Review: RockShox' New Flight Attendant Suspension System

Sep 28, 2021 at 20:54
by Mike Kazimer  



Flight Attendant, RockShox' new wireless electronic suspension system launched today, and it's big enough news that it warrants two separate articles. If you want a comprehensive rundown on how Flight Attendant works, check out Mike Levy's article and video here. If you're more interested in how it performs out on the trail, keep on reading.

First, the quick synopsis of what Flight Attendant does: it automatically makes suspension adjustments depending on what a bike and its rider are doing in order to maximize efficiency. The system takes information from sensors in the fork, shock, and cranks, and uses it to decide what compression setting the suspension should be in: Open, Pedal, or Lock, or even a mix, where the fork might be in one mode and the shock in another. The analysis happens every 5 milliseconds, although the time it takes to actually open or close the fork or shock does takes a little longer than that.

Efficiency is often associated with cross-country bikes, which is why it was a little surprising to find out that Flight Attendant is aimed more at longer travel options where pedaling performance isn't typically the top priority. The idea is that Flight Attendant should make it possible for a longer travel bike to have greatly improved manners while climbing, all without losing anything on the descents - I like to think of it as the 'having your cake and eating it too' concept.

I was lucky enough to get my hands on a Specialized Enduro with the new bits on it four weeks early, giving me just enough time to put in a solid thrashing before issuing a verdict. Testing took place on Vancouver's North Shore, in the Whistler Bike Park, and on a wide mix of terrain around Bellingham, Washington. Conditions were also mixed, and ran the gamut from dry and dusty to soggy and sodden.

I should note that while I've racked up enough hours on the system to feel comfortable calling this a review, it's still too early in the testing process to comment on long-term durability – if any issues arise in the future we'll be sure to issue an update. For now, the focus here is on how the system functions and feels out on the trail.


Different colored lights indicate what is being adjusted. In this case, it's the shock's low-speed compression.

Set Up

Getting the Flight Attendant system up and running requires a strong cellular or wi-fi signal, at least if you want to access the in-app tutorial, so it's best to avoid go too deep into the bush before performing the necessary pre-flight procedures. The most important step is the calibration of the system. Calibration is only done for the initial setup – it's not something that needs to be done before every ride.

The app includes step-by-step instructions, but calibration basically involves sitting on the bike so that the amount of sag can be detected, and then tipping the bike towards the non-drive side in order to give the sensors the information they'll need to determine the bike's position in space out on the trail. The lights on the top of the right fork provide visual indicators to make things easier, and from beginning to end the process only takes five minutes or so.

For my 160 lb weight I ended up running 210psi in the shock for 30% sag, and 59 psi in the Zeb fork.

Flight Attendant does take up more space on a frame, which is why it'll initially only be available on select models from a handful of companies.


AXS App

The app that I was using during testing was a beta version, so I can't issue an absolute verdict as to how well it works. I can say that there were some frustrating moments when the app was having trouble recognizing all of the AXS components – I ended up getting caught in a few endless loops before deciding to do a full reset and start over again. Hopefully those bugs are worked out for the final version.

Thankfully, once Flight Attendant is calibrated and set up there's really no need to open up the app again – all of the adjustments can be performed via the buttons on the top of the fork's control unit. The only time you'd really need to use the app is to reassign which AXS lever is used to put Flight Attendant into override mode. Override mode is accessed by holding down the selected AXS lever for two seconds. That switches the system into the pre-selected mode – fully locked out is the default option.

I ended up choosing the fully open position as my override mode rather than fully locked out. That way, I could basically turn the system off and have everything open whenever I wanted. I didn't end up using it all that much, due to how 'smart' Flight Attendant is, but I appreciate having that option close at hand.

There's an app for that...
Adjusting your compression damping is possible via the Flight Attendant / AXS app, or on the fork itself.


Flight Attendant Performance

Let's start with what it's like to live with Flight Attendant out on the trail. Within a couple of pedal strokes the Flight Attendant system wakes from its slumber (if it doesn't wake up, a quick push of the AXS button on the fork should do the trick). The 'bzzt, bzzt' of the fork and shock servos doing their job lets you know it's receiving information, along with the green light on the top of the fork that illuminates with each mode change.

The current Specialized Enduro isn't a terrible climber, especially considering how much travel it has, but it is a bike that benefits from being able to firm it up on uphill or rolling terrain, especially to help minimize the suspension movement during out of the saddle climbing. With Flight Attendant, any concerns I may have had about the Enduro's pedaling efficiency were completely erased.

At one point, thanks to a slight miscommunication, I ended up on an XC ride with two buddies, one on a Specialized Epic and the other on a Transition Spur. To help bridge the gap I bumped up the Flight Attendant's Bias level to the firmest position, which made it so that it placed more of a priority on being in the fully locked out setting, and then proceeded to pedal my brains out.

Did those electronics completely level the playing field? Definitely not, but they did take one of the advantages of those shorter travel bikes off the table. The Enduro's weight and geometry meant that it still wasn't an even match, but it was nice to be able to stand and sprint without any mushiness, and then when the suspension automatically opened up on the descents I was able to reap the benefits of bringing that big bike along.

The fact that Flight Attendant's default setting is open rather than closed is what sets it apart from something like Fox's Live Valve, and I'd say it's one of its biggest strengths. I was a little hesitant at first, worried that the suspension would firm up or open up when I didn't want it to, but I never encountered any unexpected mode changes while descending (or climbing for that matter). It fades into the background, aside from the noise when the modes change, and the algorithm does a great job of adapting to terrain and pedaling input changes in a way that's not distracting or jarring.

The Bias adjustment feature is a nice touch - it makes it possible to fine tune what the system is trying to achieve. My preferred setting ended up being one firmer than the default middle position, which is one away from the setting that places the highest priority on being in the fully-locked position. That gave the Enduro a sportier feel on mellower terrain and while climbing, a change in the bike's manners that had me pedaling harder on that type of terrain than I would have without Flight Attendant, simply because of how much more efficient the bike felt. Rather than being content to sit and cruise to the top at a more relaxed pace, I found myself more likely to go a little harder due to the extra support that the firmer mode created.

I did get an odd noise to come out of the rear shock when I hit a big root in the middle of a mode change, sort of like what I imagine it'd sound like if you hit a robotic duck with a hammer. That was the only tiny hiccup, and I'd hesitate to even call it that since the performance didn't change at all.

The new ButterCups found on the bottom of the air spring and damper use a rubber bumper that's designed to absorb high frequency vibrations.
Pressure relief valves are located on the back of each leg.

The Non-Electric Bits

The algorithms, servos and such are the main focus of this launch, but the new suspension tech that's been rolled out at the same time shouldn't be overlooked. RockShox's official statement is that “We have introduced new technologies with the new chassis, which includes the new Pressure Relief Valves. We are always working on new product and cannot comment on any current or future developments.”

I'll eat my hat if the next generation of the Zeb and Pike don't have those relief valves or the Buttercups – I'm sure they were developed to work with more than just Flight Attendant. Honestly, the Buttercups are probably my favorite feature of this whole package. That's due in part to how deceptively simple the design is. It's not a totally new concept (it's used in the automotive world), but I haven't seen anything like it on any modern suspension fork.

I'm curious if the performance will change at all in cold temperatures – will that little rubber puck firm up and diminish some of the Buttercups' benefits? That's a test that'll have to wait until the winter. In the meantime, I will say that this is hands down the best feeling Zeb I've been on. It manages to take the edge of the small chatter while still retaining enough support to keep it from diving too deep into its travel, a trait that was appreciated on the chunky trails of Vancouver's North Shore and on the end-of-season brake bumps in the Whistler Bike Park. I've only had one harsh bottom out, on a decent sized drop to flat, but otherwise there's been plenty of ramp up to keep that from occurring even with only one volume spacer installed.

With similar set ups, the Fox 38 feels a little softer off the top, but the Zeb does seem to muffle the trail chatter a little better. So far the changes to the Zeb don't seem to be enough to make it a clear winner over the 38 – the battle between those two forks continues to be too close to call, and it really comes down to personal preference. The one downside to this Flight Attendant configuration is that there's no high speed compression adjustment – that's been taken off the table to allow for the different low speed compression modes. I'm more of a set-and-forget rider when it comes to that adjustment, so I didn't miss it much, but riders who want access to as much fine tuning as possible may find themselves wishing for its existence.

I am glad to see the addition of pressure relief valves, a feature that should make sticking a zip tie down past the dust seals to allow any trapped air to escape a thing of the past. They work, too; I've heard a 'psst' of air escape when I've pushed the buttons. The final battery-free feature worth mentioning is the addition of a hydraulic bottom out to the SuperDeluxe shock. That's going to be an option that companies can choose when spec'ing this shock depending on the bike's kinematics and intended use. I was glad to have it on the Enduro - the ramp up was nice and smooth, and it matched well with what the fork was doing up front.

The pedal sensor is housed inside the crank arm spindle, and is powered by a AAA lithium battery that's said to have a run time of 200 hours.

Downsides

Personally, the 'bzzt bzzt' of the mode changes annoyed me a little, especially when I was out on a long climb by myself. It's an almost identical noise to that of the SRAM AXS derailleur, so if that noise doesn't bother you then Flight Attendant likely won't either. On the descents, where there's more noise from the trail, and the mode changes are less frequent, the electronic 'bzzt' didn't get under my skin as much.

Adding Flight Attendant to a bike also means there are two more batteries to keep charged, three counting the one in the crank sensor. If you're running the complete AXS 'ecosystem' (sorry, that word makes me cringe too), then you're looking at a total of 4 batteries that will need regular charging, plus three batteries that are worth checking once a year – one in each shifter and one in the aforementioned crank sensor). Fingers crossed SRAM is working on a multi-port charger, since having four separate chargers going at once seems a little silly. Wireless seems like a great selling point, and it does simplify setup, but I feel like if there was a way to connect everything so that it could all be charged from one port that would make things easier.

The cost of the system is undoubtedly a hurdle as well, although that could become less of an obstacle in the future when the price comes down, or if the system ends up being available on its own. RockShox didn't release any specific prices, since at the moment it's only available on complete bikes, but for reference the Specialized S-Works Enduro I was on is priced at $12,500, or $2,000 more than the current non-Flight Attendant equipped S-Works Enduro.



Future Dreaming

I'm sure there's an article out there that says Flight Attendant is 'game changing', but I'm not going to use that tired cliché. Is it novel? 100%. Is it an absolute necessity? Not at all, but that doesn't mean it shouldn't exist, especially considering all of the other potential doors that it opens.

I like Flight Attendant because it makes me think, not so much about its performance, but about what the future of the system could be like. As it is, it's an incredibly strong debut - it does exactly what it's supposed to with an intuitive interface for fine-tuning its performance. That doesn't mean there aren't some things I'd like to see somewhere down the road, though.

There's no denying that firming up the fork and shock improves the efficiency of a bike, especially on a longer travel machine like the Enduro. Not needing to think about making those changes on the fly is nice, and makes it easier to focus on the trail, or think about what's for dinner. That being said, I'd be content with a simple wireless shock lockout. I'm not as worried about the fork being in the open position, but I would love to see a less expensive version of this system that makes it possible to cycle through the three settings via a little thumb lever or a blip button.

I also think a suspension control that correlates with the seatpost height makes a lot of sense - open when the seat is fully dropped, firm when the seat is fully extended, etc... BMC tried it with their TrailSync system with mixed results, but there's certainly still room for a better execution of the concept.

It's going to be interesting to see where Flight Attendant goes in the future - will RockShox keep adding more and more features, like an integrated ShockWiz unit in the air spring side, or will they roll out simpler, pared-down versions to hit more affordable pricepoints? Or all of the above? We'll have to wait and see - for now, I have a feeling tracking down a bike with Flight Attendant on it will be challenging enough.



Pros

+ Dramatically improves climbing performance
+ Intuitive interface makes on-the-fly adjustments easy, no phone required
+ The non-electrified features of the Zeb fork and Super Deluxe shock are excellent improvements.

Cons

- More electronics means more batteries to charge
- The sound of the suspension switching modes can be distracting
- Along with the substantial cost, Flight Attendant comes with a 300 gram (.7 lb) weight penalty.




bigquotesElectronically controlled mountain bike suspension isn't exactly new - I'm old enough to remember the 9-volt battery powered K2 Smart Shock from the late 90's. Thankfully, there have been massive advances in technology since that time, which has allowed RockShox to cook up the best execution of the concept yet. Flight Attendant has the potential to turn more gravity-oriented bikes into potent all-rounders, or to make mid-travel options more XC-oriented nature on the climbs, all without sacrificing anything on the descents. Mike Kazimer



508 Comments

  • 608 16
 I’m getting worried that in a few years time, my bike will not work if I loose my phone
  • 127 174
flag jclnv (Oct 5, 2021 at 7:23) (Below Threshold)
 Nothing will. That’s why 5G was so heavily pushed. Smart devices from cars to electricity meters.

You better behave or your account may be temporarily suspended.
  • 405 4
 More importantly, your bike will not work if you stop paying your monthly subscription(s).
  • 705 2
 "Sorry, you've run out of SRAMCOIN© so this months autopay is suspended. To unlock your suspension and dropper post, please purchase more SRAMCOIN© at sram.com/up-yours , in $299 increments."
  • 13 3
 Fax
  • 20 2
 @jclnv: To bad some of the best riding areas have no signal 5G or otherwise.
  • 159 0
 @hamncheez:

$289.99
  • 8 5
 Or that it won't work due to paywalls.
  • 42 2
 @hamncheez:

Hello sir, your replacement broken shifter is only compatible with SRAMCOIN_2.0©, to continue using the remaining of our products (the whole bike) please upgrade everything...........
  • 106 2
 "NOTICE: We've detected you exceeding 25kph on a residential street after you finished your ride. This is in violation of local traffic ordinances. As a consequence we've suspended (get it) your account for 30 days, after which you'll be able to unlock your suspension, derailleur, and dropper post."
  • 12 0
 serfdom...take over the world!!! oops, I meant subscription...it's good for everyone!!!
  • 41 1
 @hamncheez: Shit like this will help push MTB's into the $20K range.
  • 26 0
 SRAMs future electronic brake system will give the word "region lock" a whole new meaning....
  • 27 1
 @hamncheez: That link works
  • 17 0
 @hamncheez: this can make it to a black mirror episode
  • 6 16
flag enduroNZ (Oct 5, 2021 at 8:27) (Below Threshold)
 @jclnv: weirdo alert
  • 17 1
 Not to mention all the data your phone is logging and sending out to who knows...
  • 12 0
 @hamncheez: I'm amazed that took to the actual SRAM website
  • 37 0
 @Jules15: lol, i think someone at SRAM is having a field day with the up-yours, it takes you to a "campaign" section with the link to the flight attendant site.
  • 4 3
 @Ttimer: HILARIOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 7 111
flag aquanut (Oct 5, 2021 at 9:01) (Below Threshold)
 NM
  • 11 108
flag aquanut (Oct 5, 2021 at 9:01) (Below Threshold)
 @AckshunW: Doh! You beat me to it. Well played!
  • 6 0
 @t1000 don’t worry! In a few years time you won’t be able to live if you lose your phone! Let alone ride a bike.
  • 2 0
 @mokmu: ha, that's amazing!
  • 35 6
 @enduroNZ: You just don’t get it, yet. A digital social credit system will require a high level of internet connection. Why do you think cash is gradually more inconvenient to use? Especially at government institutions. You have a lot of faith in power if you think it’s going to be sunshine and rainbows over the next few decades.

“Think of the technology of today and think how nefariously it could be used and that’s pretty much where we’re going to end up” - Edward Snowden
  • 43 0
 "Hello valued customer, we've noticed that you upvoted a DoublecrownAddict post. As a consequence, we've permanently revolked your account. Your suspension, dropper post, and derailleur are now paper weights. Have a nice day."
  • 5 2
 @jclnv: but 5G is way worse than 4G if you’re just trying to track people. The range of 5G is so short in comparison. And to keep tabs on someone you don’t need the speeds that 5G provides.

I don’t feel the need for 5G (4G works well enough for me) but 5G doesn’t do anything that 4G LTE doesn’t already, other than increase internet speed.
  • 30 99
flag snarlymarley (Oct 5, 2021 at 9:41) (Below Threshold)
 @Ttimer: SAAS: SHREDDING AS A SERVICE
  • 2 0
 @snarlymarley: now to add 5g service and you're really talking IoT SaaS!
  • 9 5
 @sdurant12: I agree but I’m not sure it’s about tracking though is it? Surely that’s already in place with GPS location tracking (although that’ll likely be part of the puzzle). I can see the stronger signal being required to prevent interference issues. Something along the lines of shopping in a busy mall with a huge amount of Wi-Fi traffic and it’s important this message reaches you - “you’ve exceeded your monthly carbon output, you cannot purchase this item for 12 days and 11 hours” It isn’t going to happen overnight like the COVID restrictions as that had the ‘protecting your health’, moral messaging to push it through. Although I think it’ll be faster than than the militarization of the police or the rise of the global decision makers - Vanguard and BlackRock etc.
  • 18 0
 Hello valued customer. We have noticed that the service reset function was not performed at an authorized SRAM dealer within the required time period. As a result your warranty is now void, we look forward to your next SRAM purchase.
  • 2 0
 @matt92037: Who will get there first. My money is on Specialized.
  • 3 1
 Thinking its time to question if you really want to be on a bike in the bumpy, hard to pedal up, off-road. Maybe e-mtb, motorcycles or 4x4's are what you're after.
  • 1 0
 looks on pinkbike the review is out the same day as the press release?? the world moving too fast
  • 4 2
 Is Outside+ beefing with Lifetime+ ? No Sea Otter mention on PB yet and onsite reg opens tomorrow.

Highly sus.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Not $2899?
  • 8 1
 @snarlymarley: I hate to see funny comments voted down because your PB+ sub had the audacity to roll over to Outside+
  • 15 6
 @suspended-flesh, like you said, Sea Otter hasn't started, hence the lack of any mention. We'll be down there, and there will be plenty of articles to read once it begins.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: Upvote for suspended pun.
  • 4 1
 @mikekazimer: Yes, and I now see that PB/Trailforks is the marquee sponsor of a SOC race I'm entered in so my comment is respectfully retracted.
  • 2 1
 @suspended-flesh: Sea Otter hasn’t started yet.
  • 7 3
 @jclnv: man, you should have known: truth is not much appreciated these days
  • 8 5
 @jclnv: “I can see the stronger signal being required to prevent interference issues”

Lol. Again - 4G works just f*cking fine in crowded malls. 5G isn’t the technology that enables “global tracking” or whatever other conspiracy you choose to believe. It’s just faster 4G at a different bandwidth that allows higher speeds across shorter distances.
  • 3 1
 I'm not worried. I won't work without my phone.
  • 13 1
 Depending on your perspective you can choose to read my comment as “OpEn your EYES we’Re alReADY bEiNg traCkeD”

Or as “everything is fine, 5G changes nothing”.

The main point I’m making is that 5G doesn’t change shit. And yes, advertisers are tracking us. Throw your phone away and go live in a cave if you really care
  • 6 4
 @sdurant12: Yep I know all that. Why is that extra bandwidth required? Unless they foresee more data transfer being required? Why would telecoms spend billions on 5G infrastructure if it offered no benefit?
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Can it ramp up compression for heavy landings if it senses you’re airborn for a good bit?
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: and or your loan.
  • 2 0
 @mokmu: I was hoping for a Rick roll at least... good on sram that is funny.
  • 6 0
 @jclnv: PB press release 2050: Sram announced today that they have rebranded to Skynet to more closely reflect their current product line. As part of their social contract they are sending ebike and electronic technology to 2021 in their newly developed time machine.

Senior executive vice- intern Mike Kazimer was quoted ". I'm not sure if that is a great idea but sram/skynet gets things right 99.89% of the time"
  • 2 3
 @snarlymarley: the badge of dishonor.
  • 2 1
 "Where is security governed through scrutiny?
Your privacy denied, organized and confined
No place to hide
No place to hide"
  • 20 14
 @panders: Agreed - I have no Outside+ subscription plans but voting up or down, in my view is just lame. Just leave the comments up, read 'em or don't and if anyone doesn't like someone's view they are free to just move the f*ck on. Dunno why this has to be a Zuck-the-Cuck comment popularity game b/c everything that tool touches turns to hammers and sickles. Funny that 99% of the people talking about censorship here are down-voting anything they don't like. China would be so proud. Just words on a screen - and its just bikes. So lame.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: you say kph, yet your flag is American. What's your story huh? You've been found out
  • 4 4
 @Mtn-Goat-13: Yet you felt the need to inject your lil' politkal buzzwords in your comment about how words don't matter. Dafuq is with yall Boomers?
  • 2 0
 What about if you lose it?
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: "To earn more SRAMCOIN©, please activate your anatomy sensor"

patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO2020060606
  • 4 1
 @jclnv: Porn and gaming - that's part of what drives IT innovation. Add to that, some of these guys might want to go toe to toe with the home internet providers.
  • 5 0
 Crossing fingers mtn biking won’t go the way of drones. Geofenced with no-fly zones.
Imagine spotting a new line and 10ft down the trail your shocks lock out, cranks lock up and brakes automatically apply. You’ve entered a no-ride zone.
  • 1 0
 How long does it take for the damper to open or close? I feel like that speed was heavily touted by fox live valve but no mention of it here. It calculates every 5 ms but how long to close
  • 1 0
 ...i'm worried it might not work if I hose it down after riding.
  • 2 0
 @Lloydmeister: I was highlighting how evil sram is- its basic theater. A good, honest, American company would never use such villainous debauchery as the metric system.
  • 1 0
 @jclnv: could not agree more... saddens me... even more so, I will stick to wires on my bike
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: STOP GIVING THEM IDEAS!
  • 1 0
 --
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Like Activision made suspension.............
  • 1 0
 @Graywing34: You mean Electronic Arts
  • 1 0
 I'm waiting for some high school kid to hack this system, rendering it useless. Dude, I can't ride today my Flight Attendant got hacked
  • 2 1
 @suspended-flesh: First: I put a fake bday here to keep anonymous - but nice try tyring to Agism your bro's her - you don't know my age.

Second: mentioning that China's a totalitarian state (which it is) - isn't "politkal" - it's a fact. Does that hurt your feelings? Don't care if it does or doesn't: I read you comment and didn't thumbs it up or down (but guess you did so you can try to see words you agree with only). Dufaq yrself - and be sure to change those diapers!
  • 1 0
 @Mtn-Goat-13: Took you long enough, but thank you for the reply.
  • 216 0
 I’ll wait for the Flight Attendant GX..also known as Spirit
  • 8 0
 Ooof. What does that mean for SX level?
  • 29 0
 GX: Jet Blue
NX/SX: Spirit
  • 7 0
 @matadorCE: X5: Allegiant
  • 10 2
 @millsr4: x3: bus
  • 2 6
flag mior (Oct 5, 2021 at 13:59) (Below Threshold)
 @matadorCE: i would say nx is southwest and sx is spirit
  • 4 0
 As long as we don’t get down to a Frontier level.
  • 2 0
 @haen: same thing but it doesn't work.
  • 209 3
 As an electrical engineer, I am of two minds on this. 1. It would be really, really fun to develop. 2. Something about it makes me want to buy a rigid steel singlespeed and sell everything else in my garage before every component of every bicycle makes it onto the Internet of Things.
  • 59 4
 As an electrical engineer, I am currently building up a rigid single speed!
  • 19 0
 EEs of PB, unite!
  • 64 3
 Three engineers post concurrently and there's no flexing of intellect...?? Strange times indeed...
  • 25 0
 As an engineer, I am too cheap to buy this.
  • 38 0
 @CamNeelyCantWheelie: as an electrical engineer, I am well-paid and obnoxious enough to buy a carbon leaf-spring fork instead of this that costs just as much but works way worse, then bounce my undamped way across the countryside on it referring to my 'passive solid-state suspension' as often as possible
  • 8 0
 As an electronic engineer I can't afford to buy this.....
  • 77 1
 As a mechanical engineer i have a deep mistrust of magical electricity
  • 14 0
 however the joy of someone inventing a hack where by you can lock out someones suspension on that 40ft gap may just be too much to handle
  • 8 1
 Singlespeeds are so much fun.
  • 15 0
 all fun and games until someone brings a jammer to the xc worlds
  • 7 0
 Yep. I was wondering - if I bought this, could I continue to service my shocks & forks myself, or will I need a degree from MIT to do so now ?
  • 4 1
 @Eatsdirt: as an ee, not one of those lesser engineering disciplines, I use too much technology at work and don't want network connectivity issues with my bike. Can't wait for someone to jam it, or maybe even a group jam each other.
  • 14 0
 @Eatsdirt: Good to see they are sticking to the age old tradition of informing us all they are engineers though.
  • 12 0
 Is there a time or place when an engineer doesn't start every sentence with, "as an engineer..."?
  • 31 0
 @acali: as an engineer, no.
  • 4 0
 I’d like to think that one of the fundamental aspects of the bicycle as a tools for freedom and fun is that anybody can repair or replace it on their own. Here we get into something else entirely. If all the shifting and suspension is going electronic, just put in on an ebike and go all the way. But not on a pedal bike….
  • 5 0
 As middle aged man, I learned to program the VCR. Now as old man, I stand no chance with this app and suspension wizardry.
  • 2 0
 @ryetoast: As a Civil Engineering Technologist, I prefer a rigid fork haha
  • 4 0
 As an hvac technician that fixes things that an engineer came up with 1-20+ years ago, I agree: you all need more ridgid single speeds in your lives. And stop putting inverters on everything.
  • 2 0
 As a control engineer with an ME'ing background, I still don't trust any practical application of Maxwell's equations.
  • 4 0
 @acali: allow me to recycle this good old pilot joke for you: how do you know if there is an engineer in the room? Don't worry, he will tell you.

Yes, I am an engineer too.
  • 1 0
 @pads: I’ve only heard that joke about vegans before
  • 3 0
 As an engineer, I just have to say hello guys
  • 2 0
 @jaame: My favourite version is "How do you know when somebody doesn't have a TV set?"
  • 1 0
 Bring them all on!
  • 2 0
 As an electronic engineer, I'm thinking "I might actually use the pedalling platform with this, because the manual one has a 100% record of being locked for the descent"
  • 10 0
 As a technical writer, I just want to congratulate all you engineers for all these complete sentences. Wink
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: this cut deep
  • 2 0
 As a Data Science Engineer i want to get my hands on the recorded data just to put labels on you like 'you shred softer than my granny'.
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne: not according to the bicycle mechanics facebook group where they think skill level for repairing bike= rocket science and wages accordingly
  • 2 0
 @toflowbi: strava integration to follow
  • 1 0
 @jaame: And single speeders...
  • 2 0
 I wonder what frequency band all the AXS stuff communicates on, so you know, you could prank your friends... Should be pretty simple....
  • 1 0
 @mlangestrom: 2405-2480MHz blue tooth according to the FCC report which is on the ISM band.

fcc.report/FCC-ID/C9O-SLMB1

That looks similar, either way it will use the same network standard.
  • 1 0
 @mlangestrom: correction, there is a second antenna in there
  • 1 0
 Also same frequency on ism band
  • 3 0
 I love my SS Hardtail, but prefer it with and ‘analog’ suspension fork, thanks. I’ll leave full rigid for my steel gravel bike.

This also makes me want to stock up on some basic drivetrain parts for my FS bike. Like 11speed XT, which has still been the best and most reliable drivetrain I’ve ever used.

I do think it will be a long time before high-end suspension goes electronic only. (Hopefully that never happens)
On the drivetrain front- well just look at what Shimano did with Ultegra.
I’ll be saddened (but not surprised) if the next XTR and XT are electronic only groups.
  • 5 0
 For all you curious normies. Engineers legally have to state they're Engineers. It's a public health warning. I am also an Engineer.
  • 1 0
 @Dougal-SC: what about washing machine repairers
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: harsh


But fair
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne: an e bike is all the way? I’m with you but I think electric motorcycle is what these goons are really after, it just hasn’t set in yet. Electronic suspension, shifting, dropper, electric motor helping.....stop with the electric motorcycle foreplay and go for home plate already people.
  • 120 6
 1. It looks cooler than fox's live valve. 2. Its wireless so your bike doesn't end up looking worse than a Scott if you put live valve on it. 3. Its cool. 4. Its cool. 5. Its cool. 6. Its cool. 7. Its cool. 8. .......but im not buying it.
  • 14 1
 Scott owner checking in
  • 1 0
 Well said I had the same thought process
  • 26 1
 Okay, long curmudgeonly rant here. Sorry, been a long day at work. But I'm struggling to see the coolness. They are telling me that I can spend two grand, add an extra .7 pounds to my bike, faff around with an app on my phone, and adopt the stress of keeping four batteries charged rather than just flipping a switch at the bottom and top of the hill. That doesn't seem like a good trade to me.

Imagine that Flight Attendant was invented before the lockout switch and we've all been using it for years. Then Sram came out with new suspension today saying, "Now, instead worrying about batteries and messing around with your phone, all you have to do is flip an onboard switch! Best of all, the whole set up will shave almost a pound off your bike! Oh, and it even allowed us to drop our prices!" We'd be stoked. Dear industry: sometimes less is more.

I'm all for engineers trying all the crazy stuff they can dream up, but the stuff the marketers try to tell us we need... sheesh. Unless you're a professional looking for the most marginal gains or just have so much money you can't figure out what else to spend it on, I can't imagine who is out there thinking, "my life would be easier and my rides will be so much more fun with this." And just think. All this to presumably compensate for frames and shocks that ought to have this sorted out in the first place! (am I right, @mikelevy ?)

Full disclosure: One day every bike will have a motor and a battery that powers all kinds of stuff, and you can use it if you want, or not. It won't weigh or cost any more than a "normal" bike. When that day comes, I'm in. I guess we don't get their without going through this sort of silliness first... so God bless the early adopters.
  • 5 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: the market will correct itself and decide whether this becomes the norm. I think the market for analog bikes will always exist, and it is nice to have cool tech to look at. This to me is different from all the dream bikes I lusted over in bike mags as a kid, because I actually don’t want all this complexity on my bike even if money were no object.
  • 2 0
 @blackthorne: my thoughts exactly. If this works amazingly, and the price comes down (way down) it will be accepted. Fox Live Valve* hasn't really caught on and remains in pretty niche applications, and I suspect thats the future for this as well.

*I realize Live Valve and Flight Attendant are going for slightly different things with very different implementations but its the best comparison.
  • 92 9
 You know, I want to come up with a rage-filled comment that refutes all of this and complains, but I can't. Sure, it's VERY expensive. But there is a legitimate use for it (look at cars, snowmobiles, motorcycles - they all have some type of computer-adjusted suspension). And for those that don't like it, the good ol' manually adjusted shocks are still available (just like the non-AXYS items from SRAM).

I'd say job well done to coming out with an electronic suspension system that works pretty damn well out of the box.
  • 16 0
 Agreed, looks super user-friendly, and if it's not for you, they are not strong-arming anyone to use it.
  • 20 3
 Electronics sure do have the power to improve the state of mechanical (or pretty much anything) objects. They can adjust the conditions on the fly. Weight and price (and environmental?) issues aside, I'm sure this fork will make me climb/descend better. And that is where the problem is.

If 1s and 0s are doing the riding for me, what is the point? Am I really climbing better or is it the suspension doing it for me, taking away my inputs and my habilities? Will the fastest rider be the one who is most talented or the one who has the best hardware? Okay, MTB is a mechanical sport and literally everything (bigger wheels, better suspension etc.) was developed to make us "better riders". But electronics can take it to another level. Imagine some sort of crazy ESP for bikes and sudenly we dont drift or crash anymore. It would make the sport safer, but would it be less interesting? I honestly dont know what is better overall.

At present time, I am not the customer for eletronics.
  • 6 2
 One more thing: this is can useful for the average (rich) Joe, who likes to ride with their friends, but can be unfair in competition. The big teams, with the best mechanicals will have a clear advantage if more and more electronics can be fitted in a bike.
  • 4 0
 @aug7hallak:
"Will the fastest rider be the one who is most talented or the one who has the best hardware?"

The bike setup plays huge part in todays DownHill WorldCup circle, havent you noticed yet? Theres really nice set of videos from FOX all about puzzling.. Smile
  • 8 2
 I've said this before, but as soon as my current side project is done I'm going to hire my electrical engineer friend and make a remote lockout that simply listens to your ANT+ power meter (who besides the XC crowd even cares about normal lockouts) and the angle of the bike. Are you pedaling? Lock it out. Are you pointed downhill? Don't lock out. I can write a phone app with some basic configuration, like minimum watts before locking out, and/or the angle of descent/climb before locking out. One of these could be cheap enough to sell for like $200 and does basically the same thing.
  • 2 1
 @aug7hallak: I think that's trying to compare apples to oranges - in a similar way E-bikes are raced today. E-bikes offer a clear advantage over their mechanical brethren. Therefore, at least in my local riding area, they're raced in separate classes so the advantage is limited to THAT particular group, not the event as a whole. Otherwise, every Tom, Dick, and Harry would be out trying to purchasing an E-Bike, leaving those of us with a mechanical bike in the literal dust.

The way I look at this is just an electronic version of a remote fork and/or shock lockout. If you think about it in a basic sense, a rider on a bike with a remote mechanical lockout versus a rider on a bike with a Flight Attendant system aren't on anything that differ all that much. Compared to someone who must leave their fork alone OR must constantly turn/unturn knobs, the other two have a clear advantage when climbing or descending. The electronic version is just a simpler way to do it (simpler in the sense that the bike took care of the adjustment).
  • 2 1
 @aug7hallak: It already is unfair to the smaller teams.
  • 4 0
 So the comparison to car suspension is one that is going to come up frequently, however the adjustments required to make perceptible changes to a car are much narrower than a mtb. A road is a road. A racetrack is also a road. The conditions there are almost identical to a quite cul de sac at 1/8 the speed. Car systems also integrate absolutely. Meaning acceleration, braking, and steering are all coordinated across a network. This allows the vehicle to adjust the suspension accordingly. If you run over a pothole at highway speeds, you’re still going to get tossed. Whereas on a mtb the suspension deals with a larger variety variety of conditions.

I’m sure they’ve done a great job at integrating a wide range of conditions into the programming but it only takes one hit where it doesn’t behave as the rider expects it to for the rider to lose confidence in the system or worse, end up hurt.

The other distinctions between active suspension on motorcycle/car/snowmobile and mtb is those vehicles have alternators (or large batteries for your electric cars), no need to recharge. If the vehicle is working, the system is capable of working. Also the weight active suspension adds as a percentage of total vehicle weight is minuscule compared to a mtb.
  • 3 2
 @Afterschoolsports: I agree that automatic adjustments of the system in a car is RELATIVELY easier than a mountain bike. HOWEVER, I'll disagree using two other vehicles as a baseline (let alone the other number of similar vehicles to these two) - the RAM 1500 TRX and Ford F-150 Raptor. If you look at what they're designed for (DESIGNED for), it's easier to say that the systems designed for these are going to have to work and calculate a large amount of information for a 6,500 pound vehicle with active suspension.

Additionally, as the article states, the total weight of the active suspension system relative to the weight of the bicycle is a miniscule 0.7 pounds. If we assume the bikes used weigh (on average) 35 pounds to 37 pounds, the active suspension system makes up only 2% of that weight. There other variables that will have a greater impact than the weight of the new Flight Attendant system on a mountain bike.

With those counter arguments said, are people going to be all over the place with their opinions on this system. Of course - we can't agree on where carbon should and should not be used, if a rear derailleur should be banned (OK, maybe we all agree on this one - looking at you DCA), the look of a Knolly bicycle, so on and so fourth. What we can agree on is that the industry is moving forward, but you can STILL purchase a single speed bicycle, a mechanical drivetrain, and suspension components that aren't adjusted with a servo motor.
  • 2 1
 @jlevandoski: for engineering those vehicles they are no different road cars, because that is where they will spend 99% of their lives. Active behaviour for them off road will still be governed by the same algorithms, which is to say that vehicle speed, engine speed, brake state, steering angle will be the predominant inputs that govern suspension behaviour. The control loop is of a very different nature on a non motorised vehicle.

2% is also a significant weight penalty on any non motorised vehicle.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I like your solution much, much more than what this Rock Shox product is offering. I think we put too much faith in the ability of electronics/computers to perform tasks consistently than we should. For people who want lockout, a wireless control on the handlebar is all that is necessary, or just a simple angle sensor to open and close the shocks. Constantly computing and adjusting on the fly is unnecessary for the vast majority of riders.
  • 1 0
 @rcybak: if you're so worried about electronics, I'll do you one better:

www.sram.com/en/rockshox/models/rm-1loc-a1
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: brilliant. Do that with user customization on thresholds and I’m in
  • 1 0
 @i-am-lp:The EBike EWS proved this last weekend.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: You don't pedal over bumps? You've never pedalled on a descent?
  • 2 0
 @Linc: Some would say pedaling should use a platform, even on the DH. Jerome Clementz on his travel adjust Jekyll had the switch controlled by a gripshift, so literally every time he had a straightaway to pedal he'd pop it into the lower travel. Other would say that you want your suspension active when pedaling at speed. Thats why I literally said "with some basic configuration, like minimum watts before locking out, and/or the angle of descent/climb before locking out"
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: So full lock out when pedalling hard out of a rough corner then? Excellent. Open compression settings when geeing out on a steep switchback? Brilliant. There are so many variables at play that make what you're proposing incredibly complicated - or more likely - a poor rider experience compared to a more standard approach to suspension set up.
  • 1 0
 @Linc: thought about this; huge problem if its for racing - but could you calibrate it on a downslope and then run the bias toward open?

For enduro just a shock would be cool of that type of calibration works
  • 1 0
 @Linc: do any of you read
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: nope. But getting called out changes behavior - so your app/lockout sounds good to me. Doosit.
  • 66 3
 I love the constant technological progress that happens in this sport, but I am beginning to genuinely dislike the amount of electronics that are becoming a part of the bikes. Can't we keep it mechanical? I know that not every bike is going to have this, but give it a few years to trickle down and I am certain that SRAM and Fox will see to it that the majority of high end bikes are going to have this stuff.
  • 16 1
 My exact thoughts. I'd rather see some improvements on chasi, dampers, and springs than those gimmicks with battery. I already end-up on a spin with a dead GPS once or twice a month so there is no doubt this is not for me. I could do with better suspensions at all levels. For instance in was time that we finally get the addition of a hydro bottom-out feature is great, same goes for the air-bleed ports.
  • 3 1
 I totally agree with you on the dislike, but I don't think it'll become the "default" for many, many years.
Suspension companies will continue to offer analogue options for the foreseeable future, I'm very confident.
  • 2 0
 my angle of this is that... as seen in some winner bike this year, and how this could be used in other forms of racing.. rules need to level the field for racers.... Im a total noob on F1 but I think some things have been banned as they are accesible to a few .. so Mr Privateer with his commencal or nukeproof would be in disadvantage, may be ?
  • 2 0
 Agreed. If you're not already buying a frame and building it up, probably time to make that your default.
  • 4 0
 Agreed. This stuff is amazing, but I don't want it to be developed at the cost of developing analogue bikes. There is something beautiful about the constraints that are put on designers when they have to create a fully mechanical and analogue solution. I want analogue bikes to keep developing so that they pedal better and descend better, without the need for switches OR electronics.
  • 5 0
 What I worry about is that 'high end' bikes used to be about peak performance - with stuff like this, the 'high end' is more about making bad riders feel slightly less bad. Doesn't improve top end performance at all so the 'trickle down' that had existed in the sport for so long is sort of done.
  • 1 0
 @Linc: I might be a bit cynical but I totally agree, it feels like most bike 'innovations' these days is mostly aimed at extracting as much money as possible from the rich, mostly middle aged dudes, who buy a new top end bike every year, and not at improving the riding experience.
  • 1 0
 Replying to myself here, but I had another thought on this!...

Interesting also that this technology is initially being pushed towards the Enduro market. We are trying to find new ways to make these increasingly massive bikes more efficient at pedalling, when it really isn't an inherent problem with the suspension we are fixing but the overall design intent of the bike that makes them such inefficient bikes to pedal. Will this mean that in 5 years we are racing enduro on 200mm travel bikes with auto-lockouts? Again I am not against progressing, but I don't know if I like where this is heading?
  • 1 0
 @Jmac888: automatic unlock of suspension.. thats it! So you dont start the stage with it locked and bounce to a tree..
  • 54 1
 I design electronic system for a living. Thus, to me, nothing sounds cool about this product and it only reminds me my daily job. On the other hand, I find that the purely mechanical system that is a bike is a marvel of engineering. As the only source of energy is the rider, it makes you feel connected to the bike by being the only decision maker. I feel that more batteries and more electronics disconnect the rider from the mountain bike experience in general. It adds a black box on your bike that can't be totally controlled and maintained. But I concede that this view is totally influenced by my personnal experience.
  • 11 0
 It resonates with me who doesn't have a clue about electronics too Big Grin
  • 6 0
 wait till you see the bikes they slapped electrickery motors on
  • 1 0
 So we need at least one of the two following options in the future: We need to make humans more electrical to feel more connected with the bike again. Or we need those electric bike systems to be open source so that every one can tune and configure what they want.
  • 1 0
 @Pussyslayer: i always thought humans were electrical my brain sends an impulse to my thumb it pushes a lever or it doesnt
  • 2 0
 @Compositepro: Yeah but @AAAAAHHH feels disconnected from his bike if a blackbox decides over his riding. So we obviously need direct brain to brake connection without oldschool lever thingies. Or brain to fork connection to manipulate all suspension setting on the fly at our controlBig Grin
  • 76 35
 I'll kick it off with the flight attendant jokes and get that part over with:

What do you call a pregnant flight attendant?
Pilot Error.
  • 36 4
 What did the football player say to the flight attendant?
Put me in coach.
  • 77 1
 No flight attendants were hurt in the making of this joke:

A woman was at her hairdresser's getting her hair styled for a trip to Rome with her husband. She mentioned the trip to the hairdresser, who responded:
"Rome? Why would anyone want to go there? It's crowded and dirty. So, how are you getting there?"
"We're taking Delta," was the reply. "We got a great rate!"
"Delta?" exclaimed the hairdresser. "That's a terrible airline. Their planes are old, their flight attendants are ugly, and they're always late. So, where are you staying?"
"We'll be at this exclusive little place over on Rome's Tiber River."
"Don't go any further. I know that place. Everybody thinks it’s something special and exclusive, but it's really a dump."

A month later, the woman came in again and the hairdresser asked her about her trip to Rome.
"It was wonderful," explained the woman, "not only were we on time in one of Delta's new planes, but it was overbooked, and they bumped us up to first class. The great food and wine were served by beautiful flight attendants. And the hotel was great! They'd just finished a $$$ remodeling job, and now it's a jewel, the finest hotel in the city."

"Well," muttered the hairdresser, "that's all well and good, but I know you didn't get to see the Pope while in Rome."
"Actually, we were quite lucky, because as we toured the Vatican, a Guard tapped me on the shoulder, and explained that the Pope likes to meet some of the visitors, and if we’d be so kind as to step into his private room and wait, the Pope would personally greet us. Sure enough, five minutes later, the Pope walked through the door and shook my hand! I knelt down and he spoke a few words to me."

"Oh, really! What'd he say?"

He said: "Who f*cked up your hair?"
  • 33 0
 Too bad this is basically a little motor turning your compression dial, nothing special. If only it could rapidly adjust pressure, compression and rebound, it would be somewhat interesting. This is just for people who don't mind spending 2k extra to not have to flick a lever
  • 14 0
 Yeah, it's pretty interesting that they put all this effort into _just_ doing low-speed compression. Cane Creek has shown that a better climb switch slows both LSC and LSR, and with a little robot doing the work, why the hell wouldn't RS adjust both. It seems the industry is still a bit stuck on that simplistic "firmer/stiffer is faster" mindset, when really stiffer usually only _feels_ faster because it's sending more vibration into the rider.

On my local trails, I never use the climb switch on my shock (and my fork [Grip2] doesn't have one anyway) because the climbs are not smooth enough to gain any benefit from the suspension being firmer. In fact, the faster I climb, the softer I was the suspension to be, for traction as I bash up and over roots and rocks and such.

I suppose if my climbs were mostly smooth and super long, I might want to use a climb switch, but usually by that point that ascending and descending become such discrete events that a robot doing adjustments seems like overkill.
  • 5 0
 @justinfoil: I hadn't properly picked this up from the article. I feel like "all that effort for only LSC adjustment" should be a con.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: I never mess with my suspension for climbs even on fire roads. I hardly have any suspension bob just sitting and spinning, not enough to make a difference really. And in tech, I do prefer it being active. That's in a coil suspension bike too.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: You're doing it right in my view. Traction > "_feeling_ quick because it's stiff AF"
  • 36 0
 SRAM is trying so hard to get as much batteries on a bike as possible...
  • 7 0
 Sounds like they are planning a super duper intergrated ebike at some point.
  • 5 0
 @xxinsert-name-herexx: it's somhow logical. 6+ different batteries on one bike is linsane.
  • 5 0
 Can't waint until the release 0,01% smaler bateries
  • 4 0
 @xxinsert-name-herexx: Which will still use wireless connections between components that have wires running between them. Mark my words.
  • 2 0
 Its kinda shocking they haven't moved into the ebike market. Shimanos EP8 is the most common ebike motor/drive system out there, and its a huge growth market.
  • 4 0
 Then theres Scott who just launched their e-bike with AXS derailleur connected by cable to the main battery. Smile
  • 7 0
 @hamncheez: They have been working on that, but are holding off until they've figured out how to guarantee a product that'll come to market with a critical flaw and can then be improved in almost every respect over multiple generations, only to still suffer from the same critical flaw. You know, like the Reverb...
  • 2 0
 @g-42: hey my suspension post is a feature not a defect
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Fair point!
  • 31 0
 right, i get the need for advancing technology and dampers etc, thats fine. but its pretty frustrating sitting here, watching someone market this to us all, when simple problems like creaking steerer tubes on £1400 forks, continues to be shrugged off by the likes of fox or rockshox. Id hazard a guess that 98% of people dont want an algorithm to adjust their compression, and would much rather have a fork that performs reliably for more than a year without having to be sent off to manufacturer to get new CSU'.
  • 2 0
 thats called shite engineers who cant do calcs
  • 3 0
 Shit most people just want that first marzocchi feel back. Start there
  • 1 0
 @browner: @browner: Marzocchi made some great forks! My first marzocchi fork was a Drop-Off Triple however. Holy mother of top out. Even good manufacturers make duds too!
  • 23 1
 The buttercups looks like an elastomer version of the short coil that lives on the end of the EXT Era air spring. SRAM took a little piece of a 1996 Quadra 21R and plopped it into the 21st century!
  • 2 2
 Or DVO's OTT spring.
  • 6 1
 @streetfighter848: OTT is an adjustable negative spring, whereas Butter Cups are simpler rubber bumpers above and below the foot bolt that lets it sort of "float" to take away some high-frequency vibrations.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: which helps that quip with most suspension aficionados.
  • 4 0
 Anyone else recall their first time riding their Quadra equipped bike in winter conditions?
  • 2 0
 And gave it a goofy name
  • 3 0
 Honesty the Buttercup is way more interesting to me than the Flight Attendant.

If it firms up during the winter you just take a bit of air for a slightly softer ride. During the summer months it’ll soften up as you get your conditioning back and add air to the fork.

They could be made adjustable, so someone who wants a softer initial stroke could put in a softer Durometer Buttercup.
  • 22 1
 ~7 batteries to run a normal bike??? good thing ill never spend 14 grand on a bike with all this
  • 8 20
flag rowanpzc (Oct 5, 2021 at 7:44) (Below Threshold)
 Well it's not a normal bike, it's a carbon fiber full-suspension mountain bike with wireless electronically controlled damping and wireless shifting. Let's all go back to rigid 26'' clunkers with coaster brakes like the core riders we are
  • 6 0
 let's make it 8 then. #8, AXS operated bike stand. automatically pops out once you arrive at your car after the ride.
  • 3 1
 @kilazilla: Always laugh when i see some Joey who has added a ten pound kick stand clamped to his bike.
  • 18 5
 I don't understand why Fox and RS just don't make coil forks and use more resources improving their coil shocks. From a competitive moto(enduro, MX, and XC), standpoint, no one uses electronic suspension. I feel that the MTB industry should really be refining coil suspension and tailoring(if not making new dampers) for coil specifically. Semi-active suspension isn't that great. And this is coming from someone who's had them on motorcycles and cars.
  • 5 0
 They are already so far behind on that they decided to go a completely different route that they could market easier.
  • 9 6
 @Almazing, I'd imagine weight and adjustability are two of the main reasons. And don't forget, Marzocchi (Fox) does have a coil version of the Z1. Needing to keep different springs in stock to accommodate different riders weights is a fairly substantial hurdle compared to the easy adjustments that air shocks have.
  • 18 1
 @mikekazimer: Weight is always a fallback reason, but how many people here jumped on the 38 and Zeb when those came out? Need I remind everyone here that the 38 weighs nearly 1/2 pound over the 36. I hardly see anyone complaining about the extra weight when they needlessly made that 'upgrade'.

I understand the hurdle of having the need for different springs and the headache that comes with choosing the right one. Yup, it sucks. So if Fox or RS don't want to keep a bunch of different springs around, why the hell do they keep a bunch of non-travel-adjustable air springs for different fork models around?

They could easily make one air spring with travel adjustments like every 'third party' or 'aftermarket' fork out there. The Z1 is a great fork, but it's also a compromised fork. Every coil fork should come with LSC and HSC adjustments. No, it doesn't need to be 43 clicks each either. Fox just hamstrings that particular fork because they don't want it cutting in to their own Fox branded sales.

Sorry man. I just don't think weight and the idea of keeping different springs around are good excuses for not making coil forks.
  • 3 2
 @Almazing: A lot of it also comes down to OEM sales. Forks are a lot easier to order with air springs because it's a one size fits all solution. Product managers already have enough on their plates without also needing to forecast purchasing the right spring rate depending on size and intended use.
  • 4 0
 @m47h13u: So OEM rear coil shocks are okay but not OEM coil forks?
  • 3 2
 From a logistics standpoint it probably is easier for shocks than it would be forks. With forks, if a customer wants a heavy spring with a medium size bike, tearing off the fork is going to a PITA.

With a shock, it’s two bolts.

I think it also depends on the brand and how they handle orders. DTC brands might have a distribution center that can swap parts before a bike is shipped, but a shop may want to get the bike off the floor as quickly as possible, and telling a customer they’ll need to wait a week for different springs might put people off.
  • 3 0
 I have about two pounds of supplies in the SWAT box of my E29. The weight penalty for the coil on the Ohlins is not a concern. Getting the correct coil on a $9000 bike shouldn't be a concern either (since this system is OEM only) @mikekazimer:
  • 19 7
 It feels wrong to say, but this seems like a legitimate innovation that could be worth paying for once the price comes down. If money's no object, I'd want this on my bike. There'll always be the crowd that calls it the "cheater switch" but to me, this is just technology progressing, much like a new damper in a fork. I don't see how this is any different.
  • 4 1
 I like long trail rides where I never stop and I think I would really enjoy it on a trail bike, but SRAM is behind it, so we have to hate it, right?
  • 14 1
 $2000 for your bike to flip the lockout switch for you a legitimate innovation? Slamming into a rock garden not knowing if your suspension is locked or unlocked or will unlock halfway through doesn't sound like progress at all
  • 1 0
 @chize: to be fair, I ride a Scott with twinloc, and I occasionally slam into rocks forgetting to open up my suspension all the way. Definitely user error… but analog systems aren’t perfect either I guess
  • 4 0
 @Hayek: A lot of people hated on Live Valve as well, it's definitely not SRAM specific. I think the hate comes more from them implying this is going to be great for everyone, and if you don't have it then your ride experience will suffer. When really it's for people who measure ride success purely by miles per time period (ie: racers, strava-nuts, etc); and the people who measure ride quality simply by "amount of time spent riding" don't want more electronic bullshit and even more batteries to worry about.
  • 16 5
 > Getting the Flight Attendant system up and running requires a strong cellular or wi-fi signal

This is not correct. You can set up the system fully without your phone or any internet. Just pair the components and calibrate using onboard buttons.

The app provides additional integrations and adjustments, but is not necessary for setup.

- a rockshox engineer
  • 4 0
 Any take on some of the valid criticisms made here regarding putting resources towards refining simpler existing systems vs chasing future breakthroughs? I know it's a delicate balancing act in product development world but it would seem there are some low hanging fruit in the suspension space that could be addressed to impact the broader riding populous in a more meaningful way.

-pragmatic rider
  • 5 2
 @agraber: no comment! I'm an EE not a product manager
  • 1 0
 What happens in the air? If you pedal or half crank for a whip will it stiffen up?
  • 1 0
 @makripper: it has a gyro and accelerometer, I'd wager that the cpu could differentiate between in air and on ground pedaling 'characteristics'
  • 2 0
 @paulbalegend: lol.... well if you happen to see any of them in a planning meeting where you presumably are given instruction on what to do... tell 'em Aaron on pinkbike is a certified armchair expert and thinks they missed the mark if their goal was to maximize volume sold and really penetrate the market. They should have done a simpler, much dumber electronic lockout that provides the benefits of wireless without all the cost and complexity of a system that only serves a tiny tiny fraction of riders. Of course if their goal was to "beat live valve" they probably did that.... even if it has the same outcome of live valve (people mostly ignore it and it vastly underperforms at a sales level). If the simple version is coming, then kudos to them....
  • 1 0
 @paulbalegend: Also, thank you for essentially decoupling the electronic bits from the fork and shock units such that they are serviced as normal.

I've been told by fox that we can not work on live valve units because they're too complex inside so they MUST be sent back to Fox. I don't appreciate that.
  • 1 0
 @agraber: you can run it in manual mode if that's what you want Smile I used to do that until the algorithm was at a point where it was vastly better than my own toggling.
  • 11 1
 As another EE who works on some pretty complex autonomous systems this fails KISS quite spectacularly. Adding complexity and weight to already weight sensitive systems for marginal benefits only makes sense for the vendor to provide another tier of cost to prevent users from spending on something else.

I do agree this would have been a nice challenge to work on and they have packaged it well. Also, we’re back to elastomers now? No thanks.
  • 15 4
 You know what also "dramatically improves climbing performance"?
A climb switch. Or correct low-speed compression settings.

This pretty lame and entirely pointless.
  • 5 0
 Even more fundamental is having good geometry and suspension kinematics.
  • 2 0
 @haen: I had the exact same thought. SRAM Flight Attendant ... or Ripmo? Hmmm.... think I'll go Ripmo thank you very much.
  • 10 1
 Those silly ButterCups are just adding hysteresis to the system. It's kind of a tacit admission that their damper and spring are not at all good at handling those high-freq movements. (And I would have to agree: my 2019 Pike, with both the B and C air-springs, was always "rattly" feeling in washboard-y high-freq stuff compared to my 2020 Fox 36. Only way to smooth it was to run it super soft, which is not a trade-off I was willing to make, hence the new fork)

Fox and Ohlins and Cane Creek go out of their way to reduce hysteresis with twin-tube recirculating dampers and high-flow pistons and such, while SRAM just says "go old-school and shove some rubber bits in there".

How are they going to perform when it's super cold or super hot? Back to the old elastomer days where the weather has a huge effect on how your suspension feels... Hooray?
  • 1 0
 You make a good point, but wouldn't the worst case be that it rides like last year's fork?
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: I think worst case is that it throws off your tuning depending on the weather. And that there is one more part to wear out or fail suddenly.
  • 1 1
 I don't know anything except that I haven't been super impressed by the RS suspension either, and that raises the biggest issue in my mind: rapidly switching between different poorly damped suspension modes is barely an improvement.
  • 1 0
 I like the idea. I would like a hybrid setup better. Or lightweight coil. And of course, better dampers, but I’m glad Rockshox is experimenting with something others than thousand dollar gadgets to adjust things for us.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: experimenting, that's the key. This reminds me of the C spring from a couple years ago: "hey, turns out we didn't do enough research and testing and it seems our air spring tune is actually not what people think they want, so here's a band-aid "solution" that might work. We'll see you in a couple years with another band-aid!"

I think these buttercups are just proof that even the C spring "upgrade" that is now standard is still not great.
  • 12 0
 This will have at least one lover in every city.
  • 7 0
 this thing is only geared toward efficiency improvements, not traction. I’d be more impressed if the system could dynamically adjust ALL the variables such as rebound, HSC & LSC independently, and air pressure. As it stands, it only serves to benefit racers pedaling aggressively up and down hill.
  • 1 0
 Not to mention it would still require a tune if you are heavier or lighter than the intended rider weight.
  • 7 0
 7 batteries... Plus your phone battery, plus your ebike battery, plus your range extender battery plus your smart watch, plus your smart glasses, plus your wireless headphones, plUs your spot or inreach beacon plus your gps PLUS THE SPARE BATTERY INCASE SRAM AXS BATTERY DIES ON TRAIL
  • 4 2
 Regardless of the [probable] satire behind this comment, it does go to show how insignificant charging batteries really is. It's not like you come back from a night ride and complain how you have to charge batteries - "back in my day, we USED THE MOON as our trail light".
  • 7 0
 What makes a bike cool is it’s powered solely by cookies, pizza, kale, or the power of will. Going with more simple bikes recently has make the experience better and more fun. Reliability and simplicity of setup and maintenance leaves more time for great rides. The challenge of making a more simple bike dance over terrain is unreal.
  • 10 1
 Just waiting for FOX to come up with a similar system called PILOT Big Grin
  • 4 0
 Cruise control
  • 4 0
 Auto pilot
  • 3 0
 Dear rs competition: send me a check
  • 2 1
 Fox has had a system a few years now...it's called Live Valve and it works similar with adjusting compression dampening using sensors. The Fox system has one superior design and that is they stuck the rear sensor at the rear axle and the front sensor on the lower legs, which makes more sense for accurately tracking performance of the unweighted suspension.
  • 5 0
 Heard it a thousand times.. Just like riding a flight attendant named buttercup until it sounds like a robotic duck being hit with a hammer. Same old story, new pony. I'll show myself out
  • 5 0
 Here's a crazy idea suspension companies, why not design dials with numbers on them instead so we can see settings at a glance.....?
  • 1 0
 Well, RS and Fox have both done that with recent shocks for LSR (and maybe LSC...).

But I think it's a bad idea since it limits the adjustment range to how many number they can jam onto the dial. Having only 8 or 10 clicks for LSR means there are large damping changes between clicks, and combined with the large range of air spring pressures, means that riders will have a much greater chance of being "in-between clicks", or at the end of the range of clicks, for their desired spring rate. And since rebound damping is for the most part set & forget, even if you have both LSR and HSR, as long as you're not frequently changing spring rates, or rider weight, there is not much need to quickly check what setting it's in.
  • 1 0
 Or an RFI chip that gives you a reading of your suspension pressure without having to attach a damn shock pump all the time.
  • 2 0
 @Linc: you do know that attaching the pump changes the reading? The only number that matters is what it says right before you detach. Really shouldn't need to be checking your shock pressure too often anyway. Maybe it's time for an air can rebuild.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I like to tinker and set suspension up for different trail conditions, tyre pressures, bar heights etc.
  • 2 0
 @Linc: In that case, remember that on every attach you lose some pressure as the hose fills (doesn't hurt detach because the valve closes before the hose empties). There are some that will try to tell you they've derived the pressure change caused by the hose, or they prefill the hose to what they think the pressure inside is, but don't be silly. If you're serious about tinkering, just use the pressure (after equalizing chambers, if applicable) before you detach for best repeatability.

And if you're tinkering and changing things, that's not just "checking pressure", that's "setting pressure".
  • 6 0
 When I was your age I had to adjust my LSR by hand uphill both ways in the snow
  • 3 0
 So for the price of an entry level full suspension bike I can add more complexity to my bike just so my suspension can be almost perfect in all situations? I know this is the future and innovation costs money, but $2,000 seems bit steep to adjust something I can barely feel.
  • 4 1
 Funny, in the test at the link below you say there is no big difference, now testing this RockShox system you say "Dramatically improves climbing performance"

www.pinkbike.com/news/tested-does-a-lockout-actually-make-climbing-faster.html
  • 2 2
 That article actually said, "The advantage offered by a lockout under these conditions is measurable but modest." That was with only a rear lockout - Flight Attendant locks the fork as well, so the feeling of efficiency is increased even further. On the Enduro I was testing with the difference between open and fully locked out is very, very noticeable - I'd call it a dramatic difference.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: But also with reflections on the timer?
  • 3 0
 I have to say, I like having one bike that can be a blast on a smooth flowy trail one day, and rally through serious rough and rocky the next. Understandable this isn't going to change the Geo of my bike or drop the weight but it seems this could help to make it possible to enjoy a bike with more travel on smoother terrain. Is this the ticket to making my 150mm travel all mountain bike carve through smooth trails nearly as efficiently as a 120mm trail bike? Really liked the idea of Live Valve for this but all the reviews were that it compromised so much on the descents by firming up. Seems like this bridges that gap. A $2k price tag might be worth it if you can have one nicely spec'd bike that works for both rather than splitting that between two bikes.
  • 4 1
 As a product designer, I can recognize the effort put in here. As a life long race and performance fan, I love the concept of active suspension and improving the experience of any sport... well anything really. Will I put this on my current mountain bike. no. Will I put it on my E-bike that I will purchase in the next 2-3 years. Yes I would. Why: because I will consider it a different activity. Biking vs e-biking. With e-biking I already have "more then mechanical" inputs with a motor and a battery, so why not geek out and try this. I love this shit. Will be great to see/work with the data, and the idea that one day it can learn from the data, start to anticipate a trail better the second time around with all those other IOT inputs helping derive a better experience. That means different things to different people of course. Go fast, do it safer, be more comfortable, ride more often, ride longer, etc, etc... Summary = very cool.
  • 3 0
 My beef with systems like this that firming up the fork while pedaling/climbing is just keeping the bike slacker when going up hill... on a bike like the enduro you want that fork sagging as deep as possible into its travel when climbing to give you a manageable climbing position.

Now a fork that could somehow firm up the compression substantially while maintaining (or better yet, increasing) sag... THAT would be the ticket to helping these big bikes on long climbs.

Maybe it's time to bring the Talas back.... might actually be useful now that trail bikes are so slack.

Really all of this just feels like a big waste of R&D money that could've been put to use paying their employees better or giving us better pricing on normal suspension Frown
  • 12 9
 Dear Sram, Go f*ck yourself.
P.S. Dear MTB Industry, GO f*ck YOURSELF.
P.P.S Enough with this shit, this gives me incentives to sell all my bikes and get into a Curling league. At least the Curling industry isn't trying to f*ck us over and over, and it's Canada's official "National sport". Yeah, f*ck MTB, this shit's just depressing. It's just complete B.S. that makes our sports more and more a "higher class" sports because only the rich entitled c*nts can afford it now (or at least in the near future).
P.P.P.S This is like Specialized 1000$ "carbon push-bike" for 1-3 years old - i.e. the clients for this shit are clueless rich c*nts.
  • 8 3
 Dude- relax. This is for pros who get it for free and squids without kids. The trails are the trails no matter who gets what silly tech crap. Nothing makes up for skill and hard work.
  • 2 1
 So, shall we start construction on the bridge to cross your river of tears?
  • 3 0
 Not only do I feel the application is poorly implemented for what the average rider really wants/needs, but what's truly sad is the stupid amounts of money they will ludicrously overcharge for what simply amounts to what a micro controller, a servo, a battery and maybe a first year high school electronics education could accomplish. There's nothing groundbreaking about this.
  • 3 0
 Then do it yourself lol
  • 3 0
 Will the buttercups be offered in different durometer rubber levels and as a retrofit for older forks? I love this concept for my SID Ultimate that is not great for off-the-top feel.
  • 5 0
 That seems like it has aftermarket potential from vorsprung, push, etc.
  • 4 2
 @b1k35c13nt15t: Vorsprung or Push would never do something as unrefined as a chunk of rubber adding hysteresis to the system. Maybe maybe maybe it opens the door for an aftermarket coil spring buttercup-type add-on, but the real solution is make a better damper that can handle the high-frequency stuff (twin-tube recirculating dampers, high-flow pistons, various other ways of reducing hysteresis, etc). Using rubber is probably the stupidest possible solution: what happens to your precious ButterCups when it's cold?
  • 2 0
 When it’s cold, you’ll just have a solid air spring shaft like they’ve been for years.

How does a coil differ from an elastomer if both have the same spring rate? It doesn’t.

Would a hybrid setup (Alla CoilAir or MARS, or Avy) be preferable? Sure! But I think this is a neat trick. It may be a failure, but it shows that suspension designers do realize that our air forks are too damn harsh. Maybe eventually they’ll give us good dampers again (and lighter coil forks).
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: yes and since that solid feel is different than the intended feel, it makes your fork feel more dependent on the weather, which is silly. Don't want to have to change spring things just because it's cold out. Big part of the reason the industry left behind elastomer springs.

Coil is more consistent with temperature and over it's lifetime, that's the difference.

"Our air forks" aren't too harsh, just theirs. I went from a 2014ish Fox 36 R2C2 to a 2019 Pike RC to a 2020 Fox 36 Grip2, and the Pike was terrible (for me) compared to either Fox: Pike was so chattery, so harsh off the top and even off the sag, felt like it was fighting to hold me up instead of eating up the terrain. 36 is so smooth and fast to move while also being very controlled in it's motion, just eats bumps of all sizes and lets me get on with shredding.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: if you think the fox stuff feels good, wait until you try Manitou or EXT.
  • 8 2
 always with the terrible names for crap like this...so cringey
  • 2 0
 From all this electronic suspension controls,my favorite was the Magura eLect. Weighted next to nothing,and used a simple inclinometer to adjust the suspension depending you were climbing or descending. Shame that Magura didn't evolved the concept,and apparently doesn't make suspension forks anymore.
  • 2 0
 how about adding an electronically controlled hydraulic bottom out? or a multi air chamber system that automatically adjusts to maintain ideal sensitivity and support. many people run very little compression. so electronically controlled a variable that few riders actively tinker with isn’t going to dramatically change things.
  • 3 1
 I had a customer in 2014 who bought a Haibike SDuro E:i - Rock Shox Suspension with a sensor on fork and shock and opened and closed in 5-8 milliseconds.

ebike-mtb.com/en/test-report-haibike-sduro-allmtn-pro-high-tech-with-ei-shock

That was 7 years ago. Had so much success - the next year they discontinued it. Now it will be the "new" game changer!?
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: 2 questions:

1) there is a lean angle associated with calibration. Does the sus have an option to firm up for more support in corners?

2) how does it effect jumping. Depending on size of the jump, does it react? Like I imagine it will be open on smaller stuff, like under 1' rocks or roots you'd want to boost off. But will it firm up on the face of an 6' natural lip? Having my suspension change on the face of a jump sounds pretty annoying, if not pucker inducing... ?
  • 4 1
 1 - No, the suspension doesn't have an option for corners - the tilting during calibration is to let the sensors figure out where the bike is in space, so it can tell if it's heading up or downhill. 2 - I spent two days in the Whistler Bike Park with this bike and didn't run into any strangeness. Even when heading up the face of a big jump the suspension remained open and predictable. Maaaybe you could trick it if you decided to toss in a pedal stroke, but pedalling up the lip of a jump isn't something I ever do. You could also put it into manual mode and set it to full open if you were planning on hitting jumps all day and didn't want to think about it.
  • 5 0
 That leads to the question: If you pedal in the air like Bruni, can you land on a rigid bike?
  • 2 0
 "Wireless seems like a great selling point, and it does simplify setup, but I feel like if there was a way to connect everything so that it could all be charged from one port that would make things easier."

LOL I know you already know the answer, but didn't want to say it out loud, so I'll help. "if only there was a way..." haha. The answer would be... a centralized port somewhere on the bike, where all these wireless things connect to. aka go wireless to get wires and cables off your bike then end up routing a bunch of wires thru a cable housing inside your bike. Granted, might be way less cumbersome or annoying than shifter cables and dropper post cables, but I have a feeling that going against the core notion of its existence in the first place, will prohibit you from getting your central connected charging, or at least without a ton of eye-rolls and irony when unveiled.
  • 2 0
 Charging mulitple different capacity LiPO batteries from a single input jack is no simple task. Can easily become a flaming hover board if the charging circuitry is poorly designed or compromised.
  • 2 0
 All these extra complications ad costs and batteries to take care of and not one one mention of how much more efficient stiffer suspension is. Or isn’t. It’s often stated with zero proof that plush suspension is wasting energy. How much? Put some numbers on that for me will ya! It’s like those Absolute black guys selling an oversized pulley wheel derailleur cage with golf ball dimples and ceramic bearings for $800 and telling us it’s way more efficient. It’s bullshit.

To me it’s meaningless. I rarely use climb switches. I do sometimes to see if I can detect a difference. Usually it feels worse. Less traction and a rougher ride which I think some people think feels faster.
  • 2 0
 This reminds me of electronic damper control that comes on some cars.
My BMW has it, I guess it’s a cool selling feature, but largely pointless as a well set up aftermarket shock from bilstien, koni, Sachs etc will be more comfortable on the street, preform better on the track, all while being cheaper and more reliable.
  • 2 0
 This is what truly scares me.. Mate Rimac (Yep that one) about his bike company GREYP


Mate: I’m not sure what they’ll look like, I can only tell you what we believe the experience should be. An eMTB should be your companion. It should make you smile and help you when times get tough. It should allow you to stay connected with your friends, to compete across continents, train alone or in a group, take care of yourself and itself. It should make decisions on its own and talk to other bikes and infrastructure. It should understand its surroundings, learn from its experiences, create content or even be a gaming platform. And the best part is this is all possible with current technology.
  • 2 0
 @MikeLevy

Hmmm, if only there were a proven, simple, comparatively inexpensive, easily maintained/repairable component that weighed less and dramatically improved climbing performance. Damn, the name of such item seems right at my fingertips but yet somehow locked out of...... hey, wait a minute!!!!!!
  • 2 0
 As motorcycles... they don't come with any tool bag.. because you need to pay dealerships to fix it...
Now to Bicycles... you will not be able to service anything yourself... good luck getting a spot on your local bike shop for a full electrical overview on your spaceship with pedals..
All smells money to me..= more stress and less fun..
What was the point on that relaxing time on the bike?
  • 2 0
 This will probably end up like Fox’ s live valve. An interesting technology that some sponsored riders use but you wont see many in the wild on regular bikes under regular people. Too much money and added complexity for a tiny gain that is mostly in the riders mind. What ever happened to the Naild React bikes from Polygon and Marin? They were touted as not needing any lockouts? To me that is a much better direction. Suspension kinematics that don’t rely on damping changes via a switch.

Who actually buys a bike with enduro levels of travel for its climbing ability? Anyone? Beuller? Oh sure some might might choose one 170mm travel bike over another because it climbs less badly than another but really? The question with this style of bike is “how does this mofo descend?”
  • 2 0
 Hear me out - an aftermarket company could capture about 90% of the benefit with a simple add-on designed for 2-position lever shocks. I get that a 2-position lever isn't quite as effective as a full lockout, but a simple motor that flicks the lever back and forth, combined with a handlebar mount control that toggles would be pretty neat. I don't really want my fork to lockout or even firm up. If anything, I think I'd prefer my fork to sag as deeply as possible on climbs, as this creates a steeper HTA and lower front end.

That said, I can see this system being useful in enduro races, where there are short, mid-stage, climbs that a racer may want to sprint through with a rigid bike. As the technology becomes better and more mature, it opens the door for changes across LSC, HSC, HSR during active riding.
  • 2 0
 Not sure why they'd advertise this on the Enduro, that bike pedals fine full open. The best 300g upgrade you can make for the Enduro is a coil shock

I am more excited about the non-electric updates to the suspension, namely the hydraulic bottom out for the SD and hopefully an updated airspring for the Zeb (more like B1 Lyrik/Pike)
  • 1 0
 Holdup

Hydraulic Bottom Out on Super Deluxe? Where did you hear this?
  • 4 0
 @PHeller: The PB review I'm commenting on...
  • 1 0
 @lyzyrdskydr: haha DERP missed it!

That's some good news.
  • 2 0
 Insanely cool stuff for race - imagine u pushing down EWS stage in Chile or EU Alps, pedaling hard as f , and boom traverse section btw the next downhill, u do not need to think, u keep pushing, and keep shaving seconds from your run;

I doubt the goal was maximize uphill performance for average joe on the fire rode uphill
  • 2 0
 This - theyre marketing is generic, but the only place Id see this over a climb switch is racing. Ive been toying with the idea of a straight post w/ QR over a dropper so I can have a remote lockout on the rear. I know you can do all sorts of bar shenanigans but this is really clean - only improvement would be like @hamncheez suggested is a power threshold. Hammer out of turn and accelerate 10mph instead of get zapped and gain 2mph...

Hoping a shock only option in the future and that HBO - they need to put that in the charger up front too!
  • 2 0
 Is anyone going to acknowledge how funny this was?! "I did get an odd noise to come out of the rear shock when I hit a big root in the middle of a mode change, sort of like what I imagine it'd sound like if you hit a robotic duck with a hammer."
  • 2 0
 How will this affect bike design? What's interesting is this could greatly affect the way bikes are designed in the future. If pedaling performance can be controlled by flight attendant and is less of a factor in overall suspension design, then bike manufacturers can focus on the best overall downhill performance.
  • 2 0
 Neat! I see a cool opportunity here to make the pedal sensor power-based using a power meter (and I'm sure they do too), and grade the compression based on how hard the rider is pedaling. The added bonus is that the rider can record and analyze their power with just the one sensor. The new Rival spindle pm would do the trick nicely.
  • 11 8
 Bzzt, bzzt. The sound of bugs on the bug zapper. Bzzt, bzzt. The sound of a dentists drill working overtime to pay for this.
  • 10 14
flag hi-dr-nick (Oct 5, 2021 at 7:22) (Below Threshold)
 mother of god, dentist jokes are so played and not funny anymore.
  • 25 1
 @hi-dr-nick: I cut my teeth on dentist jokes and abandoning them would leave a cavity where they once were. No other joke is so incisive or filling.
  • 3 0
 Lol, Majority of my "rich friends" with the bling stuff are either retired military/LEO/nurses or biz owners whom work 60+ hours a week(smartly).
  • 4 0
 @hi-dr-nick: Only bad dentist jokes are not funny anymore. Funny dentist jokes on the other hand...
  • 1 0
 @hi-dr-nick: Fair enough....would you be ok with tech CEOs or maybe digital media CEOs for stereotypes of folks with more money then time/need for premium items?

Maybe we need a poll PB:

We are sick of Dentist jokes what stereotype should we replace it with:

1. Engineers, they make good money and always overspend on tech toys
2. Bankers/Financial adviser, money, nice suits and that 12k enduro bike out for the group XC ride
3. Doctors, most of my doctor friends are roadies because they don't want to get hurt mtbiking
4. Dentists, It is the classic and generally accepted as well paid, high depression/suicide rate so like to conpensate by buying nice toys
5. US presidents, Donald Trump is gone but hey we can still remember the good old days
6. Digital Media Empire CEO, Puts formerly free content behing a paywall and spends it on nice bikes he doesn;t have time to ride
7. Other


Just a side bar here: I actually got a free Enve Stem from ENVE last year for a slightly funny dentist joke on the aluminum stem launch article: Was along the lines of "a product a dentist can get for the hygienist"...
  • 1 0
 @pink505: guess I need to move to Canada. Engineering degree and engineering job, most definitely not well paid over here.
  • 1 0
 Around my parts, it's public servants or tradesmen on the expensive bikes.
  • 9 6
 Can't wait to see guys cruising down the greens with these specced on their s-works along with their axs and enves to really let you know they have more money than skill
  • 1 1
 What are you doing on the greens if you're so bad-ass? Ain't hurting those with "more skill than money" to have the robot-lovers injecting money into the industry _and_ staying off the more advanced trails.
  • 2 1
 @justinfoil: Except it sorta does in the long run - R&D budgets are finite and more money funnelling into tech that allows someone to progress from Squiddy McGreentrail to Squiddy McBlueflow might help the bottom line of a MTB company, but doesn't do much to advance the sport
  • 2 0
 @Linc: How does helping riders advance in skill (I guess you see this type of product as helping that?) NOT advance the sport? I'm mean, that's literally advancing the people doing the sport...
  • 2 1
 @justinfoil: It doesn't help advance skill. It compensates for a lack of it - and fitness. It's basically a comfort tool. For anyone who rides regularly or pushes the limits of the sport there are no performance gains from this.
  • 1 0
 @Linc: Comfort? For comfort, you wouldn't be firming up LSC at all. You're the one who mentioned someone going from green to blue, hence the skill advance. And since lots of riders pushing the limits really like [remote] lockouts/climb-switches, having it happen automatically definitely could add some performance.
  • 2 0
 For crying out loud, just give me the dropper controlled thing for an extra hundred bucks. Dropper down, full open…dropper up mixed mode or firm or whatever. It’s such a damn simple problem to fix.
  • 3 0
 It’s the future no question just look at every car. Audi has announced subscription services as well.
We can only resist it by not buying it.
  • 1 0
 Audi is premium brand and new cars being leased a lot in US - so subscription service makes perfect sence, people pay more for road insurance and other things at the dealership
  • 3 1
 Thanks for this review. I wasn't a fan before the review, but now its solidified, not a fan. In the 3 "Pros" above, there's only one that I would care about and its not related to the electronics.
  • 3 1
 SRAM Marketing: "Every part and feature should have a cute little name. How long have we been using the word 'sag'? It's so old. It's now Black Hole."

And at least they didn't call it Stewardess.
  • 1 0
 All the usual electronics, cost, weight, obsolescence, sustainability, doomsday, Orwel comments - seconded. My uniquish comment - I was really hoping for a simple, all in control system built around AXS - shifter, both dampers and droppers - from the existing AXS controllers. No extra sensors or thinking for me, maybe a hot key or smart click or two, but I just wanted easy, wireless control of everything. I'm already sold on RS suspension, and with ANOTHER Shimano 12s failure this morning, I'm eyeballing SRAM drivetrain stuff for my next replacement cycle... integration would have been a big selling point for me. This... this is better than livewire, but not by much.
  • 3 0
 I hope and pray that hackers will kill all bike electronics in my lifetime. That might be one of the greatest days of my life. Just ride your gd bike
  • 4 0
 The Specialized Enduro w/ “flight attendant” is called “the no brainer.”
  • 4 0
 MTB's are going the way of John Deer tractors. You don't have the right to repair.
  • 2 1
 Came here to say this. And it could end up soooo much worse (partially because there probably won't be a Ukrainian firmware like there is for the John Deere equipment). I know the PinkBike Commentariat are militant about their service intervals and never, ever allow their suspension to go 30 seconds over its rebuild interval. But... for the less amazing out there... What happens when the software gets updated and now tracks time since last service, then requires a SRAM certified repair center to conduct the service and reset the service interval? As is, this system basically blocks you from putting an open bath damper in ala Avalanche, stops you from converting to coil ala Smashpot, etc. No mix and match components either. Part of the reason this is on the top spec only (I imagine) is because the system basically requires an entire on brand spec. I'm not a huge SRAM fan to begin with, but can't imagine spending this much on a bike for RS dropper, fork, shock, SRAM brakes, drivetrain, crank, etc.
  • 1 0
 Is it @mikelevy that always says bikes should be designed to not need lockout switches? i wonder how this (in an affordable GX or even NX version) would impact that opinion. I spent two years on my Capra 29 AL Base without lockout and it was fine. Now that I have lockout (and a coil rear shock) I certainly do appreciate having it.

Disclaimer, i pretty much just winch to the top for a descent. 28t chainring and an Eagle cassette. In fairness, i generally don't use the 2 easiest gears except for long steep road climbs or as recovery gears after short punchy climbs.
  • 1 0
 Any idea if a current Quarq could do the function of the pedal spindle? It would be nice to save a couple of dollars if these ever became an aftermarket option. Or I would think this would be sold at the $$$ level that the bike should be coming with a power meter anyhow.
  • 1 0
 I'm not quite sure what this is for. Is it basically an automatic climb switch? Does it make damping adjustments while descending? It would make sense if it keeps it firm for flow and jumps, then opens up the right amount to deal with chatter, impacts and to give traction, but I can't see any mention here.

If its just an automatic climb switch, then I'm sorry but that's dumb. An extra 2 grand so I don't have to reach down and flick a lever?
  • 1 0
 Hard to tell how much better this performs compared to just reaching down to change compression settings by hand while riding. Also hard to tell what conditions this is most/least suited for. My rides are mostly long-up followed by long-down, so I set compression in the parking lot, and adjust it when I get to the top. Which makes me think this tech is better suited to cross-country, but the article above suggests that's not the target market.

Also wondered what kind of terrain might present a problem for this tech - short punchy climb (lockout) followed quickly by a drop - would it open up compression before impact?

I've got no problem with adding tech for those that want it. I'd sooner get some cheap telemetry tech that records my suspension performance than this Flight Attendant though. And more than all that, I wish manufacturers would invest more into tech that stops your bike from being stolen!
  • 1 0
 Not thrilled on each electronic having their own batteries. I also think having these electronic components on a regular mtb is kind of going against the principles if that's a thing. Hope to see these stuff on emtbs tho, all connected to the one battery.
  • 2 1
 Do any sponsored racers actually use this? Looks like a product purely aimed at entry level riders with low skills and big wallets. Sad that innovation is being directed at this demographic, rather than trying to push the limits of MTB
  • 1 0
 Man...I am an AXS owner (both the seatpost and derailleur) and genuinely believe it's the best option on the market, amazing stuff. This one is a head scratcher for me, I appreciate the innovation but I really struggle to understand the true advantage. Props to SRAM for always pushing things forward, I guess time will tell.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer
Has Sram finally released a two paddle left hand AXS controller too so you can run an AXS dropper post and the manual Flight Attendant mode? This should allow you to control an AXS rear derailleur with a left hand instead of a right hand.
  • 1 0
 i dont understand the value of this. modern bikes barely need a lockout. The bikes that did use different suspension designs to save weight.. about 300gr of weight lol.

the only value i'd see is if the suspension automatically adjusted all settings, with a lot more adjustment steps (like 20 rather than 3, and including low/high dampening). Of course it'd be far too heavy, but also, it'd be actually useful.
  • 1 0
 Is “Flight Attendant” the best name that they could come up with? “Flight Attendant” only congers up an image of a good looking person in an ugly uniform telling me to bend over and kiss my ass goodbye and I plummet to the ground!
  • 1 0
 Can't remember the last time I actually had a good looking flight attendant. NTTAWWT, the career just changed since the turn of the century.
  • 1 0
 I’m more interested in self driving cars, I just have no desire fir a self adjusting bike, I am quite satisfied with my ability to tune a suspension.

The funniest thing about having a self adjusting suspension is that a poor damper isn’t improved by wiring it to an algorithm
  • 1 0
 SRAM's next release is going to be the universal ear-hanger, a noise cancelling headset pre-programmed to cancel out the sound of small motors shifting, and idlers ticking, with dynamic DUB-step squeak compression, and center-line squawk digital filtering.
  • 1 0
 Some schmuck used to be big on suspension design. did not like lockouts wanted good design over simple lock outs. Now schmuck schmackey thinks computer controlled lock out are good and versatile answers to mtb. Guess schmuck evolving. Didnt know the leftovers from a bris could think so hard or baby new tech so well. Scmuck schmuckky schmuck schmack! Despite this nema still likes schmucky, and cant judge too hard, since nema likes fuel injection and ebikes (!!!) Maybe nema is a big schmuck chunk too.
  • 1 0
 " The idea is that Flight Attendant should make it possible for a longer travel bike to have greatly improved manners while climbing, all without losing anything on the descents - I like to think of it as the 'having your cake and eating it too' concept. "

The issue with long travel trail bike going uphill is not the suspension. Most of them can be locked or semilocked. It is the sheer weight of those things + low rolling aggressive tires. Adding 300gr of waste on them won't make them magically climb like goats.
  • 4 0
 Anybody else got the Build Me Up Buttercup lyrics in their head now?
  • 1 0
 How long do the batteries last on average? if you have the full AXS setup is one battery (deraileur, dropper, suspension) going down faster than the rest or are they pretty consistent?
  • 12 0
 it's perfectly matched so that at least one battery dies on every single ride
  • 2 0
 The run times are pretty similar for the suspension and drivetrain, somewhere in the neighborhood of 20-30 hours. In my experience the dropper lasts longer since it's not being used as much. That's somewhat terrain dependent, though. A spare battery is pretty easy to carry, and only weighs 25 grams. I'd carry one if I was heading out on a big mission with all this electronic stuff, just in case.
  • 2 0
 this needs an efficiency test (as does the sram version). Seems like you can run this fully open on the exact same bike, so why not?
  • 1 0
 I used to crave something like this to control bob under hard efforts. But i've found that high pivot bikes with high anti-squat (I imagine 160% or more) make for a totally solid platform.
  • 2 0
 Would it need to be recalibrated everytime you adjust your air pressure? Like if you are toying around with sag setups or changing pressure based off of conditions or area?
  • 1 0
 Yes, if you make a large change in the amount of sag you're running RockShox recommends re-calibrating the system. It only takes a couple minutes to do that.
  • 4 0
 ah, the delicate sound of pb readers heads popping....
  • 4 0
 Looks like Live valve is now the Di2 of the electronic suspension world
  • 1 0
 I coughed up and got my bike tuned via dialled telemetry. It transformed the bike...well worth it. For how much bikes cost it was well worth it. www.dialled-telemetry.com
  • 2 0
 2021 MTBer Needs:
ebikes to flatten hills
axs to handle shifting and seatpost
flight attendant to flatten bumps
additional charging outlets in garage
  • 1 0
 I ride a Capra because I prioritise the downs, how much faster would this make the ups a few seconds a minute or two.....really who cares. Riding is about enjoying the journey.
  • 1 0
 If the sales pitch would be like sure for $40 you don't have to reach down and hit the climb switch every time you want some pedal platform....then yes I would buy it. The juice still isn't worth the squeeze
  • 1 1
 On today's episode of "innovation" nobody needed: electronic suspension. Because flipping a lever is apparently too hard for most people... Next episode, we dive deep into why your pedal shouldn't be able to rotate on its own without a battery
  • 1 0
 I want that rear shock for my Enduro however I'm not sure if I would pay $1,300 for it. I guess that's the price range of an 11-6. I see it making my bike more fun on tame trails which is worth something
  • 2 0
 When can we ditch the wheels and drivetrain and have some kind of magnet pulse anti-gravity system? And a green ogre suit to fit..
  • 1 0
 Ok, in motorbikes this is quite standard so why not?

I'm just worried for the global shortage of any raw material and components

I've selled all mtb for a gravel and i'm so happy to keep it simple

I need a full rigid mtb
  • 1 0
 Finally, a review that concedes that most modern trail bikes really benefit from being firmed up for the climbs. The bar for acceptable pedaling efficiency has been too low in recent years.
  • 1 0
 Had to make a tinfoil hat to read the comments today. "5G is coming to get you" But the thought of having to pay subscription fees to ride your bike made me shutter. I could almost see that happening.
  • 1 0
 Before Flight Attendant: The one guy in your biking group with a bike that won't stop creaking
After FA: The one guy in your biking group which sounds like a robotic duck being beat with a hammer
  • 1 0
 I'd rather see Delphi get into the game with MagneRide. Near instantaneous damping changes vs. a motor turning the LSC adjuster. It works wonders in high end sports and super cars.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MagneRide
  • 1 0
 "or will they roll out simpler, pared-down versions to hit more affordable pricepoints?"

Fairly certain a few companies already have a bar mounted, multi-position remote lockout. Works real good.
  • 1 0
 I’d rather have engineers use the electronics in their CAD systems to design a bike that doesn’t need me to turn the compression up and down 700 times in the middle of a ride.
  • 2 0
 For around 2000 dollars, this product dramatically improves climbing performance... but so does reaching down and hitting the climb switch.
  • 1 0
 Just for my personal use, I don't like mandatory batteries out in nature. If my watch dies while I'm running, it doesn't ruin my run. If my power meter dies, it doesn't ruin my ride. If my AXS battery dies...
  • 5 1
 Robo bike.... thanks no!
  • 3 0
 Huh, I saw a spy shot insta post of this yesterday, and a review today?!
  • 1 0
 On an EWS Enduro, the same one that was used for testing.
  • 4 0
 this is kinda cool.
  • 2 1
 Does anybody have a annoying rear end rattling noise on their Enduro in chatter or braking bumps. I can't seem to figure out what it is
  • 2 0
 Yes! My Enduro does rattle, I can't figure it out either. 2 months old, custom build. Noticed it on day one. Can't figure it out, but stopped worrying about it. Absolutely love the bike.
  • 2 0
 It’s not the rear end chattering you need to worry about, it’s the upper headset seat that will inevitably crack on you
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: Brake pads??
  • 1 0
 It's likely your rear brake line just in front of the caliper. When the suspension sags, there's more slack and it clacks on the frame. Put some soft sided velcro on the line where it passes the frame. Also make sure your down tube guard is tight
  • 2 0
 Probably your teeth ...lol
  • 1 0
 @Gordyboy: running Saints. They haven't been noisy on other bikes, but always worth a double check.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: Sometimes the separation spring between the pads becomes weak - if the pads are vented fin types they can also add a bit more weight to each pad giving it more inertia to wobble? Or it could be something else.........
  • 1 0
 @Gordyboy: yep, agree. Will look into it. Thanks for the reminders.
  • 1 0
 Ok, but how many batteries you now have to charge before ride? Seems like 6 (six!) different batteries for full AXS flight attendant bike.
  • 2 0
 It'll be four batteries for a full AXS Flight Attendant bike - derailleur, dropper, fork, shock. The batteries in the controllers and the pedal sensor last much longer.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: it's like mouse battery, it can last for year+ but if you are not aware of it draining and not checking it all the time - it will happen suddenly at some point.
  • 2 0
 Get the Zipp moto wheels and you can add two more with your tirewiz.
  • 2 0
 Soooo, are they going to release those Buttercups to upgrade existing forks with?
  • 1 0
 Probably not compatible with current airshaft and damper so would likely need to buy entire unit.
  • 2 3
 Funny: the same people having a hissy-fit about eMTBs drool over eSuspension… if you are really purists, you have to condemn that crap.
And besides: 7 batteries for a „full“ AXS-equipped bike? Seriously???? Funny is that you have to have good WiFi for setting up… sometimes engineers are really, really strange.
  • 7 2
 no one is drooling over eSuspension
  • 1 0
 and the hardcore ride rigid
  • 2 0
 How is this better than just manually adjusting compression for climbs on my bike? Which, btw, is free and 0 grams?
  • 2 0
 It's not better, it's just a trade-off. If you trust the system, you can stop putting brain-power into worrying about flicking switches or turning dials.

However, you might now have subconscious worry about whether the robots are actually doing what you want them to do. Plus weight, and plus another subconscious worry about more f*cking batteries to charge. (I can find a way to now have 15 individual batteries on a non-e-bike on a nighttime training ride, holy shit)
  • 2 0
 A bit thin on actual ride experience...more about the tech than anything else...
  • 3 1
 Sram on south slavic (Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Montenegro and Macedonia) languages means shame Smile
  • 1 0
 Fair play to the engineers for developing this stuff but for two grand I’m going to expect a f#ckin piggy back up each and every hike a bike from here on in!
  • 2 0
 I can't wait for our bikes to go all Skynet and throw us off them. Probably mid-jump.
  • 1 0
 Electronic suspension will become common, much the same as traction control is common on autos. For wide adoption the cost cannot outweigh benefit.
  • 2 0
 i just hope you'll still be able to get normal suspension in the future
  • 1 1
 I dig this. Thanks SRAM for continuing to push technology forward. This seems like a better implementation of electronics into suspension than Live Valve if only because it defaults to open mode.
  • 1 0
 Phone, headphones, drivetrain, fork, shock, bike computer...... Too many fooking things to charge! Until my ebike does it all on the fly I'm out.
  • 1 0
 $2000 extra made your bike a pound lighter with a carbon frame and $2000 extra replaced the little lever on your shock while making your bike a pound heavier.
  • 1 0
 AXS is cool for sure, I'm still on the fence with all these batteries, adding 3 more batteries, ok I guess, but they lost me by using a AAA battery for that pedal sensor.
  • 1 0
 LOL at you losers with your analogue bikes, analogue gears, analogues droppers and analogue suspension. 26 ain't dead you shriek. Oh yes it is.
  • 2 0
 Or I'll just pedal my long travel CBF bike around for no extra costs and the same (rear shock) benefits...
  • 3 0
 Everyone wants to ride a flight attendant!
  • 1 0
 wireless lockout would be fine. I also think the main issue for pedalling up is not lock out but tyre drag from chunky enduro tyres
  • 1 0
 This tech, plus the adjustable suspension tech Chris Canfield was talking about on Gnarcouch last week, would truly give you an all in on quiver bike. Pretty cool stuff.
  • 2 0
 Words can not describe how much I would NOT EVER want something like this on my bike.
  • 1 0
 Neat concept. But even if I had the funds, I can’t imagine this necessary on a long travel bike. A product that is creating its own market.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer when will we see the new pressure relief valves and buttercups on other rockshox non-flight attendant forks? Did RockShox comment?
  • 4 1
 soooo ... meh?
  • 1 2
 i wonder if the suspension has robot noises now
  • 3 0
 Yeah there was no excitement, even from the guy that tested it
  • 2 0
 This should be on a coil shock not air.
  • 3 1
 I remember the days when you could just ride you bike...
  • 2 2
 You can still just ride your bike...Rockshock, Fox, SRAM, Shimano, and everyone else still make non-electronic components. Or you can sit on the internet and complain about something you're probably not going to see a ton of in the current market (have you tried to even get a normal rear derailleur recently?)
  • 2 0
 Moe things to replace and go wrong.
  • 1 0
 This was my thought. How is the longevity and service life of the motor elements of this system and will small service parts be available? Sram has a notoriously bad reputation amongst suspension tuners in this regard.
  • 1 0
 I remember speaking to a SRAM rep about this very thing at the NEC bike show in Birmingham maybe 3 years ago. Seems cool.
  • 1 0
 How long before bike hacking is a thing? Seriously you could totally ruin someone's race with these wireless components.
  • 1 0
 mountain bikers are better than that
  • 2 1
 @f00bar: u haven’t met my crew
  • 3 1
 Lucky for my dentist I'm due for a check-up
  • 1 0
 “could become less of an obstacle in the future when the price comes down“

Lulz.
  • 1 0
 Nice should be some really good deals on normal shocks next year when all the ebikers need a Eshock upgrade.
  • 1 0
 Will it work to calibrate and charge an on on bike vibrator? Asking for a friend.
  • 8 0
 Username checks out.
  • 4 1
 C'mon solar flare!
  • 2 0
 EMP! EMP! EMP!
  • 2 0
 My fox suspension has become obsolete and completely unrideable.
  • 1 0
 I am just here for the peanut gallery, no interest here much less a 5g signal.
  • 1 1
 Do I have to take off my shoes, belt, jacket, everything out of my pockets, and dump all the liquids in my bottle before being able to use the app and suspension?
  • 1 0
 holding out for E-tires that wirelessy inflate/deflate for changing conditions.
  • 2 0
 Future lawsuit by Burton?
  • 2 0
 I'm too poor to understand all this, unfortunately.
  • 2 0
 A+ well written article, great point about the wireless remote lockout...
  • 2 0
 This is where we are wasting silicon...
  • 2 0
 just what we need with a chip shortage, more industry anal.
  • 2 0
 Finally, a $12,500 Specialized Enduro!
Now I can sleep at night.
  • 1 0
 Hard to see the value for those of us who mostly climb up and then ride down.
  • 2 0
 I ride to get away from tech.
  • 2 0
 Flight attendant - shite amendment.
  • 1 0
 This is great and all. But, when are we going to get lean sensitive ABS and wheelie control?
  • 2 0
 Scott will find a way to attach a couple of cables to it
  • 1 0
 "what I imagine it'd sound like if you hit a robotic duck with a hammer"

Imagine... *air quotes*. Yeah, riiiiight...
  • 2 0
 Typo in the headline: Should be "Rockshox's".
  • 1 0
 When will the new non-axs Zeb be available? The bleeders and buttercup look like a nice upgrade coming from a Lyrik.
  • 1 0
 Fox has a patent on lower leg bleeders. Not sure if it just ran out or if the fact that this is an electronic fork it makes it exempt from infringing on the Fox patent
  • 1 0
 Will this be considered an Ebike? Apparently there is a motor in there switching things around
  • 1 0
 Call it Hal end end this madness.
Wired only along with my 26" hoops the more the madness grows
  • 1 0
 Mike’s knees in the riding clips cracked me up. Reminded me of the energizer bunny on hyped up on monster .
  • 1 0
 Coming soon: EWS and XC 'unplugged" divisions where only full mechanical bikes are allowed.
  • 2 0
 Finally a new reason to raise prices!
  • 1 0
 Electronic shifting, electronic dropper post, electronic suspension dampers…not an E-Bike.
  • 1 0
 "Buy this $5k suspension setup! Oh sorry, we're out of eagle chains... forever..."
  • 1 0
 "Getting the Flight Attendant system up and running requires a strong cellular or wi-fi signal" I've read enough, I am out.
  • 1 0
 Where is the error display? 404
  • 1 0
 Yeah but will this make plowing through braking bumps any smoother?
  • 1 0
 Next step : Automatic brake
  • 1 1
 Soooooooo what happens when the battery dies? You stuck locked out for the rest of your ride?
  • 2 0
 Think default is open.
  • 1 0
 from the article, its default setting is open, opposite to fox' live valve which i closed. which i always thought was stupid if im honest
  • 5 0
 The fork and shock auto downgrade to lower end version
  • 3 0
 No, it's default position is open, not locked.
  • 1 0
 They combined Flight Attendand with Buttercup to get all the jokes.
  • 1 0
 How much does that donut weigh?
  • 1 0
 K, lemme just pull out my phone really quick to adjust my suspension..
  • 1 0
 No info about updates to the damper? Or is that under embargo?
  • 1 0
 luftkapp from rockshox inside
  • 1 0
 HOW DARE THEY GIVE DENTISTS MORE OPTIONS!?! HRR DRRR
  • 1 0
 I'm sure this gizmo will be just as reliable as their dropper posts.
  • 1 0
 I’m just glad everything is keeping the same battery!
  • 2 0
 Time to switch to BMX.
  • 1 1
 Is this really necessary since we’ll be riding ebikes in the near future?
  • 1 0
 Only a good idea if it's 100% predictable.
  • 1 0
 So, does it measure air time?
  • 1 0
 tell me more about this robotic duck.
  • 1 0
 Maybe an idler pulley dynamo to power it all?
  • 1 0
 Can I get it in oil slick?
  • 1 0
 Ok, now can they make a 200mm axs post? That would be nice
  • 1 0
 No in flight entertainment! I wanna watch rampage out on the trail.
  • 1 0
 Flight attendant to Ground control, we have a problem!
  • 1 0
 Shaking my fist at random clouds
  • 1 0
 This makes me want to get a fully rigid bike, maybe singlespeed.
  • 1 0
 Meh
  • 2 2
 It’s like an e bike ,that’s not an e bike
  • 1 0
 Set and forget baby!
  • 1 0
 Cool, l guess ....
  • 1 0
 Pass
  • 1 0
 Levy eats climbing pie.
  • 1 0
 rubbish
  • 1 1
 I will never pay 2000 so I don’t have to flip a climb switch
  • 1 0
 What chip shortage ?
  • 1 1
 Just take a dhx2 and a grip 2, Why f**k around?
  • 1 1
 Urgh
  • 1 1
 I'm good thanks
  • 1 1
 No.
  • 1 3
 seems a bit flighty…
  • 2 0
 Plane old technology.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.051779
Mobile Version of Website