Sounds like a great fork. If I lived in north america and had the cash, i'd like to have one. Bit on the heavy side but, many nice features. But i live in europe and have an intend bandit. so i'm very happy with that one. and no stanchion guards, they look silly
  • 2 0
 Under the fork bushings section, the last bit should be "BRAKING loads", not "BREAKING loads".
  • 3 0
 That $2600 price is really PUSHing it.
  • 3 0
 the day this fork came out my dentist told me i need new teeth... jk
  • 4 1
 That's a very heavy single crown, heavier than some Boxxers.
  • 3 0
 My T.H.E. fender from 2001 has entered the chat...
  • 1 1
 Only fork on the market using a NUT on the end of the axle, and it looks... not good. Should have gone with a little end bolt like most other forks, would have looked much nicer at least
  • 2 0
 Looks cool, but why would you buy it over an Intend that's equally as fancy and has a higher chance of supporting it longer!
  • 4 1
 Expensive, but also rad.
  • 1 0
 Put it against a Bright Racing Shock Fork and Intend which are both cheaper btw
  • 1 0
 Intend doesn't come with stanchion guards out of the box. I only know you can get guards if you send them off or buy through that Italian. Is this still correct?
  • 3 0
 It is almost a $1 a gram
  • 2 0
 It costs as much as it weighs.
  • 1 0
 "annual service"?!?!?!? Don't tell my never ever not even close to ever having been serviced fork....
  • 3 1
 No way that’s 1600$ better than a 38
  • 3 0
 Well of course not. It's always the rule of diminishing returns. A GT2RS isn't 15x better than a Miata even though it cost that much more (totally made-up factor btw) but notably better it is.
  • 3 6
 @SunsPSD: engine is in the wrong place on the gt2rs.
  • 1 0
 For that price it better come with a season pass to my favorite bike park too lol
  • 1 0
 They should have Salt -n- Peppa do the add campaign.... "Push.......... it real good".
  • 3 2
 Haven't seen a new push shock on a bike in a long time, they're being outcompeted by EXT.
  • 1 0
 People would freak if I paired this with my 5dev titanium cranks on my steel frame
  • 2 0
 Braking forces. Check spelling. You wrote breaking forces.
  • 1 2
 That's not spelling, breaking forces is spelled perfectly fine, just that spelling refers to something else. However, making this mistake, and not catching it when proofing, in a major MTB publication, is just lazy af, and honestly pretty typical for this place.
  • 4 6
 Why people discussing the price? This fork was probably designed in 2010. Forget the price for a second: coil on an enduro fork - who still does that? Adjustable travel - only trouble. Inconsistent feel, more mechanical issues, more frequent service needed - it's the same story again. And the weight - it's a 36 fork massively outweighing all the 38 forks out there.
And then, there's the price. It's kind of like the Yeti cooler approach - worse product for 3x the price.
  • 1 0
 Can’t wait till Boostmaster chucks this on the front of his Maiden or VPS Shore or whatever.
  • 1 0
 Looks very cool. But it is very obese and expensive. I'm sure there are people who will buy it though.
  • 3 2
 90% of us cannot ride beyond our current fork's capacities, so why spend an extra $1800 for no practical gain?
  • 2 0
 Expensive heavy strong - pick two. At least.
  • 1 0
 Mucho Money, Mucho Money!!!,... :-P
  • 2 1
 Did all the budget get used up and couldn't take some real pictures?
  • 1 0
 Ooh baby babyyyy, ooh baby baby.
  • 2 0
 $3000 after tax. OOOF
  • 5 4
 That's a lot of money for a flexy inverted fork.
  • 7 6
 Can't wait to get mine. Preordered!
  • 2 0
 That's a spicy meatball!
  • 1 0
 May as well have just gone all out with $ per gram.
  • 2 0
 WANT (but can't afford).
  • 1 0
 Looks like the fork is compatible with torque caps.
  • 2 1
 LEFTY CHASSIS IS STILL BETTER
  • 1 0
 ONLY 93 pennies per gram!
  • 1 0
 Little late for groundhog day.
  • 2 0
 Like a $1 per gram
  • 1 0
 Only $3500 CAD plus tax? Fork for peasants.
  • 2 0
 #whitebros
  • 3 1
 I just bought 3
  • 1 0
 Deluxe version of my old single crown Shiver. Looks good.
  • 3 1
 Looks like a Duracell
  • 1 0
 Yep, you gonna charge that much, I want 203 travel…beeiches
  • 1 0
 Yep, you gonna charge that much, I want 203 travel…beeches
  • 1 0
 I like it since it’s prettier than my Halson Inversion fork!
  • 1 0
 I rode the black Halson back in the day, too!
  • 1 0
 Push don't really give a fork with that pricing in mind.
  • 1 0
 Not only is it heavier, it costs more, too!
  • 1 0
 Can you fit a mudguard? If not then that's me out.
  • 2 0
 Can _you_ fit a mudguard? Questionable, if you have to ask. All the Marsh Guard clones just zip-tie on, would be easy to slap one right on the crown. Won't give quite as much coverage as on an arch, but something bigger like a Mudhugger might, and give you a rad moto look.
  • 1 0
 Sweet, I need a new anchor for my boat.
  • 1 0
 Can't be better than my Avalanche'd Domain...
  • 1 0
 Dave Weagle, Hap Seliga, Jason Schiers: "Hmmmmm... pass the popcorn"
  • 1 0
 6 pound fork at 3,000 dollars is 500 dollars a pound!
  • 1 0
 Mike Homer
  • 3 6
 The Bright Racing Shocks USD fork released a week ago has better tech, and is cheaper. Can’t see anyone besides people who have money to waste wanting this over basically anything else out there.
  • 2 3
 I don’t see that price holding up. Give it 9-12 months and it’ll be sub 2k
  • 1 1
 Fork joke?
  • 1 1
 COLO-RAD-BRO!
West elk one-hitters delight…
  • 1 1
 The upper structure and axle lugs.. That ought to do it!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Shiver.
  • 1 0
 Fork-Week let’s go!
  • 3 3
 Silver steerer tube...vomit
  • 1 0
 Downvoters missing the humour here! This is my favourite comment of the week haha
  • 4 4
 2,600. Hahahahahaha.f off
  • 1 0
 Seriously?
  • 2 1
 2.6k hahahaha
  • 3 3
 If it’s as good as their shocks……. Garbage
  • 1 1
 The best way to make a suspension fork period
  • 1 2
 Dang that's rad looking. Dream build material right there!
  • 4 5
 If you buy this fork you're an idiot imo
  • 3 4
 These guys are the best in suspension biz!
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