First Look: Trust Performance's $2,700 Carbon Fiber Linkage Fork

Oct 25, 2018
by Mike Levy  



What do Dave Weagle, linkage forks, and a lot of carbon fiber all have in common? The answer to that question would have been ''diddly squat'' not all that long ago, but you're looking at The Message, a 130mm-travel, carbon fiber linkage fork that Trust Performance (the company behind it), is claiming to be the next leap forward in suspension performance.

This wild looking creation isn't some one-off prototype either. The first production run of 2,500 forks is ready to be sold straight from Trust's website... For $2,700 USD. Wowza.
Trust

You might as well leave your jaw on the floor because there are a whole lot more eye-openers on the way, including that Trust is saying, depending on wheel size, the exact same 130mm-travel fork will work just fine on ''bikes designed around 110mm to 150mm of travel.'' Wait, what? Just imagine Fox or RockShox saying ''Sure, not a problem'' about slapping one of their 130mm forks on the front of an enduro bike. That wouldn't happen, of course, but nothing that Trust Performance is doing is all that normal.

Keep scrolling down to get hit over the head with all the tech, but the gist is that the geometry of The Message's trailing-linkage design is claimed to add an immense amount of stability to a bike, while also making even the latest telescoping forks feel antiquated. Tucked up inside its carbon legs are two air springs (one on each side), and a single twin-tube, thru-shaft damper designed by Weagle and manufactured in Trust's own factory. Like I said: not a lot of normal.


The Message

• Trailing multi-link design
• Travel: 130mm
• Wheel size: 27.5'' / 27.5+ / 29''
• Carbon chassis, steerer & linkages
• Aluminum pivot hardware
• Sealed bearings (lifetime warranty)
• Twin-tube, thru-shaft damper
• External adjustments: rebound; three-position compression
• 250-hour service interval
• Rotor Size: 180mm rotor / 203mm max.
• Tire clearance: 29'' x 2.6'' / 27.5'' x 2.8''
• Axle to crown: 535mm
• Tapered steerer
• Weight: 1980-grams (claimed)
• MSRP: $2,700 USD
www.trustperformance.com
bigquotesThe reason that we ended up going down this path is that I wanted to answer a simple question: What happens if you build a device that lets the stability of the front-end of a bicycle or motorcycle increase on corner entry rather than decrease? It's a simple question that I don't think anybody has ever asked.Dave Weagle




Some bold claims

Also not normal are the claims that Trust is making about The Message. Now, I'm sure a lot of us are a bit salty when it comes marketing newspeak, but Trust's claims are so bold, so emphatic, that they're worth singling out because if they're true, we might have something special here. Actually, if they can check off even half this list, The Message will have an interesting future, which is a hell of a lot more than any other linkage fork has been able to say.

Of course, we hear the obligatory ''... pedals like it’s running XC suspension, but it descends like a full-on enduro suspension.'' Trust then describes the travel as offering, ''supple performance early in the stroke to provide ground-hugging traction, support through the mid-stroke, and more bottom-out resistance at the end of the travel,'' and they also say that it's, ''competitively lightweight and resoundingly stiff.''

The big claim, though, is the added steering stability that Weagle and Company believe is key to riding a bike faster, in more control, and in more comfort.



Why a linkage fork? And why now?

If you think this whole linkage fork thing is a new idea, it's very much not. Using pivots instead of telescoping tubes has been done for many decades and on the front of everything from folding bicycles to Grand Prix racing motorbikes. But despite grandiose claims that these glorified Erector Sets would make stanchion tubes and bushings seem silly, it's probably fair to say that linkage forks have been laughed off as the platypus of the mountain bike world - most people think they're neat, but they might as well have a duck bill, webbed feet, and venomous spurs. And lay eggs, too.
Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.


Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
Dave Weagle is better known for his rear-suspension creations, but now he's turned his attention to the front of the bike.
Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
Jason Schiers started ENVE when it used to be called Edge, and now he's at Trust.
Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
Hap Seliga co-founded Competitive Cyclist and looks after Trust's sales and operations.


Rare, misunderstood, and funny looking (but not egg-laying), linkage forks have always promised us next-level performance but have been, for the most part, nothing but vapourware. And if they're so good, why the hell aren't Fox and RockShox making their own platypi? Well, if my business had multiple decades worth investment in one product, I doubt that I'd want to make a 180-degree turn and go down a completely different road, a road that would likely pillage my current business.

''That's exactly it. You've hit the nail on the head,'' replied Weagel when I posed that scenario to him. ''I realized right away that if an established company brought this out, especially on the heels of Boost being adopted, they couldn't even sell or market it against their own products, because there's literally no comparison,'' Weagle went on to say. ''I mean, they don't even have the same metrics to talk about. Yeah, they both have travel, and they both have bolt-on wheels, but that's about it.''

Old-timers will remember Horst Leitner and his AMP linkage fork, although Pro-Flex arguably had the most commercial success back in the mid-1990s. And, aside from some interesting but pretty wacky-looking prototypes over the years, that's been about it since then.

There has been essentially zero commercial success or public acceptance. So, what's changed to make Trust Performance think that they're the ones to make the platypus finally happen?
Who is Trust Performance?

Right now, Trust is about twenty-five people, including a branch in Taiwan, but the company was founded by three:

Dave Weagle: You probably know this guy. He's been responsible for a load of proven rear suspension designs over the years, including the aptly named dw-link. ''Dave oversees Trust's advanced development,'' says their website, and I suspect that fairly ambiguous phrasing accurately describes that one of the company's founders and its Technical Director is usually in his workshop.

Jason Schiers: The founder of ENVE Composites clearly has a thing for carbon fiber. Shiers moved on from ENVE years ago, going on to co-found Trust Performance, where his job title is President and he manages the brand and its communication.

Hap Seliga: You might not have heard of Hap, but have you heard of a lil' outfit called Competitive Cyclist? He co-founded that too, taking it from a storefront to the online giant that it is today. Seliga is probably the right guy of the three to look after Trust's sales and operations, and he's also the CEO.


Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
Nearly all carbon fiber and next to nothing in common with a traditional telescoping fork. Also, it's possibly from the future.


''The equation has changed now, and the thing that's changed in the equation is materials and technology,'' Jason Schiers, Trust CEO and President, replied when I hit him with that one. ''The damper technology that Dave has developed and created is unique. It hasn't been done before. And, being able to capitalize on composites and the physical characteristics of composites is new. It's only in the last ten years that people have been making composites at the level where you could load them and create the structures and weights that we're creating,''

The Trust Performance team has spent over four years on The Message fork, so Schiers is no doubt optimistic, but they also say that they never set out to bring a linkage fork to the market; it just kinda happened.

''It wasn't the goal. As a matter of fact, it wasn't even a goal to start a company,'' said Weagle. (I don't know about you guys, but isn't it annoying when you accidentally start a company?) ''The more we got into it, the more we realized that we had to do it, and the bottom line is, we realized that if we didn't do it - we'd know it exists and we'd know it's possible - somebody would do it,'' he went on to say.

Weagle said the Trust team spent the last four years developing The Message in secret, going so far as to slide a pair of leg warmers up each side of the fork to hide its trailing-linkage design from camera phones. ''With each of the successive prototypes over the years, the data came back better, the perception came back better, the feel was better, and it just like, 'Holy shit, there's really something there.' You add the qualitative and quantitative ride experience and it's just, like, 'Holy shit, we have to do this.''

So they did it.






What does the linkage do?

Weagle is best known for his rear-suspension designs and, in a way, The Message is could be thought of in a similar light, especially because the fork's trailing linkage looks after stuff like pedaling support, stability control, and bump absorption. You know, just like a good rear-suspension layout would.

The big one there, Weagle says, is the stability control: ''The reason that we ended up going down this path is that I wanted to answer a simple question: What happens if you build a device that lets the stability of the front-end of a bicycle or motorcycle increase on corner entry rather than decrease? It's a simple question that I don't think anybody has ever asked,'' he told me over a Skype call.
Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.


Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
The trailing linkage design allowed Weagle to fine tune the fork's kinematics, just like he would have if it was a rear-suspension system.


Not coincidentally, stability comes largely from stable geometry, and the usual approach with a telescoping fork involves adding low-speed compression and/or firming up the spring rate to keep the fork from going into its travel when you're braking or moving your body around. That can help, but Trust's PR says that the very fact the fork isn't being allowed to go through its stroke freely, due to the added damping or higher spring rate, means that you really aren't doing yourself any favors. And the more your fork compresses, the more funky and unstable your steering can be, which is something that I'm sure we've all felt.

So, rather than depend on damping or the spring rate to bring stability, Weagle uses four-bar trailing linkage. The link arrangement meant that he could determine the fork's kinematics, just like he would if he was penning a rear-suspension layout, and also that the Message has a leverage rate, also just like a rear-suspension system. Weagle combined those two things, along with a whole lot of carbon fiber, to tackle the stability problem in a way that a telescoping fork, with its 1:1 ratio, isn't able to. Physics and calculators and science stuff.

''Trying to explain this in words to you is kind of like trying to explain to someone what a new flavor they’ve never tasted is like,'' Weagle said to me after I asked him for the twentieth time to tell me how the fork feels.

I'm not sure what stability tastes like, but here's Weagle with at least part of the recipe: ''The Trust linkage was designed to increase and normalize steering stability in real world riding conditions. This materialized through a ton of data acquisition, testing over years and years, and from seeing trends in how different riders on mountain, motocross, and street bikes rode and realizing they all faced similar issues inherent to telescopic forks. The linkage was designed to combat those issues. The axle path just became what it needed to be. It’s a driven dimension, not a driving one. If I had to describe it, I’d say that, generally, the axle path is a complex curve that sweeps rearwards and upwards in relation to the steering axis and crown race as the suspension compresses, with its shape driven by the dynamic ride requirements.''
Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
There are eight pivots in total, all of them using sealed bearings with a lifetime warranty.

It sounds like Dave had to do a hell of a lot of math, but what it all means is that The Message's axle path isn't dictated by the steering axis like it always is with a telescoping fork, and also that it's offset changes in relation to the steering angle. Even more importantly, it maintains the same mechanical trail number through its travel, and that is why Trust is claiming that their linkage fork can outperform a telescopic fork.

''To put it simply: handling remains the same even when the head angle changes - early in the turn, at the apex, and at the exit, climbing or descending, your bike always steers the same,'' are their exact words.





How is it different from other linkage forks?

I have a bit of a soft spot for anyone who's doing things differently, no matter how good we think the norm might be, and you've probably seen a few of the linkage forks I've covered and ridden in the past. France's Motion Ride showed me theirs at the last Eurobike show, while the Wild Scurra 2 and Structure Cycleworks both made the Motion Ride creation look somewhat normal.


Eurobike 2018
Structure Cycleworks
The Motion Ride fork (on the left) looks almost normal compared to the wild Structure Cycleworks.


There are others, too, from Whyte's PRST-1 (which had consistent trail) to the aforementioned Pro-Flex, but they all have one very important thing in common: They were all a flop in the marketplace, if they even made it that far. Failures, every single one of them.

Last time I checked, I had a bunch of Fox and RockShox forks in my shop, but not a single linkage fork. So, how is Trust's new baby any different?


That was a bike Whyte PRST-1
The Whyte PRST-1 used a linkage fork designed to offer consistent trail back in the early 2000s, but if you think The Message looks odd...


''Most of those other link designs end up with forward-arcing axle paths or try to mimic the linear motion of a telescopic fork while adding some braking anti-dive feature with their link,'' Weagle said. ''That’s probably partly why our product looks so different than anything else. In the end, by focusing on stability, we ended up with a pretty novel invention.'' Preventing brake dive actually wasn't the focus of his efforts, even if it ended up being a byproduct of it.

bigquotesThe linkage is separating the forces that come in from the handlebar and the forces that come up from the wheel. Whereas, with a telescopic fork, they're totally tied together in a linear system.Dave Weagle

Haven't most of the linkage forks in the past been about preserving geometry, which is something I might refer to as increasing stability? ''Yup, about preserving geometry under brake dive. So I just said straight up from the beginning, 'Brake dive is something I'm not concerned about when building test mules.' Let's go back to 2011 when I was talking to partners of mine about lower, longer, slacker geometry, and it was kinda falling on deaf ears. But in 2013, it's not falling on deaf ears anymore. All of a sudden, people are pretty freaking receptive. There's a marketplace shift, and I'm saying, 'Holy shit, people finally get that more stability is better; not worse, better.''

Dave's example of bike geometry evolving drastically, especially over the last couple of years, is a pertinent one because it's been done for, guess what, stability.

''The difference between a VPP axle path, a dw-link axle path, and a single pivot is, you know, we're talking tiny bits of millimeters here. But a totally straight and linear displacement of a wheel on a telescopic fork versus the curved axle path on our product - especially a trailing link, multi-bar like this, that's been designed for stability - It's a big freakin' difference,'' he said with more than just a hint of excitement in his voice.

So, while a lot of previous linkage forks had built-in anti-dive characteristics that (according to Dave), might help to preserve the bike's geometry, they actually lower stability in the big picture.

The Message, on the other hand, provides a constant trail number that's said to make for calm, predictable handling while still allowing the fork to move up and down through its stroke. ''I got there by doing way too much math,'' Weagle told me when I asked him how it does what he says it does.
Amp B2 1003
AMP's four-bar linkage fork was intended to be a lightweight cross-country design to go up against equally spindly telescopic forks from Manitou and RockShox in 1993.





Chassis and internals

Not surprisingly, The Message is largely made from carbon fiber, with the legs, crown, tapered steerer, and linkage pieces all being the expensive black stuff. The pivot hardware is aluminum because, rather than saving some grams by using bushings, you'll find sealed bearings at all eight pivot points. There's a 180mm post mount on the brake side, but you can jump up to 203mm by bolting on an adapter. I think that also underlines the fact that Trust really does intend this thing to be used in any setting where you'd put a 150mm-travel fork into action.


Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
On the front of the white Salsa is an early proof-of-concept prototype using Fox dampers. On the right is an early carbon prototype.


I expected the axle to be keyed on the ends so as to tie the left and right clamps together, but Weagle says that they've gone with a standard 15 x 110mm Boost thru-axle that's also Torque Cap compatible. He was originally expecting to have to use pinch clamps (they're on the older prototypes), but the chassis proved to be impressively rigid and they weren't needed.

If you're thinking that the fork legs are a little bit fat, it's because they're hiding two air springs and single twin-tube, thru-shaft damper. Weagle wasn't too keen to jump into what's going on inside The Message's damper, but he did let on that it uses a nitrogen-charged IFP that runs at very low pressures, and also that it can pretty much be rebuilt anywhere with a bucket of oil and a few tools. That means the those who know what they're doing can get inside to tinker with things, and those who don't know what they're doing might take it to someone who does.
Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
This may take some time to get used to...

As far as adjustments go, the silver lever at the top of the right fork leg toggles between your open, medium, and firm low-speed compression settings, while an anodized red clicker tweaks the low-speed rebound at the opposite end. Pretty straightforward stuff damping-wise, but the guys at Trust sounded a bit coy when I wanted to get into it, so I suspect there's still more to learn.


Trust
Trust
While looking nothing like the production fork, prototypes like this one let Weagle test pivot locations and suspension setup.


When was the last time you saw an air-sprung fork with valves on both legs? These days, essentially everything uses a single air spring in one leg, but remember what I said about normal and Trust not doing that? The Message has an air spring in each leg, both with self-adjusting negative springs via a dimple on the air rod. Weagle did the math to have the volume of the two chambers call for the rider's body weight in PSI, at least as a close starting point. So, at 165lb, I'd put 165 PSI in each leg. They'll also have volume-reducing tokens to put in there if you need more ramp-up, but Trust did say that they went pretty aggressive with the spring curve. There are some pretty skookum-looking bottom-out bumpers, too.





Is it going to work?

My test fork is only hours away from showing up on my doorstep, so I can't tell you what it's like to ride quite yet, but that's not really what I'm wondering when I ask if it's going to work or not. I suspect that it'll perform well, but will it work in the marketplace? As we see at nearly every trade show, someone is always showing up with a new Erector Set of a linkage fork that we'll never end up seeing again.

All sorts of promises and then, nothing.


Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
If it works half as well as the press release says, it'll be impressive. Stay tuned.


This is quite different, however, as Trust Performance has 2,500 forks ready to send out the door pretty quickly. They're also keeping service in-house for the first year so as to see every single issue that might come up, and there's also that 250-hour service schedule and lifetime warranty on the sealed bearings. It's all sounding promising, especially with Weagle's know-how and name attached to it, but is the buying public ready for a linkage fork that costs $2,700 USD and doesn't have a clearly defined customer yet?

I guess it's you guys that are going to answer that question, but I suspect that Trust is going to have an uphill battle when it comes to convincing people to look the other way when it comes to The Message's appearance. Function trumps fashion, always, but also not actually always because we're all funny and looks do count for points. That said, this one is less kooky-looking than most that have come before it, and if it rides even half as well as Trust is saying it will, it should blow us all away.

Stay tuned for an in-depth video and ride impressions of Trust Performance's new linkage fork.







561 Comments

  • + 663
 Good thing its only 2,700 dollars. I was worried it would be expensive for a second.
  • + 114
 Looks like a spork.
  • + 33
 Yeah, seriously. Like, who doesn't just have that sitting in their bank account. Silly peasants. #ifyouaintgotnomoneytakeyourtelescopingforkhome
  • + 71
 Groan! Telescoping suspension tech was one of the last barriers to having every last bit of our bikes made of $$$ carbon fiber. $15,000 bikes, here we come!
  • + 13
 I'll have two thank you.
  • - 7
flag lkubica (Oct 24, 2018 at 23:53) (Below Threshold)
 I thought it looks great but then I remembered my recent encounter with a tree which resulted only in broken brake lever because my frame, bar, stem and fork are made from aluminium ... Maybe some day carbon will be as cheap as alu, then I will take two Wink
  • + 101
 When will Pinkbike finally review forks above 2000$?
  • + 3
 Bargain lol
  • + 80
 Finally some proper premium fork. Tired of sub 1k budget forks.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 25, 2018 at 2:01) (Below Threshold)
 @chyu:

Tested: rear derailleurs above 300$
  • + 15
 For that price, it better be 3 times better than a telescopic fork
  • + 86
 Anyone who can spend $8000 on a bike can spend $10000. People just want something to spend their money on in a lot of cases. I think this looks cool and while I will never buy one, if I won one I would give it a try even if someone was offering to buy it off me for $2000 cash.

Looks cool, and I bet it doesn't creak like my Fox 36, and I bet you don't have to stand it upside down for five minutes before you use it to get some good small bump action.

Point is, nothing is perfect. Telescopic forks are far from perfect, and they aren't exactly cheap either. I mean, when you can buy a football for $10, a set of forks for $1100 is not in any way cheap.

Get at it Dave Weagle. You are a visionary!
  • - 1
 @jaame: as we know nothing is perfect. Ever. Some compromises are however better than other ones. Sometimes people compromise lots of things only for the sake of making something different. Initially it sesms that "Trust" has put it together nicely, for the first time in the history of non-telescopic forks. Maybe Laufer being the other example but that's not really a performance fork.
  • + 41
 @WAKIdesigns: well, some things are perfect. Have you not heard of Ellsworth
  • + 8
 @Ryanrobinson1984: Randy's ass is perfect.
  • + 20
 I trust that only my dentist will be getting the Message
  • + 77
 "Trust".... for Trustafarians who drive $250,000 Sprinter Vans and don't have to work for a living.
  • + 1
 That´s the key point to make a product valuable for OEM...
  • + 33
 I am "Lauf"ing over this one
  • + 21
 As soon as someone breaks this fork the Trust is gone.
  • + 11
 Anyway you look at it, It's just too forking expensive.
  • + 14
 @RollinFoSho: or 6 times better than a Lefty
  • + 5
 Forkget it, there’s no forking way I’m forking out that much cash for a fork!!
  • + 1
 @Turnburn36: significantly underrated comment!
  • - 5
flag WasatchEnduro (Oct 25, 2018 at 6:22) (Below Threshold)
 So is this Randy’s Rampage fork?
  • + 3
 But is it LiveWire compatible?
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL!!!!!!!!!!! i just lost it!
  • + 19
 and only 16 more bearings to service.
  • - 1
 I should have become a dentist
  • - 2
 What the Fork Offest tho!?! Looks like 100 instead of the new 42 or 44 standard
  • + 3
 @axelerate: Do you really want to stare into peoples mouths and taste their hummin' breath all day even if it lets you ride one of these?
  • - 3
 All that money for something so dam ugly. *le sigh*
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Fox 40
Manitou Durado pros
Boxer World Cup.
These 2000$ + forks?
  • - 3
 @Sshredder: or Pike and 36 with push coil unit and avalanche damper.
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: oh my that does sound like a winning combination. And not quite 2700$
  • - 1
 @Boardlife69: also looks like a Robo-Lobster Claw.
  • + 0
 @raditude: Did you order yours yet?
  • + 0
 @Boardlife69: A comment that actually made me laugh here
  • + 1
 @nyhc00: trust issues alreaday? LOL
  • + 17
 @x6thgearwideopen: All I know is Dave Weagle is over here trying to sell $2,700 forks. Meanwhile Kurt Sorge is trying to win his 4th Rampage on a SR Suntour that costs $12 to make.
  • + 5
 Yes agreed, I have some wisdom teeth to remove on Monday. That should cover it.

This will be worth it just for the lower unsprung weight and trailside caché in my view.
  • + 8
 Is this a real complaint? Completely new tech is always going to be expensive until it either catches on and becomes less expensive to produce, or disappears.
  • + 13
 I can't wait to put this on my Wolf Ridge to even out the ugly
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: When the Message comes out with a 150mm.

Me I'm waiting for the big one 205mm you should be able to get one for under $4,000 US dollars a bargain at $2,000 per leg.
I wish them luck but I think a miracle will be in order.
  • + 0
 @bishopsmike: That is not saying much, Lefty claimed stiffness light weight better steering and less travel they only managed the less travel part, expensive pogo stick.
  • + 2
 @Jaybirdy: looks like it is pretty normal to me. The hub is behind the main tubes. I bet it's mid 40's somewhere. Not on any of their docs though...
  • + 1
 @Niko182: Yeah, $2700 is great for a new bike! And it even has a little carbon, and it's DW! Oh wait, that's just the fork...
  • + 0
 @iqbal-achieve: hahah perfect!! Lmao
  • + 0
 @ShredlyMcShredface: haha right on.. was just kinda joking and I forgot you can’t joke on PB!!!
  • + 4
 @jayacheess: I think it’s being criticized because It’s price is so high compared to already proven products it hasn’t quite proven itself yet. A smart move would have been to make this along side a less expensive heavier model to give more people a chance to try it out if the concept is so sound than even a heavier version would be convincing enough for part of the industry to change. I like the concept always have but I think it may have some limitations. I’m interested in how it would feel to launch off something on one of these if anyone has some insight on this I’d love to hear about it do you have to change your riding style a lot with one of these?
  • - 1
 Um yeah.... Next!
  • + 1
 @jaame: of course a "set of forks" is expensive, try just buying one next time
  • + 4
 Just in case anyone was curious

2500 x $2700 = $6,750,000
  • + 2
 @High-Life: Ha, weird looking at both ends!

Actually, I think given how different this is from a telescopic fork it actually looks pretty good.

Also $2700 is obviously loads, but it's the first one, if it is successful then there is bound to be a range eventually with lower prices.
  • + 2
 @alexhyland: The question is, how much more is the Factory Kashima option going to cost me?
  • + 0
 @RollinFoSho: It might be.
  • + 18
 @TheUnknownMTBR:

DW: "HEY FACTORY, WHAT'S MOQ?"

FACTORY: "(UNDER BREATH, OH GOD WE DON'T WANT TO MAKE THAT, TELL 'EM SOMETHING RIDICULOUS LIKE 2,000) UH 2,500"

DW: "SOUNDS GOOD, HIT GO!"

FACTORY: "F*CK"
  • + 0
 But why 2 air spring instead of 1? On one hand you have lower pressures, better sealing, but on the other hand you have more stiction!
  • + 0
 @brcz: there’s no bridge between the two side links. The axle is the only bridge connecting them together. A spring on one side only is going to create a lot of force imbalance that wouldn’t be a good for that situation. Ultimately it depends on the magnitude of stiction vs magnitude of applied force rather than just stiction alone.
  • - 1
 @TheSmilingDentist: I would to cancel my appointment to remove my wisdom teeth, because I want to buy this fork Wink
  • - 1
 @TheUnknownMTBR: Any guess as to the capital investment? Maybe 1/3 this in COG alone but 25 employees already on board? These 3 put up $3M+ combined minimum to fund this? That is stunning confidence...And that's why I'm not a real entrepreneur ;(
  • - 1
 Maybe I missed the memo, but the biggest question that this writeup fails to address is why in the ever living f—- is it called “The Message”?!?!?!?

Maybe we should have a contest to see who can come up with the best “message” this product delivers? You know, stuff like:

Screams “more money than common sense” ...
All your bass are belong to us ...
Kiss your retirement goodbye ...
Hey, your wife’s divorce lawyer just called ...
Fuglier than a fugly stick ...
Does a spork take a dive in teh woods ...
We were gonna call it The Double-DLink, but then thought it would send the wrong “message”. Hey, wait a minute ... EUREKA, THAT’S IT!!!
  • + 0
 @TheUnknownMTBR:

The message is that you remember the name and the message is: telescopic fork makers pay attention. Also the mesaage may be I have much pricier fork than you. Sure. But assuming malice is quite childish that’s my message to you, and I also don’t mean no malice. Lighten up bro. Life’s too short for negative emotions
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: you of all people telling someone clowning around to lighten up; ironic. No malice intended and none taken. Peace out.
  • - 2
 @TheUnknownMTBR: i am just learning on my own mistakes... reading my old comments
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Losers gonna loose loose loose loose loose
  • + 0
 @Jaybirdy: what are you on about? Judging by your riding stance on the pictures you wouldn’t win racing me so why are you calling me a loser? I am not sure I understand.
  • - 1
 Guess you picked the wrong guy to tell to lighten up :-p
  • - 6
flag Jaybirdy (Oct 28, 2018 at 17:54) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: hahah Just saying Shut the Duck up! also i'd f*cking kick your ass no prob! try me come taste some of the best wine and food in the world in Napa and i'll show you i'm not just all talk! anyhow doesn't matter who's better kuz you are nothing compared to the best! haha smart ass idiot
  • + 1
 @Jaybirdy: thank you for your invitation. You are welcome to Gothenburg Sweden. We have great coffee, rain, tasty fish, fine men and women in sexy tights and the climbs will fist you, whatever you are into.

@TheUnknownMTBR I wrote it with a giant douche smile. Interwebs aren’t good at conveying feelings other than anger and nerdy f*cklessness.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: apparently not, even when an emoticon is added to emphasize the point —-> ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • + 145
 Put that thing on a marin and u have the ugliest bike ever
  • + 74
 Add Spengle Wheels and you create Malaria symptones
  • + 133
 Was thinking that the Polygon UR team should adopt this. Then they might have Trust issues with whoever Naild their bike together, so they would R3act and send The Message to Dave Weagle, and they would be back at XquarOne again. Legit though imagine if the two suspension systems got put together and then they started obliterating everyone in sight. Mick winning by 10 seconds sort of thing. The hysteria that would cause within the World Cup scene...
  • + 21
 @samjobson: Get a Grip 2 many puns.
  • + 0
 That Ellsworth might have to throw its hat in the ring for ugliest bike too
  • + 5
 Pretty ugly on the Evil, too, specially with this fat headtube.
  • + 21
 @gnralized: I’m just glad they decided to display their floating pivot fork on a single pivot frame.
  • + 15
 Put it on an Ellsworth and you will turn to stone as if you had just looked straight into medusa's eyes
  • + 0
 Put it on a Ellsworth
  • + 5
 @funbox: My eyes !! Why, just why..... Bikes can look so smooth and appealing
  • + 2
 @funbox: Oh dear god say it aint so!
  • + 4
 @funbox: whoa
  • + 13
 @funbox: honestly that looks sick
  • + 3
 @funbox: Fantastic.
  • + 1
 @CullenHerring: Maybe you mean sickly?
  • + 2
 If someone sends me a free one, I'll put it on my Marin for the picture lol. It just needs to be set up for 170 mm of travel
  • + 5
 So much bike-racism here
  • + 1
 @funbox: tron lightbke! Just add solid disc wheel on rear and a 50mm tall carbon front rim. Might as well run drop bars and get moar aero!
  • + 3
 @funbox: This is so awful. Thank you for bringing this into my life
  • + 17
 I went and made this fork/bike combo look with with an Ellsworth. BE WARNED....

https://www.pinkbike.com/photo/16499325/
  • + 9
 @eastsideride: kill it with fire!
  • + 1
 @funbox: AWESOME! Can you do a MACHINE?
  • + 3
 I’m still holding out for the lefty linkage fork. Should be half the price right?
  • + 2
 @eastsideride: HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!
  • + 1
 @ninjatarian: was thinking same. too funny .
  • + 1
 @funbox: haha that actually really works, the ugly balances out to make something almost futuristic looking
  • + 1
 Well it looks a bit weird. Like it snapped ad the headtube. Thats what makes it look strange to me. Perhaps if the crown (its basically the crown all the way to the bottom) Was attached straight on the steerer tube it would look better. But you would need a Crazy slack head angle to get that front wheel in the same spot. (and that might even cause bad wear on the headset bearings). I dunno. I think well get used to it.
  • + 130
 Honestly, the best-looking linkage fork of many previous attempts from many other companies. By coincidence, most all of the bikes I've ever owned has had one of Dave's suspension designs. Now on a Firebird and loving it. Dave being behind this along with some other solid guys, I'm super curious. That price tho. :/
  • + 10
 Going the same path as you (owned Devinci, Evil, Pivot). Thought I was in the real thing.
Then I demoed a Knolly Endorphin...
You don't really know how a suspension must perform until you put your hands on a Knolly.
  • + 8
 “Who’s chopper is this?”
  • + 4
 Totally agree. Best looking I've seen and Dave has the know how and reputation. But it will be an uphill battle with price and unconventional looks.
  • + 1
 Girvin was better looking and could use a single, normal air spring.
  • + 1
 @gnralized: on a Ripley now coming from a 26" Endorphin. Definitely can say I miss it a little.
  • + 3
 @ReformedRoadie: This is Ned's Chopper baby. Who is Ned? Ned's dead baby.
  • + 18
 Trust Evil?..

We already have a President, thankyou.
  • + 5
 I actually love the retro vibe of the proof of concept myself. That would look sweet on a retro rebuild.
  • + 3
 If it performs better, even just 7% better overall than typical forks. I will save up and buy it. Everyone here always hating on expensive bikes and parts. Same people hating on pink bike so often instead of getting the F@*k away from their keyboard and working overtime or trying to find a job thats not "entry level" (retail, fast food) at the age of 30+ yrs. Haters gonna hate. Great job Dave, still loving your rear suspention on both my Pivots (09 and 2015 mach 4).
  • + 5
 I agree, I don't think it looks too bad at all. If this thing offers any real improvement over a telescopic fork then there is no reason this type of design shouldn't take off. The looks of some of the previous attempts were horrendous, but this thing looks decent enough that no one should dismiss it due to aesthetics.
  • + 3
 Yeah, I like it
  • + 0
 @scary1: Thankfully that guy got replaced in 2016
  • + 1
 @JohanG: hahaha
  • + 82
 @mikelevy, it's platypodes not platypi, it's Greek not Latin. Why does pinkbike keep getting this wrong in bike reviews, it doesn't happen in other publications.
  • + 98
 Username checks out
  • + 3
 @bishopsmike: baahahahaha
  • + 45
 I’m embarrassed. We’ll need to conduct an internal review to ensure this never happens again.
  • + 14
 @brianpark: I'm surprised no one has made the connection with the amount of advertising you guys get from dead languages...
  • + 3
 @Kickmehard: Good stuff. Way over their heads.
  • + 6
 Check out the big brain on this dude
  • + 10
 @jclnv: #latinaintdead
  • + 7
 And what's with all the monotreme bashing? They're not that weird...
  • + 2
 Actual lol
  • + 2
 Glad someone mentioned it. BTW, platypuses is also acceptable as there are many words derived from foreign languages that we pluralise with an 's' (or 'es').
  • + 47
 To me this is the first non-telescopic system that looks like it makes sense. It just looks solid, not like something that a local car mechanic made for you after your fork broke in the middle of a 1 month bike trip to Kambodja. I can just imagine some other company making just the frame and you will be able to mount any set of dampers you want. Great stuff Dave.
  • + 3
 What if it looks good but rides terribly?
  • + 6
 @justanotherusername: well it looks promising. Unlike those other exclusive nut crackers.
  • + 3
 @justanotherusername: ah yes, the old Fox Evolution conundrum.
  • + 7
 @Klainmeister: I'm just baffled that people seem to care more about how something as detracted from the current norm looks than how it might work.
  • + 4
 @justanotherusername: People care how things look. You do, too. You're not going to admit it, but you do. It might not be rational, but it's reality.
  • + 4
 @TheR: I wouldn't ever say I don't care how things look, you decided that for me.

I just find it funny everybody saying 'looks horrible / weird' or 'looks like it makes sense / promising' without any comment on it working or its potential benefits.
  • + 4
 The problem with non telescopic forks is that if you look at the motorcycle world, which is in may ways ahead of the bicycle world in terms of design and performance, at every level of competition there are still telescopic forks.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: people think every four bar with a vertical shock is a session. It’s pinkbike. And you’ll have read the comments under Manitou fork reviews. Sigh. I agree with you, it does seem there’s a lot of emphasis put on what things look like.
But it sounded like Waki was saying it ‘looks’ like it might work as opposed to previous attempts on the theme. Granted there’s a massive difference between that and it actually working. But I also agree with him.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Agreed. More stable in turns? Yes please! That and I've watched my boxxer "walk" along rocks and ruts and bomb holes and it's never a satisfying relaxing experience, a little more stability would be very welcome.
  • + 1
 @LoganKM1982: heh for me that's a bit off. For pumptrack/ dirt I love ultimate rigidity, for machine dug stuff, some rigidity, rockgardens and wet roots on off cambers, natural gnar, give me Dorado anytime.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Never ridden a Dorado, and only one ride every on a 40, so my perspective is admittedly limited.
  • + 3
 This is such a different concept than trying to use a shock up front to decouple the steering/suspension inputs. This is basically a standard telescopic fork with a dynamic axel path. It's a really interesting idea.
  • + 46
 Am i the only one that actually thinks it looks kinda cool? I mean, it's different but not Structure-different. On the Evil it looks pretty awesome
  • - 27
flag aljoburr (Oct 25, 2018 at 2:07) (Below Threshold)
 Yes Kinda cool,having a fork made of toxic plastic?
  • + 7
 @aljoburr: As opposed to toxic metal?
  • + 4
 @aljoburr: I'm sure you bike everywhere, grow your own food etc..
  • + 1
 @aljoburr: Like most bikes these days?
  • - 5
flag aljoburr (Oct 25, 2018 at 6:42) (Below Threshold)
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Yes as much as possible, but somehow not making much differnce
  • - 4
flag aljoburr (Oct 25, 2018 at 6:45) (Below Threshold)
 @bikerider0985: I do know you can get epoxy now that is not toxic, but sure it is not as good, as marketed as Art resin?
  • - 3
 @justanotherusername: Yes metals have a level of toxicty, yes if you take scrap aluminium frames powder it up & spray it into the atmosphere, yes toxic
  • + 3
 @aljoburr: do you ride a bike made from metal, most likely aluminium?

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajka_alumina_plant_accident

Did you get your hate of carbon from Pole bikes unsubstantiated rant?
  • + 1
 @aljoburr: who is powdering and spraying frame dust?
  • + 0
 @justanotherusername: Good question, I think why is a better one?
  • + 2
 @aljoburr: please enlighten me, I'm seriously interested as it sounds mental.

Any comment about why you believe carbon to equal environmental death and metal to be ok?
  • + 3
 @aljoburr: Yes, because a bike must be edible and nutritious as well as stylish and functional.
  • + 2
 @hknivers I think it looks the nuts. Look at a telescopic fork after looking at the trust fork and they look crude and dare I say something that should be on a budget bike. The frames have all this complex clever linkage and yet the front end has a couple of skinny scaffold poles bolted on.

My major concern is that the patent protection ends up drawn too widely and it throttles competition and sensible prices.
.....and at a practical level we won’t see it for demo in the UK for years and the price will be way too obscene in £ to think about buying without trying.
  • + 1
 @Travel66: Lets hope that patent protections work. How much money do you think it took to develop this? If they aren't able to make their money back why would they spend money researching and developing the next innovation?
  • - 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Agree with that, this isnt like a patent on a spline shape, the direction in which suspension links rotate or something like split pivot which is realistically persued to retain a unique product in the marketplace this is likely to have taken considerable resources to achieve, is fairly unique (though admittedly just a hash on an old idea and likely something already done in moto or similar) and a patent would be protecting this.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: Well I have built a few carbon frames & the resin is seriously toxic, but I am going to build some more frames but not with toxic epoy resin
  • + 40
 I think it looks fantastic.... WAY out of my budget and arguably my ability... but i absolutely love it.
  • + 2
 Yeah what I got from this article is that If you corner hard enough your head angle changes so drastically that your bike steers differently at different bits of the corner. My stiff setup and lack of skills prevents me from telling the difference between this and my 36.
  • + 36
 It actually makes the head tube on an Evil look small. Thats a feat all on its own.
  • + 33
 this fork is amazing, you could put water bottle holders on both sides!
  • + 27
 People criticize the price, but it’s the same as a set of Enves, and way more justified by the complexity involved. Enve wheels are a dime a dozen around here in Utah, and I’m hoping these guys manage a similar success.

This airplane mechanic will certainly consider the option, come spring.
  • - 2
 Enve = best quality = high price
This fork = ??? = high price
  • + 28
 I like it.

For sale:
Lightly used kidney. Just one previous owner. No dents or scratches. Never operated with heavy narcotics or involved in serious accidents.
Sold to highest bid above $2700 USD.
  • + 5
 Do a package deal on both of them and save up for a Structure Works bike!!
  • + 26
 Not sure about the company name. Whenever somebody says 'trust me' it automatically makes me not trust them.
  • + 56
 Guessing you don’t have Hope brakes...
  • + 3
 Trust = Trussed?
  • + 3
 @GalenS: considering how much they cost, I Hope they work
  • + 3
 @GalenS: This is the best comment on any of these threads in ages...!
  • + 23
 Target audience for this fork is the guy who has an XTR build Pivot 429 with ENVE’s who rides six miles a week and spends an hour before and after the ride telling everyone in the parking lot about the German headset spacers he ordered.

Just remember that DW is way, way smarter than you.
  • + 4
 Lulz
  • + 44
 Or a guy like me who rides 100-150km a week, has a high household income and no kids. Poser riders exist at all income levels, and dedicated riders exist across the spectrum too.
  • + 26
 There are exotic German headset spacers to be ordered?
  • + 7
 @TheR: wait until Industry Nine releases some new CNC machined 5mm spacer for only 49.9$ !
  • + 4
 @zede: Shut up and take my money!
  • + 3
 @TheR: you won’t be saying that when Jolanda Neff and Emily Batty will be releasing a new Top Fuel doing girly giggles. You’ll be like: “take my money but please don’t stop talking!!!”
  • + 1
 sounds like someone should have worked a little harder in college, and picked a better career choice...
  • + 1
 I have a XX1 build Pivot Firebird with Reynolds Black label, I ride 50ish miles and 15,000k feet a week and spend an hour before and after drinking esoteric craft beer and I still would consider trying this fork. lol
  • + 1
 Might be true but there aren't 2,000 of these guys out there.
  • + 21
 Trust......as in you'll have to cash in your trust fund to buy one.
  • + 16
 Lifetime, 250hr service, Weagle and I like the smooth lines and proportion. I think it’d grow on me pretty quick if it works as I suspect. If it could somehow be 4lbs and money was no concern they’d really have something I think. Looks mean from the front
  • + 9
 Yeah, this could look normal in a few years. Things change. Imagine putting 800mm bars on a bike in 92', without bar ends!!! People would laugh out loud and wonder what the hell they were looking at, and yet, here we are.
  • + 17
 This article needs to be updated with Mike Giese's Instagram video... @steezygiese765 go watch that now...

www.instagram.com/p/BpXA8WFBtH9/?taken-by=steezygiese765
  • + 14
 Would be interesting to hear what a super fast (and technically capable) rider thinks of how these ride.

Usually, riders ask for predictability, not preferring strange leverage curves or mechanisms that interfere with brake / rear suspension interaction. This seems the case for DH and motorcycle racers who often remove electronic suspension for racing as it being constantly variable removes the predicability of a mechanically damped setup.

The telescopic fork is one part of the bike that operates in this way and is a design stuck to at much higher expenditure levels of sport, though this could be regulation?

What will a racer / high end rider think of a variable axle path from their front wheel, how will this alter the bikes balance in terms of front / rear suspension and is anti-dive (though not the goal here as stated) actually a beneficial trait? Be interesting to see if this takes off, would love to try one.
  • + 2
 Fair point, those forks never made their way to MX racing either..
  • + 5
 Check out steezygiese765 on instagram...
  • - 2
 @pbraunstein: instaf*ck can die
  • + 10
 What if...

What happens if this gets out there, people actually ride it before deciding, and love it? What if this radically looking piece of hardware out performs a regular fork by a huge margin? Is it then worth the almost double price of a new Fox? Or is it worth more? Performance far outweighs the price if it works. I mean that's what is all about, isn't it? Having the latest and greatest? What happened when carbon frames first came out? I certainly wasn't going to pay for one, but after riding it I'd spend the money. I mean really, in the grand scheme of things, if this fork performs, and it takes a 7-8k bike to 8-9k, is it really that much of a difference in price that you wouldn't pay for it to have the best?
  • + 2
 If if was going to be world beating we would see this arrangement in other areas of wheeled sport, mx, moto racing, larger mtb companies etc. I am not suggesting there won't be any benefits, but as with most modern 'inventions' in the cycle industry all we see are improvements on old parts and design - this is no different, it's not the first linkage fork.
  • + 3
 "What if this radically looking piece of hardware out performs a regular fork by a huge margin? "

It won't. How I know? Motorcycles. If the non-telescopic forks made sense, the moto-enduro dudes, as well as the motocross dudes would all use them.

There have been plenty of non-traditional fork designs in the moto world, none of them work well.
  • + 5
 @justanotherusername: um. This is a bicycle after all. We settled on different wheel sizes, different transmissions, sometimes clipless pedals, etc. Humans weigh less and produce less power. Bicycles live with different physics. Maybe this is just perfect for bikes and not for other wheel sports for a variety of reasons.
  • + 5
 @justanotherusername: We did see it, Britten Motorcycles used a linkage type front suspension. Sadly John Britten only made 10 bikes before his untimely death due to a skin cancer related illness but the bikes were successfully raced in the early 90's.
  • + 1
 @alexsin: I agree with you to some extent, rear suspension a good example of this as of course we pedal a bike vs an engine.

With a fork though, not so sure, the fundamentals remain the same push bike fork v moto fork albeit one is significantly lighter than he other.

I do remember anti dive mechanisms being tried in moto and the riders preferred he geometry change that braking induced over the anti dive system - I know this wasn't the primary drive behind the fork design but is touted as a benefit.

As I say, I'm super interested to see how they work out, I just doubt we are seeing any more than an incremental development in the real world, it's a very nicely designed hash of an old system (devils is the details of course) at the end of the day.
  • + 3
 @phops: There is a big limitation to linkage style forks and that is the amount of travel available. That is likely the reason you don't see them on Moto/Enduro but have seen them many times on road motorcycles.

Many of the designs worked very well and made it to production bikes. The real issues were production costs due to lower volume sales and complexity/reliability. So are not indicative on whether they work but other factors.

Both BMW and Yamaha produced variations for the road. Also many factory produced sidecar equipped motorcycles used to be equipped with girder type forks due to the ability to accept side load(not an issue on a traditional motorcycle).
  • + 1
 @fabwizard: the expense / complexity argument while valid does miss the point that they would be irrelevant if the performance differential was there - they go to ridiculous lengths in other areas of a motorbike to get minor gains, if the linkage fork offered a huge improvement it would be developed regardless of cost and conplexity.

The new Yamaha Niken isn't ludicrously priced and has a pretty mental fork / twin wheel arrangement, that bikes meant to excel in some areas but you won't see that front end on an R1M anytime soon.
  • + 9
 “What happens if you build a device that lets the stability of the front-end of a bicycle or motorcycle increase on corner entry rather than decrease? It's a simple question that I don't think anybody has ever asked.”

I’ve asked that before but never found the time to design and prototype a fork that does that - because I’m too busy running the business that I did start by accident 10 years ago!
  • + 6
 As a former pro motorcycle road racer(albeit a looooong time ago) fork dive and the reduced stability helped with turn in to corners. So by tuning out fork dive the early linkage forks actually made their race bikes slower.

This is much less of a concern with MT. Bikes due to the lower rotational mass but is more an indication that what works for one use ie. motorcycles may not work for another and vice versa.

So I agree that we need a review by a large group high level rider/racer testers to really understand if this works or if the increased stability will actually hinder handling as it was found on racing motorcycles.
  • + 1
 @fabwizard: Good point, I rely on a little dive to corner faster, especially on my way out of berms. Time will tell if Trust has a winner.
  • + 1
 This was exactly my concern. Stability is not always beneficial when you want to change direction.@fabwizard:
  • + 12
 Ok that fork does look good Smile
  • + 9
 The thing that I like about it is that there's proper damper inside that you can tune. From all that weird looking forks that one is the best IMHO. Price, as always, is strictly from the ass.
  • + 8
 Great minds think alike!

It's about time the linkage concept got the attention it deserves!

And now for my complaint:

Dave says: "What happens if you build a device that lets the stability of the front-end of a bicycle or motorcycle increase on corner entry rather than decrease? It's a simple question that I don't think anybody has ever asked."

Not only have we asked it, this is nearly a copy of the language we use for our Stability on Demand technology.

Focus on stability, rather than axle path: yep, that's the core of our technology.

Dynamic geometry: yep, that's us, too.

Constant trail: in pitch, ditto; in heave, ours increases trail for ultimate stability.

Sealed bearings at all pivots with a lifetime warranty: ditto.

Proprietary suspension hardware: nope, ours is off-the-shelf.

$2700: Perfect, makes Structure look like a bargain! Smile

Challenge accepted, Dave. Time for a group test!
  • + 4
 When can I try this in Vancouver/squamish/whistler?

If people could actually try it I bet you could gain a lot of sales
  • + 2
 Extra please do a group test!!!
  • + 3
 @LOLWTF: The most correct answer is "as soon as we finish testing, lock down the final version design, get the factory tooling built, go through the safety/standards certification processes, and optimize the lay-up".

The more useful answer is "mid-2019 ... probably".

No one is more eager than us to put our bike under the public - as soon as it's ready, you'll hear all about it! Until then, you can ask your favourite shop, trail guide, or skills instructor to contact us about acquiring a demo and you can subscribe to our mailing list via www.structure.bike

Thanks for your support!
  • + 2
 @Structure-Ryan: I'll see you next summer then! Looking forward to it
  • + 1
 Yea, but can you fit a water bott-ARGH PB GOT ME TOO! Love the concept - good luck!
  • + 1
 Available now (Hap Seliga) in volume. $2700 vs. $5995, for those who already have a bike. But kudos for not publishing a top tube length, as it forces an issue.
  • + 2
 @iduckett: Under the down tube. I'm a water bottle fan, too, so I plan to at least offer a bottle with a flip top to keep the valve clean.
  • + 2
 @ceecee: Top tube length is my most hated geometry parameter. For better or worse, my geometry chart involves a lot of "forcing the issue": seat tube angles are given at the typical "effective" point and at a realistic seat height, reach is measured at the industry-average stack height to facilitate comparison, and our head angle is a conversation unto itself.

It's true our frame + fork is more than the Trust fork, but that shouldn't be surprising. A Structure chassis is priced comparably to a traditional carbon frame with a Trust fork, but offers the advantage of clean-sheet integration.
  • + 6
 This, unlike past efforts, will be accepted because...Lauf. They made a decent product that did "ok" in the market and they will have blazed a trail of acceptability for this form factor. Current composite design and manufacturing technology is a game changer.

I'll be in line for one of these because I like trying new tech and don't mind the risks of early adoption.
  • + 1
 Have you ridden a Lauf? Without damping, and with how flexy it is, its worse than a rigid fork. Significantly.
  • + 7
 @hamncheez: I have, on a fat bike I demoed on snow. Was impressive for its intended purpose in that application but would likely not work for my style of riding on anything but.

I'm not saying the performance of the Lauf, which had relatively insignificant market penetration, will lead to acceptance. I'm saying this is the psychology of something new not being accepted on a wide scale until it has been seen for a certain number of times by the masses. Everyone here now knows what a Lauf is and that it is a "viable" design concept regardless of peoples opinions about its performance. This will open the door for acceptance of a certain look or style of product if improvements have been made to the first-to-market version of said product.

Everyone laughed when I first started using the original Samsung Galaxy Note in 2012, holding their iPads to their heads and pretending to dial them. That size phone is pretty much standard and now everyone mocks my Luddite iPhone SE.

Truth: I just like being an attention whore at the trail head. LOL
  • + 6
 How do they plan on handling different axle to crown lengths?

If I were to drop this on my bike (140mm fork), it'd lower the front end by almost 20mm, something that is sure to have an impact on the geometry of the bike. If they really feel that having a 130mm fork that can take the place of longer forks the bike was designed for (unless I misunderstood that statement and it's going to be adjustable travel), then there is going to have to be some mechanism of raising the front for proper a2c on bikes with geometry that depends on it.
  • + 2
 17mm lower spacer was used on Switchblade 29; Hightower at top of article still has a flattish bar, but headset spacers. Sag is only 20%. Dynamic stack strongly influenced by axle path.
  • + 9
 I don't know how well this is going to work, but I trust that Dave has done the math on this.
  • + 6
 Look anything Weagle has his hands on, ive got to try before making any rash decisions. They have a great crew and cant wait to get my hands onto one if these wierd looking front ends. Next step-pro status
  • + 5
 Looks intriguing! The long service interval and easy rebuild are big positives to me. Unfortunately, if they can get the cost in a competitive range of the top telescoping forks I won't (can't) consider this fork.
  • + 4
 Dave makes some pretty amazing stuff and I have no doubt this thing will test with stellar results. Yes $$, but the price will drop down over time and you'll see this tech trickle down to entery level format. Remember Carbon Frames? I for one think this bold new direction in fork tech is the future. Fox and RockShox are probably testing some interesting stuff as well. The consumer wins. Good news is that the stuff out there now (GX build kit for example) is the result of an overpriced (why do I need it?) reaction that is the mainstream of the entery level bike for every manufacturer now. Just wait.
  • + 4
 This fork suffers from the same problem as inverted forks and all of the other linkage forks with the linkage down low. Independent fork leg motion (for inverted forks), or differential motion of the left and right linkages. The only thing keeping the left and right sides moving together is the axle. That is probably why there are air springs on both sides, but I am skeptical that it will be stiff enough.

Other than that, pretty good-looking. Not quite as good-looking as the old Girvin linkage fork, but still pretty good.
  • + 2
 You could adress that by making the rear links longer and connect them with an arch, kinda like the DVO Emerald, but it would gain weight and not look really good.
  • + 2
 Agreed! That axle-only bridge between the left and right links is under a lot of stress and has me wondering how it will hold up. I'm happy to stress test it for them Smile
  • + 2
 On those grounds, the only thing keeping the left and right sides at the back of your full-sus moving together is the axle. It isn't like an inverted fork because on that the axle is on sliding stanchions moving within bushings - here you have a series of bearing pivots which will have far less play or flex outside their designed motion. This fork should be stiffer than telescopic forks of a similar weight.
  • + 1
 @threehats: No. For rear suspension designs, both the left and right chainstays and the left and right seatstays are connected to each other around the front of the rear wheel. I can't think of a single example of a rear suspension design where the stays are not connected to each other.

As to your second point, that is just speculation. Ball bearings have some play, otherwise they wouldn't move. What that play translates to at the rim, and how that compares to other forks, is something that neither of us knows. One of the problems with many of the linkage forks in the past has been that the play has been too much.
  • + 1
 @SJP: Loads of rear suspension designs are just joined at the pivot axles and wheel axle. For starters look at almost every true single-pivot design. A ball bearing needs almost zero play to move because it features rolling not sliding contacts - orders of magnitude less play than sliding bushings. It’s a good engineering solution, speaking as a mechanical engineer.
  • + 1
 @threehats:
If they are joined at the pivot axles, they are joined. On this fork, they are not joined at all, except by the axle. On this fork, without the wheel in place, you can completely compress the left side and the right side will not move at all. There is no rear suspension design for which that is true. "True single-pivot designs" especially tend to have very beefy swingarms and pivots.

"Almost zero" play translates to how much relative motion between the handlebar ends and the contact patch? The sliding contacts in a conventional fork are much farther apart than the relevant pivots on this fork, and they support lowers that are connected at both the arch and the axle. Pointing out that displacement of a sliding bushing at the bushing is less than displacement of a cartridge bearing at the bearing is not convincing. Exactly the same argument can be made about the AMP forks (which didn't suffer from the left/right independence issue), and they were noticeably flexier than even the crappy early 90s telescoping forks.
  • + 4
 I think it looks cool as shit. Especially on that Evil. It's weird to me that so many of you are unwilling to accept new tech. What if it IS a whole lot better? With adoption by the masses the price could come down significantly.
O.k. Now keep on bitching about how you suck and cant afford the fancy stuff.
  • + 4
 The cost!!! I am still paying off my pikes. Good to see innovation even if most goes now where. Lol soon they are going to invent an organic , bio-mechanical, sustainable, , low maintenance, highly tunable and adaptable system, call it ARMS for the front and LEGS for the rear, with direct BACK linkage. Now where is my 2wd dirt bike.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 25, 2018 at 2:09) (Below Threshold)
 Still paying off your bikes? What did you get for your previous fork? 26 dollars ???
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: as much as it sounds like the perfect plan to sell your old equipment for a decent price and then to only have the difference between old and new to pay... It rarely works out
  • + 4
 Great! This looks very promising. Great tire clearance. What about integrating a fender(moto style)? Expected to see a 20mm axle on such a design.
I always thought (since my first Mag 21) that a pulled swingarm front suspension would be great on a mtb(Saw some photos of Honda MX bikes with pulled swing-arm very long time ago) . So I´m really excited. Would love to test-drive. Wish them great success. Then hopefully prices go down...
  • + 5
 Weagle is my idol: he takes crappy old solutions like the ugly functioning Vespa alike suspension, puts it on a patent with some minor mods and people crave to fill his pockets. Nr. 1 Mr. Weagle!
  • + 4
 Six feet and 140 lbs. Look like a giraffe on a bicycle. Having to use a light spring rate puts me in dive city on drops. I have to square up and weight the front end while the back is stable. Yeah I see the need. I might have to wait for the "XT" version. Best of luck with this.
  • + 4
 I just MIGHT be the only guy around here old enough to remember, and actually owned, a Lawill Leader, which seems pretty similar in concept. I practice, well I'll just say the bike shop gave me a full refund after several months of troubles. Looking forward to ride reviews, but damn, that price is crazy, even though I'm married to a dentist!
  • + 5
 I've been riding a Lauf SL with an 1" of travel on my gravel bike and it's sick! (As far as gravel bikes go.) I'm open to this concept. Still looks a little weird though. But nobody has Laufed at me yet.
  • + 4
 Crazy. Glad someone is pushing the envelope even if this isn't the tech that takes over the market. If it's good enough then it'll influence enough to give us better bikes even tho it seems a bit crazy. Kind of like Pole with their geo
  • + 7
 29er linkage fork front, gear box, E-bike 27.5 rearend with NO bottle holder....Blow up the internet.
  • + 3
 I love the looks and tech! Price is wacked though and I'll wait until version 2 or 3 before seriously considering it...yep, I'm a laggard. If v1 proves successful (and I hope it does) I'm sure DW and team will make several refinements and get the price down on future models. Will this fork be included in any upcoming Evil bike demos? Please?
  • + 3
 Like just about everyone else here, I DO have 2,700 bucks burning a hole in my pocket, also, I've always thought that telescopic forks were initially not the ultimate answer for a bike, where its' rider weighs several more times than it does. But eventually, I had to admit that telescopic forks were here to stay, if only for the Brap factor. And then they got good. Just kidding about the dough. It's gonna take a winning lotto ticket before I'll even consider spending that kinda money on a fork.
  • + 3
 I do really believe that linkage forks will one day be popular , and I think they can be superior to telescoping forks...but I really do wonder about the business case for this approach. Two proprietary air sprints, one proprietary damper, full carbon construction, 8 bearings costs almost as much as a budget bike...Maybe the way to have this go mainstream is to have the $$$$ versions sell and prove the concept, funding development of a more mass market version down the line (Tesla's approach) But will it get enough market penetration to make that happen ? who will service them ? will those dampers be reliable ? lots of potential for disaster from a business perspective, we shall see. Exciting none the less Smile
  • + 3
 It probably will work just fine, just like it work in Moto GP, or GP motocross in the 60s and 70s but at the end of the day traditional suspension forks won out for a reason, remember when everyone was going to have inverted forks......
  • + 5
 Aren't forks still inverted in moto?
  • + 5
 actually inverted forks won in motogp so...
  • + 3
 I like my inverted forks on my CBR
  • + 2
 @fr3er1d3r: he meant inverted forks for mtbiking
  • + 2
 Inverted forks still have plenty of dedicated followers. manitou dorados, shivers, and DVO's abound at the parks. Xfusion came out with that inverted trail fork. I'd happily try out an Xfusion. Or if manitou, marzocchi, and DVO came out with newer model single crown inverted forks lots of people would be super stoked. Benefits are obvious: constant seal lubrication, lower unsprung weight, more tire clearance.
  • + 5
 I want to hate this, but if Weagle designed it, chances are it will work. The price and the fact it looks like the terminators sex toy kind of put me off though!
  • + 3
 I remember magazines proclaiming other linkage forks as the future many years ago. It never happened. This may be different, but there is a fair bit of marketing bullshit in there, which makes me sceptical.

As others have said, if this design is really so much better than telescopic forks it would have seen wholesale usage in the upper echelons of motorbike racing by now. It’s incredibly naive to think that top level teams in motorsport would stick with conventional forks just because they’d already invested so much time and money in developing them; manufacturers and teams are looking for any advantage, often regardless of cost.

JP
  • + 3
 "Function trumps fashion, always"... unfortunately for Trust, this is about as far from the truth as you can get. Doesn't matter how good it rides, it will never be accepted by the wider market. Yeah, yeah, that's what everyone has ever said about any great idea, but i'm sorry people buy products based on emotions, not facts. As an engineer myself, this fact of life pains me.
  • + 3
 Why the fakk cannot I work on my project faster, and others are passing me by? Why God-damn-mortgage, why?
.
I think there is some interesting moment coming in MTB industry. Some spin-off situation that will eventually bring many small builders to show their design and we will see unprecedented wave of suspension developement. Thinks are looking hopefully because we wont be discussing water bottles, mega-boostinators and TR inserts for a long time.
  • + 3
 Honestly, because Dave is behind this, I think it legitimately has got a chance, unlike any other linkage fork I've ever seen (and I own a Pro-Flex). This guy has shaken up the industry more than once, I'm sure he can do it again. It looks strange, and costs a ton, but if it does what's written on the box, that will all change in time.
  • + 2
 Exactly. Most companies are lucky to come up with a single ok rear suspension design. Dave has what, 3 designs? And with that the DW link has multiple variations that ride slightly different?

Agree 100%. If there is a reason this fork is a winner is Weagle doesn’t do anything less than 100%. None of these guys would bother if they didn’t come up with a game changer. And they did.
  • + 3
 I owned an IRD TL5 and a Lawwill Leader back in the day. Both were amazing for different reasons. The IRD had anti-dive built in and it worked great. I've been waiting for someone to tackle this properly for years. Can't wait to see how it evolves. Stop complaining about price. Jeez.
  • + 3
 Hallaluia. Some innovation in the mountain bike industry (yes I know there's been similar stuff before so no need to say). I think this looks great and good on them for pushing and wanting to develop linkage suspension. Makes so much sense but get the price down!
  • + 3
 Owned and rode the Lawill Leader back in 1996. Had similar anti dive & constant trail features. I could push it waaay harder and faster than a Zoke Z1 from the same era. I bet this thing takes us to the next level. Prediction: in 5 years all $6k and up bikes have something like this!
  • + 3
 Imagine everybody had no ears and somone would grow up one day with a pair of those weird things growing out of the side of his head. People would find ears ugly. His friends would certainly make a crowdfunding to operate him.

Its the same with telescopic vs linkage forks : we get used to see stuff to the point of normal. Telescopic forks are the norm so linkage forks look weird. This linkage fork looks much better than the ones I've seen before. The price is understandably massive and wont help to make those forks look normal.
  • + 3
 Always thought it would be cool to have a Bimota Tesi.

I'm surprised that nobody in motorcycle GP's has experimented with anything different of late, but there is so much invested in the standard fork design that nobody can afford to run at the back of the pack while they work our something different. My old BMW had a Telelever front end, but it still looked "conventional." Worked well, though.
  • + 2
 Mike, I love your work, but could you possibly sound anymore jaded in a single article? Yes, the price is madness, but kudos to these gents for trying to actually innovate. By the way, who decided that a telescopic fork was supposedly attractive? By the way, the 250 hours service interval is freaking amazing. The idiotic 50 hour service interval Fox and others deliver needs to die a rapid death. This gives me hope for the future. An expensive future...
  • + 2
 PinkBikerCommenters gonna PinkBikeComment, but it's an interesting fork.

I'm sure Fox & RS could have released something like this, they would have marketed it first for the XC high end bike like the RS1 which is a classic fork but still "different", then overtime taken it over to the other disciplines.

Also I wonder is that architecture may not be brought over to the back end of the bike again (even if it's derived from already), with a smaller damper hidden in each seatstay rather than a big shock, or as the diagonal of a parallelogram, something like that.
  • + 2
 interesting idea for sure, the only problem imo is all the proprietary stuff as a result
  • + 2
 Looks so good I think! Futuristic without looking ridiculous. There are a ton of potential benefits to this design as they say so if it works well this could be a huge innovation in mountain bikes. Price is a lot but that's what you get for a first generation product that is full carbon and pretty complex. Just the fact that you get rid of bushing bind and are able to have some leverage is huge. Anti-dive and improved handling are just icing on the cake really.
I wonder if there is an optimal head angle this thing is designed around?
  • + 5
 Needs to be Randy tested and approved before I endorse. ***Must withstand one metric Randy of abuse.
  • + 2
 Not sure I want a fork that preserves trail under compression. That means the axle is moving back much faster than on a telescopic fork and shortening your front center even more. Trail determines steering feel and centering but front center and wheel keeps your weight where you want it. I was hoping it had a slight rearward path off sag for small bump compliance then would move forward for wheelbase preservation even if it reduces trail. I would be curious to ride one but this costs more than I just spent on whole bike in buysell and I have a kid to feed.
  • + 2
 It's just a few milliliters of fork offset that is changing which is rather insignificant when talking front-center length on modern mountain bikes but it is rather significant when it comes to fork trail and it's impact on handling. It's still much less of a change than one frame size. I also don't think it is shortening the front center much more than a telescopic fork, it's just that telescopic forks shorten the front center without changing the fork offset and they also shorten the fork trail as the head angle steepens. While this thing is changing the fork offset as it goes into travel trying to preserve fork trail length. Though, hard to judge how it really behaves without riding it.
  • + 4
 This looks amazing, and I am a fan of the aesthetic. 250hr service schedule? No stupid dust seals and foam rings? Sounds great to me.
  • + 2
 I think it looks bad ass! And if it can increase stability and performance why wouldn't we want to go down that road. Also, it is a first run first company price...I think developing it and actually getting it to market is amazing! Now we can pick a traditional telescoping fork or a linkage fork and be dicks about that. 27.5 tires are obviously the best....everything else should be burned like witches.
  • + 2
 Exciting to see innovation that seems worth putting the time into. I bet these guys know the market will come around enough to move that many. I'd love to try one. I can see how the math works out a little bit just by observing that the axle path moves behind where the weight is distributed initially. Also, on a telescoping fork, the angle of attack is relative to whatever your head tube angle is where as this is not affected by that. You're weight is more directly above the front suspension in this way and that will increase stability as well as well bump sensitivity. I really hope I get to try one. Literally going to contact these guys this week if I can and see what I can do to test one. This is actually game changing and not hideous IMO. Strange, kinda, but not ugly.
  • + 2
 Anti brake dive for the front is super high up my wishlist and I think linkage forks are the way of the future. But I'm concerned by the leverage ratio to the shock. Looks like the shock and spring only have about 30-40mm of travel so there really must be something pretty special going on in there if the IFP really is low pressure. I'm also wondering how that works when the mud starts flying, both in terms of the linkage and my eyes... Hope we see this develop into something lighter and more affordable... reducing it to a single leg would probably help a lot with that...
  • + 2
 While I never owned one, a lot of the guys at the shop I worked with in the late 90’s had the Girvin Vector linkage fork. The thing was weird, but in the day of 30mm stanchion tubes (pre-Fox 32) it was a fork that wouldn’t flex like crazy.

Years ago, I saw an article of a group of guys still riding klunkers expousing the benefits of a Schwinn Springer fork because it slackened the head angle and increased wheelbase as it compressed and was pushed into turns. That idea has stuck with me wondering if someone could actually make a good modern linkage fork. I’m hoping these guys are into something, the price will come down eventually.
  • + 3
 And he totally didn't copy anything from the Lauf Carbonara forks... which conveniently didn't get mentioned even once in this story, though every other linkage fork seems to have aside from the Noleen and Look forks.
  • + 1
 There really isn’t much that’s similar. Maybe visually they are similar (esp the top half) but other than that this is a very different product
  • + 2
 If this works and is reliable, there are some strong positives-less frequent service intervals and no stanchions to scrape appeal to me as much as any improved axle path vs. the current telescoping stuff. It's way spendy because these are the first, hand built, limited run products. If the substance matches the hype, demand will bring the price down. More importantly UP THE IRONS Dave!!!!!!!
  • + 0
 Demand brings the price UP. Offer brings the price DOWN. I think I learned that in grade 9... Smarten up
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: Yeah, but mass production tends to bring the production costs down a lot and mass production is only viable if there is mass demand. And then multiple entities start to mass produce because there is a lot of demand and competition drives the margins down.
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: Exactly, look at the Pike. $1k to start... and still $1k.
  • + 4
 Just because it's really ugly doesn't mean it's a bad ride. I dated this ugly girl once. When the lights went out well nevermind.
  • + 2
 Ya know people thought $2500 wheels for a mountain bike were stupid when Jason Schiers announced such while at Enve. I don’t recall anything above $800-$900 when they did. People laughed at the idea of a $10k mountain bike. Every brand has one now that’s a player. Came Creek launched a $1000 crank and the armchair gurus said it’d never sell. They’re back ordered for weeks still and launched a second version. Say what you want, predict as you’d like a downfall. But I bet they sell those first 2500 in 6-7 months.
  • + 1
 makes the bike look like optimus prime. this feels like the Alta motorcycle. innovative and very well executed. but too expensive and a very good chance it will not appeal to the mass market. good luck boys, sounds like they worked pretty hard.
  • + 1
 Anyone have any thoughts on the one size fits all approach? It is going to be a small number of people who
A. Want to try this.
B. Have the money.
C. Have a bike where this is even close to the proper Axle-Crown length.

I find that people who like to try things like this tend to pay attention to those details and won’t fall for the 110-150 travel, 27.5 or 29 is all good on this fork.
  • + 1
 C is fairly easy to adjust if there’s enough steer tube length; they stated elsewhere that a 17mm spacer was used to correct for a 29er

https://www.mtbtools.com/product/extended-crown-race-for-fat-bike-suspension-fork-clearance/

I wouldn’t be that surprised if a few showed up FS used at a 25% or more off in the Buy/Sell area within 6 months of being released. That’s fairly common for any component generally speaking. The vultures will be lining up, lol
  • + 0
 @TheUnknownMTBR: Thanks for the spacer 'link. Here's the one from Huang via an Australian office, tho you have seen it: cyclingtips.com/2018/10/trust-performance-message-fork-review. I can't tell if images above are Wreckoning LB, Calling, or both, but Wreck has a lot of stack at 160mm fork.
  • + 1
 @ceecee: thanks for the link

Lifetime replacement or not, I still have maintenance concerns for all those pivots and wonder how stable it is when they starting wearing and moving around. Time will tell I suppose ....
  • + 1
 .....was thing about this all weekend. Its a great design. I realized I've seen it before on an automobile....The VW beetle link pin front suspension is the exact same thing. Its been the basis for off road race cars from the beginning.
  • + 1
 It’s unique and not in a terrible way. If it works we will all want one. But, at this price I’ll wait a while at least. I can get by with what I’ve got. If I can pick one up for $800 at the end of the season maybe? Where can we go for a test ride?
  • + 1
 That one is out of my budget that's for sure.

If it really is truly better, the price will come way down and in time it would replace telescopic forks. If past experience is any indication, that's not going to happen.

That said, I have lots of faith in DW and his understanding of suspension geometry. If anyone can make it work phenomenally, he can.

BTW, the 2500 forks x $2700 = $6.75 million gross. That's some serious dough to bring in on the first run. Seems like the lights could be kept on at a much lower margin and if it worked as well as claimed, it would explode in popularity.
  • + 3
 Schier's locks look like something between suspension Jesus and the dude. Weagel's look like he's Jason's drunk monk sidekick.
  • + 1
 WOW! That is what I love with merica! "trailing 4 bar" I would take the test-version with the chopped-off carbon-fibre-tubes and the milled raw-aluminium-linkage. I am pretty sure that would have come cheapter.... Guy´s for most of us that is wayyyyyyyyyyy to expensive for a fork! Please think about the rest of us :-) Make a cheapter Version :-) Oh, and pinkbike: in the overview the "Hurrycat vorace" (and the stbr "german-a kilo 2.0") would have been nice, because they also stand for "trailing 4-bar forks; actually as far as I can judge the whyte is a diffrent kinematic-concept that is similar to "hossack-fork" and the "Motion" seems also to be a "trailing 4-bar fork", so that seems to be a good competitor, though it is a pulling and not pushing design, but that is detail... The leitner-fork is actually a "leading 4-bar" as would be the "german-a Kilo 1.0" and lot´s of others, that rather form a contrast here :-)
  • + 1
 Theses articles about linkage fork never mention old linkage French forks.
There was the Look/Fournales, but also the Hurricat Vorace, who also as got a trailing parallelogram. I think the axle parh is exactly the same as on his this fork.

It is also the same conception as the Lauf fork, but with pivots and an hydrauluc damper.
  • + 2
 I want to rock these with a Pinion equipped Polygon XQUARONE EX9 and the Bike Ahead carbon wheels...no really, i really want that. just need Polygon to meet up with Pinion...
  • + 1
 I would expect 24mm Maverick style front axel. dedicated front hub should come with the fork. With such a price tag it will not be mainstream anyway so it wouldnt matter. I looked closely at the slomo sequence on their website.. its cleverly cut, but at one point front wheel flexes that it almost touches the leg of the fork..
  • + 4
 Well I had this back in the early 90's

www.pinkbike.com/photo/7271027
  • + 2
 I have to admit I am interested (when the price comes down to earth) just for the possibility that the damned thing wouldn't creak like an old wooden ship after a couple of weeks!
  • + 1
 Whatever is gained on stanchion creak would maybe be lost on new pivots creaking. Like having a second rear suspension on your bike in terms of pivots.
  • + 5
 This video is password protected
  • + 1
 Video at Trust website
  • + 1
 I'm a new adopter, had a Lauf and it was okay though flexy.

I bet it'll work pretty well with Weagle on board; love DW, but that's too much money for me unless I'm looking for a solution to a problem ... which I'm not.

When the price drops to half the introductory price, I'll think about it after a test ride.
  • + 1
 I'd love to see a coparisation with this fork: www.adroitcycleworks.com/product/adroit-front-subframe-linkage-fork
the "adroit" looks most functional of all linkage forks I've ever seen and seems to be affordable as well...all carbon btw. The Axlepath thing of the "trust message" seems interesting but a backt to back would be intersesting! Linkage fork comparisation any soon @mikelevy ? Semms to line up in a revival of theese kind of suspension....
  • + 2
 NEVER TRUST A MAN WITH AN IRON MAIDEN T-SHIRT WHO WANTS TO SELL YOU SOME CARBON WITCHERY.

Otherwise, I don`t know for you, but the best front suspension I`ve experimented till now resides in my Iron Arms Smile
  • + 1
 Really cool idea with some solid engineering (and possibly a fair bit of marketing thrown in). I just wonder if the price vs. extra performance is really worth it for average rider. I'm a big guy and the difference between a 130 mm Fox 32 and 140 mm Pike on my Rocky Mountain Instinct was huge!

At least some of the "technical advances" of the last few years is filtering down to lower price points. Dropper posts, wider rims, larger diameter stanchions, new school geometry and even space for water bottles in the frame is becoming the norm on most new bikes. I cant see this becoming "standard spec" soon.
  • + 1
 Hahahaha, how many comments on this commercial... Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin
This forks catching attention big time already now. I will give them a try, definitely.
Where I am shocked is that's almost no serious comment from Germans... Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin You know, German engineering an so on.... Big Grin
  • + 1
 I guess I don't know how much $3k forks are supposed to weigh, but that does seem heavy for the buck. I think the interesting part is the it looks like the unsprung weight of this fork is pretty minimal - almost the whole fork is sprung weight. Should make it ride nice.
  • + 1
 2500 units at 2700 each. Wow these clowns wants 6.7M right away. You haven't proven your self yet in the market and you want 3-4 times the price of current forks??!!!. Sounds like they want their investment/money back right away just in case this thing flops.
  • + 2
 I think this is a great idea and certainly the best linkage front suspension fork I have seen. The price tag is going to make it difficult to push.
  • + 1
 Is it the only linkage fork that anyone has ever been able to go and buy and fit to any normal frame? That's got to help rather a lot with potential sales even if price doesn't.
  • + 1
 So my question is How is the smallbump sensitivity with 200psi in each leg and double the seals? Leverage ratio may take care of it and I hope it does. Bring on the first ride review!
  • + 0
 I think suspension's biggest problem hasn't been addressed with this, and that's the fact it only absorbs bumps from one angle. Say it absorbs a bump at 70° (linear to the headtube angle), but you hit a 40° bump, it's only going to absorb like half of the energy.
  • + 3
 at that price ...it should be future proof in the same way as a Push 11-6 shock!
  • + 0
 So after my $2,700 usd payment clears they send me the rest of the bike? Via DLC? What's the catch?

These guy's are nuckin futs! What is it with companies these days?

ProTip: I can get a full set of performance coil overs with custom springs for my lude, and still have $ left over for party supplies. #TruStory
  • + 2
 Lol...Your definition of 'performance' coil overs might be different than mine.
  • + 1
 Maybe if you're talking Ground-Control sleeves and Eibach springs.
  • + 0
 This is obvious a rich kid's toy.

3 successful MTB guys (2 of which sold their companies) decided to build something with all their dividend checks.

Great irony that the axle path (up and back) is what makes this fork supposedly handle so well. It's the same path that Parul Turner and Maverick designed 20 years ago. Again 2 Rock Shock guys decided to build their ultimate mountain bike....

Problem is it didn't catch on well enough to sustain the company.

Love to see the engineering and creativity but for $2700 - not today...
  • + 4
 Not really, it's just a limited production run to test the market and get the forks out there. Wait and see what happens if/when a few get sold and the reviews come in. $2700 will not be the eventual price if they are able to truly mass produce the things...
  • + 4
 Love the envy dripping from this post.
  • + 2
 This is the first linkage fork Ive seen that isnt too stupid looking to be put on my bike, but for $2700 Ill just buy a new bike instead.
  • + 4
 Might need to setup a trust-fund
  • + 1
 Setting it up is easy, filling it up not so much ...
  • + 4
 Finally a fork that matches the Evil...
  • + 0
 1. A parallel link has a very similar axle path as a telescoping fork, claims of OMG performance are great but will not be a game changer 2. It weighs as much or more than a RS Pike. 3. It cost the equivalent of three RS Pikes on ebay. Good luck, and a great idea but I don't see it gaining any real traction or going longer than a few years and draining the developers wallets.
  • + 0
 im all about new technology. DW link has multiple pivot. it is designed to take abuse. it seems to me that this fork is designed with DW link rear suspension in mind and implemented to the fork design. Notice the multiple pivots? I would like to see R&D video and rider post ride input on this fork. price is another story which i will post later.
  • + 4
 Maybe Cannondale can make a lefty version for only $1,350???
  • + 1
 ????????????
  • + 1
 This comment FTW ^
  • + 2
 @Orion1977: not sure which one is funnier; original comment or the ???? reply, roflmao ...
  • + 3
 F&ck it. I’m just gonna put a Pogo stick on the front of my bikes. Coil is cool again right?
  • + 2
 I think the biggest question is what would a fork like this have to do to win people over? I don't think a couple of % performance gain would be enough.
  • + 3
 I don't trust a company if they almost sounds like "trust me I am an engineer"
  • + 2
 I think this will get lost, but for all looking for videos of this being ridden, check out steezygiese765 on insta shredding the piss out of the Trust fork..
  • + 3
 My buddy Randy rides one of these and he’s the fastest dude you’ve never met
  • + 1
 Do they make a Lefty version?
Seriously tho i'm sure they will have a lower pricepoint model next year, probably call it The Memo or something and price it at $2k so everyone can buy it
  • + 4
 not sure why but I trust this brand
  • + 6
 Clearly you didnt get the message.
  • + 2
 I'm not a dentist but I did go to one today so I can probably afford this. Right? Plus I was the only person left who had not commented.
  • + 1
 At least we won't have to worry about hearing about yet another DW lawsuit. I don't know a company on planet earth that be willing to encroach on that patent. And dare I say it... Definitely uglier than a POLYGON!!!
  • + 0
 Looking at that photo of the guy descending with the blue pivot.. that brake line looks like its going to be put under tighter bending angles more often.. hope they don't wear out.
  • + 2
 I think I'm going to wait for the lefty version. Half the fork at twice the price.
  • + 2
 and by next year mid summer this fork will be obsolete due to the new,even more expensive boost model replacing it.
  • + 4
 no bottle mount ?!
  • + 2
 You can Trust that I won't be buying this fork. That's The Message I wanted to tell everyone.
  • + 3
 What's the matter, you guys don't trust the message?
  • + 2
 Trust that it's not only ugly as hell but also way too expensive to boot. I'll pass.
  • + 0
 3 position low speed damping adjustment. You guys are waiting for the budget version. This is the budget version. It can accommodate all the adjustability of top current forks including HSC.
  • + 2
 That fork is so Fetch! Gretchen, stop trying to make fetch happen! It's not going to happen! - Mean Girls.
  • + 1
 F*ck me I knew what you were referencing. Damn you 24/7 media consumption.
  • + 2
 Another consumer R&D product? Kind of like GT in the 90's. Haven't seen it on any podiums. No thanks. Till then.
  • + 2
 What, no mention of the Profile // Girvin link'd fork dating back to before Vbrake days
  • + 2
 Wow $2700 seems reasonable to start parking lot conversations about your bike, Not!
  • + 3
 Did I just spot a nod to AvE?
  • + 0
 Seems to be clearly aimed for the trail bike segment for first release.

I'm genuinely interested but curious if a longer travel "enduro" version will be forthcoming or if Trust claims this is sufficient for bigger bikes?
  • + 2
 I wouldn't be opposed to trying that out. I would however, not like to spend $2700 to try it out.
  • + 2
 First thoughts were what the hell. Then on a second look i think i like em.
  • - 1
 It seems like an interesting option.
Re: high price.
First evolution of new tech, needing to pay for new developments etc. once this tech takes off I am sure there will be entry level versions. Also downhill versions, XX versions and enduro versions.
I look forward to buying one in 5 years time when they are well established. It would almost worth buying one of these keeping it in the box as an investment and then selling it in 10 years as one of the first ones (be that with either success or failure). .... obviously you’ll need more cash that most of us have hanging around.
  • + 2
 This is cycling not art / something mainstream - parts don't usually appreciate in value just because they are the first 2500 made, you would just have an old fork in a box nobody wants, even less so if it turns out to be appreciabt no better than something half the price.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: true... that's the risk. IF it turns out to be a classic and something that changes the whole way suspension is done then it would be valuable. If not, then it would just be an oddity, a very expensive oddity.
  • + 1
 @Mcphisto1978: You really beleive that? You genuinely believe a suspension fork openly available to the public in a minority sport will increase in value? - To who?

Name almost a single thing in the MTB world that is actually more valuable than when it was first made, and please adjust for inflation.

This isnt a fork used by a moto GP rider to win a championship, its just a commercially available product.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: Smile just having a wonder out loud and not tied to anything. You could well be right. Once again a big risky investment.
Take care dude. Enjoy your riding.
  • + 0
 Why the hell you need so much linkage and bearings. Take a look at a Vespa. It works much easier. And at last no one needs such a short fork that was not the lightest for 2500 bugs.
  • + 0
 Vespas don't have linkage forks for suspension or something like that but for making the rider brave and fatalistic...
  • + 0
 @mikelevy I don't suppose you've had any luck contacting Adroit RE: their Subframe fork? It's a linkage fork that I've been interested in getting a hold of, but they have not responded to a single e-mail or facebook message.
  • + 3
 I am sorry, but at that price, with those looks? Not in 2700 years
  • + 3
 Not even Randy would run this
  • + 3
 other websites are available, apparently it rips!
  • + 3
 I think it's kinda... sexy?
  • + 2
 It looks pretty similar to a Mert Lawwill Leader fork just mounted backwards.
  • + 3
 That is one ugly fat fork.
  • + 2
 Short version of a very long article....It's an Anti-Dive fork that looks pretty good, something really hard to do.
  • + 2
 that looks great -like a mantis eating rocks and roots, i would love to try it. free fork for a german forum influencer ?
  • + 3
 Finally pivots to creak and maintain on the front of my bike
  • + 2
 3x the cost (almost) of a 34 Stepcast, and almost a pound heavier. Also ugly as shit.
  • + 0
 Talking xc vs trail.
  • + 2
 I find it hard to believe that I'm thinking this, but it actually looks kinda cool.
  • + 2
 If I were a dentist, I'd have one of these. Just to make all the other dentist bikes look regular.
  • + 2
 Can it make me ride 3x faster than my overpriced $900 fork?
  • + 1
 Looks far better on the Evil than on any other bike! Maybe interesting on an Unno too!
  • + 2
 If ALIEN had a bike it would be look like Evil with that fork.
  • + 2
 I ordered one for my Unno Dash.
  • + 1
 awesome combination!! put some pics up if you arent bsing haha
  • + 1
 "It's a simple question that I don't think anybody has ever asked." get the f- out of here.....dave.
  • + 0
 I absolutely love the concept, and even the look. I'd love to test one of these out.

Any idea how much it weighs compared to a traditional fork?
  • + 2
 Because front forks needed to be more complicated & expensive.
  • + 2
 Came here to read all the 'OMFG! how much?" comments
Wasn't disappointed
  • + 2
 It looks like the bicep flyer from Always Sunny in Philadelphia.
  • + 1
 As opposed to the Lefty; it has 2 legs: I am all in if had the cash to blow!
  • + 2
 I just came here to watch this thing get ripped apart.
  • + 2
 My dog likes cheese burgers
  • + 1
 I have always thought something is missing from my Yeti with the sweet wings....
  • + 0
 Perfect bikepacking fork!! Strap your bags and bottles to the legs and they won't add to the un-sprung weight. If only it didn't cost 7X the price of my alu frame,
  • + 2
 Love the (mostly aluminium) prototype!
  • + 3
 Reminds of that rear suspension, which used manitou forks on the seat stays.
  • + 3
 1 MIIIIIlLLLLION DOLLARS
  • + 1
 Someone please take Weagle's pencil before he invents the four-bar linkage suspension helmet.
  • + 1
 Press release during Rampage in the hopes they won't get crushed in the comments. 340 comments in 10min....
  • + 2
 Will they have one ready for Rampage?!
  • + 1
 Looks very good. Titanum was a better option i think, like the crank of cane creek, more stronger.
  • + 1
 isnt the front wheel a couple of inches further back from where you would expect it to be ?
  • + 2
 Fork for Bold's frame, way to realy creepy bike)))
  • + 1
 Yes. No. Maybe. Can I sit on the fence for a few years and throw shit at the possible future?
  • + 0
 Looks very intruiging. Prices would go down soon if this design caught on. Remember the high cost of the first Rock Shox? Now no bike is sold without a suspension fork.
  • + 2
 Should of named it "FUND"
  • + 1
 For those that didn't think a Lauf wasn't ridiculous or stupid looking enough
  • + 2
 BURN IT WITH FIRE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 First 1 to buy 1 & break 1, I’ll give them $2700 to buy another ...

And the cycle continues ;-d
  • + 2
 Trust me, you are going to need a trust fund to afford this.
  • + 2
 Looks like a Vespa fork LOL
  • + 1
 Come to think of it, this could be the best way to add a front suspension to my CG carbon penny-farthing Big Grin
  • + 2
 I like Dave because dave likes iron maiden..????
  • + 0
 Competitive Cyclist is taking orders already. With a 15% code its only $2295, so y'all can quit complaining about the price.
  • + 2
 A 150mm version to go on the front of an Insurgent would be wild.
  • + 2
 child fork of cannondale lefty
  • + 0
 Finally a "fork" that doesn't look out of place on an over-sized carbon (or some aluminium) frames. If my tax return is great
this year maybe...
  • + 1
 I think it’s hot. I’m fairly cheap and I’ve never paid more than 800 for a fork but I’d love to try one
  • + 3
 No 26" Deal breaker!
  • + 1
 Weight and Price perfect for my Ebike, 4 more root canals AND IT WILL BE MINE
  • + 2
 Cant see many sales at that price or even 1/2 that price?
  • + 1
 Would look killer on my 200 quid 1998 Proflex Beast. Too bad it doesn`t come in 26``.
  • + 2
 this fork will look perfect on a Ellsworth
  • + 2
 Just needs anything cage mounts
  • + 1
 So it's basically A Parallelogram suspension fork. I hope he succeeds where others have failed.
  • + 1
 Not buying why a leverage rate is beneficial when an air spring can already be tuned as progressive as desired?
  • + 1
 Yes. Ok, but what does Randy think? Will he be able to take his 15th ews title on this new technology?
  • + 3
 Is it April 1st already?
  • + 0
 Dave has over four million dollars invested . Please give the fork to some pros. I want to see some podium finishers with this radical departure from telescoping forks.
  • + 0
 Interesting, lots of tech as marketing speak though, 3/4's of the way down they explain it though, the idea of the fork is to keep the trail the same throughout the travel.
  • + 1
 Isn't this kinda like a Luaf fork but with more travel? www.laufforks.com
  • + 0
 It needs to cost $1500 or less and work so much better than a Lyric or whatever to make it. That said i think it looks cool and I'd love to try one.
  • + 1
 I have little doubt it works far far better
  • + 2
 Looks like a session
  • + 1
 Bam, bam, bam, bam, bam!
Flintstones kid>
  • + 1
 Meanwhile Sorge is on a SR Suntour fork
  • + 0
 I'm actually wondering how that fatty would look on my skinny tubed Chro Mo hard tail.....?
  • + 0
 Put it on the Polygon from Kurt Sorge to make it the worst frame-fork-combo ever!
  • + 1
 Well, if nothing else it makes a Lauf fork almost look sexy by comparison.
  • + 1
 Looks like a doubledildo.
  • + 1
 I want one. You had me at Dave Weagle. I'm in.
  • + 1
 That's really forking ugly
  • + 1
 I'll take 2 when the price dropped to 500 a pcs!
  • + 1
 I wonder if the increased moment on the head tube will be a problem.
  • + 1
 $2700 usd for a fork hahaha. That made my day.
  • + 1
 I want this to work but I can't explain why.
  • + 1
 i was skeptical, but i actually like it!
  • + 1
 Change is necessary and I appreciate this change!
  • + 1
 Telescoping forks already look antiquated compared to this.
  • + 1
 So what you're saying is, its stiffer. Ok
  • + 2
 it's MUD EATER .... :/
  • + 1
 Whole bike looks like a Transformers Decepticon!
  • + 1
 Dave Weagle for president
  • + 1
 I thought carbon fibre is generally used because you need less of it...
  • + 1
 I don't know why, but I don't Trust this fork.
  • + 1
 Nothing new.....BMW already does it
  • + 1
 At just 2700 I'll take 2 one for the huffy and one for the yt
  • + 1
 I was wondering who’ll rush to be the first to throw one on a hardtail frame
  • + 0
 Awesome fork. I'd be down for one of these in longer travel.
When is the release date for the 170mm version?!!!!!
  • + 1
 Looks good. Would love to test one out someday!
  • - 1
 Pink bike comments are so not prognarcore especially towards a supreme wizard like dw. Where is dt, he should be unveiling the new turner line as well?
  • + 1
 basically Leading Link Forks
  • + 0
 So basically you upturned the rear ended of the evil and mounted it to the front, cool
  • + 0
 evil is a single pivot.
  • + 1
 I swear I’m function over form any day of the week.
Until this.
  • + 0
 It probably is better system but is it 2% better or 50% better. Will I be 50% better and happier.
  • + 1
 This might be the most niche item i've ever seen
  • + 1
 When's the fat bike version going to be available?
  • - 1
 Why do they consider it trailing link when the linkage IC is always located behind the wheel axle?
The front wheel axle is not TRAILED by IC but led by IC.
  • + 1
 The guys behind this seem solid. And the logo looks good.
  • + 2
 Honda Goldwing!!!
  • + 1
 What a fucking load of waffle..
  • + 1
 I wanna see some santa cruz style smash testing on this plastic pos
  • + 1
 Lets take a very simple mechanical fork and make it very complex.
  • + 1
 I will believe the hype when I see this in the xc world cup or Olympics
  • + 1
 ***waiting for Randy to chime in his approval/disapproval***
  • + 1
 This is the opposite of Ocams razor.
  • + 0
 Jaw dropped when I saw DW designed this... this may actually be the next thing! Their website does a good job selling it.
  • + 1
 Launching a mountain bike product the week of rampage. Smart move.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy what shock is the fork using? looks new....
  • + 1
 All that money and the cable routing looks like shit.
  • + 1
 Personally I think it looks shite
  • + 1
 If cost were no object I buy it. Put it on an S-Works wonder bike.
  • + 1
 Dave weagle trying to make quick buck - again. Imagine that.
  • + 0
 I wonder why they chose 130mm travel? I doubt that's the most common option.
  • + 2
 Halloween is next week.
  • + 0
 Would love to try this but probably will never get the chance because of the price. Looks awesome though
  • + 1
 Future here we come! Can't wait to try this thing!
  • + 1
 1st one that looks decent. But, over my $300 used fork budget.
  • + 1
 Lots of squirrels where I live, not a healthy option for them.
  • - 3
 The review should just read, "just look at it". Nothing more needed. Oh my GOD! I haven't seen something so INSULTING to look at since Hilary Clinton ran for president.

Seriously... would anybody put this eye splinter on their bike even if it were free!!!?????? I wouldn't sport this hemmhoroid looking wart if they paid ME to put it on my bike. Major, major fail. Why even have a review

It's like a halloween costume gone wrong!

Have I mentioned how f$%king UGLY this thing is!?
  • + 1
 Awesome! i'll take 2!
  • + 1
 ... quiero ver el video
  • + 1
 kill it before it breeds
  • + 1
 I don't TRUST it.
  • + 0
 Bike industry people need to lay off the tweak for a bit..........
  • + 0
 It's bad form for employees of trust to dislike comments.
  • + 1
 Vitamin G is what powers this industry and wouldn’t be surprised if there is some are trust. That’s not a bad thing.
  • - 1
 I don't think I'd run one, but not gonna lie it looks pretty sweet on that evil
  • + 0
 This is what mountain bikes is all about %
  • + 0
 Looks awesome. Off to buy a lottery ticket!
  • - 1
 Doesn't matter how good it rides. No one will buy it if it looks like shit.
  • - 3
 Fox 34 trail forks are floating in the sub 2lbs (1.7kg) and costs typically under $1000 online. Also offers more travel.

So this fork is 4.5lbs and costs double with less travel option?
  • + 1
 Do you work for NASA? Your conversions are a bit off. 1.7Kg is around 3.74lbs. and were did the 1.7kG come from? Even the fox 34 27.5 weighs 3.90 lb / 1770 g so that's not even close to reality. This fork will work for 29ers so it's better to use the 3.95 lb / 1790 for the lightest 29er version of the Fox 34.

Either way, it's certainly in touch on weight.
  • + 1
 @gaberoc: As a matter of fact I do work for NASA haha...kidding.

Seriously, relax. I tried to compare this 130 travel fork "The Message" fork to a 120mm lightweight 34 Fox trail fork which when I looked it up is: 3.58 lb / 1623 g (29er)

So really calm down dude...so I said "Fox 34 trail forks are floating in the sub 2lbs" my bad for the "2lbs" I wrote this early in the am and made a typo I didn't realize.
  • + 0
 9 out of 10 dentists would buy.
  • + 0
 Nope.
  • + 2
 @hellbelly: Aw, come on. It's right up your Evil. Isn't that a Wreck in article photos? 160mm...130mm linkage. I bet the message is highly entertaining.
  • + 2
 @ceecee: I believe that is a Following MB which would make more sense with fork's intended use. My "nope" is that I am not one of those dentists that would buy it. I look forward to test riding one eventually. If it is as groundbreaking as it is purported to be, then more will be made and the cost will become more reasonable. On the contrary, if the Message (all I can think about is the Grandmaster Flash song that shares the name) simply adds an incremental improvement then I cannot see spending that kind of dough for it. That said, Dave Weagle is without a doubt a suspension genius so this could be really good.
  • + 1
 @hellbelly: So much depends on distinguishing rusty trombone from muddy waters and drunken olive. If they sell 'em out, won't price go up until there's competition? DELTA was more palatable marketing...don't Trust The Message? Get The Picture! No one's said much about large compressions yet. Thanks for replying.
  • + 2
 @hellbelly: Found the tenth dentist. Hypothesis checks out.
  • - 1
 My buddy Randy runs this fork on his Cannondale along with the $1,000 Eewing titanium cranks.
  • + 0
 I look forward to the offerings from Blitz and Apexi.
  • - 1
 Nope. Nope. Nope. Gross. I’m going back to bed. This is just a nightmare.
  • + 1
 Ugly, Bulky, Unnecessary
  • + 0
 with a face like that she better be a really good lay
  • + 0
 Man, that black prototype with gold anno hardware? swoon.
  • + 1
 Looks like shit
  • + 1
 No.
  • + 0
 when does the steel version drop?
  • + 1
 #FuglyForks
  • + 0
 This, on a Forbidden. Game over.
  • + 1
 were u at lauf ?
  • + 1
 please, just....STOP.
  • + 0
 No thanks
  • + 0
 HHHHHHHHHHHHAHHH YEASH
  • - 1
 call me shallow but its dam ugly and I like pretty things!
  • + 0
 No, hell no!
  • - 2
 And yet again....somebody trying to answer a question that NO ONE is asking!
  • + 0
 I've been asking it for 14 years. I can't tolerate single crown forks. yes, they're better than ever, but still noodles.
  • - 1
 I'd hit that
  • - 1
 500th post
  • - 2
 Randy tried it and didn't like it #RandyKnows.
  • - 2
 ahhhhh i'm torn i mean its probably really good but it's bloody ugly
  • - 2
 Price discussion apart, I really wonder how much this fork weights.
  • + 3
 Well, it's listed in the specs.
  • + 1
 @casman86: yeh but its (claimed)
  • + 0
 ... if it changes something to your life, why not.
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